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VERTICAL CITIES ASIA EVERYONE CONNECTS TU DELFT MUMBAI

DESIGN BOOK TEAM B


Vertical Cities Asia ‘The Vertical Cities Asia International Design Competition is organised by the National University of Singapore (NUS) School of Design and Environment (SDE), and is sponsored by the World Future Foundation (WFF) and Beijing Vantone Citylogic Investment Corporation. The competition was launched on 1 January 2011, premised on the belief that a new paradigm of high density compact urban development was necessary for rapidly urbanising Asia, which is besieged by massive rural-urban migrations. Either existing urban architectural models will continue to be recycled to accommodate increasing populations with devastating effects

on land, infrastructure, and the environment or new models of urban architecture will be formed to take on the specifics of Asian urban development.’

Competition Brief - Everyone Connects ‘Every year a one square kilometre territory will be the subject of the competition. This area, to house 100,000 people living and working, sets the stage for tremendous research and investigation into urban density, verticality, domesticity, work, food, infrastructure, nature, ecology, structure, and program - their holistic integration and the quest for visionary paradigm will be the challenges of this urban and architectural invention. This new environment will have a full slate of live-work-play provisions, with the residential component making up to 50% of the total floor space. In the fourth of this series of competitions, the competition site will be located in Mumbai, India with the theme “Everyone Connects”. “Everyone connects” is a wide and provocative challenge. It demands a holistic and integrated approach. “Connect” is interpreted extensively to mean the following: Connect to clean energy, Connect to clean

water, Connect to fresh air, Connect to transport efficiency, Connect to work, learn, live and play opportunities, Connect to communities, In other words, “Connect” to liveability.’

Site ‘Mumbai is facing the challenges of urban connection. The site is located within the Eastern side of the city of Mumbai peninsula (including the dockyards and a portion of an adjacent urban district). Participating teams are to select their site of one square kilometre within the larger territory.’

TU Delft - Team B Sebastiaan Buitenhuis - The Netherlands Calcen Chan - Surinam Federico Gobbato - Italy Wouter Langeveld - The Netherlands Vicky Metzen - Germany Piet de Reuver - The Netherlands Katarzyna Uchman - Poland

‘The objective of the competition is to seek a holistic solution or a new urban paradigm for a rapidly growing Asian city which also faces the issues of sustainability and quality of life that also addresses the notion of urban connection in Asian cities.’


CONTENTS Project Overview 4 1. Site Conditions 6 2.

Potentials and Needs of Mumbai

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3. Strategy 10 4. Masterplan 12 5. Vision 14 Technical index 16


PROJECT OVERVIEW Mumbai teaches us that things may not essentially be what they appear and one needs to understand the essence behind them, the story ruled by a specific Indian logic. What we see is a metaphor for a deeper sense, a journey into the complexities of the unknown. It connects what seems disconnected, gives hints, develops dynamically and dramatically, adds hues of colour and speaks to the unconscious. It addresses the core faculty of any human being - imagination, notwithstanding one’s social background. Connectivity on all scales has always been a nexus of development for Mumbai. As Charles Correa put it, “Mumbai was shaped first as a colonial trading harbour, and second by its railways, junction between the strategic movement of military power, and the commercial demands of business” (Correa in Living in the Endless City, 2012). Millions of people commute daily to main economic clusters - the Island City, Bandra Kurla and the developing Panvel and Nashik. Millions pass by the same spots, millions walk or use train, millions get stuck in congestion on a car or rickshaw along the North-South infrastructural spine of the city. The swarm of motors intertwining with ever-present traditional music tunes melts into one with the staccato of honks and shouts of street vendors and children. Headed in diverse directions, people’s stories cross, combine, repeal, speed up or slow each other down. The Indian public sphere as we learnt it in Mumbai. An acoustic space where everything connects.


SITE CONDITIONS The street acts as a multifunctional public space and an extension of the private realm of the appartments.

A huge amount of traffic leads to congestion and air pollution. More and more people associate owning a car with a higher social status.


Mumbais railway network is used by millions of commuters every day. It is much beyond the current capacity of public transportation system which is also extremely vulnarable during monsoon season.

