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William Peace University does not discriminate in its recruitment and admission of students, regardless of gender, race, creed, color, religion, age, national and ethnic origin, sexual orientation, disability, or veteran status. William Peace University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia, 30033-4097, telephone 404-679-4500) to award baccalaureate degrees. The university reserves the right to make any necessary changes in the regulations, policies, or any other section of this document. Students are expected to abide adhere to the updated version of the document, which is available at www.peace.edu

WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


"On my honor as a William Peace University student, I will not lie, cheat or steal; nor will I condone the actions of those who do."

WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


William Peace University Community Conduct Code 2017-2018

Table of Contents Part 1: Introduction Part 2: Jurisdiction over Student Conduct Part 3: Violations of the Law Part 4: Special Provisions Part 5: Student Conduct Authority Part 6: Conduct Procedures Part 7: Conduct Sanctions Part 8: Disciplinary Records Part 9: Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act of 1990 Part 10: Community Conduct Code Part 11: Alcohol and Drug Policy Part 12: Sex/Gender Discrimination Policy Part 13: Sexual Misconduct Policy Part 14: Abusive Affiliations Policy Part 15: Student Athletes The Community Conduct Code is a statement of policies and does not constitute a contract, express or implied, between students and the University. Nothing contained in the Community Conduct Code should be construed as creating a promise or a binding contract with the University for any purpose. WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


Part 1: Introduction William Peace Conduct Agreement I agree to uphold the principles of honor set forth by this community in the William Peace University mission statement, the Academic Integrity Policy and Community Conduct Code, to defend these principles against abuse or misuse, and to abide by the regulations of William Peace University. Philosophy The student conduct program within the Office of Residence Life and Housing is committed to an educational and developmental process that balances the needs of the individual student with the needs of the William Peace University community. In order to accomplish this, there are three philosophical tenets of the student conduct program. I. Prevention – The student conduct program educates students about appropriate standards of conduct within a university community through programming and dialogue before issues occur. The program seeks to reduce incidents by educating students about healthy decision-making, constructive discourse, and bystander intervention. II. Intervention – The student conduct program identifies the personal, educational, and social influences that result in misconduct on campus and intervenes through diverse mechanisms of resolution that place emphasis on repairing harm, personal decision making, community commitments, and student learning. III. Harm Reduction and Retention – The student conduct program reduces and repairs harm to the community caused by misconduct after an incident has occurred. The program creates opportunities for students to learn from their experiences and affect positive change in decision-making. By taking an active role in designing conduct outcomes, the program offers students an opportunity to remain a part of the William Peace University community. The William Peace University community is committed to fostering a campus environment that is conducive to academic inquiry, a productive campus life, and thoughtful study and discourse. A community exists on the basis of shared values and principles. At William Peace University, student members of the community are expected to uphold and abide by certain standards of conduct that form the basis of the Community Conduct Code. These standards are embodied within a set of core values that include integrity, social justice, respect, community, and responsibility. Ultimately, each member of the William Peace University community is expected to assume responsibility for his/her conduct and to assume reasonable responsibility for the behavior of others. The student conduct process at William Peace University exists to protect the interests of the community and to challenge students to embody the values of William Peace University. The process and outcomes are intended to challenge and shape students’ moral and ethical decisionmaking and to help them bring their behavior into accord with the community expectations. When a student is unable to conform his/her behavior to community expectations, the student conduct process may determine that he/she should no longer share in the privilege of participating in this community. Students should be aware that the student conduct process is quite different from criminal and civil court proceedings. Procedures and rights in student conduct procedures are conducted with fairness to all, but do not include the same protections of due process afforded by the courts. Fair process, within these procedures, assures written notice and a hearing before an objective decision-maker. No student will be found in violation of University policy without information showing that more likely than not a policy violation occurred and any sanctions will be proportionate to the severity of the violation and to the cumulative conduct history of the student. Part 2: Jurisdiction over Student Conduct William Peace University distributes the Community Conduct Code on the William Peace University website. Visit http://www.peace.edu and navigate to Community Conduct Code under Student Life. A hard copy can be made available upon request from the department of Student Life. Students are charged with the responsibility of having read, and agreeing to abide by, the provisions of the Community Conduct Code and the authority of the student conduct process. The Community Conduct Code and the student conduct process apply to the conduct of individual students and University-affiliated student organizations. Because the Community Conduct Code is based on shared values, it sets a range of expectations for William Peace University students no matter where or when their conduct may take place; therefore, the Community Conduct Code applies to behaviors that take place on the campus, at University-sponsored WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


events and may also apply off-campus when the administration determines in its discretion that the off-campus conduct affects a substantial University interest. A substantial university interest is defined to include: I. Any action that constitutes criminal offense as defined by federal or state law. This includes, but is not limited to, single or repeat violations of any local, state or federal law; II. Any situation where it appears that the student may present a danger or threat to the health or safety of him/herself or others; III. Any situation that significantly impinges upon the rights, property, or achievements of self or others or significantly breaches the peace and/or causes social disorder; and/or IV. Any situation that is detrimental to the educational or other interests of the University. The Community Conduct Code may be applied to conduct that takes place from the time a person accepts enrollment as a student and continues until the student withdraws or graduates, including periods during semester breaks and between semesters. Further, the Community Conduct Code applies to guests of community members whose hosts may be held accountable for the misconduct of their guests. Visitors to and guests of William Peace University are also protected by the Community Conduct Code and may initiate grievances for violations of the Community Conduct Code committed against them by members of the William Peace University community. There is no time limit on reporting violations of the Community Conduct Code as long as the offending student is still enrolled at William Peace University; however, the longer someone waits to report an offense, the harder it becomes for William Peace University officials to obtain information and witness statements and to make a determination regarding alleged violations. Though anonymous complaints are permitted, doing so may limit the University’s ability to investigate and respond to a complaint. Those who are aware of misconduct are encouraged to report it as quickly as possible to the Office of Residence Life and Housing, Office of Student Life and/or to Public Safety. Part 3: Violations of the Law Alleged violations of federal, state and local laws are incorporated as offenses under the Community Conduct Code. When an offense occurs over which the University has jurisdiction, the University conduct process will usually go forward notwithstanding any criminal complaint that may arise from the same incident. Should a student withdraw from the university when a criminal complaint is made, the University may pursue investigation and resolution of campus conduct matters, regardless of the fact that the student has withdrawn. When criminal charges are pending, the University may be delayed from conducting its own investigation and moving forward with a campus hearing. The University in consultation with legal counsel and local authorities will determine a period of time that will be considered a reasonable delay. However, for the good order and safety of the community, the University will move forward with its own investigation to determine if a student is responsible for a policy violation. Part 4: Special Provisions I. Attempted Violations In most instances, William Peace University will treat attempts to commit any of the violations listed in the Community Conduct Code as if those attempts had been completed. II.

Misconduct Online Students are cautioned that behavior conducted online, such as harassment or bullying via email, can subject them to University conduct action. Students must also be aware that blogs, social media sites, and web page entries on sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, MySpace, Twitter and other similar online postings are in the public sphere and are not private. These postings can subject a student to allegations of conduct violations if evidence of policy violations is posted online. The University does not regularly search for this information but may take action if and when such information is brought to the attention of University officials.

III.

University as Complainant William Peace University reserves the right to initiate a complaint, to serve as complainant and to initiate conduct proceedings without a formal complaint by the victim of the alleged misconduct.

WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


IV.

False Reports William Peace University will not tolerate intentional false reporting of incidents. It is a violation of the Community Conduct Code to make an intentionally false report of any policy violation and it may also violate state criminal statutes and civil defamation laws.

V.

Group Violations A student group or organization and its officers and membership may be held collectively and individually responsible when violations of this code by the organization or its members take place at organization sponsored events, have received the consent or encouragement of the organization or of the organization’s leaders or officers, or was known or reasonably should have been known to the membership or its officers. Hearings for student groups or organizations follow the same general student conduct procedures. In any such action, individual determinations as to responsibility will be made and sanctions may be assigned collectively and individually and will be proportionate to the involvement of each individual.

VI.

Parental and Departmental Notification William Peace University reserves the right to notify the parents/guardians of dependent students regarding any conduct situation, particularly Level II Conduct Probation, loss of housing, suspension, and expulsion. William Peace University also reserves the right to designate which University employees have a legitimate need to know about individual conduct complaints pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and will share information accordingly.

VII.

Determination of Hearings The outcome of a campus hearing is part of the education record of the accused student/respondent and is protected from release under the Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), except under certain conditions. In accordance with FERPA, when a student is accused of a policy violation that would constitute a “crime of violence” or non-forcible sex offense, upon written request of the victim (or next of kin) the University will inform the alleged victim/complainant in writing of the final results of a hearing regardless of whether the University concludes that a violation was committed. Such release of information may only include the alleged student’s/respondent’s name, the violation committed and the sanctions assigned (if applicable). In cases of sex offenses, regardless of written request, the above information and rationale for the outcome will also be shared with all parties to the complaint. In cases where the University concludes that a student violated a policy that would constitute a “crime of violence” or non-forcible sex offense, the University may also release the above information publicly and/or to any third party. FERPA defines “crimes of violence” to include: A. Arson B. Assault offenses C. Burglary D. Criminal Homicide—manslaughter by negligence E. Criminal Homicide—murder and non-negligent manslaughter F. Destruction/damage/vandalism of property G. Kidnapping/abduction H. Robbery I. Forcible sex acts

VIII.

Defenses It is common for individuals accused of policy violations to defend their actions with explanations such as, but not limited to, prescription drug interactions, self-defense and disability. The University’s policy is that providing a defense is equivalent to the admission of engaging in a policy violation. William Peace University will take the legitimacy of an individual’s explanation into consideration in the determination of appropriate outcome and sanctioning.

Part 5: Student Conduct Authority I. Authority The Director of Residence Life and Housing is vested with the authority of Chief Conduct Officer. The Chief Conduct Officer authorizes the Student Conduct Administrator to oversee and manage the student conduct WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


process. The Chief Conduct Officer and/or Student Conduct Administrator may appoint administrative hearing and appeals officers as deemed necessary in order to efficiently and effectively supervise the student conduct process. In the event the Director of Residence Life and Housing is unable to serve in this role, a campus administrator will be designated to serve in the role during the absence. In many cases the Assistant Director of Residence Life & Housing will temporarily serve as both the Chief Conduct Officer and Student Conduct Administrator. The Assistant Director of Residence Life and Housing is designated as the Student Conduct Administrator. The Student Conduct Administrator or designee will assume responsibility for the investigation of an allegation of misconduct to determine if the complaint has merit. Depending on the nature of the complaint, an investigation may be limited to a review of written reports or may extend to full interviews and collection of evidence. No complaint will be forwarded to a hearing unless there is reasonable cause to believe a policy has been violated. Reasonable cause is defined as some credible information to support each element of the offense, even if that information is merely a credible witness or a victim’s statement. A complaint unsupported by any information will not be forwarded for a hearing. If a minor allegation can be addressed by mutual consent of the parties involved, on a basis acceptable to the parties involved and the Student Conduct Administrator, such disposition will be final and there will be no subsequent proceedings. If the complaint cannot be addressed in a manner mutually acceptable, or for incidents that are not minor, the Student Conduct Administrator will refer the complaint to the Administrative Hearing Officer. The decision of where to refer the complaint is at the sole discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator, who may take into consideration the preferences of the parties to the complaint. II.

Interpretation and Revision Any question of interpretation of the Community Conduct Code will be referred to the Student Conduct Administrator whose interpretation is final. The Chief Conduct Officer or Student Conduct Administrator may make any necessary modification to procedure that does not materially jeopardize the fairness owed to any party. The Community Conduct Code will be reviewed and updated annually under the direction of the Student Conduct Administrator.

Part 6: Conduct Procedures Part of the education process is learning how to live in harmony with community members and within a system of standards established by and for the community. Students are accountable to students and other community members for these standards through the procedures outlined below. This system is not a legal process but, rather, an administrative hearing system. Principles of fairness govern all such bodies. All students who violate these standards will be held accountable for their behavior through a process that protects the rights of both the complainant and the accused student/respondent. I.

