Page 1

Annual Report FY15-16


About Us The Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre (WMI CRC) has been a catalyst for change in the wound industry since its inception in 2010. The WMI CRC is an industry led, cooperative organisation whose activities are transforming wound outcomes by addressing the key issues affecting wound healing and prevention. The WMI CRC brings together the best of industry, academia and end user organisations

Our Vision Transforming Wound Outcomes

Our Mission We will improve wound healing and quality of life for people with wounds and implement cost effective wound care that lessens the burden on the Australian Health System

Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre Head Office: Oxley House Level 2, 25 Donkin St West End QLD 4101 PO BOX 2375 Toowong DC QLD 4066 www.woundcrc.com + 61 07 3088 6666 enquiries@woundcrc.com

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

Š Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre, 2016


Contents 01 02 03 04 05

Achievements

Highlights 4-10 Risks and impediments 11 End-user environment 12 Impacts 13

Research Performance against activities Education and training SME engagement

14-18 19 21

Results Utilisation and commercialisation Intellectual property management Communications

22-24 25 26-29

Resources Governance Participants Collaboration Financial management

30-38 39 40 41

Other Activities Industry Growth Centres

42


Achievements The Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre (“WMI CRC or Wound CRC”) is an industry-led, cooperative organisation that has become a recognised global leader in chronic wound management. Through effective and strategic deployment of funding, and the skills and reach of our participants, we have built the foundations for the formation of a new industry sector and a novel model for wound and related chronic disease healthcare.

In FY 15-16, the WMI CRC has continued to progress operations on multiple fronts leading towards the formation of The Australian Wound Innovation Centre (“AWIC”). AWIC will be the legacy vehicle that will house a number of activities of the Centre. AWIC will continue the CRC’s research, product development, education, clinical

WOUND CRC Annual Report FY1516

treatment and training. The combination of these elements will create a world first and unique perspective of the management of chronic wounds. This is not only valuable for Australia but can be built upon further to lead a global effort. The value creation in the AWIC has already been validated through the interest expressed by industry through

our engagement program. We now have the top 5 wound management product companies in the world as participants. The investment undertaken by the Wound CRC between 2010 and 2015 has now been reorganised into four operational areas, and has been in the reporting period, and will be managed as follows:


Clinical Translation – We have identified, initiated and are actively managing activities of the Centre that will form the operational basis of AWIC and a National Peak Body. Each of these activities have the following common aspects: • •

• • •

• •

They are currently missing from the Australian and global wound landscape. When formed they will allow a focused organisation for the translation of existing CRC research and new research opportunities. Ultimately they can be managed to form financially viable business units. They will create enhanced workforce capacity and new jobs. They are complimentary and build upon the unique insights and knowledge created by the other projects and activities of the Centre. Efficiencies will be introduced and new supply chains built and deployed into currently fragmented and confused markets. Regulatory burden will be reduced through providing evidence to drive healthcare reform. They are underpinned by solid healthcare economics to influence reimbursement of cost effective products.

When formed they will create profound value for Industry, healthcare systems and ultimately patients.

However, the true value is in their combination to form a system of chronic wound management. The transition of some of the assets has already started to happen and the organisation is beginning to form a national footprint with nodes in Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne and Brisbane. Industry Focused Research – Industry led projects including projects that build further value for AWIC represent almost 60% of new projects. In the reporting period, these include 5 randomised clinical trials which we hope will lead to new best practice in a range of wound management scenarios.

in an existing project with commercial potential. Education and Skills – We have generated a multi-disciplinary cohort of professionals connected through their passion for wounds management. This will create a new work force, some of which will hold key positions in the AWIC and more broadly AWIC will be a National training centre for clinical skills. In the reporting period, the Governing Board of the Wound CRC was refreshed and enhanced. The new Board have skills, experiences and networks that will drive the legacy activities of Wound CRC. Through the vision and financial contributions of the Commonwealth and Participants, Australia can take a dominant global position in Wounds Management.

Development – We have licensed 5 development technologies that are being groomed by Industry leaders to form next-generation, high-value products. It is anticipated that at least two of the technologies will result in new start-up companies and licensing opportunities based on protectable IP. We have further built our development pipeline with two new promising development projects and continued a second round of investment

5


Highlights Research

60% Of new projets indsutry-led

The WMI CRC research portfolio was historically divided into three multidisciplinary research programs that are focused on understanding wound biology, the development of new wound products and diagnostics and the identification and delivery of best practice wound care, translating evidence-based care into practice. Although we continue to invest in research in each of these areas there is a natural shift, given the maturity of the organisation, to translation and impact. This has meant a reduced investment in topics that are more basic research

and discovery, and a stronger focus on clinical and industry led research. The research selection process has been augmented through the independence of the Research Advisory Committee and the internal Wound CRC systems. The quality of the research brought to this Committee has been vastly improved through the refinement of the Wound CRC Research Priority Document and the annual Wound CRC Research Roadshow. This year at each state event we brought a number of our Industry participants. They presented their organisations

and their research interests. This led a number of proposals and further engagement of these product companies into the Wound CRC network. All of these multi-national organisations are controlled from head offices in the US or Europe. The strategic value of this research is to establish Australia, and the Wound CRC, as a place where high-quality industry-focused research can be undertaken. Thus stimulating a broader engagement between industry and academia after the current CRC funding cycle.

Development The development portfolio of the WMI CRC consists of fi�e technologies, 4 of which have been licensed from the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University (RMIT) and further developed by the WMI CRC.