The lack of affordable housing and generally poor housing conditions are clearly visible. 35% of the people in our site ive in slums.

Mumbai can be seen as a city without ground. The intricacies of land tenure and the take over of once governmental ground by large private developers lead to extreme inequity. High-rise towers for the rich are gated off from the poor with a large plots of unused private green.


POTENTIALS AND NEEDS OF MUMBAI

INFRASTRUCTURE

medical research center extreme traffic congestion

production village

flood risk zone

waterfront busy train stations

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HOUSING

dilapidating informal housing of the urban poor

immense density

civic center

old mills: precious ground

inaccessible private green

existing and planned towers Sewree market

mangroves

lively use of open spaces

ENVIRONMENT AND WATERFRONT

flooding critical infrastructures

contamination of ground, water and air

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STRATEGY

HOSPITAL CENTER

MARKET

PRODUCTION VILLAGE

ECOLOGY

The currently heavily polluted waterfront needs immediate remediation.Polluting industries need to move out, allowing ground phyto-revitalization. Natural drainage of the site during monsoon season is provided by the creation of waterfront islands. It will also become a

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barrier for a potential surge from the bay. Drainage is supported by a green belt along the lowest part of the site which plays the role of retention reservoir and prevents soil erosion. The green buffer is continued throughout the site and towards the waterfront.


HOUSING

We see a sustainable way of dealing with housing in acknowledging the existing fabric and housing typologies and grow on their potentials. By maintaining a vast number of communities and networks we saved up to 2.8M sqm of gross floor area.

We identified potential housing locations and applied specific strategies which would improve the living conditions while maintaining local identities and sense of community.

CIVIC CENTER

STATION

MOBILITY

The new harbour link arrives at the site with a tunnel. By splitting the traffic, congestion can be eased and distributed into three main arteries. The new, hybrid Sewree Station acts as a hub on a metro-

politan level, serving trains, metro and rapid bus, as well as a ferry on the waterfront side. Located in the green belt and designed as a topography, it can become a very civic spot and a catalyst for the neighbourhood.

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Our strategy offers flexibility in phasing and realization. The three layers, environment, infrastructure and housing, can to be tackled individually, each at its own speed, and become powerful when merged. India needs flexibility and options in planning and we simply offer a way to begin. A multi-layered plan for a diverse and complex city where all vessels connect.

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CREDITS

VCA 2014: Mumbai

Design Book July 1st 2014, Delft, The Netherlands

Technical University of Delft Design Team Sebastiaan Buitenhuis - The Netherlands Calcen Chan - Surinam Federico Gobbato - Italy Wouter Langeveld - The Netherlands Vicky Metzen - Germany Piet de Reuver - The Netherlands Katarzyna Uchman - Poland Chair Editor Mitesh Dixit Department of Architecture Technical University of Delft The Netherlands Studio Leader Mitesh Dixit Department of Architecture Technical University of Delft The Netherlands Ulf Hackauf Department of Architecture Technical University of Delft The Netherlands Katerina Salonikidi Domain Rotterdam The Netherlands Contacts Delft University of Technology c/o Faculty of Architecture Julianalaan 134, 2628 BL Delft, the Netherlands National University of Singapore c/o Department of Architecture 4 Architecture Drive Singapore 117566 Republic of Singapore All image rights remain with the original authors. Every attempt has been made to properly attribute images and reference sources.

CP U

Complex Projects Chair: Professor Kees Kaan

Urbanism


TECHNICAL INDEX

I.

Site Research

II. Randstad Comparison

III. Mumbai Bridge Studies

IV. Masterplan

V.

Side Products

VI. Reflection Essay

VII. Presentation Slides

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SITE RESEARCH

0

100

200

300

400

500

Building Functions

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Residential Slum clusters Medical facilities Educational facilities Industry Commerce Social amenities Under constAruction Governmental institutions Transport Law and order Urban Village Mixed Use : Residential + Commercial Vacant

0

100

200

300

Building Functions

400

500

LEGEND Residential Slum clusters Medical facilities Educational facilities Industry Commerce Social amenities Under constAruction Governmental institutions Transport Law and order Urban Village Mixed Use : Residential + Commercial Vacant