Complaints Any member of the University community, visitors, or guests may file a complaint against any student for misconduct by contacting the Office of Student Life, the Office of Residence Life and Housing, or Public Safety. Complaints will be presented to the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee) and/or to the Title IX Coordinator, when appropriate. Additionally, these administrators may act on notice of a potential violation whether a formal complaint is made or not. All complaints can be submitted by a victim or a third party, and should be submitted as soon as possible after the offending event occurs. The University has the right to pursue a complaint or notice of misconduct on its own behalf and to serve as complainant in the subsequent campus conduct process. Based upon an initial complaint, the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee) will determine if reasonable cause exists to move the case forward or further investigation is needed. Third parties who were not witness to the alleged misconduct should be aware that lack of corroboration may limit the University’s ability to address the alleged misconduct. There is no time limit on reporting violations of the Community Conduct Code as long as the offending student is still enrolled at William Peace University. However, the longer someone waits to report an offense, the harder it becomes for William Peace University officials to obtain information and witness statements and to make a determination regarding alleged violations.

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II.

Methods of Resolution Once a complaint has been received the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee) may utilize a variety of methods of resolution. It is at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator to determine which method of resolution is appropriate for the alleged violation. These include, but are not limited to, non-conduct meetings with administrators, restorative conference, mediation, and administrative hearings. Students wishing to explore alternative dispute resolution methods are encouraged to discuss these options with the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee).

A. Non-Conduct Meetings Non-Conduct Meetings are a process the Office of Residence Life & Housing conducts. The purpose of these meetings is to resolve a minor incident/situation. This form of resolution is an educational conversation aimed at preventing a policy violation or addressing minor policy violations. This form of process may be approved by the Student Conduct Administrator. If the facilitator feels that the restorative process is not effective, the facilitator may cancel the meeting and refer the case for traditional adjudication. B. Mediation The Student Conduct Administrator, Chief Conduct Officer, and/or designee have discretion to refer a complaint for mediation. All parties must agree to mediation and to be bound by the mutually agreed upon resolution. If the parties cannot reach a mutually acceptable resolution they must accept any decision made by the mediator with no review/appeal. Any unsuccessful mediation can be forwarded for formal processing and hearing; however, at no time will complaints of sexual misconduct of a physical nature or violence be mediated as the sole institutional response. The Student Conduct Administrator, Chief Conduct Officer, and/or designee may also suggest that complaints that do not involve a violation of the Community Conduct Code be referred for mediation. C. Restorative Conference Restorative Conferences are a process in which the respondent accepts responsibility for one or more of alleged violations. The respondent agrees to meet with the complainant and affected parties. During this process, the respondent discusses the incident, accepts responsibility, and listens to the impact of his/her actions on affected parties. The group participating in the conference develops steps that the respondent will take to repair harm to affected individuals and the community. All cases are reviewed to determine if a restorative conference is appropriate. Additionally, either the complainant or the respondent may request that a case be considered for a restorative conference. If determined to be an appropriate means of resolution, the Student Conduct Administrator and/or designee offer a status sanction to the respondent. This status sanction is typically of a lesser degree than the standard sanction for the violation and is contingent upon successful completion of the restorative conference. If the sanction is accepted by the respondent, the student conduct administrator will appoint a facilitator. The facilitator will meet with the respondent and complainant/victim separately for an intake meeting. The purpose of this meeting is to prepare each party for the restorative conference process and normalize expectations regarding potential outcomes. After the intake meetings, the facilitator will hold the restorative conference where the respondent, victim/complainant, and other affected parties meet. Based upon this conversation a restorative agreement is developed by the parties involved. This agreement is final and binding upon the respondent. This agreement may not adjust the status sanction of the respondent. If the facilitator feels that the restorative process is not effective, the facilitator may cancel the meeting and refer the case for traditional adjudication. D. Administrative Hearings Administrative hearings are the most common form of hearing. In this type of hearing, a student meets with an administrative hearing officer to discuss the incident. The hearing officer will discuss the incident with the student by asking the student to respond to questions about the alleged violation(s). The student may present witnesses and evidence as outlined in the witness and evidence section of the procedures. Based upon this conversation, the hearing officer will determine if it is more likely than not that the student violated university policy. Determination of Hearing letters will be delivered to the student by University-issued email, or other approved means if warranted. The Administrative Hearing Procedure is as followed: WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


III.

Administrative Hearing Process The following sections describe William Peace’s conduct administrative hearing processes. No student may be found to have violated the Community Conduct Code solely as a result of the student’s failure to appear for a hearing, except in a complaint involving failure to comply with the summons of the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). In instances where the respondent fails to appear, the conduct hearing will proceed as scheduled and the information in support of the complaint will be presented to, and considered by, the Student Conduct Administrator, or Administrative Hearing Officer presiding over the hearing. If the facilitator, through the investigation and hearing process, receives information that other violations may have occurred, the facilitator may cancel or suspend the current hearing process and refer the case for back to the Student Conduct Administrator. The Student Conduct Administrator will then decide which methods of resolution to utilize for all alleged violations (new and ongoing).

A. Notice of Hearing Once a determination is made that reasonable cause exists for the Chief Conduct Officer, Student Conduct Administrator, and/or designee to refer a complaint for a hearing, notice will be given to the accused student/respondent. Notice will be in writing; University-issued email is the primary means of communication used by the University and the student conduct program. The Student Conduct Administrator (or designee) may at his/her discretion deliver notice by one or more of the following methods: in person by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee); mailed to the local or permanent address of the student as indicated in official University records; or emailed to the student’s University-issued email account. Once sent, the notice is assumed to have been received. The letter of notice will: 1. Include the alleged violation and notification of where to locate the Community Conduct Code and university procedures for resolution of the complaint; and 2. Designate a time, date, and location of the hearing and name of hearing officer or body; or direct the accused student/respondent to contact the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee) within a specified period of time. The administrative hearing will, generally, be no less than 3 days from the date of delivery of the letter. The conduct process maybe accelerated if deemed appropriate by the Chief Conduct Officer. B. Administrative Hearing Procedure 1. If the respondent fails to attend the hearing, a decision may be rendered in the student’s absence. 2. The student will attend the hearing. It is the responsibility of the respondent to assure that the student’s advisor and witnesses, if applicable, attend the hearing. If a witness cannot attend a hearing, the witness may submit a written statement as outlined in the witnesses section of this document. Witnesses will wait outside the hearing until the hearing officer determines that it is the appropriate time to hear their testimony. 3. The hearing officer will welcome advisors who meet the advisor criteria into the hearing. The hearing officer will identify the role of the advisor to the respondent and their advisor. 4. The hearing officer will review the general procedures for the hearing and answer any questions the respondent may have. 5. The hearing officer will question the respondent regarding the incident and alleged violations. 6. The respondent will provide truthful and full responses to the hearing officer’s questions. 7. The respondent may present evidence to the hearing officer. Determinations as to the relevance of the evidence are at the discretion of the hearing officer. 8. When appropriate the hearing officer will then interview witnesses. The hearing officer will allow one witness at a time. The hearing officer will outline the process and procedures for witness testimony to the witness, respondent, and the respondent’s advisor, if applicable. Respondents may not directly question witnesses. Rather, they may pose questions through the hearing officer. A more detailed explanation is available in the witnesses section of this document. 9. The hearing officer will then ask any additional questions that he/she has of the respondent 10. The hearing officer may take written notes throughout the process/investigation. Voice Recorders or Electronic Devices are prohibited unless deemed necessary by the Chief Conduct Officer, Student Conduct Administrator, and/or Legal Counsel. 11. The hearing officer will review appeal procedure as outline in Section 3 Subsection D. WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


12. The hearing officer will then end the hearing by explaining that a formal decision letter will come to the student via email or other approved means. Decisions are not final until sent to a student via email or other approved means. 13. If it is in the best interest of the student conduct process, the hearing officer may seek additional clarification; verify statements, and interview witnesses outside the confines of the hearing. The hearing officer is not required to re-interview the respondent about new information. 14. Minor deviations from this procedure that are in the best interest of the student conduct process/University will not be considered procedural errors. Deviations will be authorized by the Chief Conduct Officer and/or Student Conduct Administrator. C. Determination of Hearing A Determination of Hearing is made after an Administrative Hearing has concluded. Decisions are based on greater weight of evidence & credibility of statements that were provided throughout the process. The student conduct process strives to make decisions that are reasonable, fair, and consistent. The decision will be in writing; University-issued email is the primary means of communication used by the University and the student conduct program. The Student Conduct Administrator (or designee) may at his/her discretion deliver notice by one or more of the following methods: in person by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee); mailed to the local or permanent address of the student as indicated in official University records; or emailed to the student’s University-issued email account. Once sent, the notice is assumed to have been received. The Determination of Hearing will: 1. Include the responsible and/or non-responsible violation(s) including sanctions (if applicable); 2. Notification of where to locate the Community Conduct Code for sanction and appeal information; 3. Deadline for an appeal will generally, be no less than 3 days from the date of delivery of the letter. D. Appeal Accused students/respondents and complainants may petition for an appeal of a decision or assigned sanction(s) within three (3) business days of issuance of a Determination of Hearing letter. All requests for an appeal must be submitted with a completed Appeal Form and delivered to the appropriate administrator; as indicated in the Determination of Hearing. If the indicated administrator determines that a complaint warrants an appeal hearing, the hearing will be held by the indicated administrator or designee. The Appeal Officer has the authority to modify, lower, maintain, or increase the original decision. Only one appeal is allowed; therefore, the decision of the Appeal Officer is considered final and no further appeals will be considered. After the appeal hearing, students may request a meeting with the Chief Conduct Officer or VP of Student Life if they wish to provide additional information on the process or receive clarification. The student/respondent has the ability to request a different Appeal Officer prior to an Administrative Appeal Hearing. Request must be approved by the Chief Conduct Officer and/or Student Conduct Administrator. An Appeal Form can be obtained in the Office of Residence Life and Housing and can be submitted for the following: 1. A review of only the sanctions imposed by the Hearing Officer 2. A review of both the determination and sanctions imposed by the Hearing Officer Typical reasons for an appeal are severity of sanctions issued, to consider new information which was unavailable at the time of the original hearing, to assess whether a material deviation from written procedures resulted in an unfair outcome of the hearing, and/or another opportunity to better present their case. E. Accelerated Administrative Hearing As previously stated, the Chief Conduct Officer has the authority to approve/grant an accelerated conduct process. The accelerated process is used for various incidents/situations. Below are the two common types of the accelerated process.

WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


F. Accelerated Hearing An Accelerated Hearing is an Administrative Hearing that is scheduled no less than 12 hours from the time of delivery of the letter. This process must be approved by the Chief Conduct Officer. The remainder of the process follows the Administrative Hearing Procedure. Accelerated Hearings are used when a student has committed an act including, but not limited to: 1. Participated in an act that endangers self or others; 2. Participated in an act that warrants an interim suspension; 3. Receiving a felony charged (or a felony charge is eminent) issued by federal/state/local authorities; 4. Excessive Repeat Violations that could result in the following: a) University Housing Suspension b) University Housing Expulsion c) University Suspension d) University Expulsion G. Accelerated Determination An Accelerated Determination is an administrative decision that is conducted by the Chief Conduct Officer, Student Conduct Administrator, and/or designee. This process must be approved by the Chief Conduct Officer. This process is used for minor incidents and situations including, but not limited to: 1. Limited time before winter and summer academic recess. 2. Violation of Health & Safety inspection; 3. Failure to Evacuate During Fire Drill; 4. Large Volume of Students in one incident (ex. party, extracurricular event, etc.); 5. Minor Violations that would result in a verbal or written Warning; 6. Community Damage that results in a building/hall fine. 7. Student seeking admission/re-admission into the University and has prior conduct history (includes federal, state, local). 8. Multiple Parking Ticket Violations; 9. Summer Housing Violations The accused student/respondent will receive in writing: 1. The alleged violation and notification of where to locate the Community Conduct Code and university procedures for resolution of the complaint; 2. The results of the alleged violations; 3. Sanctions if found responsible for violation(s). a) The accused student/respondent will receive the lowest typical sanctions that are associated with each violation. 4. Deadline to appeal decision If an appeal of the decision is warranted by the student/respondent then the general Administrative Hearing process will take place. The Accelerated Determination process cannot be used when a student has committed an act including, but not limited to: 1. Participated in an act that endangers self or others; 2. Participated in an act that warrants an interim suspension; 3. Received or pending a felony charged issued by federal/state/local authorities; 4. A single severe violation or excessive repeat violations that could result in the following: a) University Housing Suspension b) University Housing Expulsion c) University Suspension d) University Expulsion IV.