5 Technologies in development

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

There is a well-defined path to market for each of these technologies, which have the capacity to transform the lives of patients living with diabetic foot ulcers, venous leg ulcers and abdominal wounds and to deliver significant commercial return to the Australian community.

The prospect of delivering these commercial products has also been increased by more active engagement with Industry.In the reporting period, we continued to support these initiatives with experienced medical product development engineers. This has focused and accelerated the activities in these projects considerably. One of these projects is now entering early stage licensing discussions. We have further enhanced the pipeline of our product development portfolio with two new projects. The first of which is a novel system to topically deliver oxygen to wounds. The

second of which is a technology that can be used to assess the quality of the skin and likelihood of skin breakdown in critical areas. We have also continued co-investment with Abregen (SME based in Adelaide) on the antibody flightless. We believe this could have profound effects on chronic wounds generally but more specifically Epidermolysis Bullosa.


Education

65

The WMI CRC is on track to educate over 50 higher degree students, each of whom will be trained in a culture of collaboration and who will have forged strong connections with their peers in diverse disciplines, all of which are integral to wound management.

the next generation of wound care researchers with two PhDs obtaining lectureships in woundrelated fields, 3 obtaining Australian research positions, 5 obtaining international research positions, 1 working for the CRC head office and 1 working as a consultant.

The CRC has fulfilled its PhD recruitment milestones with the last Honours students’ positions available in early 2017. 15 WMI CRC students have obtained their PhDs, and have demonstrated a strong commitment to being part of

The Student and Alumni cohort remain engaged and the CRC endeavors to produce employment opportunities through its clinical translation activities, with 3 ex-PhD students now in CRC funded positions.

The CRC has run online IP training sessions for new students and building on the successful student conference in FY15, the CRC continues to provide individual advice on publication and presentation skills to students.

Next generation wound researchers

Translation The Wound CRC’s translation activities are centred on sustainable models of wound clinical service, the provision of clinical education activities and mechanisms for increasing the uptake of evidencebased practice.

5 Translation legacy vehciles

Also, the quantification of the Australian wounds problem supported by a significant body of work in health economics to raise awareness and start to improve the re-imbursement for cost effective treatments. See highlights on each unit on the next page.

DFA

WHIA

AACWS

AWIC

AWR

7


Highlights

Wound Healing Institute Australia (WHIA) In December 2015 the Wound CRC announced that it had completed the Licensing transaction that transferred the Intellectual Property that was formerly “WoundsWest” into a Wound CRC subsidiary company, called Wound Healing Institute of Australia (WHIA). This Agreement also triggered the start of commercial operations of WHIA. WHIA’s services are offered nationally with a focus on education, practice and research reflected in the following key service delivery areas: • • •

Online and clinical wound education service; A telehealth wound advisory and clinical patient care service for patients with wounds; Research and clinical audit services in wound management

Diabetic Foot Australia (DFA) Globally diabetes-related amputations occur every 20 seconds. Australia has an increasing diabetesrelated amputation rate making it the second highest in the developed world. Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are the leading cause of amputation and diabetes-related hospitalisations, costing the Australia’s health system an estimated $1billion per year. In early 2015, the WMI CRC Board approved funding to help establish Diabetic Foot Australia (DFA) as a National body seeking to use Australia’s expertise in diabetic foot ulcer research and management to address the growing issue of DFUs in Australia. The key goals of DFA will be to: • • •

Facilitate national diabetes foot ulcer (DFU) evidence-based practice and research; Reduce national diabetes-related amputations by 20% within 5 years; End avoidable amputations in Australia within a generation.

Brands launched in FY 15-16 Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516


Australian Wound Innovation Centre (AWIC) - Clinical Services AWIC - Clinical Services will be the cornerstone of the Wound CRC clinical translation activity and will be the nation’s central facility dedicated to the provision of expert wound care. In the reporting period, significant planning and modelling activity has been undertaken such that AWIC will commence operations in the first quarter of 2017. The Clinical Services complement other key translation initiatives of the WMI CRC, including the Wound Healing Institute Australia, the Australian Aged Care Wound Services and the Australian Wound Repository, the health economics and credentialing work.

Healthy Ageing Node In the reporting period, projects with organisations in the sector have revealed that there is limited awareness of wounds, and how to treat them amongst residential aged care staff. In addition to the desire to improve outcomes for residents, there is a growing regulatory obligation to provide auditable wound information to meet aged care accreditation requirements. The Healthy Ageing Node provides customised delivery of WHIA’s activities for the aged care sector.

The Australian Wound Repository (AWR) The introduction of clinical registries to monitor health care performance and track clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of treatments in real-world clinical practice, is a proven strategy for improving service delivery. Clinical repositories improve outcomes by engaging clinicians using credible data and fostering competition and they also help to encourage engagement among patients, families and/ or caregivers and the community. There have been legislative and operational difficulties in deployment of AWR that have called for a strategic review and recalibration of certain aspects of the project specifically around changes to Australian privacy law and data control. The Wound CRC has conducted independent reviews and sought recast expressions of interest from parties with a track record in clinical registry formation and management. We will continue to invest in this project as the Board believes that it is of significant strategic importance.

Brands to be launched FY 16-17 9


Highlights Other Highlights:

The WMI CRC’s revised strategy of improving research commercialisation, establishing industry-led research and improving the productivity of the wound industry aligns closely with the Commonwealth Government’s new vision of the CRC Programme.