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APARTMENT MATRIX 1:500

3.0 MARKET HOUSING FROM THE MERCANTILE ECONOMY

4.0 CHAWLS

13 M2

15 M2

9.0 INFRASTRUCTURE RELOCATION HOUSING

7.0 SLUMS

18 M2

2.0 WADI FROM THE MERCANTILE ECONOMY

20 M2

6.0 HOUSING BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR

2 38 38MM2

23 M2

10.0 PRIVATE HOUSING AFTER 2000

5.0 MASS HOUSING BY THE STATE

43 M2 70 M2

8.0 REDEVELOPMENT OF DILAPIDATED AREAS

1.0 FISHERMEN COLONY HOUSING

90 M2

104 M2 11.0 PRIVATE HOUSING BEFORE 2000

118 M2

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3.0 MARKET HOUSING FROM THE MERCANTILE ECONOMY

4.0 CHAWLS

2,2 M2

9.0 INFRASTRUCTURE RELOCATION HOUSING

3 M2

7.0 SLUMS

4 M2

2.0 WADI FROM THE MERCANTILE ECONOMY

4 M2

6.0 HOUSING BY THE PUBLIC SECTOR

4,6 M2

7,6 M2

1.0 FISHERMEN COLONY HOUSING

5.0 MASS HOUSING BY THE STATE

8,6 M2 10,4 M2 8.0 REDEVELOPMENT OF DILAPIDATED AREAS 10.0 PRIVATE HOUSING AFTER 2000

18 M2

11.0 PRIVATE HOUSING BEFORE 2000

23 M2

TENANTS

M² PER TENANT XX M2

34 M2

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CORE MATRIX 1:2000

Core matrix 1:2000

Trived Apartments

Oberoi Splendor

Aquaria Grande Tower A

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Kanchanjunga Apartments

Planet Godrej

Evershine Cosmic

Vasant Grandeur

Evershine Crown

Ashok Towers D

Kohinoor Square Tpwer A

New Cuffe Parade


200m 150m 100m

400m

50m Vasant Polaris

Oberoi Sky Height

0m

50m

100m

150m

200m

250m

Belvedere Court

300m

350m

0m Kalpataru Tower

900 North MIchigan (Chicago)

Imperial Tower I

The River (Bangkok)

23 Marina (Dubai)

World one

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RANDSTAD COMPARISON

Randstad

Randstad

Mumbai

Mumbai

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Randstad

Mumbai Metropolitan Area has an area comparable to the Dutch Randstad region - 4355 sq km compared to 4300 sq km. Having noticed that allowed us to relate to the scale of intervention and urban intensity of Mumbai. Whereas Randstand was developed according to strict rules as a system of cities well-connected with public transport - connected vessels, Mumbai exhibits a more compact model of urbanity, with development along the main transportation arteries. Although there is a limitation on the number of inhabitants for each city (none can exceed one million) in the Randstad, the density regulations are not as rigid as the ones of Mumbai. We see that as a great advantage to urban development, which allows a dense, compact urban tissue rather than a loose, overcrowded one.

Mumbai

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CITY TISSUE COMPARISON Mumbai: study of urban footprint and morphology

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Amsterdam: study of urban footprint and morphology

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MUMBAI BRIDGE STUDIES

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Bosporus Bridge, Istanbul, 1,5 km

Champlain Bridge, Montreal, 7,4 km

Oakland Bay Bridge, San Francisco, 8km

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MORPHOLOGY SAMPLES

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ENVIRONMENT AND WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT

Flush flood risk zone and direction of gravitational water flow

Alleviation of the original site drainage routes

Creation of functional water channels

Linking the restored environmental system with the existing mangroves

Green belt along the lowest part of the site where critical infrastructures are located - it acts as water retention and prevents soil erosion. Also, it creates a decent urban space, aiding the city’s heat.

Green structures on the site connect to the forest belt, creating a sustainable system of connected vessels, enlivening the site and Mumbai’s Eastern Waterfront. Bay water circulates in the created archipelago aided by a system of sluices and natural, as well as man-made barriers.