Advisors Students are permitted to have an advisor present during their hearing. The advisor may be a William Peace University faculty, staff, or student. The advisor may not be witnesses, legal counsel, and/or parents/guardians. In

WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


the rare instance where civil or criminal court proceedings are currently pending against the student or at the discretion of the student conduct administrator or designee, legal counsel may serve as an advisor. If the student brings an advisor who is ineligible to serve in that role, the hearing will proceed as normal without the advisor. To ensure the integrity of the student conduct process, the role of an advisor is to provide personal and emotional support for the student. Advisors who are permitted to attend a hearing may not speak during a hearing. However, if legal counsel is permitted as outlined above, legal counsel may advise the student not to answer questions which may harm the student’s criminal case. V.

Witnesses Students are permitted to present witnesses in Administrative Hearings. Students are responsible for assuring that witnesses are aware of the time and date of and attend the hearing. If a witness cannot attend a specific hearing time and date, they may submit a written witness statement to the hearing officer. In order to verify the identity of the witness, witness statements must be sent from the witness’ William Peace University student email. Witnesses who attend Administrative Hearings and Student Conduct Hearings will be instructed to wait outside the hearing until the hearing officer determines that it is an appropriate time for the witness to testify. The respondent, complainant (if applicable), and their respective advisors may not speak directly to the witness. In order to preserve the integrity of the witness testimony and decorum, hearing officer will pose all questions to the witness. After the hearing officer finishes questioning the witness, the hearing officer will ask the respondent if the respondent wishes the hearing officer to ask specific questions of the witness. The hearing officer will determine relevance and specific phrasing of each question. It is a violation of the Community Conduct Code for witnesses to knowingly provide partial, inaccurate, misleading, or false information during any investigation or hearing.

VI.

Evidence During administrative hearings, students may present evidence in support of their case. The hearing officer will be responsible for determining to the best of their judgment whether evidence is relevant and permissible. The university does not hire experts to evaluate the authenticity or validity of evidence. In order to provide a fair and reasonable conduct process, hearing officers will exercise reasonable judgment in evaluating evidence and may consult with others within reason. A. Other Special Provisions The past sexual history or sexual character of a party will not be admissible by the other parties in hearings unless such information is determined to be highly relevant by the investigator. All such information sought to be admitted will be presumed irrelevant and any request to overcome this presumption by the parties must be included in the complaint/response or a subsequent written request which must be received by the Student Conduct Administrator. While previous conduct violations of the accused student/respondent are not generally admissible as information about the present violation, the Student Conduct Administrator or Title IX Coordinator may supply previous complaint information to the investigator only if the following criteria is met: 1. The respondent was subject to a previous credible allegation and/or previously found responsible for a policy violation; 2. The previous incident was similar to the present allegation; or 3. The information indicated a pattern of behavior by the respondent. Regardless of their willingness of the complainant to participate in the investigation process, the complainant in any complaint alleging sexual misconduct will: be notified in writing of the outcome of a hearing and any sanctions assigned; have the right to a review if the appeal criteria is met; and be kept apprised of the status of any review requests filed by the accused student/respondent.

VII.

Special Provision for Distance Learners Students who are members of the university community who only attend on-line courses and do not live locally will be given the option to have their administrative hearing conducted via telephone/video conference call. Students wishing to utilize this provision must contact the Chief Hearing Officer, Student Conduct Administrator

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or Hearing Officer no less than 48 hours prior to their scheduled conduct hearing. The Student Conduct Administrator will then work with the student to schedule a telephone/video conference call hearing. Part 7: Conduct Sanctions I. Conduct Hold As stated in the Student Handbook, a “hold” can be placed on a student’s account record when he or she has not fulfilled a responsibility to the Office of Residence Life and Housing, Student Conduct Program, and to the University. A “hold” prevents a student from registering for classes and/or obtaining an official transcript. A hold may also prevent a student from moving in or returning to housing. The most common reasons that “holds” are placed on students’ account include unpaid damage bills, fines, or unfulfilled disciplinary sanctions. II.

Interim Suspension Interim suspension, under the Community Conduct Code, may be imposed by the Chief Conduct Officer (or designee) when necessary to protect the health and safety of a student or of the community; preserve University property; pursue an investigation and/or hearing; prevent disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of the University. Interim suspension will be used for short periods of time, pending an Administrative Hearing for a Community Conduct Code violation. During an interim suspension, a student will be denied access to University housing and/or University campuses. As determined appropriate by the Chief Conduct Officer or the Student Conduct Administrator, this restriction includes classes and/or all other University activities or privileges for which the student might otherwise be eligible. The student will be require to turn in all forms of University access (keys, access card, etc.) At the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator and with the approval of, and in collaboration with, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, alternative coursework options may be pursued to ensure as minimal an impact as possible on the accused student/respondent.

III.

General Sanctions William Peace University sanctions are divided into three categories: status, educational, and restrictive sanction. Most violations will result in a status sanction and one or more educational sanctions. Sanctions are determined based upon the severity of the violation, past conduct history, and any aggravating or mitigating factors. One or more of following sanctions may be imposed upon any student for any single violation of the Community Conduct Code:

A. Status Sanctions: Status sanctions are an indication of the student’s relationship with the university. Status sanctions typically escalate with each offense. Though it is not necessary that a first sanction begin with a warning. Sanctions are determined based upon the nature of the offense after reviewing aggravating and mitigating factors. As well, status sanctions do not always need to escalate; at the discretion of the hearing officer, a student may remain at the same status however duration my increase. Certain status sanctions involve parental notification. 1. Warning: A written notice will be sent to the student(s) who violated University policies and/or rules. It specifies that inappropriate and unacceptable actions have occurred and that more severe conduct action will result should the student be involved in other violations while the student is enrolled at the University. 2. Level I Conduct Probation: A written reprimand that expires after a specified time outlined by the Student Conduct Administrator. A notice will be sent to the student(s) who violated University policies and/or rules. It specifies that serious or repeated inappropriate and unacceptable actions have occurred and that more severe conduct action will result should the student be involved in other violations while the student is enrolled at the University. Good Conduct Standing with the university is removed during the specified time period. 3. Level II Conduct Probation: A written reprimand that remains in effect during the remainder of the student’s academic career. A notice will be sent to the student(s) who violated University policies and/or rules. It specifies that repeated or severely inappropriate and unacceptable actions have occurred and that future violations will likely result in suspension or expulsion. The parents, guardians, or financial sponsors of students who are dependents as defined by FERPA will be notified of this status. Good Conduct Standing WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


with the university is removed for no less than 2 calendar years; a specified time will be outlined by the Student Conduct Administrator. 4. University Suspension: The student is separated from the University for a specified period of time, and upon the satisfaction of specific conditions, after which the student is eligible to return. Separation includes physical & electronic removal from the University. The Office of Residence Life and Housing will notify the Office of Information Technology (IT) once an appeal has ended or the appeal period has elapsed. IT will then remove electronic access and accounts will be deactivated. The student is required to vacate University housing and/or campus within 24 hours of notification of the action, though this deadline may be extended upon application to, and at the discretion of, the Director of Residence Life and Housing or designee and the Student Conduct Administrator. Students are banned / trespassed from campus and all university affiliated properties for the duration of their suspension. Temporary exceptions to banning/trespass for university related business may be granted by the Office of Student Services and/or Student Conduct Administrator or designee. The parents, guardians, or financial sponsors of students who are dependents as defined by FERPA will be notified of this status. 5. University Expulsion: The student is permanently separated from the University. The student is barred from being on campus and the student’s presence at any University-sponsored activities or events is prohibited. Separation includes physical & electronic removal from the University. The Office of Residence Life and Housing will notify the Office of Information Technology (IT) once an appeal has ended or the appeal period has elapsed. IT will then remove electronic access and accounts will be deactivated. The student is required to vacate University housing and/or campus within 24 hours of notification of the action, though this deadline may be extended upon application to, and at the discretion of, the Director of Residence Life and Housing or designee and the Student Conduct Administrator. Students are banned / trespassed from campus and all university affiliated properties for the duration of their suspension. Temporary exceptions to banning/trespass for university related business may be granted by the Office of Student Services and/or Student Conduct Administrator or designee. The parents, guardians, or financial sponsors of students who are dependents as defined by FERPA will be notified of this status.

B. Educational and Restorative Sanctions: Educational and restorative sanctions are designed to enhance the educational outcomes of the student conduct program. Educational and restorative sanctions frequently serve to repair harm to individuals or communities, provide additional education on a given subject, or aid students in considering their educational and personal goals and priorities. 1. Educational Program: Requirement to attend, present and/or participate in a program related to the violation. It may also be a requirement to sponsor or assist with a program for others on campus to aid them in learning about a specific topic or issue related to the violation for which the student or organization was found responsible. Audience may be restricted. 2. Community/University Service Requirements: For a student or organization to complete a specific supervised University service. 3. Behavioral Requirement: This includes required activities such as, but not limited to, seeking academic counseling, counseling assessment, personal counseling, writing a letter of apology, etc. 4. Research Projects: This includes required activities such as, but not limited to, writing papers, creating educational materials and bulletin boards, etc. 5. Restitution: Compensation for damage caused to the University or any person’s property. This is not a fine but, rather, a repayment for destroyed, damaged, consumed, or stolen property. C. Restrictive Sanctions: Restrictive sanctions modify a student’s privileges on-campus. These sanctions are typically not the primary sanctions used by the university. However, repeated or serious violations may warrant one or more restrictive sanctions. 1. Fines: Previously established fines may be imposed. 2. Banning/Trespass: The student’s privilege to be present at or utilize certain buildings, facilities, classrooms, etc. are restricted. Temporary exceptions to banning/trespass for university related business may be granted by the Office of Student Services and/or Student Conduct Administrator or designee.

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3. Eligibility Restriction: The student is deemed “not in disciplinary good standing” with the University for a specified period of time. Specific limitations or exceptions may be granted by the Student Conduct Administrator and terms of this conduct sanction may include, but are not limited to, the following: a) Ineligibility to hold any office in any student organization recognized by the University or hold an elected or appointed office at the University; or b) Ineligibility to represent the University to anyone outside the University community in any way including: participating in the study abroad program, attending conferences, or representing the University at an official function, event or intercollegiate competition as a player, manager or student coach, etc. 4. Loss of Privileges: The student will be denied specified privileges for a designated period of time. 5. Confiscation of Prohibited Property: Items whose presence is in violation of University policy will be confiscated and will become the property of the University. Prohibited items may be returned to the owner at the discretion of the Student Conduct Administrator. D. University Housing Sanctions: University housing sanctions are imposed when a student’s behavior also violates the terms and condition of their housing license agreement. 1. Restriction of Visitation Privileges: An individual or individuals residing in University provided housing may be restricted from having guests. The parameters of the restriction will be specified. 2. University Housing Reassignment: The student is reassigned to another University provided housing facility. Residence Life personnel will decide on the reassignment details. 3. University Housing Suspension: The student is removed from University provided housing for a specified period of time after which the student is eligible to return. During this time the student’s privilege to live in, or visit, any University provided housing structure is revoked. Conditions for re-entry to University provided housing may be specified. Under this sanction, a student is required to vacate University provided housing within 24 hours of notification of the action, though this deadline may be extended upon application to, and at the discretion of, the Director of Office of Residence Life and Housing (or designee) . The parents, guardians, or financial sponsors of students who are dependents as defined by FERPA will be notified of this status. This sanction may be enforced with a trespass action if deemed necessary. 4. University Housing Expulsion: The student’s privilege to live in, or visit, any University provided housing structure is revoked indefinitely. Under this sanction, a student is required to vacate University provided housing within 24 hours of notification of the action, though this deadline may be extended upon application to, and at the discretion of, the Director of Office of Residence Life and Housing (or designee). The parents, guardians, or financial sponsors of students who are dependents as defined by FERPA will be notified of this status. This sanction may be enforced with a trespass action if deemed necessary. E. Other Sanctions: Additional or alternate sanctions may be created and designed as deemed appropriate to the offense with the approval of the Chief Conduct Officer, the Student Conduct Administrator, or designee. F. The following sanctions may be imposed upon groups or organizations found to have violated the Community Conduct Code: 1. One or more of the sanctions listed above in the educational and restorative sanctions, restrictive, and other sanctions sections; and/or 2. Deactivation, de-recognition, loss of all privileges (including University registration), organizational probation for a specified period of time and upon fulfillment of certain conditions.