Building on this, we are engaging with MTP Connect, the Industry Growth Centre, with the aim of partnering closely to deliver outcomes and generate additional opportunities for industry focused research. The WMI CRC provides a unique pathway between researchers, institutes and the wound industry. Our research is structured into priority areas that lead to national legacies, new technologies and an empowered workforce. The WMI CRC has a unique mixture of Industry Participants, both product based companies and service providers. Hence, the WMI CRC is uniquely positioned to create better supply chains, enhanced models of care and systems that can reduce the regulatory burden of clinical trials to release clinical development of the next generation of innovative wound products. National and International Collaborations The WMI CRC has over 20 international expert collaborators spanning 8 countries. In the reporting period the CRC continued to collaborate closely with Prof. Keith Harding from the Welsh Wound Innovation Centre, ensuring that CRC translational and development are internationally relevant. Wound CRC has engaged international expert Dr Jaap van Netten for a 12-month period to consult in many areas of the CRC’s operations including: Diabetic Foot Australia; Hyperspectral imaging (development); Pressure sensing insoles (development) and General liaison with research Participants.

Communications The CRC’s research, development and clinical translation activities are underpinned by a unified and comprehensive communications strategy, integrating newsletters, publications, webinars, social media, email marketing and online communities as well as managing live events. Highlights of the year include:

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

• • •

• •

• •

Launching of an integrated social media and website platform for DFA Launch of an e-commerce platform and website for WHIA Launch of a new CRC website in August 2015, optimised for mobile devices 11 media releases (see page 26) 20x email campaigns promoting CRC and DFA organised events, funding opportunities, and seminar series (see page 26-29) 3x WMI CRC Newsletters, and 8x DFA Newsletters Initiated “What’s New in DFU” networking and educational series, bringing together international experts, industry leaders, and clinicians and convened 2 steering committee meetings for Diabetic Foot Australia Organised an expert Masterclass with Prof. Keith Harding focusing on “is TIME still relevant” and hosted an event bringing together the CRC’s industry, clinical and research partners with Prof. Harding Coordinated a national “Wound CRC Research meets Industry” Roadshow across 4 states Engaged Industry Participants in a Development Advisory Committee Industry Showcase

Commonwealth Milestones and Impact Tool The Impact Tool was revised in June 2015, reflecting the strategies that have been under implementation in FY16, hence the Impact Tool has not required revision in FY16. The overall predicted benefit: cost ratio remains 2.70 and the June 2015 revision of the Impact Tool predicts total expected benefits of $298,531,343 and total expected costs of $110,715,111. In April 2016, minor changes to Commonwealth Milestones were submitted and approved by the Commonwealth to better align milestones with the current development activities. These revisions are not anticipated to affect the Impact Tool. The WMI CRC has a strong focus on the utilisation and commercialisation of research outcomes and is on target to achieve and exceed expectations relating to the original utilisation milestones and has also delivered on additional utilization milestones that were agreed in a variation submitted in May

2016. 12 of 13 output milestones have been achieved, 9 of 10 utilisation milestones due in FY16 have been achieved. The remaining two utilization and output milestones are in progress, pending finalization of theses.

Industry Engagement Since the inception of its revised strategy in 2014, the WMI CRC has grown a reputation in the wound industry which is now being reflected in the dramatic increase in the number of corporate partners interested in joining or collaborating with the CRC. The WMI CRC has welcomed New Industry Participants Molnlycke, Hartmanns, Acelity and 3M. Including Founding Industry Participant Smith & Nephew, the CRC now has 5 of the leading wound care product companies as Participants, clear validation of the role that the CRC is playing in transforming wound care outcomes in Australia. A number of Australian SMEs are engaged with specific CRC Project teams including Southern Cross Care utilizing the CRC’s Healthy Aging node, two product development companies Marinova Pty Ltd and Abregen Pty Ltd, and other aged care providers involved in research projects including Hall and Prior, Regis Heath Care and the Bethanie Group. Close collaboration with Wounds Australia (the new name for Australian Wound Management Association, AWMA), whose membership includes a diverse range of wound care service providers and Industry partners, on several key initiatives including work on the credentialing of wound care experts, reimbursement of best practice wound care and a wound awareness campaign continues. The WMI CRC and Wounds Australia have been developing a major public health campaign to be launched as part of Wound Awareness Week in October 2016. With the addition of the Research Advisory Committee (RAC) and Development Advisory Committee (DAC) and ongoing relationships with existing Participants, the CRC is progressing a number of promising technologies, educational initiatives and industry specific research programs.


Risks & Impediments Risks and impediments are evaluated regularly by the Executive and management and a risk register is maintained and reviewed by the Board. The WMI CRC remains conscious of the risk of having insufficient time with Commonwealth funding to complete its translation and utilization activities. As such, it has created a substantial focus on establishing these activities. The CRC Participants have revised Governing Board membership to reflect the skillsets required to provide oversight for achievement of these activities. Additionally, the CRC has bolstered corporate capacity, appointing an experienced Chief Operating Officer and Corporate Services Manager/in house Legal Counsel to drive the transition and ensure financial viability of the CRC legacy activities. The WMI CRC takes financial risks seriously, and has implemented a revised financial management system, appointing SRJ Walker as auditors, UHYN Accountants and RNA Solutions to provide outsourced book keeping services, ensuring financial processing consistency independent of personnel. There is a risk that research providers who are no longer receiving the financial return that they enjoyed earlier in the Wound CRC lifecycle, will reduce their

contributions or withdraw from the CRC. The CRC is proactively communicating with our Participants to manage expectations and additional contributions have been committed both as tied funds to specific projects from current Participants and from new Participants joining the CRC. At a project level, risks are identified prior to project approval and included in the project agreement and risk status and mitigation is monitored via quarterly reports. The CRC has 6 major clinical studies ongoing and as with all clinical studies there is a risk that the studies will take longer than planned due to recruitment. The CRC has set recruitment targets for each project for each quarter and is monitoring recruitment closely and ensuring proactive mitigation plans are initiated when recruitment is behind the target. However, there is a risk that although all studies are scheduled to complete prior to the end of the CRC’s term, recruitment may need to continue into the transition phase to achieve maximum impact from the data.