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Metropolitan strategy - embracing and protecting the green coasts of the Thane Bay. The competition site, once an industry-dominated zone extends the green mangrove system which aids natural drainage of the city, acts as its lungs and diminishes urban heat. Current metropolitan infrastructure plans need to take this strategy as a prerequisite, otherwise the city cannot develop sustainably - possibly not at all - in the future.

An impression of mediated urban waterfront development

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INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT Existing modes of transport on the island - dominant North-South direction

The harbour link enters the island as a tunnel, to preserve the waterfront and Sewree neighbourhood from infrastructural overload.

Traffic from the harbour link is distributed across the island through several major arteries running through the site.

Sewree Station, featuring an extended train node for the existing North-South system, metro runninng to Navi Mumbai, as well as rapid bus connnections and public functions, is an important transit node and a destination for public life.

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Section station looking towards the North

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HOUSING STRATEGIES easy upgrading possibility

community building defines center

Preshant (45) just invested to renovate his house

Network of open space is predefined public water and sanitation units

Add new block structure

keep symbols for historical identity

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convert old mill buildings for public use


allow to adapt, change, evolve to create a naturally grown fabric

Block structure with inner courtyard

redesign existing typologies add communal space and floorplan flexibility transform inner courtyard to public space

keep identity of the individual appartments

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FAR

Current situation FAR, ranging from 0.6 till 6.1

New situation FAR, ranging from 1.5 till 10

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DISTRIBUTION OF DENSITY

DISTRIBUTION OF PROGRAM

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SIDE PRODUCTS

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issues: Natural waterflow blocked by build environment (floods) limited access to clean water Potentials: quantity of water through monsoon season natural river network

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REFLECTION ESSAY PREFACE The swarm of motors intertwining with ever-present traditional music tunes melts into one with the staccato of honks and shouts of street vendors and children. Headed in diverse directions, people’s stories cross, combine, repeal, speed up or slow each other down. The Indian public sphere as we learnt it in Mumbai. Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate. C G Jung What Mumbai taught us is that things may not essentially be what they appear and one needs to understand the essence behind them, the story ruled by a specific Indian logic. What we see is a metaphor for a deeper sense, a journey into the complexities of the unknown. The very word metaphor in Greek means journey and there is no better context than India to understand its notion. Stories, parables happen on the road, in the journey, in the in-between. It is the journey and the metaphor which render the beauty of a story. The metaphor connects what seems disconnected, gives hints, develops dynamically and dramatically, adds hues of colour and speaks to the unconscious. It addresses the core faculty of any human being - imagination, notwithstanding one’s social background. Yet, when one looks at the reality of Mumbai, it is not as holistic as the unwritten logics behind. The clash between different social strata is as vivid as the one of a colourful Indian patchwork and permeates all areas of life. Living conditions, mobility, service accessibility, social presence and respect, political expression of self or community, to name the substantial ones. Connectivity on all scales has always been a nexus of development for Mumbai. As Charles Correa put it, “Mumbai was shaped first as a colonial trading harbour, and second by its railways, junction between the strategic movement of military power, and the commercial demands of business” (Correa in Living in the Endless City, 2012). Millions of people commute daily to main economic clusters - the Island City, Bandra Kurla and the developing Panvel and Nashik. Millions pass by the same spots, millions walk or use train, millions get stuck in congestion on a car or rickshaw along the North-South infrastructural spine of the city. Most of Mumbai’s population dwells in substandard conditions. Affordable housing, one of the unresolved issues, is pushed into the shadow of gated residential high-rises. The problem is rooted deeply in “the pursuit of policies for city planning, land use and ownership and public housing apparently in isolation of each other” (Ramakrishna Nallathiga, 2011). Next to people, industries also dwell in the city, on the one hand providing work for the masses but on the other - contaminating their air, ground and water. Although on the regional scale third sector employment is long outnumbered by services and IT, Mumbai’s industries play a vital role for the country. Its generates almost half of India’s crude oil export, and its ports handle 30-40% of international passenger and cargo movement.