IV.

Failure to Follow Through on Conduct Sanctions All students, as members of the University community, are expected to comply with conduct sanctions within the time frame specified by the hearing officer. Failure to follow through on conduct sanctions by the date specified, whether by refusal, neglect or any other reason, may result in a conduct hold being placed on a student’s account or result in suspension from the University and, in such situations, resident students will be required to vacate University provided housing within 24 hours of notification by the Student Conduct Administrator, though this deadline may be extended upon application to, and at the discretion of, the Director of Residence Life and

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Housing and the Student Conduct Administrator. A suspension will only be lifted when compliance with conduct sanctions is satisfactorily achieved. This determination will be made by the Student Conduct Administrator. Part 8: Disciplinary Records and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Documents that are created and maintained as part of the conduct process are subject to the protections of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. § 1232g. Conduct records are maintained by Office of Residence Life & Housing in accordance with the university records retention policy. Private conduct records are maintained by the University for seven (7) years after the graduation or withdrawal of the student. Other than University suspension and expulsion, conduct sanctions will not be made a part of the student’s permanent conduct record, but will become a part of the student’s private conduct record. During this time, students may visually inspect the record by contacting the student conduct administrator who will arrange an opportunity for the student to inspect the record. For the complete Records and Right To Know Policy please see the Records and Right To Know section of the Student Handbook. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA, 1974) is a federal law designed to protect the privacy of a student’s educational records. The law applies to all educational institutions that receive any federal financial support. William Peace University complies with the conditions and provisions of FERPA. FERPA gives certain rights to parents regarding their children’s educational records. These rights transfer to the individual who becomes an “eligible student” when he/she reaches the age of 18 or is attending any school beyond high school level. All enrolled students are considered “eligible” and these rights are guaranteed under FERPA at William Peace University. Relevant portions of FERPA, which have the greatest application to William Peace University students, are outlined below: Students’ Access to Their Education Records During the first week of the academic year (fall semester), all students are emailed an Annual Notification of Rights under FERPA. All current and former students have access to their education records. Upon request and identity authentication, the Registrar will meet with the student to review his or her education record with explanation and interpretation when necessary, or in instances where the self-service option in My Pacer Net does not provide the record information needed. If the student is at a distance, the Registrar will make accommodations by providing a copy of requested records, provided the student can prove his or her identity to the Registrar. The Registrar has up to 45 calendar days to provide record access after the request has been made. Students have the right to seek amendment to their academic records if they believe the information to be inaccurate or misleading. If students cannot find resolution, they have the right to request a hearing to review the academic records. If after the hearing the university refuses to effect the correction, the student has the right to place a statement in the record commenting on the contested information. Appropriate Use of Information Generally, the university must have written permission from the student before releasing any information from a student’s record. However, the law allows the university to disclose records without the student’s consent to the following parties with legitimate educational interest: university employees who have a need-to-know; other colleges or universities to which a student seeks to attend; parents when a student is over age 18 but is still dependent for financial aid determination, or when the student has given the university permission to do so; certain government officials in order to carry out lawful functions; organizations conducting certain studies for the university to contribute toward educational science or the benefit of the student or organization; accrediting bodies; persons who have obtained court orders or subpoenas; persons who need to know in cases of health and safety emergencies; state and local authorities to whom disclosure is required by state laws adopted before 1974. Faculty and other staff deemed “university officials,” may obtain access to education records only for legitimate educational interests. University officials may also include contractors, consultants, educational agencies, clerical and WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


professional employees, and administration who perform institutional services on behalf of the institution or are contributing to educational research. University officials must be acting in the “student’s educational interest within limits of their need to know” (p. 11 2012 FERPA Guide). The university may also routinely release certain information to those who inquire. If the student requests in writing to the Registrar before September 1 that academic information not be released, it will remain confidential until the student requests the hold lifted. Forms are available in the Registrar’s Office. If a request is not filed, William Peace University assumes that neither eligible students nor parents object to release of the directory information. Directory information includes: full name, addresses, telephone numbers, email address, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, athletic team member weight and height, dates of attendance, degrees, honors, and awards received, most recent school attended, parent name and address, photographic, video and electronic images of students taken and maintained by the University. Students do not have access to records where a conflict exists regarding privacy rights of others. Examples of such records include financial information submitted in support of financial aid application and confidential letters and statements of recommendation placed in their records in cases where students have signed a waiver of their right of access. Waivers normally are related to confidential recommendations concerning admission to the university, job placement, etc. If you wish to review your education records or have questions about FERPA, contact the Registrar. Part 9: Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act of 1990 The Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act of 1990 is a federal mandate which requires all current students and employees be provided with information on policies and procedures involving campus security, the reporting of criminal action or other emergencies, and the enforcement authority of security personnel. This information must also include descriptions of programs for students and employees about campus security and crime prevention, as well as statistics on the occurrence of specific crimes. Notification of the annual report is made by the William Peace Director of Public Safety and the full report is posted on the University website each October. Hardcopies are available from the Public Safety Department on request.

Part 10: Community Conduct Code I. Definitions a. The term “the University” refers to William Peace University. b. The term “student” includes all persons who have accepted admission to, enrolled at, are taking courses at, and/or have a continuing relationship with the University, including those who attend full- or part-time at the undergraduate, School of Professional Studies, or non-matriculated level. c. The term “faculty member” refers to any person employed by the University to conduct instructional activities. d. The term “University official” includes any person employed by the University who is designated as an official or who holds administrative or professional supervisory responsibilities. e. The term “member of the University community” refers to any person employed by, volunteering for, or attending the University as a student, faculty member, administrator, staff member, intern, or volunteer. f.

The term “University property” includes all land, buildings, facilities, and other property in the possession of, owned or controlled, whether leased or rented, by the University.

g. The term “organization” refers to any number of persons who have complied with the formal requirements for University registration, or who are members of University sponsored-groups. WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


h. The term “Administrative Hearing Officer” refers to any persons authorized by the Student Conduct Administrator or a delegated representative to determine whether a student has violated the Community Conduct Code and to impose sanctions. i.

The term “Student Conduct Administrator” refers to the Assistant Director of Residence Life and Housing in the Office of Student Services, who represents the University by managing the daily operations of the student conduct system and impose sanctions upon students found in violation of the Community Conduct Code.

j.

The term “Chief Conduct Officer” refers to the Director of Residence Life and Housing, who authorizes the Student Conduct Administrator to organize a student conduct system, assures the essential fairness of the process, and imposes sanctions upon students found in violation of the Community Conduct Code.

k. The term “Appeals Officer” or “Appellate Body” refers to any person or persons authorized by the Chief Conduct Officer and/or Student Conduct Administrator to consider a review or appeal of the decisions of an Administrative Hearing Officer, and the Student Conduct Administrator. l.

The term “Complainant” refers to any member of the University community, visitors, or guests who file a complaint against any student for misconduct by contacting the Office of Student Services, the Office of Residence Life and Housing, or Public Safety.

m. The term “illegal drug” is defined as a substance defined and regulated under the provisions of the Federal Controlled Substances Act, and includes but is not limited to: CNS depressants, CNS stimulants, hallucinogens, or other illegal drugs such as PCP, cocaine or crack. n. The term “use of drug” includes: the misuse of prescription or over-the-counter medication; the possession of drug paraphernalia; and/or the use, possession, manufacture, sale or distribution of any one or more illegal drugs while on or off University property. o. The term “will” is used in the imperative sense. p. The term “may” is used in the permissive sense. q. The term “policy” is defined as the written rules of the University found in, but not limited to the Community Conduct Code. r.

The term “day” refers to a regular business day when university offices are open.

s. The term “position of trust” refers to student job or leadership position in which a student has been entrusted with special responsibilities or information within an office, community, team, or organization. t.

II.

The term “Good Conduct Standing” refers to the status in which a student is fully eligible to participate in university activities and privileges.

Core Values and Behavioral Expectation Policy The University considers the behavior described in the following sections as inappropriate for the William Peace University community and in opposition to its core values. These expectations and rules apply to all students. Further additional behavioral expectations may be applied to a student based upon the professional ethics and guidelines of their field of study. The University encourages community members to report to University officials all incidents that involve the following actions. Provided below are examples of violations for each of the Core Values. These example violations are in themselves policies and/or standalone policies.

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A. Integrity: William Peace students exemplify honesty, honor and a respect for the truth in all of their dealings. Behavior that violates this value includes, but is not limited to: 1. Acts of academic dishonesty as outlined in the Academic Catalogue; 2. Knowingly furnishing false, falsified, or forged information to any member of the University community such as falsification or misuse of documents, accounts, records, identification or financial instruments; 3. Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of means of access to any University building (i.e. keys, cards, etc.); 4. Action or inaction by someone in collusion with another or others to violate these rules; 5. Violations of positions of trust within the community; 6. Tampering with the election of any University-recognized student organization; 7. Misuse or unauthorized use of University or organizational names and images. B. Community: William Peace students honor and value their community. Behavior that violates this value includes, but is not limited to: 1. Misuse of access privileges to University premises or unauthorized entry to or use of buildings, including trespassing; only the University may grant access; students may not grant or transfer access rights to another individual; 2. Remaining in or near a University building while behaving in a manner inconsistent with the intended purpose of that location, such as loitering, sleeping for excessive periods of time, hanging out of or climbing from/on/in windows, balconies, roofs, etc.; 3. Taking possession of property that is known to be or reasonably should have been known to be stolen; 4. Intentional and unauthorized taking of University property or the personal property of a member of the University community; 5. Intentional and unauthorized destruction of, defacement of, or damage to, University property or to the personal property of a member of the University community; 6. Violating the William Peace Copyright Policy; 7. Violating the William Peace Computer Policy; 8. Violation of the Solicitation Policy; 9. Violation of the Public Safety policies; 10. Violation of any policy that is outlined in Student Handbook; 11. Violation of any policy that is outline in the Academic Catalogue; 12. Gambling prohibited by law; 13. Possession, use, or distribution of explosives (including fireworks and ammunition), guns (including air, BB, paintball, and pellet guns), or other weapons or objects that could be construed as weapons such as arrows, axes, machetes, nun chucks, throwing stars, or knives with a blade of longer than four (4) inches; 14. Storing any item that falls within the category of a weapon in a vehicle parked on University property; 15. Use of alarmed doors for entry into or exit from a William Peace University building. Activating an alarmed door may result in a $75 fine; 16. Failing to report a lost William Peace University key or identification card; or 17. Violation of local, state, federal or campus fire policies including, but not limited to: a. Failure to evacuate a University-controlled building during a fire alarm; b. Improper use of University fire safety equipment; or c. Tampering with or improperly engaging a fire alarm or fire detection/control equipment while on University property. Such action may result in a $1,000 fine in addition to University sanctions; C. Social Justice: William Peace students exemplify just and equitable treatment of all members of the community in their dealings and interactions. Behavior that violates this value includes, but is not limited to: WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