recalibration and a revised contract with negotiations ongoing. The Wound Healing Institute of Australia was successfully established, and is currently focused on aligning the commercial model with end users. The CRC continues to monitor the risk of emerging competition, particularly for WMI CRC’s development activities. In addition to direct monitoring, the CRC now has access to insights from the 5 leading wound care companies who are now CRC Participants, as well as leveraging the Research and Development Advisory Committees expertise and networks to ensure that the CRC is aware of, and can respond to, the activities of any relevant competitors.

The WMI CRC has faced several impediments in relation to establishing the Australian Wound Innovation Centre, with negotiations on premises significantly prolonged, and after the pilot phase the Australian Wound Repository has required substantial

11


End User Environment Wounds are a silent epidemic in Australia. Conservative estimates suggest that wounds affect over 420,000 Australians and cost the public health system approximately $3 billion per annum, or 2% of the healthcare budget. However, historically wound prevalence data has not been routinely collected, and therefore these numbers are likely to represent a significant underestimate. Wound prevalence is also forecast to rise dramatically over forthcoming years due to increases in predisposing factors associated with wounds such as an aging population, and increased incidence of diabetes, obesity and other co-morbid conditions. The wound management industry consists of a diverse set of participants. Wound care services are provided by a range of public and private participants including general practitioners, hospitals, private practice, residential aged care, community and centre-based nursing, allied health, pharmacy and patient self-care. Wound care products are developed and distributed by a range of companies, ranging from large multinational companies to small to medium-sized enterprises (“SMEs”). Five of the large multinational wound care companies have now joined the WMI CRC as Participants, and the CRC is actively engaging on a project by project basis with a range of other industry participants from large aged care organisations to wound care-focused start-ups. The key issues which face the wounds management industry remain: • There is insufficient evidence around best practice wound care; • There is a shortage of clinically proficient staff who are adopters of evidence-based practice; • There is a lack of data about the dimensions of Australia’s wound problem. It has not been possible to determine how many Australians are affected by wounds, how their wounds are being treated and if those treatments are working; • There is a need for development of new products or processes to assist in treatment of wounds which do not respond adequately to existing treatments; • Wound care is not recognised as a specialty, and so patients are often not

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

• •

connected with appropriate services and do not receive best practice care; Wound care is highly fragmented making supply chains highly inefficient; Health care providers are not properly incentivised to provide optimal care due to inadequacies in reimbursement of practitioner time and product costs.

Such issues cannot be addressed by any one singular focus organisation. By collaborating, and through the assistance of federal government funding and academic partnerships, the WMI CRC has driven, and will continue to drive, improvements in the productivity and sustainability of the wound management industry. The WMI CRC is catalysing efforts to address these as follows: Development and dissemination of evidence based best practice The CRC has funded 6 large RCTs to develop evidence to answer key questions in relation to what is best practice for wound care and prevention. The CRC has also funded production of 22 best practice summaries which have been downloaded over 43,558 times as of April 2016. In Dec 2015 the WMI CRC established WHIA as a national vehicle to disseminate evidence-based best practice clinical resources to health care providers. The WHIA will support health professionals, patients and carers through the provision of education, training, advice, research and health promotion. Health economics research demonstrated that the cost of wounds in aged care settings in Australia was over $18.4 million AUD annually, with many of these wounds potentially preventable. The aged care industry in Australia is currently undergoing major reform, with industry consolidation, and an increased focus in quality of life as life expectancy consistently rises. Given the huge potential for reducing the cost of wounds in this sector, and the unique challenges of the aged care setting in regards to diversity of staff, regulatory environment (including obligations to provide auditable wound information to meet aged care accreditation requirements) and limited awareness of wound prevention and treatment, the CRC is in the process of establishing the Healthy Aging node which will provided tailored dissemination of best practice using WHIAs suite or resources into this sector.

Shortage of clinically proficient staff The CRC’s core business units provide an integrated approach to increasing clinical proficiency, and importantly establishing national recognition schemes for clinicians, organisations and products to provide evidence of proficiency to end users. Through WHIA, DFA and the Healthy Aging node, the CRC provides online and face to face education and training to clinicians. This is currently supplemented by practical training provided by WHIA and the Healthy Aging node, and the AWIC- Clinical Services will provide hands on clinical education activities. The CRC’s credentialing schemes for expert wound clinicians will provide national proficiency recognition, and the Health Skin tick programme will identify organisations particularly in the aged care sector that have met clinical proficiency bench marks. Quantifying Australia’s wound problem Wounds are one of the most frequent health care challenges in Australia, yet there are limited resources available to fully quantify the cost of wounds nationally, and hence drive cost/benefit decision making around new interventions or clinical pathways for treatment and prevention. The CRC has a significant investment in health economics analyses, both embedded in ongoing clinical studies and more broadly developing health economic models for the major wound types. The CRC’s Australian Wound Repository will provide a scalable resource that can be interrogated to support quantification of the wound problem, and the CRC has also funded projects to quantify the current cost of care of wounds in the community. Development of New wound products and processes The CRC has invested in 6 major RCTS to test the efficacy of processes and TGA registered products for wound prevention and treatment, supporting the development of best practice. Additionally, the CRC continues to support development of medical devices to improve wound management and prevention, including new imaging systems for diabetic foot ulcers, pressure sensing insoles to prevent diabetic foot ulcerations,


Impacts The Impact Tool was revised as at the end of June 2015 and has not been revised this year, as the previous revision contemplated the strategies matured during this reporting period. In summary, the overall benefit: cost ratio remains 2.70. The revised Impact Tool predicts total expected benefits of $298,531,343 and total expected costs of $110,715,111.