Epistrophe - the Need to Connect The clash perpetuates down to the smallest scale, to a house. While visiting poorer settlements, in many homes we saw large lcd screens, their colour and shine enlivening humble interiors and equally humble life styles. Indians love stories, love drama as a metaphor for their own dreams which makes the reality more acceptable. In Patrick Harpur’s words, it is intrinsically healing and liberating for the soul to be told the stories, the myths of its tribe (Harpur, 2002). Maybe it is this very affection which stops them from fighting for access to clean water or sewage at home. Yet, these do not offer good stories, they do not make them feel socially better, more heard, more colourful. Because nobody sees what is behind the scenes, what happens when the lights go off and heroes disappear. The Human Condition Having considered all these big concepts, there is another, salient notion to address in the project, namely dignity. Dignity as a value of every human being, notwithstanding their social standing. Yet, people do not solely eat and defecate. They work, socialise, commute, relax, cleanse, they have dreams and aspirations. We feel our role in this project is to understand that our aspiration should be to facilitate theirs happening. It should encompass an environment in which people can follow their dreams, or at least be exposed to a diversity of things other than poverty or wealth of their enclosed community. The sphere and services offered by the public to the individual need to be considered in terms of their capability of rendering stories true. Of being more attractive than a Bollywood film in order to motivate to develop and connect to society. Architecture cannot and should not aim to change the latter, but can be its tool, its connecting vessel. PROBLEM STATEMENT Place is a process. We need to understand that we are dealing with a dynamic system and whatever change we introduce will affect the existing and future reality in manifold ways and interact with other processes and stories within. Referring to the competition site, we see the first stepping stone to such an evolutionary process in the environmental pollution question. The latter, resulting from both industrial and domestic sources, is particularly severe given the site is located in between a ship breaking yard to the South - Mazagaon, oil and petroleum refinery zone to the North, power plant and heavy industry zone to the North East, the Mumbai Port on the coast, as well as unresolved waste disposal, use of traditional fuels and waste on the domestic scale. This issue is directly linked to poor accessibility to energy, potable water, and sewage networks. Looking at the projected population growth, these will become more acute if no integrated approach is taken. On the larger scale, a clear trend can be observed as far as mobility infrastructures are concerned. Mumbai has historically developed along transport arteries, generating highest densities in closest proximity to the North-South-running railway lines. Many proposals for future development suggest this structure should evolve into a ring city model and encompass cross-bay links, i.e. bridges. One such bridge will connect the competition site to Navi Mumbai. It poses both a threat and an immense opportunity; if constructed at the present state of things, it will not only destroy the existing community settlement but also hinder any non-commerce-driven development. Yet, once the Port Authority releases its land for the bridge and adjacent projects, the soaring land prices will only allow another wall of gated high-rise residential and office towers, locking the waterfront off for the public. On the other hand, if designed with respect to other processes going on on the site, it could transform the site into a well-connected, regionally central link on the West-East axis. The connectivity and mobility in this direction definitely needs implementation, in order to become more attractive both transport- and programme-wise. The aforementioned aspects do not render the site as a resiliently liveable, accommodating environment for human habitation with a perspective for dynamic development. Like a gridlock or connected vessels, they influence one another as well as block positive processes happening on the site. One could say, cultural infrastructures are tamed by their physical counterparts, an ever-present drama of the disorder of orders. AIM Every journey has a telos, an aim. The main aim of our intervention on the Worli – Sewri axis is to make sure that the existing network can absorb the wave of a rapidly growing population by bringing balance to programme, infrastructure and environment. Given the projected densification, the area has to evolve into a micropolis, a smaller part of the larger metropolis with all of its features and flavours, but at the same time needs to retain its vibrancy, entrepreneurial spirit, as well as the social and programmatic mix. To do justice to the spirit of the place and its local identity, our aim is to preserve and boost the spontaneity, micro-connectivity, sense of community and walkability that define the area. To organise these on a site with a density of a predicted 100.000 Mumbaikars per square kilometre, collective use of the open space will play an important role. Inaccessible area needs to be diminished as much as possible and the connection between the Mumbai streets and built environment has to be even stronger than it is now. Parallel to the development of the larger network, on a smaller scale a higher level of liveability has to be achieved by providing for the needs of Mumbaikars who live in substandard conditions. Quality affordable housing located in safe, well-connected areas, as well as a sensible spread of amenities throughout the site is needed. When it comes to bringing balance in the site’s programme, the aim is to let the industries that are stalling the evolution of the area make space for more site-specific, city-friendly industry. It is essential to create a productive living community - to provide employment opportunities in the area itself for every social group. On the level of infrastructure, balance has to be restored in the heavily congested road- and public transport network. The site will play a crucial role in the discharge of both systems on a metropolitan scale. Next to that we aim to update the antiquated sewage system and electricity grid. To complete the balance on an environmental level, sewage treatment plant and waste disposal have to be implemented to decrease air-, water- and soil pollution. The vacated industrial plots should be decontaminated and the Thane Creek needs to be protected as a natural and wildlife reserve.