1. Discrimination, defined as any distinction, preference, advantage for or detriment to an individual compared to others that is based upon an individual’s actual or perceived sex, gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion or sexual orientation that is sufficiently serious that it interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s educational program or activities; 2. Discriminatory Harassment, defined as detrimental action based on an individual’s actual or perceived gender, race, color, age, creed, national or ethnic origin, physical or mental disability, veteran status, pregnancy status, religion, sexual orientation or other protected status that is unwelcome and unreasonably interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s educational program or activities; 3. Retaliatory Harassment, defined as any intentional, adverse action taken by an accused individual or allied third party, absent legitimate nondiscriminatory purposes, that harms an individual as reprisal for filing or participating in a civil rights grievance proceeding; 4. Bullying, or cyber bullying, defined as repeated and/or severe aggressive behavior likely to intimidate or intentionally hurt, control or diminish another person, physically or mentally that includes, but is not limited to: creating web pages with a negative focus; posting insults or lewd photos/videos/audio recordings on social networking sites; or spreading rumors with malicious intent; 5. Disruption of University operations including obstruction of teaching, research, administration, other University activities, or other authorized non-University activities which occur on campus; 6. Obstruction of freedom of movement by community members or visitors; 7. Abuse or interference of, or failure to comply in, University processes including conduct; or 8. Abuse of the campus conduct system including, but not limited to: a. Failure to appropriately respond to a letter of notice, or summons letter; b. Failure to attend meetings scheduled for conduct code administration purposes; c. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information; d. Failure to provide, destroying, or hiding information during an investigation of an alleged policy violation; e. Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the campus conduct system; f. Harassment (verbal or physical) and/or intimidation of a member of a campus conduct body prior to, during, and/or following a campus conduct proceeding; g. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed by the campus conduct system; or h. Influencing, or attempting to influence, another person to commit an abuse of the campus conduct system. D. Respect: William Peace students show positive regard for each other, for property and for the community. Behavior that violates this value includes, but is not limited to: 1. Threatening, or causing, physical harm, written or verbal abuse or other conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person; 2. Intimidation, defined as implied threats or acts that cause an unreasonable fear of harm in another; 3. Violation of the William Peace University abusive affiliation policy (section 12 of this document); 4. Violence between those in an intimate relationship with one another; 5. Stalking, defined as repetitive and/or menacing pursuit (physical or electronic), following harassment and/or interference with the peace and/or safety of a member of the community or any of the immediate family of a member of the community; 6. Sexual misconduct including sexual harassment, non-consensual sexual contact, non-consensual sexual intercourse, or sexual exploitation; 7. Inappropriate conduct which is disorderly, disruptive, obscene or indecent while on campus or at functions sponsored, or participated in, by the University; 8. Conduct Unbecoming while on-campus, off-campus, or at functions sponsored, or participated in, by the University including, but not limited to: a. Any action that constitutes criminal offense as defined by federal or state law. This includes, but is not limited to, single or repeat violations of any local, state or federal law; WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


b. Any situation where it appears that the student may present a danger or threat to the health or safety of him/herself or others; c. Any situation that significantly impinges upon the rights, property, or achievements of self or others or significantly breaches the peace and/or causes social disorder; and/or d. Any situation that is detrimental to the educational interests of the University. 9. Failure to comply with the directives of University officials or law enforcement officers during the performance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so; 10. Smoking in any building or in any undesignated areas; or any other violation of the smoking policy as outlined in the student handbook; or 11. Using a bathroom designated for a person of the opposite gender. E. Responsibility: William Peace students are given, and accept, a high level of responsibility as role models. Behavior that violates this value includes, but is not limited to: 1. Violation of the University Alcohol Policy; 2. Violation of the University Drug Policy; 3. Assisting in, inciting, or condoning the violation of University policies or local, state or federal laws; 4. Violation of local, state or federal laws (other than minor traffic violations); 5. Intentional failure of any organized group to exercise preventative measures relative to violations of the Community Conduct Code by its members; 6. Knowingly condoning or remaining in the presence of a violation of these rules without: 7. Leaving the area where the violation was occurring; or 8. Intervening or confronting the violation in an effort to stop it; or 9. Contacting the appropriate staff members to address the violation. 10. Violation of other published University policies or rules; or 11. Intentionally or recklessly causing a fire which damages University or personal property or which caused injury to any member of the community. F. Residence Halls: Students and their guests are subject to the following residence hall policies as published in the Student Handbook: 1. Violation of University Guest Policy; 2. Violation of University Visitation Policy; 3. Violation of University Escort Guest/Visitor Policy; 4. Violation of Excessive Guest/Visitor Policy; 5. Violation of Cohabitation Policy; 6. Violation of Excessive Noise Policy; 7. Violation of Quiet Hours; 8. Violation of Check-Out Procedures; 9. Violation of Room Consolidation Procedures; 10. Placement of sound equipment or speakers in residence hall windows; 11. Violation of Sports in the Hallway Policy; 12. Possession of a Prohibited Item; 13. Possession or use of non-approved appliances, 14. Possession or use items determined to be a fire hazard; 15. Possession or use of an open-flame source or flammable liquid in the residence halls including, but not limited to, oil lamps, candles, incense, gasoline and lighter fluid; 16. Removal, Possession, and/or Improper use of furniture and/or other furnishings provided by the University; 17. Violation of Decorating and/or Sign Policy; 18. Covering more than one-third of the wall or door space of a residence hall room; 19. Engaging in acts of Vandalism & Property Damage; 20. Failing to place trash and/or recycling in designated containers; 21. Using a residence hall room for business purposes; 22. Engaging in unauthorized room switch; WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


23. Improper use and/or removal of University furniture including lounge and residence hall room furniture; 24. Possession of a pet; 25. Violations of the William Peace University Housing License Agreement. 26. Violation of any Residence Life and Housing policies outlined in the Student Handbook. Part 11: Alcohol and Drug Policy To comply with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989 and subsequent amendments, students and employees of William Peace are informed that strictly enforced policies are in place which prohibits the unlawful possession, use or distribution of any illicit drugs, including alcohol, on University property or as part of any Universitysponsored activity. In addition to the Community Conduct Code, students and employees are also subject to all applicable legal sanctions under local, state and federal law for any offenses involving illicit drugs on University property or at University-sponsored activities. The University affirms that illegal drug use is harmful and detrimental to the educational objectives of the university. The use of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees could result in cognitive deficits, loss of productivity and other health risks. These risks include an increased incidence of accidents which may result in death or permanent injury. Free, confidential counseling for alcohol and other drug abuse issues is available to students through the William Peace Wellness Center. Other referral resources may include assessment, individual counseling, educational programs, materials, and referral and case management through community agencies. Students exhibiting signs of excessive alcohol consumption will, at a William Peace University agent’s discretion, be transported via Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and at the student’s expense, for medical attention. Refusal to cooperate with EMS personnel may result in arrest for emergency detention in order to ensure the student’s health and safety. I.

Policy on Parental Notification William Peace is concerned about students who improperly use alcohol and other drugs and the effects such use may have on their health, academic success, interpersonal relationships and, ultimately, their future. William Peace University reserves the right to notify the parents/guardians of dependent students regarding any conduct situation, particularly Level II Conduct Probation, loss of housing, suspension, and expulsion. William Peace University also reserves the right to designate which university employees have a legitimate need to know about individual conduct complaints pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and will share information accordingly.

II.

Alcohol Policy The following sections describe William Peace’s policy regarding the sale, service, distribution, and consumption of alcoholic beverages on University property or at University-sponsored events in accordance with federal, state and local laws.

A. Basic Guidelines Students who are 21 years of age or older are permitted to possess and consume alcohol only in Designated University Housing. ”Designated University Housing” refers to Bingham Hall or The Vie at Raleigh apartments in which all residents are 21 years of age or older. Students who are of legal drinking age may not share or provide alcohol to any students, employees or guests who are under 21 years of age. Those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21 years are not permitted to possess or consume alcohol anywhere on University property or at University-sponsored events. The following is a list of William Peace alcohol policy violations: 1. Possession or consumption of alcohol by a person under the age of 21: possession is defined as being in physical possession or having reasonable access to alcohol; 2. Possession of empty alcohol containers by a person under the age of 21; 3. Being present in an area where alcohol is prohibited while alcohol is present; 4. Furnishing, selling, or providing (including access) alcohol to a person under the age of 21; WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


5. Hosting a party where persons exceeds guest limits and/or excessive alcohol is present and persons under the age of 21 are consuming or have consumed alcohol; 6. Driving Under the Influence/Driving While Intoxicated: William Peace University is concerned about students who violate state and local laws regarding consumption of alcohol and the operation of motor vehicles. In accordance with state law, the University abides by the legal definition of intoxicated as “not having the normal use of mental or physical faculties by reason of introduction of alcohol, a controlled substance, a drug, a dangerous drug, a combination of two or more of those substances, or any other substance into the body” or 0.08 Breath or Blood Alcohol Concentration. In addition, students under the legal minimum drinking age of 21 years who are found to have any detectable amount of alcohol in their systems will be considered driving under the influence of alcohol and subject to penalties under that offense. 7. Possessing, using, or serving from a common source of alcohol regardless of age: common sources include punch bowls, kegs, beer balls, or equivalent; 8. Possessing excessive quantities of alcohol: William Peace University believes that of age students should be allowed to consume in moderation. Students who are 21 years of age or older are permitted to possess one 750ml bottle of hard liquor, one 750ml bottle of wine, or twelve 12oz beers. This amount is per student who is at least 21 years of age and lives in the room/apartment/cottage. The amount is not increased based upon guests who are 21. All residents must be 21 or older. 9. Being intoxicated or showing physical or mental impairment following or resulting from alcohol use regardless of age: a person is showing physical or mental impairment if the person is unable to coherently and respectfully answer questions, comply with the instructions of a university official, or is unable to walk unassisted; 10. Participating in or being present during a drinking game or simulated drinking game regardless of age; and 11. Possession of alcohol including empty containers, regardless of the student’s age, in any location other than a residence hall room, residence hall apartment, or university sponsored event where alcohol is specifically permitted. B. Sanctioning Hearing officers have been trained to carefully weigh a variety factors when determining sanctioning. Below are three lists of violation categories and common sanctions for each offense. The list below is a suggestion; each hearing officer must consider a variety of aggravating and mitigating factors. Potential aggravating factors include but are not limited to: hosting a party where persons under 21 are consuming alcohol; failing to cooperate with the instructions of a university official or law enforcement officer; disorderly conduct; being verbally abusive toward staff or students; quantity of alcohol; potential for injury to self or others; and past conduct history. Potential mitigating factors include but are not limited to: compliance with the instructions of staff; admitting responsibility during the hearing or the documentation of the incident; conducting oneself in an appropriate manner; student is able to articulate personal responsibility; student creates and follows a treatment plan prior to hearing; and assisting the staff addressing the incident. Minor Violations of the Alcohol Policy including but not limited to: being present while alcohol is being consumed; possession of an empty alcohol container; and consumption/possession by a person under the age of 21. 1. First Offense—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Level I Conduct Probation; b) Participation in an alcohol education class. c) Fine of $50 for students 21 or older or $75 for minors. d) Other sanctions as determined by Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). e) Other sanctions as determined by the hearing officer. 2. Second Offense— Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Level I Conduct Probation – Level II Conduct Probation b) Authorship of a research/reflection essay; and/or c) Other sanctions as determined by Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). d) Fine of $100 for students 21 or older or $150 for minors. 3. Third and Subsequent Offenses—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


a) Level II Conduct Probation. b) Mandated substance abuse assessment by an approved agency and required compliance with the assessing counselor’s evaluation; c) Authorship of a research/reflection essay; d) Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students as defined by FERPA; e) Subsequent offenses will result in loss of housing, suspension, or expulsion from the university; and/or f) Other sanctions as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). Serious violations of the university alcohol policy, including but not limited to: hosting a party where persons under the age of 21 are consuming or have consumed alcohol; non-compliance with or disrespect toward staff while also violating a policy that would be categorized as a minor violation of the alcohol policy; consuming alcohol in a space other than designated areas; and furnishing selling, or providing alcohol to a person under the age of 21. 1. First Offense—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Level I Conduct Probation; b) Participation in an alcohol education activity at the student’s expense and as determined by the hearing officer; Authorship of a research/reflection essay; and/or c) Other sanctions as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). d) Fine of $50 for students 21 or older or $75 for minors. 2. Second and Subsequent Offenses—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Level II Conduct Probation b) Authorship of research or reflection paper c) Fine of $100 for students 21 or older or $150 for minors. d) Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students as defined by FERPA e) Subsequent offenses will result in loss of housing, suspension, or expulsion from the university and/or f) Other sanctions as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). Major violations of the university alcohol policy, including but not limited to: possessing, using, or serving from a common source of alcohol; driving under the influence where there is no injury or other aggravating factors; and consuming alcohol to the point where intervention by staff, police, or EMS is required. 1. First Offense—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Level II Conduct Probation b) Participation in an alcohol education activity and/or a Minor in Possession course, at the student’s expense and as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (designee); c) Observation of one or more sessions of the County Misdemeanor or Felony Drug Court as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee); d) Community services hours to be performed at a specific location as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee); e) Authorship of a research/reflection essay; f) Fine of $50 for students 21 or older or $75 for minors; g) Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students as defined by FERPA; and/or Other sanctions as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). 2. Second and Subsequent Offenses— Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Suspension or expulsion from the University; b) Fine of $100 for students 21 or older or $150 for minors. c) Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students as defined by FERPA; and/or d) Other sanctions as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). III.