The Commonwealth agreed to minor changes to language in some WMI CRC utilization milestones, to better reflect the CRC’s revised research and development focus on medical device rather than drug development which were accepted in July 2016. In addition to those activities specifically contemplated in the milestones, we have

Health Economics

significantly increased our level of clinical translation activity to ensure that evidencebased best practice is widely implemented. These activities include the establishment of Diabetic Foot Australia and the Wound Healing Institute of Australia and significant work to underpin the establishment of The Australian Wound Innovation Centre and the Australian Aged Care Wound Services.

New clinical evidence • • •

Wound CRC

Wound care clincial trials New wound care technologies New wound prevention technologies Wound prevention clinical trials

Best practice wound care Wound prevention

Highly skilled wound care Workforce • • • • •

AWIC WHIA DFA Wound Credentialing Healthy Ageing Node

Wound CRC’s integrated strategies are underpinned by health economics to ensure best practice wound care to patients

13


Research Industry led projects including projects that build further value for AWIC represent almost 60% of new projects. In the reporting period, these include 5 randomised clinical trials which we hope will lead to new best practice in a range of wound management scenarios.

WOUNDCRC Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516


Clinical translation activities In the reporting period the CRC has had a dual focus, firstly managing the research, development and educational portfolio to meet the contracted CRC milestones and secondly developing the five Clinical Translation business units established to form the basis of the CRC’s legacy vehicle to ensure full utilisation of CRC outputs. Performance of the Clinical Translation business units is summarized in Section 3: Utilisation and Commercialisation.

Research and development activities Whilst there has been a substantial increase in emphasis on the Clinical Translation business units, the CRC continues to drive milestone achievement across the whole portfolio and the CRC has achieved 12 out of 13 output milestones due between 1 July 2015 and 30th June 2016. The remaining Milestone is delayed as PhD completions are behind schedule: the majority of students are taking close to 4 years to research and write their theses, the process from submission to acceptance of theses after examination is taking up to a year, and a significant number of PhD students have taken leave of absences all of which impact on completion date.

Through the CRC’s new funding processes, the CRC has invested in 15 additional Projects primarily to mature potential commercial outcomes from the original research portfolio, develop evidence to support new treatments, pathways and preventative strategies, support the clinical translation activities and optimise achievement of the remaining output and utilisation milestones. The CRC health economics team have identified pressure injuries as a very significant cost to the healthcare system ($2.85 billion p.a.). In response, the CRC funded a Delphi consensus study to identify key research questions in the field and has since funded 3 randomised controlled trials (RCT) to address some of these questions. Additionally, the CRC has funded an RCT, building on surgical wound dehiscence risk assessment tools developed through the CRC, to assess the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the prevention of surgical wound dehiscence in collaboration with CRC Participant Smith & Nephew.

clinical practice suggests that low frequency ultrasonic debridement or NPWT may improve outcomes. Hence the CRC has funded RCTs to compare sharp debridement with compression bandaging to ultrasonic debridement and compression bandaging and in conjunction with CRC Participant Smith & Nephew compare compression and NPWT with compression alone. In addition, the CRC bolstered its development portfolio, funding two projects developing new imaging devices, a novel dressing approach, and further engaged with UniSA and the start-up Abregen on final proof of concept studies for a monoclonal antibody therapy. New projects in support of the CRC’s clinical translation strategies included a study measuring health service costs of treating wounds in the community, and leveraging international expertise to support the CRC’s diabetic foot associated development and education projects.

Previous CRC projects have confirmed the utility of compression therapy in treating venous leg ulcers, but a proportion of patients do not respond to compression therapy. Evidence supporting adjunctive therapies for VLU treatment is weak, however low level evidence and anecdotal

15


Performance Against Activities

Research Program 1: Enabling Technologies

Research Program 2: Tools and Therapies

Research Program 1 focused on improved understanding of the wound microenvironment and the application of this knowledge to identify new diagnostics, prognostics and therapeutics, including preclinical models.

Research Program 2: Tools and Therapies RP2 is focused on the development of new wound management products including bioactives, diagnostics and dressings. Due to the cost of development and long timelines involved in early stage therapeutic development, the WMI CRC deprioritized research projects that were focused on the identification and testing of discovery stage wound treatments, having completed Output 2.1 (bioactive discovery).