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RESEARCH QUESTIONS The main research questions we identified are: How to balance the impact of high-speed economic development and how to improve the liveability of the competition region without damaging the essence and story of the place and its potential for self-organised urbanisation. In order to find answers to these, all aspects of the site should be researched separately. The following sub-questions, therefore, represent the in-between steps that will be taken: What kind of opportunities and challenges will the site face in a regional development scenario? - What information can be extracted from the vision plans for Mumbai Metropolitan Region proposed by the government? (Political and economic background study) What factors are crucial to improve liveability in the Indian context? - How to build an efficient & low-impact connection between Mumbai and emerging Navi Mumbai? - How to achieve that with infrastructural connectivity, programme and balanced environment? -What is the possible way to create more effective open space in a living community? How do the local identities reflect in spatial characteristics? How to phase urbanisation in a low-impact way geared to the Indian context? METHODOLOGY/DESIGN Methodology: 1. Evaluate/ define 2. Set our targets 3. How do we achieve it? 1. Evaluate/ define The definition of the problem stems from the lack of balance between the site and its larger context. At a regional level, pressure and uni-directional transport lines in combination with the growing prices of land results in informal settlement branching from the transport arteries. The site being in the midst of the former Southern island has a unique programme and yet reflects the typical problems of the region. With a still active harbour and insertion of aspirational quotient of world city, the site and its context looks like an amalgamate of many cities, in its own worth, a city in the region of Mumbai. There is a powerful change planned in the form of a bridge connection from a growing centrality and planned airport in Navi Mumbai to the centre of our site - the harbour edge. It interjects on the one side deserted bulk storage-based harbour, followed by a ship-breaking yard which is an informally run industry and continues into lightweight industries. On the other side, the harbour is run by refineries and energy plant that supplies to the energy grid for South Mumbai. When the bridge enters inland, it transform into a secondary network and connects the East and the West rail line with vital programmes of the site intersecting it along that run. The programmes that we consider vital for the site and which makes this interconnecting spine are medical, institutional, commercial, residential (both formal and informal) and industrial. The spine makes a combination in a way that it looks like a checkered board of programmes with a hub for medical facilities. The programme and environment on site is compromised in a way that the inland follows the same format of the Mumbai city with multi-hued land use and the harbour is a cut out version of industrial waste land and informal ingenious work power. on the Navi Mumbai side, the connection of the bridge is made to the highway that strengthens the industrial corridors running along to Pune, Nasik and JNPT port. Also, at the same location a new airport is planned that will service the Mumbai Metropolitan Region and the corridors. Many centralities are envisioned in the Navi Mumbai area, which radially grow outwards considering the South Mumbai island as centre. 2. Set our targets & 3. How do we achieve it? We have targeted our aims in a way that balances this disproportionate distribution of networks, quality of living and environment in the Mumbai Metropolitan Area. We aim to start with redefining the connection between Navi Mumbai and South Mumbai, treating the given site as a link/node in the larger network. Further, the harbour needs to be dismantled into workable and non-workable functions to the city in terms of environment and safety, but at the same time promoting and adding functions that encourage labour employment and bring variance in the Eastern side. The inland is treated in a way that strengthens the connection and crosses the formidable differences of East and West coast. This spine will benefit the site by appropriating the betterment that the site requires in terms of deficient functions in proportion to housing, quality of housing and urban spaces. These changes have to be supported by energy & waste management that is deficient in the city. Along these lines we aim to resolve the flooding by appropriate drainage measures and antiquated services that destroy the site’s liveability factors. On the whole, the liveability factors combined with connectivity is the focus, the telos, that the site has to move towards.