Illegal Drug Policy The following sections describe William Peace’s policy regarding the sale, manufacture, distribution, possession and use of illegal drugs on or off University property or at University-sponsored events in accordance with

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federal, state and local laws. This policy provides flexibility for the University in addressing drug-related offenses which occur on or off-campus. Moreover, it permits the University to address its fundamental mission of holistic education and the development of human potential. While recognizing that there is a need to address violations related to the use or possession of controlled substances, the University must address the education and well-being of all its students and employees. In addition to University imposed sanctions, students and employees are subject to all legal sanctions under federal, state and local law for any offenses involving illegal drugs on University property or at University activities. A. Basic Guidelines No WPU students are permitted to have any form of illegal or prescription drugs except as permitted under federal, state, or local law. Students with valid prescriptions are permitted to store or use as needed; however, all medications must remain in the prescription bottle with the student’s identification clearly printed. WPU takes a strict stance on illegal drug use that takes place on or off campus. The following is a list of William Peace University drug policy violations: 1. Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, including but not limited to; a. bongs, rolling paper, pipes, bats, grinder, vaporizer, scales, etc. b. any container that a reasonable person would believe is for the use or storage of illegal, synthetic drug, or unlawfully obtained prescription drug; 2. Possession of Illegal Drug(s), including but not limited to; a. any form of illegal drug, synthetic drug, or unlawfully obtained prescription drug; 3. Use of Drug Paraphernalia; 4. Use of Illegal Drug(s); 5. Being present in an area where drugs or drug paraphernalia are present; 6. Furnishing, selling, or providing (including access) drugs or drug paraphernalia; 7. Hosting a party where persons exceeds guest limits and/or drugs are present are/have been consumed/used; 8. Driving Under the Influence/Driving While Intoxicated: William Peace University is concerned about students who violate state and local laws regarding drug use and the operation of motor vehicles. In accordance with state law, the University abides by the legal definition of intoxicated as “not having the normal use of mental or physical faculties by reason of introduction of alcohol, a controlled substance, a drug, a dangerous drug, a combination of two or more of those substances, or any other substance into the body.� 9. Showing physical or mental impairment following or resulting from drug use regardless of location: a person is showing physical or mental impairment if the person is unable to coherently and respectfully answer questions, comply with the instructions of a college official, or is unable to walk unassisted; 10. Intent to or action of distribution, selling, or manufacturing any form of illegal, synthetic drug, or unlawfully obtained prescription drug.

B. Safe Harbor The University has a Safe Harbor rule for students. The University believes that students who have a drug and/or addiction problem deserve help. If any William Peace student brings their own use, addiction or dependency to the attention of University officials outside the threat/use of drug tests or conduct sanctions and seeks assistance, a conduct complaint will not be pursued. A written action plan may be used to track cooperation with the Safe Harbor program by the student. Failure to follow the action plan will nullify the Safe Harbor protection and campus conduct processes will be initiated. C. Sanctioning Hearing officers have been trained to carefully weigh a variety factors when determining sanctioning. Below are two lists of violation categories and common sanctions for each offense. The list below is a suggestion; each hearing officer must consider a variety of aggravating and mitigating factors. Potential aggravating factors include but are not limited to: failing to cooperate with the instructions of a college official or law enforcement officer; disorderly conduct; being verbal abusive toward staff or students; potential for injury to self or others; and past conduct history. Potential mitigating factors include but are not limited to: compliance with the instructions of staff; admitting responsibility during the hearing or the documentation of the incident; conducting oneself in an WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


appropriate manner; student is able to articulate personal responsibility; student creates and follows a treatment plan prior to hearing; and assisting the staff addressing the incident. Manufacture, Sale or Distribution of Illegal Drugs: 1. First Offense—Sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Suspension or expulsion from the University; b) Immediate removal from housing; c) Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students as defined by FERPA; d) Notification of law enforcement authorities; and/or e) Other sanctions as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). For the Possession or Use of Drug Paraphernalia, Synthetic Substances and/or Illegal Drugs: Drug paraphernalia (e.g. bongs), illegal drugs, and synthetic substances (e.g. K2, Spice) whose common purpose is to replicate the effects of illegal substances are prohibited on campus. 1. First Offense—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Level I – Level II Conduct Probation b) Participation in a drug education activity, at the student’s expense and as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee); c) Observation of one or more sessions the County Misdemeanor or Felony Drug Court as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee); d) Authorship of a research/reflection essay; e) Fine of $100; f) Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students as defined by FERPA; and/or g) Other sanctions as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). 2. Second and Subsequent Offenses—Possible sanctions include, but are not limited to: a) Loss of housing, permanent loss of good conduct standing, suspension or expulsion from the University; b) Fine of $200; c) Notification of parents/guardians of dependent students as defined by FERPA; and/or d) Other sanctions as determined by the Student Conduct Administrator (or designee). Part 12: Sex/Gender Discrimination Policy The William Peace University is committed to complying with all requirements as set forth by Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 (“Title IX”). As such, discrimination on the basis of sex or gender will not be tolerated in any of William Peace’s education programs or activities. Such discrimination includes, but is not limited to: sexual harassment; sexual violence; sexual assault, sex or gender-based bullying/cyber-bullying, hazing, stalking, relationship violence, retaliation and failure to provide equal opportunity in admissions, employment or athletics. Whether misconduct takes place on or off campus, the University assumes jurisdiction over the incident if it has the potential to interfere with the educational mission of the University or to create a hostile environment on campus or within a University program. The William Peace University Title IX Coordinator will be informed of, and oversee, all complaints of sex discrimination and is responsible for identifying and addressing any patterns or systemic problems that arise during the review of such complaints. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator will assist with Title IX Coordinator with various Title IX training and education programs, prevention and awareness campaigns, and review and creation of all policies and procedures pertaining to sexual misconduct to ensure consistency and compliance. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator also receives reports of sex discrimination and sexual misconduct and oversees the Community code of conduct, providing complainants and respondents with information about the code of conduct, investigation, and adjudication processes. Lastly, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator serves as the primary communicator to the respondent and complainant and ensures that all students involved are treated appropriately and equitable.

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Questions or concerns regarding William Peace and Title IX may be directed to one or more of the following resources: William Peace Title IX Coordinator Amber Kimball Associate Vice President for Human Resources Phone: 919.508.2028 Email: AMKimball@peace.edu William Peace Deputy Title IX Coordinator Bobbie Cole Director of Residence Life and Housing Phone: 919.508.2078 Email: BDCole@peace.edu William Peace will make every effort to successfully complete the grievance process for complaints of sex discrimination over a period of 60 days or less. In cases where student-initiated sex discrimination is alleged, the process and timelines utilized will be identical to the investigation procedures outlined in Part 6, Subsection VII of this document. All parties involved are entitled to periodic status updates on the progress of the complaint and any subsequent appeals. During the investigation and/or grievance process for complaints of sex discrimination, the University may take a number of interim actions in order to ensure the preservation of a complainant’s or respondent’s school experience and the overall university environment. These actions may include, but are not limited to: issuance of University no contact order on the accused individual; residence hall room change for one or more involved parties; changes in academic schedules or assignments for one or both parties and interim suspension of the accused student/respondent. To read more about Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, please visit: www.dol.gov/oasam/regs/statutes/titleix.htm. Part 13: Sexual Misconduct Policy William Peace University maintains a policy of zero tolerance for sexual misconduct. Members of the University community, guests and visitors have the right to be free from sexual violence. When an allegation of sexual misconduct is brought to the administration, and an accused student/respondent is found to have violated this policy, serious sanctions will be imposed to ensure that such actions are not repeated. All members of the University community are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that does not infringe upon the rights of others. The William Peace sexual misconduct policy has been developed to reaffirm these principles and to provide recourse for those individuals whose rights have been violated. This policy has dual purposes: 1) it serves as a measure to determine, after-the-fact, if behaviors trespassed on community values and 2) as a guide for students on the expectations William Peace has, preventatively, for sexual communication, responsibility and respect. While the policy below is quite detailed and specific, the expectations of this community can be summarized in this simple sentence: Individuals who choose to engage in sexual activity of any type with each other must first obtain clear consent. 

What is Consent? o William Peace defines consent as clear sexual permission that can only be given when all participants have the capacity to consent and agree to sexual activity.  What is capacity?  Consent cannot be given by someone who is asleep, drugged, intoxicated, unconscious, under 16 years of age, mentally/psychologically disabled, and/or harassed, coerced, threatened, or forced into sexual activity.  Individuals who consent to sex must be able to fully understand what they are doing. For example, when alcohol or other drugs are used, a person will be considered unable to give valid consent if the person cannot appreciate the who, what, where, when, why, or how of a sexual interaction. In addition, silence—without clear actions demonstrating

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o

I.

permission—cannot be assumed to indicate consent. Finally, there is a difference between seduction and coercion; coercion unreasonable pressure for sexual activity and may constitute a violation of this policy... Consent can be given by word or action, but non-verbal consent is more ambiguous than explicitly stating one’s wants and limitations. Consent to one form of sexual activity should not, and cannot, be taken as consent to any other sexual activity.

Violations of the University Sexual Misconduct Policy

Sexual misconduct is a serious offense. Such violations are subject to any combination of conduct sanctions as described in Part 6: Conduct Procedures. Individuals found responsible for the violation of nonconsensual sexual intercourse are subject to recommended sanctions of Housing Expulsion, University suspension, or University expulsion. A partial list of William Peace sexual conduct policy violations is listed below. A. Sexual Harassment: Gender-based verbal or physical conduct that has the effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or educational environment. Sexual harassment can include: B. Hostile Environment includes situations in which there is harassing conduct that is sufficiently severe, pervasive/persistent such that it alters the conditions of education or employment. The determination of whether an environment is “hostile” must be based on all the circumstances. These circumstances could include, but are not limited to: 1. The frequency of the speech or conduct; 2. The nature and severity of the speech or conduct; 3. Whether the conduct was physically threatening; 4. Whether the speech or conduct was humiliating; 5. The effect of the speech or conduct on the alleged victim’s mental and/or emotional state; 6. Whether the speech or conduct was directed at more than one person; 7. Whether the speech or conduct arose in the context of other discriminatory conduct; 8. Whether the speech or conduct unreasonably interfered with the alleged victim’s educational or work performance; 9. Whether a statement is a mere utterance of an epithet which engenders offense in an employee or a student or offends by mere discourtesy or rudeness; and/or 10. Whether the speech or conduct deserves the protections of academic freedom. C. Quid Pro Quo sexual harassment exists when there are unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature and submission to, or rejection of, such conduct results in, or is thought to result in, educational or employment action. D. Nonconsensual Sexual Intercourse (or attempt to commit same) ): Any anal or vaginal penetration , however slight, with any object or body part, by a person upon another person, without consent, or any oral penetration, however slight, with a sexual body part, by a person upon another person, without consent . E. Nonconsensual Sexual Contact (or attempt to commit same)): Any intentional sexual touching, however slight, with any object, by person upon another person, without consent. F. Sexual Exploitation: Taking nonconsensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for one’s own advantage or benefit, or to benefit a person other than the one being exploited. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to: 1. Prostituting another student; 2. Non-consensual video or audio recording of sexual activity or the non-consensual distribution of such a recording, even if consensually made ; WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


3. Exceeding the boundaries of explicit consent, such as allowing friends to hide in a closet to be witness to one’s consensual sexual activity; 4. Engaging in voyeurism (Peeping Tommery); and/or 5. Knowingly transmitting a sexually transmitted disease/infection or HIV to another student. G. Relationship Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate relationship with the complainant. Relationship violence includes but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. H. Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (A) fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or (B) suffer substantial emotional distress. For the sake of this policy, a course of conduct is: a. Two or more acts where the stalker directly or indirectly, even through third parties, by any action, method or device, follows, monitors, threatens, observes, surveils or communicates to or about a person. I.