As the CRC matures, projects from Program 1 have completed or transitioned into development phase Program 2 Projects and hence the majority of outputs within this Program have now been achieved. Sample collection for a library of protein, metabolite and microbial samples (Output 1.1) is now complete, and has been interrogated using the completed Output 1.3 bioinformatics suite to identify and validate biomarkers associated with wound healing, susceptibility to chronic wounds and scarring and lead candidates offered to industry partners or selected for additional development by the CRC (Output 1.2 – completed). In vitro and in vivo preclinical models and methodologies for assessing wound therapies including skin integrity products (Output 1.4) have been developed and these resources supported pre-clinical and biocompatibility testing of [output from 2.07] and an anti-Flightless antibody therapy for Epidermolysis Bullosa. The preclinical data review of the anti-Flightless antibody led to a decision to fund further development leading to commercialisation as part of Research Program 2. Output 1.5 Key education and dissemination outputs: A minimum of 15 PhD and 15 Honours students completed and a minimum of 30 papers and 1 patent and know-how generated. This research program has: • 21 PhD, 9 Honours and 5 Masters students commenced; • 7 Honours, 4 Masters and 2 PhD student completed, 4 PhD students submitted; • 21 refereed papers, 3 review articles and 1 book chapters published; • 86 conference presentations; • 1 patent

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

The WMI CRC licensed four novel medical device technologies from RMIT University and established development stage projects at RMIT with support by experienced medical device product development specialists. These technologies include hyperspectral imaging to monitor and predict wound healing, new materials for open abdomen wound closure following surgery, an integrated fabric sensor for use in medical compression, and a pressure sensing insole with integrated biofeedback for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. Output 2.2 At least 5 new prototype wound diagnostics and prognostics that will guide clinical decision making: In alignment with the CRC’s revised strategy focusing on projects with near term impact and potential for commercial returns, the CRC has funded development of two diagnostic imaging technologies, pressure sensing insoles and integrated fabric sensors for use in medical compression. A validation study for microbiome based markers is close to completion and research is ongoing on burn paediatric markers. Output 2.3 At least 5 prototype advanced wound care products (therapies, dressings and skin integrity products) comprising conventional or novel wound dressings incorporating bioactives and/or biosensors developed for clinical evaluation: New CRC Projects on a novel oxygen-releas-

ing dressing and definitive proof of concept studies for the “Flightless” antibody (with SME Abregen) have been initiated. The CRC completed lab-based proof of concept of new materials for open abdomen wound closure and is working on commercial paths for this technology. Development of plasma therapy continued in preparation for proof of concept studies. Output 2.4 Utilisation and SME engagement output: The Development Advisory Committee has continued to provide valuable input to the CRC’s development assets. A number of Australian SMEs are engaged with specific CRC Project teams including Southern Cross Care utilizing the CRC’s Healthy Aging node, two product development companies Marinova Pty Ltd and Abregen Pty Ltd, and other aged care providers involved in research projects including Hall and Prior, Regis Heath Care and the Bethanie Group. Outputs from 3 projects have been formally reviewed by industry partners. Output 2.5 Education and dissemination outputs: A minimum of 11 PhD students completed and a minimum of 15 papers and 7 patents and know-how generated. To mid-2015 the following educational outputs have been generated: • • • • • •

17 PhD students commenced; 2 completed, 4 submitted 2 Honours student commenced and 1 completed 31 papers and 4 review articles published, 2 book chapters published; 53 conference presentations 11 patent applications filed


Research Program 3: Clinical Application Research Program 3 is focused on delivery of best practice wound care, including conducting clinical studies, developing risk assessment tools and translating evidence-based care into practice, including education of health-care practitioners. This Research Program will continue to focus on the delivery of best practice wound care with key activities surrounding clinical research and its translation to adapt to an environment of constrained health-care budgets and growing patient need. Output 3.1 At least nine proof of concept studies and/ or clinical trials on new wound interventions that are developed internally or externally to the CRC, or existing interventions with a limited evidence base: The following clinical studies have been conducted to-date, with 6 large randomised controlled trials initiated in the reporting period: • • • • • •

• • • • •

Use of moisturiser to prevent skin tears in residential aged-care (complete); Effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to treat chronic venous leg ulcers (complete); Testing of allopurinol in patients (complete); Use of moisturiser in a hospital setting (complete); Effectiveness of exercise to prevent chronic venous leg ulcers (complete); Investigating the effectiveness of skin moisturising cleanser for reducing the incidence and costs of skin tear injuries (complete) Remote diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcers using mobile phone technology (ongoing) Preventing pressure injuries in aged care (ongoing) Reducing ICU medical device-related pressure injuries (ongoing) The EXTREME Pressure 2 study assessing the impact of critical illness on tissue reperfusion time (ongoing) efficacy of topical negative pressure in the prevention of surgical wound dehis-

cence (ongoing) Measuring the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy and compression bandaging vs compression bandaging alone in patients with venous leg ulcers (ongoing) Efficacy of low frequency ultrasound debridement vs sharp debridement in patients with venous leg ulcers (ongoing)

Output 3.2 New wound risk assessment tools for wound occurrence, recurrence and scarring and new strategies for the prevention of wounds and hypertrophic scarring trialled and published. Factors that are associated with wound/scar occurrence and wound recurrence will be evaluated in longitudinal studies of different types of wounds: Longitudinal studies on factors associated with wound/scar occurrence and now complete. The CRC’s risk assessment tools for VLUs and surgical wound dehiscence are being disseminated and published. Building on the dehiscence tool, an RCT testing a prophylactic intervention for patients at high risk of dehiscence has initiated. Risk assessment tools for delayed healing and the prevention of recurrence of venous leg ulcers have been released as an App, with a launch planned at the World Union of Wound Healing Societies in Sep 2016.

provided face-to face education to clinicians in hospitals, aged care, GP and community settings across the country. The CRC is developing a credentialing program for wound clinicians to acknowledge training in best practice and developing a ‘Healthy Skin’ tick program to drive integration of best practice into residential aged care settings and recognise appropriate products. Additionally, establishment of the Australian Wound Innovation Centre (AWIC) will provide an exemplar for best practice wound treatment and educational leadership. Output 3.4 Education outputs: suite of educational packages developed for key clinicians, patients and carers AND training of 6 PhD students and 4 Honours students: Educational packages for clinicians are being delivered through WHIA, and a portal for patients with diabetic foot ulcers developed as part of DFA. June 2016, 14 PhD students and 6 Masters Students have commenced, with 3 PhD and 1 Masters student have graduated, and 2 PhD theses under examination. 38 papers, and 61 conference presentations have leveraged the research funded through program 3.