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PRESENTATION SLIDES Every year a one square kilo-

metre territory will be the subject of the competition. This area, to house 100,000 people living and working, sets the stage for tremendous research and investigation into urban density, verticality, domesticity, work, food, infrastructure, nature, ecology, structure, and program - their holistic integration and the quest for visionary paradigm will be the challenges of this urban and architectural invention. This new environment will have a full slate of live-work-play provisions, with the residential component making up to 50% of the total floor space. In the fourth of this series of competitions, the competition site will be located in Mumbai, India with the theme

EVERYONE CONNECTS MUMBAI_INDIA

Vertical Cities Asia 2014 Team B // Delft University of Technology

Calcen Chan Sebastiaan Buitenhuis Federico Gobbato Wouter Langeveld Vicky Metzen Piet de Reuver Kasia Uchman

“Everyone Breathes Fresh Air”.

“Everyone connects” is a wide and provocative challenge. It demands a holistic and integrated approach. “Connect” is interpreted extensively to mean the following: Connect to clean energy, connect to clean water, connect to fresh air, connect to transport efficiency, connect to work, learn, live and play opportunities, connect to communities In other words, “Con-

Every year a one square kilo-

metre territory will be the subject of the competition. This area, to house 100,000 people living and working, sets the stage for tremendous research and investigation into urban density, verticality, domesticity, work, food, infrastructure, nature, ecology, structure, and program - their holistic integration and the quest for visionary paradigm will be the challenges of this urban and architectural invention. This new environment will have a full slate of live-work-play provisions, with the residential component making up to 50% of the total floor space. In the fourth of this series of competitions, the competition site will be located in Mumbai, India with the theme . “Everyone connects” is a wide and provocative challenge. It demands a holistic and integrated approach. “Connect” is interpreted extensively to mean the following: Connect to clean energy, connect to clean water, connect to fresh air, connect to transport efficiency, connect to work, learn, live and play opportunities, connect to communities In other words, “Connect” to liveability.

“Everyone Ages”

Every year a one square kilo-

metre territory will be the subject of the competition. This area, to house 100,000 people living and working, sets the stage for tremendous research and investigation into urban density, verticality, domesticity, work, food, infrastructure, nature, ecology, structure, and program - their holistic integration and the quest for visionary paradigm will be the challenges of this urban and architectural invention. This new environment will have a full slate of live-work-play provisions, with the residential component making up to 50% of the total floor space. In the fourth of this series of competitions, the competition site will be located in Mumbai, India with the theme . “Everyone connects” is a wide and provocative challenge. It demands a holistic and integrated approach. “Connect” is interpreted extensively to mean the following: Connect to clean energy, connect to clean water, connect to fresh air, connect to transport efficiency, connect to work, learn, live and play opportunities, connect to communities In other words, “Connect” to liveability.

“Everyone Harvests”

Every year a one square kilo-

metre territory will be the subject of the competition. This area, to house 100,000 people living and working, sets the stage for tremendous research and investigation into urban density, verticality, domesticity, work, food, infrastructure, nature, ecology, structure, and program - their holistic integration and the quest for visionary paradigm will be the challenges of this urban and architectural invention. This new environment will have a full slate of live-work-play provisions, with the residential component making up to 50% of the total floor space. In the fourth of this series of competitions, the competition site will be located in Mumbai, India with the theme . “Everyone connects” is a wide and provocative challenge. It demands a holistic and integrated approach. “Connect” is interpreted extensively to mean the following: Connect to clean energy, connect to clean water, connect to fresh air, connect to transport efficiency, connect to work, learn, live and play opportunities, connect to communities In other words, “Connect” to liveability.

AMSTERDAM

TOKYO

BEIJING LOS ANGELES

CONTRADICTION

“Everyone Connects”

DUBAI BANGKOK

SINGAPORE

JOHANNESBURG

7 2

MOSCOW

CAIRO

27

26

25

3

NALA SOPARA

DELHI

AMRAVATI

ACADEMICS

PROFESSIONALS

NAGPUR

KALYAN

NASHIK

KOLKATA

NAVI MUMBAI

AURANGABAD

PUNE

KARJAT

SOLAPUR

CHENNAI

PEN ALIBAG

9

29

28

11

10

30

12

15

13

14

31

32

16

17

34

35

37

38

33

36

VISIT

18

19

20

39

POPULATION MILLIONS 16

Difference between design and planning

14

“...planning is problem solving, while design is problem setting. Where planning focuses on generating a plan – a series of executable actions – design focuses on learning about the nature of an unfamiliar problem.”