Gender-based harassment or discrimination: Acts of a verbal or nonverbal nature or physical aggression, intimidation, or hostility based upon sex/gender or sex/gender-stereotyping that is sufficiently serious that it has the potential to limit or deny an individual the ability to participate in or benefit from University events, programs, and activities.

J. Retaliation exists when an individual harasses, intimidates or takes other adverse actions against a person because of the person’s participation in an investigation of discrimination or sexual misconduct. Harassment or intimidation includes, but is not limited to, threats or actual violence against the person or their property, adverse educational or employment consequences, ridicule, taunting, bullying, or ostracism. The University will impose sanctions on any faculty, student or staff member found to be engaging in retaliation.

II.

Confidentiality and Reporting Sexual Misconduct

University officials, depending on their roles at the University, have varying reporting responsibilities and abilities to maintain confidentiality. In order to make informed choices, you should be aware of confidentiality and mandatory reporting requirements when consulting campus resources. On campus, some resources may maintain your complete confidentiality, offering you options and advice without any obligation to inform an outside agency or individual unless you have requested information to be shared. Other resources exist for you to report crimes and policy violations and these resources will take action when you report victimization to them. A. Confidential Reporting: If you would like the details of an incident to be kept confidential, you may speak with mental health counselor, health service providers, off-campus rape crisis resources, or members of the clergy/chaplains who will maintain confidentiality. A campus counselor is available to help you free of charge and can be seen on an emergency basis during normal business hours. B. Quasi-Confidential Reporting: You may seek advice from certain resources that are not required to tell anyone else your private, personally identifiable information unless there is cause to fear for your safety, or the safety of others. These resources include those without supervisory responsibility or remedial authority to address sexual misconduct, such as faculty members, advisors to student organizations, career services staff, admissions officers, student activities personnel, and many others. If you are unsure of someone’s duties and ability to maintain your privacy, ask them before you talk to them. They will be able to tell you and can help you make decisions about who can help you best. Some of these resources, are instructed to share incident reports with their supervisors, but they do not share any personally identifiable information about your report unless you give permission except in the rare event that the incident reveals a need to protect you or other members of the community. If your personally identifiable information is shared, it will be shared with as few people as possible and all efforts will be made to protect your confidentiality to the greatest extent.

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C. Non-Confidential Reporting Options: You are encouraged to speak to University officials, such as the Title IX Coordinator, Student Conduct Administrator, Public Safety, Residence Hall staff, or Deans to make formal reports of incidents of sexual misconduct. You have the right, and can expect, to have incidents of sexual misconduct taken seriously by the University when formally reported, and to have those incidents investigated and properly resolved through administrative procedures. Formal reporting does not mean that your report will not be confidential, but it does mean that people who need to know will be told, and information will be shared as necessary with investigators, witnesses, and the accused student/respondent. The circle of people with this knowledge will be kept as tight as possible to preserve your rights and privacy. Reports may be made in person, via email, or by phone. Contact information for the Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Coordinator is: William Peace Title IX Coordinator Amber Kimball Associate Vice President for Human Resources Phone: 919.508.2028 Email: AMKimball@peace.edu William Peace Deputy Title IX Coordinator Bobbie Cole Director of Residence Life and Housing Phone: 919.508.2078 Email: BDCole@peace.edu Victims are encouraged to report potential crimes of sexual assault to law enforcement in addition to the University. The Title IX Coordinator/Deputy is available to assist an individual in notifying law enforcement. Criminal and school investigations are separate and may be conducted simultaneously. Although the University strongly encourages all members of its community to report criminal sexual misconduct to law enforcement, it is the victim’s choice whether or not to make such a report and victims have the right to decline involvement with the police. III. Federal Timely Warning Obligations Victims of sexual misconduct should be aware that University administrators must issue timely warnings for incidents reported to them that pose a substantial threat of bodily harm or danger to members of the campus community. The University will make every effort to ensure that a victim’s name and other identifying information is not disclosed, while still providing enough information for community members to make safety decisions in light of the danger. Part 6: Conduct Procedures VIII. Special Procedures and Provision for Cases of Alleged Sexual Misconduct Due to the very personal and private nature of an alleged sexual assault/misconduct investigation, William Peace University acknowledges the need for special procedures and policies to investigate and resolve such complaints. Any student who reports allegations of sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, or other Title IX related allegations, either as a complainant or a third party witness, will not be subject to disciplinary action by the university for using and/or consuming alcohol or drugs at or near the time of the alleged incident, provided that any such alcohol or drug use did not, and do not, place the health or safety of any person at risk. For the sake of this policy, please note the following definitions: a. Respondent: the alleged offender/accused; a person alleged to have engaged in any of the conduct prohibited in the Sexual/Gender Discrimination Policy b. Complainant: the party who makes the complaint; who alleges to have been subjected to any of the conduct prohibited in the Sexual/Gender Discrimination Policy

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The Title IX Coordinator will appoint one or more Title IX Investigators to assume responsibility for the investigation of alleged cases of sexual misconduct where a student is the respondent. The Title IX Investigator will be responsible for assuring that the Title IX Coordinator is appropriately informed about each step of the investigation and resolution of a sexual misconduct case. The Title IX Investigator will serve as primary investigator or appoint an investigator to investigate and resolve the complaint. The appointment of investigators must be approved by the Title IX Coordinator. The investigator(s) will take the following steps, if not already completed by the Coordinator or designee: B. Receipt of Complaint In coordination with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator,  Initiate any necessary remedial actions such as no-contact orders, housing and academic accommodation, and interim suspensions to ensure safety and security of all students involved.  Determine the identity and contact information of the complainant. While anyone may report an alleged incident of sexual violence, for the purposes of a Title IX sexual assault case, the alleged victim of the sexual assault is considered the complainant. In the event the complainant does not wish to participate in the investigation or resolution, the university may itself serve as the complainant.  Inform all students involved of their rights and responsibility as it relates to the process, investigation and potential adjudication as well as share support resources for students such as the Wellness Center and Campus Counseling services. C. Preliminary Investigation Conduct an immediate preliminary investigation to identify potential policy violations, to review the history of the parties, the context of the incident(s), any potential patterns and the nature of the complaint; 1. If the complainant is reluctant to pursue the complaint, determine whether the complaint should still be pursued and whether sufficient independent evidence could support the complaint without the participation of the complainant; 2. Notify the complainant of whether the University intends to pursue the complaint regardless of their involvement, and inform the complainant of their rights in the process and option to become involved if they so choose; 3. During the preliminary investigation phase the university may but is not required to interview the respondent prior to finalizing or determining charges; 4. Preliminary investigation usually takes one day to one week to complete. Pending a hearing or other disposition or the allegations against a student, if the continuing presence of the respondent is a potential danger to persons or property or a potential threat of disrupting the academic process or any activity authorized by the University, the University may take such immediate interim disciplinary action, such as an interim suspension (Part 7 Section II) or restricting access to specific areas of University owned or operated property, as is appropriate to the circumstances. If the accused individual is a member of the University community, a no contact letter may be given by the University to all parties involved until the conclusion of the investigation. This will prohibit communication between the parties, including contact verbally, in writing, through technology or third parties. Violations of institutional no contact orders will be handled as separate violations of the Honor Code and the University reserves the right to resolve those charges prior to the completion of the investigation into the sexual misconduct or interpersonal violence complaint. If the accused is not a member of the University community, the University may issue an order barring the individual from campus facilities. Victims of domestic or dating violence, stalking or sexual abuse may also want to consider obtaining an order of protection from the State of North Carolina. The University can assist victims with navigating the procedures for obtaining a protective order.

WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


The University also can provide interim support to both complainants and respondents as appropriate. Supportive measures may include academic accommodations, class schedule changes, housing reassignments, the issuance of a nocontact order, and counseling. A student who has received interim disciplinary action may request a meeting with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator to contest the interim disciplinary action taken by the University. A meeting request must be submitted to the Deputy Title IX Coordinator in writing within three business days of interim disciplinary action being taken. If requested by a student, the meeting will generally take place within ten business days after the request was received. During this meeting with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator, the student may present documentation or other evidence for review in consideration of lifting or altering the interim disciplinary action. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator shall issue a written decision within five business days of the meeting regarding whether the University’s decision to take interim disciplinary action should be reversed, altered, or otherwise left unchanged. D. Comprehensive Investigation A comprehensive investigation usually takes one to two weeks. The order of the following steps are at the discretion of the investigator. Given the nature of a sexual misconduct complaint it is not uncommon for witnesses to be interviewed or evidence to be presented at varying times in the investigation as parties often only recall details during interviews and when prompted by certain questions. The investigator should take steps to minimize the number of interviews conducted with each party. However, the investigator may interview each party multiple times. It is not unusual for the complainant and respondent to each have an initial and follow-up interview. 1. As necessary, conduct additional interviews with complainant and respondent; 2. Interview all relevant witnesses, obtain statements from each, and have each witness sign their statements to verify them; 3. Obtain all documentary evidence and information that is available; 4. Obtain all physical evidence that is available; 5. Complete the investigation promptly by analyzing all available evidence without unreasonable deviation from the intended timeline; E. Notice of Charge If there is insufficient evidence through the comprehensive investigation to support reasonable cause, the grievance will be closed with no further action. If there is sufficient evidence to proceed, the investigator will determine what specific policy violations should be listed in the Notice of Charge. The Notice of Charge will be provided to both the respondent and the complainant. F. Adjudication Once a comprehensive investigation has been conducted the investigator will turn over all documents to the Deputy Title IX Coordinator or designee. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator or Designee will then review all facts and information obtained from the investigation. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator will then meet with the complainant and respondent separately to discuss Adjudication Process. The Adjudication Procedures for cases involving alleged sexual misconduct are as follows: 1. Administrative Disposition An Administrative Disposition shall be conducted by the Deputy Title IX Coordinator or Designee. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator shall meet with the respondent to review responsibility of policy violations and applicable sanctions. a) In cases where the respondent accepts responsibility for the policy violations and agrees to the proposed sanctions, the administrative disposition shall be final and there shall be no further appeal of responsibility or sanctions by the respondent. Once a respondent has accepted responsibility for the policy violations and agreed to the proposed sanctions, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator or Designee WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


shall, subject to Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and other applicable law, inform the Title IX Coordinator and the complainant of the outcome. The complainant shall have the right to request for the case to be heard by a panel hearing or right to appeal proposed sanctions. b) In cases where the respondent accepts responsibility for the policy violations but does not agree to the proposed sanctions, the respondent shall have the right to request for the case to be heard by a panel hearing or right to appeal proposed sanctions. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator or Designee shall subject to Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and other applicable law inform the Title IX Coordinator and the complainant of the respondent’s decision. The complainant shall have the right to request for the case to be heard by a panel hearing or right to appeal proposed sanctions of the respondent’s appeal decision. c) In cases where the respondent disputes responsibility for policy violations the case shall be assigned to a panel hearing. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator or Designee shall subject to Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and other applicable law inform the Title IX Coordinator and the complainant of the respondent’s decision. 2. Panel Hearing A hearing panel shall be comprised of no less than one University Hearing Officer and two faculty/staff members. All members of the hearing panel will receive annual training in their responsibilities that draws on professional and expert resources. The hearing panel will review all information gathered from the investigation, hear statements from the complainant, respondent, and witnesses as appropriate. The panel will ask clarifying questions and make a determination of responsibility based on a preponderance of the evidence, i.e. whether it is more likely than not that the respondent committed a policy violation. The panel shall, subject to Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and other applicable law, inform the Title IX Coordinator and the complainant of the determination of the hearing. 