Output 3.3 Translation of evidence based-care into practice in community, hospital and residential aged care settings: A trans-disciplinary approach to wound care has seen CRC research produce over 22 best practice guides, developing and integrating into practice effective prevention and treatment methods, thereby significantly improving outcomes in areas such as pressure injuries, skin tears, venous leg ulcers, and wound dehiscence. The CRC’s Healthy Aging node has worked with WHIA on a test case implementation of a suite of tools to ensure best practice is implemented and retained within an aged care organization, and planning for broader implementation is under way. WHIA has

17


Publications FY 15-16

CR02 Norman, R. E., Gibb, M., Dyer, A., Prentice, J., Yelland, S., Cheng, Q., Lazzarini, P. A., Carville, K., Innes-Walker, K., Finlayson, K., Edwards, H., Burn, E. and Graves, N. (2016). Improved wound management at lower cost: a sensible goal for Australia. International Wound Journal, 13(3), pp 303-316. CR13 Gibb, M., Gorse, D., Chua, X. and Queen, D. (2015) The Australian Wound Registry. Australian Nursing and Midwifery Journal, 23(3), pp 35. CR14 Price K., Dyer A.R., Rando T. and Hickman P. (2015) Healthy healing and wound prevention. Australian Nursing and Midwifery Journal, 23(3), pp33. 1.19 Zang T., Broszczak D., Broadbent J.A., Cuttle L., Lu H. and Parker T. (2016) The biochemistry of blister fluid from pediatric burn injuries: proteomics and metabolomics aspect. Expert Review of Proteomics, 13(1), PP 35-53 2.08 Robinson D.E., Al-Bataineh S.A., Michelmore A., Cowin A.J., Short R.D., Smith L.E. and Whittle J.D. (2016) Plasma Polymer and Biomolecule Modification of 3D Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering. Plasma Processes and Polymers, 13(7), pp. 678689. 2.11 Gaur N., Szili E., Oh J., Hong S., Michelmore A., Graves D., Hatta A. and Short R. Combined effect of protein and oxygen on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the plasma treatment of tissue. Applied Physics Letters, 107, pp 1037. Szili, E.J., Harding, F.J., Hong S., Herrmann F., Voelcker, N.H. and Short R. (2015). The hormesis effect of plasma-elevated intracellular ROS on HaCaT cells. Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 48(49). Oh J., Szili E., Gaur N., Hong S., Furuta H., Short R. and Hatta A. (2015) In-situ UV absorption spectroscopy for monitoring transport of plasma reactive species through agarose as surrogate for tissue. Journal of Photopolymer Science and Technology, 28, pp 439-444. 3.05 Parker C., Broszczak D., Edwards H., Upton Z. and Finlayson K. (2015). Transdisciplinary collaboration in wound care research. Wound Practice and Research: Journal of the Australian Wound Management Association, 23(4), pp 179– 183.

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

3.11 O’Brien J., Finlayson K., Kerr G. and Edwards H. (2016). Evaluating the effectiveness of a self-management exercise intervention on wound healing, functional ability and healthrelated quality of life outcomes in adults with venous leg ulcers: a randomised controlled trial. International Wound Journal, epub ahead of print. O’Brien J., Finlayson K., Kerr G., Shortridge-Baggett L. and Edwards H. (2016). Using a theoretical approach to identify factors influencing adherence to an exercise programme for adults with venous leg ulcers. Journal of Health Psychology, epub ahead of print 7/7/16. Parker C., Finlayson K.J., Shuter P and Edwards H. (2016) Risk factors for delayed healing in venous leg ulcers: a review of the literature (Letter). International Journal of Clinical Practice, 69(9), pp 1029-1030. 3.14 Haesler E.(2016) Evidence Summary: Managing lymphoedema – Complex lymphoedema therapy. Wound Practice and Research: The Australian Journal of Wound Management, 24(2), pp121-124. Haesler E.(2016) Evidence Summary: Managing lymphoedema – Low level laser therapy. Wound Practice and Research: The Australian Journal of Wound Management, 24(2), pp119-121. Haesler E.(2016) Evidence Summary: Single modality treatment of lymphoedema -manual lymphatic drainage. Wound Practice and Research: The Australian Journal of Wound Management, 24(2), pp116-118. Haesler E.(2015) Evidence Summary: Lymphatic Filiariasis Prevention. Wound Practice and Research: The Australian Journal of Wound Management, 23(4), pp196-198. Haesler E.(2015) Evidence Summary: Lymphatic Filiariasis - Treatment. Wound Practice and Research: The Australian Journal of Wound Management, 23(4), pp198-201. 3.23 Lazzarini P.A., Hurn S.E., Kuys S.S., Kamp M.C. & Reed L. (2016). Foot-related conditions in hospitalised populations: a literature review. Australian Wound Management Association Journal, 24(1), pp 16-35.