12

FRAGMENTATION

10

COMPLEXITY

8

David H. Petraeus, Counterinsurgency Field Manual, 2006

6

2010

2000

1990

1980

1970

1960

1950

4

Reclaiming the Urbanism of Mumbai Kelly Shannon 2008

22

23

CONGESTION

INFORMAL DWELLERS

42

41

40

24

EXISTING CLOGGED NULLAHS

UNCLOGGED NULLAHS

MILLIONS 16

SLUM:

14

“Residential area where dwellings are unfit for human habitation by reasons of dilapidation, overcrowding, faulty arrangements and design of such buildings, narrowness of faulty arrangements of streets, lack of ventilation, light, or sanitation facilities or any combination of these factors which are detrimental to the safety and health.”

12

7.2 MILLION COMMUTERS/DAY

62 %

10 8 6

2010

2000

1990

1980

1970

1960

1950

4

Firstpost.com All you need to know about Mumbai’s newly launched metro Ivor Soans 2014

Reclaiming the Urbanism of Mumbai Kelly Shannon 2008

Census of India 2011 43

45

44

PLACEHOLDER

SEASONAL FLOODS

62

61

WOODLAND AS RETENTION AND BARRIER

ECOLOGICAL BUFFER

63

SUPPORTIVE GREEN STRUCTURE

mm 700 600 500 400 300 200

November

December

July

October

September

May

August

April

June

March

January

February

100

Indian Metereological department 2012

48

47

46

64

65

66

67

68

70

72

73

74

78

79

SUPPORTIVE GREEN STRUCTURE

51

50

49

THE GOAL OF OUR STRATEGY IS TO IMPROVE THE LIVEABILITY AND INFRASTRUCTURES OF THE SITE WHILE RESPECTING THE IDENTITY AND THE AUTONOMY OF THE COMMUNITIES

BY MAINTAINING THESE BUILDINGS AND ACCEPTING THE ONGOING DEVELOPMENTS WE SAVE 2.4 MILLION m²

52

54

53

PLACEHOLDER

HOUSING

GREEN AND BLUE

INFRASTRUCTURE

INFRASTRUCTURE

LIVEABILITY

ENVIRONMENT

ENVIRONMENT

58

56

55

77

PLACEHOLDER

62 | TU Delft Team B - VCA 2014 |

8%

2%

LOW INCOME

MIDDLE INCOME

HIGH INCOME

STRATEGY

STRATEGY

59

90%

60

60

80

Report of the technical group on urban housing shortage 2012 - 2017 Government of India 81

82


PROGRAM BAR 270.000 People Site 6 Km2 GFA: 5.850.000 m2 FAR: 1

11 m2 pp

120.000 m2

1.620.000 m2

60.000 m2 360.000 m2 120.000 m2 180.000 m2 420.000 m2

600.000 People Site 6 Km2 GFA: 30.000.000 m2 FAR: 5

25 m2 pp

2.880.000 m2

102

104

105

103

SEWREE NAKA MARKET

MEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE

PRODUCTION VILLAGE

CIVIC CENTRE

600.000 m2 1.500.000 m2 600.000 m2 900.000 m2 900.000 m2 1.200.000 m2

4.500.000 m2

CIVIC CENTRE

4.800.000 m2

240.000 m2

Infrastructure Logistics Hotel Healthcare Culture Education Retail Office Housing

101

85

84

83

15.000.000 m2

86

87

88

106

89

90

91

107

108

109

92

93

94

110

111

112

95

96

97

113

114

115

98

99

100

116

117

118

119

120

121

122

126

127

128

129

130

131

| TU Delft Team B - VCA 2014 | 63

Profile for Wouter Langeveld

Designbook Mumbai TU Delft Team B  

Designbook Mumbai TU Delft Team B  

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