Based on the determination of the panel hearing, the Title IX Coordinator will impose sanctions as appropriate to the findings. The Title IX Coordinator will present the investigation report, findings, and determination to the respondent and complainant separately. During this time, both the respondent and complainant will receive instructions for the appeal process and given three business days to request an appeal.

G. Appeals Each party has three business days from the date of notification of the findings, investigation report, and sanctions to submit an appeal. Dissatisfaction with the outcome is not sufficient grounds for an appeal. The only permissible grounds for an appeal are: 1. An error in the process that substantially prejudiced the outcome to such an extent that the appealing party was denied a fundamentally fair process as a result; or 2. The emergence of new evidence that could not have been discovered previously by the exercise of due diligence and would have substantially impacted the original decision of the panel. All requests for an appeal must be submitted in writing to the Deputy Title IX Coordinator; as indicated in the Determination of Hearing. Upon receipt of an appeal, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator will provide the other party notice of an appeal and a copy of the appeal. The other party has three business days from receipt of notice to respond in writing to the appeal. In the event that both parties initially appeal the findings, each party will be provided notice and a copy of the other party’s appeal. Each party will be given three business days from notice to respond in writing to the appeal. If the indicated Deputy Title IX Coordinator finds that the appeal was made on permissible grounds, an appeals hearing will be held by an Appeal Panel and both the complaint and respondent will be notified of an appeal hearing date within five (5) business days. The Appeal Panel will be comprised of the Title IX Coordinator, a trained Title IX hearing panelist (must not have participated in original panel hearing of the case) and Vice President of Student Services or Designee. During this appeal hearing, the Appeal Panel will review all documentation associated with the case and any new evidence submitted that was not available during the original adjudication. The Appeal Panel has the authority to modify, lower, maintain, or increase the original decision. Only one appeal is allowed; therefore, the decision of the Appeal Panel WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


is considered final and no further appeals will be considered. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator will inform both parties separately of the Appeal Panel decision. After the appeal hearing, students may request a meeting with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator or VP of Student Services if they wish to receive clarification or additional information on the process. A copy of the final case record is provided to the Title IX Coordinator. The appeal process typically takes between one and two weeks. H. Other Special Provisions The past sexual history or sexual character of a party will not be admissible by the other parties in hearings unless such information is determined to be highly relevant by the investigator. While disciplinary history of the complainant and respondent generally is not relevant, the Student Conduct Administrator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator may supply such information to the investigator if the following criteria is met: 4. The respondent was subject to a previous credible allegation and/or previously found responsible for a policy violation; or 5. The information indicates a pattern of behavior by the complainant or respondent. Regardless of the willingness of the complainant to participate in the investigation process, the complainant in any complaint alleging sexual misconduct will: be notified in writing of the outcome of a hearing and any sanctions assigned; have the right to a review if the appeal criteria is met; and be kept apprised of the status of any review requests filed by the accused student/respondent. I. Student Responsibilities and Rights 1. Student Responsibilities a. To know and adhere to the WPU Community Code of Conduct and Student Handbook b. To attend all meetings or hearings in a timely manner. c. To provide a list of proposed witnesses and any documentary evidence to the Deputy Title IX Coordinator. d. To complete any imposed sanctions on time and consistent with the decision in their case (for respondents). e. To comply with all interim measures, including but not limited to, no contact orders, housing reassignments and other administrative remedies assigned by the university. f. To participate in a manner that is civil and respectful. g. To submit an explanatory or explicative challenge to the selection of designated investigators or adjudicators if perceived conflict of interest exists. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator or designee will approve or deny any challenges. 2. Student Rights a. To an investigation and appropriate resolution of all credible complaints of gender-based/sexual misconduct made in good faith to responsible employees. b. To select and provide for his or her self an advisor of choice who may accompany the student at each stage of the process. Note that the advisor’s role is to provide support to the student, and not to interfere with the meeting or to speak for or on behalf of any party. c. If a decision is made that a panel hearing will occur: i. To a pre-hearing meeting with the Deputy Title IX Coordinator where rights, responsibilities and procedures are explained. ii. To review all available information and documents that will be considered by the panel. WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


iii. To appear in person, hear all testimony and present relevant information; submit questions to be asked of any witnesses at the hearing in the discretion of the panel. iv. To a closed hearing. A closed hearing is closed to the general public. v. To refuse to answer any questions or make a statement; however, the hearing panel shall make a decision solely on the basis of information presented at the hearing. vi. To have all statements, information or comments given during the hearing held in the strictest of confidence by the hearing panel before, during and after deliberation. vii. To be informed in writing of the outcome and any imposed sanctions. viii. To have the right to appeal the outcome and any imposed sanctions. Alternative Testimony Options For gender-based/sexual misconduct complaints, the hearing panel may elect to separate the alleged victim and respondent, including but not limited to placing a privacy screen between the parties, or allowing the parties to listen to one another remotely via speakerphone or other device. Impact on Student Enrollment If a case is assigned for a formal investigation, the university reserves the right to place an encumbrance on the respondent’s registration and transcript, including awarding of grades for the current semester, until such time that the investigation and any associated charges are resolved Off Campus Resources InterAct is a private, non-profit, United Way agency that provides safety, support, and awareness to victims and survivors of domestic violence and rape/sexual assault: Main Office Line: 919-828-7501 24 Hour Domestic Violence Crisis Line: 919-828-7740 24 Hour Sexual Assault Crisis Line: 919-828-3005 Solace Center: 919-828-3067 U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights: Washington DC (Metro) Office for Civil Rights U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-1475 Telephone: 202-453-6020 FAX: 202-453-6021; TDD: 800-877-8339 Email: OCR.DC@ed.gov Visa and immigration assistance: U.S. Department of Homeland Security. https://studyinthestates.dhs.gov/students Legal assistance: Legal Aid of North Carolina: 1-866-219-LANC Part 14: Abusive Affiliations Policies William Peace University believes that all students are entitled to be treated with considerable respect at all times. The University is unconditionally opposed to any situation created to produce mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, ridicule, or social ostracism. Thus, all forms of abusive affiliations are prohibited. In addition to being violation of William Peace University abusive affiliations policy, hazing is a criminal offense in the State of North Carolina. As such, it carries serious penalties. WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


In determining whether a specific behavior violates William Peace’s abusive affiliation policy, consideration will be given to how the behavior relates to the University’s mission and purpose. William Peace University defines abusive affiliation as any mental, physical or social requirement, request, or obligation placed upon any person that could cause discomfort, pain, fright, disgrace or injury; that is personally degrading or humiliating; that would cause a reasonable person to believe that s/he would experience social ostracism for failing to participate; or that violates any federal, state or local statute or University policy, the willingness of an individual to participate in such activity notwithstanding. A person is defined as a university student, any pledge, associate member, member, affiliate alumnus, guest of any campus organization, or other individual. Abusive affiliation includes but is not limited to the following activities:

I.

Physical A. Encouraging or requiring persons to consume excessive amounts of alcohol or other fluids (e.g., encouraging or requiring individuals to use beer bongs, play drinking games, or drink unknown substances, including water); B. Requiring that person do or submit to any act that will alter his or her physical appearance in any significant degree for any substantial period of time (e.g., branding; tattooing: using makeup, paint, or markers on a person: or shaving the head or body); C. Requiring activities that disrupt a person’s normal schedule. A normal schedule includes three reasonably spaced meals per day, the opportunity for sufficient rest at night (at least six full hours), time requires for study outside of scheduled class hours, and reasonable time for personal hygiene; D. Requiring a person to engage in physical activity of unusual kind or duration, such as calisthenics; overly difficult work assignments; activities that may be excessive for a person with physical disabilities; activities that require a person to remain in a fixed position for an extended period of time; being naked: or being confined in a room that is too hot or too cold, too noisy, or too small. E. Hitting or pretending to hit an individual; and/or F. Performing acts that are, or seem to be dangerous.

II. A. B. C. D. E. F. G.

Psychological Requiring a person to pretend to or actually violate a law; Yelling or screaming at individuals; Calling individuals demeaning names; Booing, hissing, or demeaning individuals when they make mistakes; Interrogating individual in an intimidating or threatening manner; Requiring a person to perform acts of servitude or perform personal errands for others; Deceiving new members prior to their gaining membership in an attempt to convince them they will not be initiated or will be hurt; H. Forcing a person to publicly wear apparel that is abnormal and not normally in good taste. I. Requiring a person to appear nude at any time; and/or J. Engaging in activity that compels an individual or group to remain in a certain place or transporting anyone without their knowledgeable consent (e.g., taking a person on a road trip to an unknown destination, or kidnapping).

III. A. B. C. D.

Social Ostracism Exiting a room when a particular person arrives; Requiring persons to attend event where illegal activities are taking place; Intentionally ignoring, or not responding, to a particular member of an organization or team; Using coercion (e.g. threats, intimidation, or demeaning comments) to obtain consent to engage in activities; and/or E. Expressly stating or implying that engaging (or failing to do so) in an activity would help or hurt an individual’s membership;

IV.

Distinction between Abusive Relationships by Organizations and Abusive Relationships by Individuals

WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018


The following statement will help distinguish hazing violations by individuals from hazing violations by student organizations; A. It is presumed that hazing incidents involve only those persons directly participating in the incident and those who are present at the time it occurs and who do nothing to stop its occurrence. B. A hazing incident may also be an organizational chapter activity, for which the organization itself may be disciplined, if any of the follow characteristics are present: 1. A faculty or staff member who has responsibility for the organization (e.g. head coach, assistant coach, advisor, etc.) is aware of the incident sufficiently in advance of its occurrence to prohibit its taking place and takes no action to prohibit it. 2. A faculty or staff member who has responsibility for the organization (e.g. head coach, assistant coach, advisor, etc.) knows the identity of the members involved in the incident and refuses to divulge that information to the appropriate University authorities or the police. 3. The incident takes place in any public place. 4. The incident involves the expenditure of any organizational funds. 5. The incident involves or is actively or passively endorsed by a majority of the members of the organization and/or a majority of the student leadership (e.g. president, vice-president, new member chair, captain, etc.). V.

Sanctions Organizations, teams, or individuals found to be responsible of hazing are subject to disciplinary action and sanctions outlined in the Community Conduct Code. Additionally, individuals and organizations may face additional sanctions from the appropriate department (e.g. athletics, student activities, etc.), including possible suspension from the organization, team and/or termination of recognition for an organization or season for an athletic team.

Part 15: Student Athletes In accordance with the Student Athlete Handbook, all student athletes who are documented for violating the Community Conduct Code shall be reported to the Athletics Department. Student Athletes who are charged with a violation of the Community Conduct Code are encouraged to speak with their coaches prior to Athletics Department notification. The Athletics Department will be notified of any student athletes who have been found responsible for a violation of the Community Conduct Code and once their appeal timeframe/process has concluded. The Athletics Department will be made aware of responsible violations, corresponding sanctions and number of previous violations. The Athletics Department may choose to sanction athletes independent of the student conduct system. If a student wishes to appeal athletic sanctions he/she should see the Director of Athletics or designee.

WPU Community Code of Conduct 2017-2018

WPU 2017-2018 Community Conduct Code  
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