Education & Training

Higher Degree Research Students Under the CRC’s post-graduate scholarship program 3 new PhD students, 1 Masters and 2 Honours student commenced their studies in FY2016 and as of June 30th 2016 the program included a total of 39 students actively engaged with the CRC along with 22 CRC alumni who have completed all requirements for their degrees: • • •

33 PhDs (an additional 9 complete) 4 Masters (an additional 5 complete) 2 honours students (an additional 8 complete)

The CRC has achieved or exceeded all milestones relating to PhD student commencement, publications and patents to date. CRC students are productive and fully engaged in the CRC Projects with over 70% of CRC publications or presentations involving CRC students. Student completion milestones and graduate destination milestones are delayed due to the extended length of time taken over thesis preparation and the lengthy examination process associated with PhDs and the substitution of scholarships for one year honours students with two years’ master student scholarships.

The WMI CRC anticipates that PhD completion milestones will be achieved. The WMI CRC has instituted a student completion bonus scheme to ensure that students remain engaged with the CRC through their write up and examination periods and beyond. The CRC has provided online IP training to ensure that all students are aware of their IP obligations.

Complementing the educational strategies, the CRC is aiming to implement two credentialing strategies: 1.

A healthy Skin accreditation reward program for both products and services will be developed and operated from the Healthy Skin Node in order to promote and reward adherence to best practice guidelines, through a program similar to the Heart Foundation tick program. Apart from providing a competitive edge to companies adhering to best practice guidelines, the program will also help to empower staff in their decisions and lead to better wound care outcomes.

2.

Developing a professional recognition scheme for specialist wound care clinicians, powered by an online portal and with endorsement and support from Wounds Australia and built for sustainability.

Professional education and credentialing The WMI CRC has established WHIA to provide online education on wound healing and skin care with endorsement as a continuing professional education provider by the Australian College of Nursing, The Royal College of General Practitioners and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine. Complementing the online education provided by WHIA, the WMI CRC Healthy Aging node focuses on customising educational module provision, face-to face training in wound prevention and care and workshops in the aged care sector while the Australian Wound Innovation Centre will provide face to face training in wound management best practices. These integrated approaches will improve outcomes for patients with wounds and promote organisational, clinical and

Lecturers:

Research associates:

Dr Christina Parker (QUT Dr Jane O’Brien (University of Tasmania)

Dr Daniel Broszczak (QUT) Dr Thomas Michl (UniSA) Andrew Stevenson (Fiona Wood Foundation) Dr Ais Jenie (Indonesian Institute of Sciences) Dr Fransiska Krismatuthi (Indonesian Institute of Sciences) Dr Chen Fan (ASTAR – Singapore) Dr Dario Stupar (ASTAR – Singapore) Dr Hashim Alhmoud (UniSA) Dr Htwe Mon (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA) Dr Roshan Vasani (UniSA)

Other:

The next generation of wound researchers trained by the CRC are now working as:

educational strategies for the prevention of wounds and maintenance of skin integrity.

Dr Michelle Gibb (Clinical Director, WMI CRC) Dr Mehmood Nasir (Independent consultant)

19


Higher Degree Students FY 15-16 Name

Start

Program

Title

Institute

Expected completion date

Jane O'Brien

1/05/11

3

The VaLUE (Venous and Leg Ulcer Exercise) Study

QUT

complete

Nasir Mehmood

28/02/13

2

Wireless Telemetric Sensors for Wound Dressings

UniSA

complete

Christina Parker

28/02/2011

3

Predicting the likelihood of non-healing: a venous leg ulcer risk assessment tool

QUT

complete

Uliya Gankande

8/08/11

3

Diagnostic markers of wound healing

UWA

complete

Daniel Broszcack

21/02/11

1

Molecular profiling of exudate from chronic ulcerated wounds

QUT

complete

Sirhari Sharma

1/01/13

1

Wound fluid characterisation

QUT

submitted

Fransiska Krismatuthi

16/07/2012

2

Sensors for wound status

UniSA

complete

Ais Jenie

1/07/11

2

Sensors for wound status

UniSA

complete

Thomas Michl

1/12/2011

2

Surfaces for rapid wound closure and infection control

UniSA

complete

Dario Stupar

20/01/2015

1

Wound fluid characterisation (proteomics)

QUT

complete

Ann Stewart

9/04/2012

3

Risk Assessment Tool Recurrent Venous Ulcers

QUT

2018

Sumeet Sandhu

1/09/2014

1

Understanding the Diabetic Foot Microbiome

QUT

2018

Claire Nelson

24/02/2014

3

Malnutrition in Patients with Chronic Wounds

QUT

2017

Natalie Benbow

16/02/2015

2

Biopolymer Films for Enhanced Wound Management

UniSA

2018

Suresh Parmar

1/03/2015

2

Venous Ulcer Smart Compression Device

RMIT

2018

Adin Tan

1/10/2014

2

Development of Smart Insole for Diabetic Patients

RMIT

2018

Asif Husein

1/11/2013

1

Bacterial diversity in wounds

QUT

2017

Lipsa Mohanty

25/07/2011

1

Role of EM transition in wound healing

QUT

2016

Stuart Johnson

2/09/2013

1

Cell clustering in wound healing

QUT

2017

Lucas Wager

1/02/12

1

MicroRNA in wound healing

QUT

2017

Chen Fan

27/02/2012

1

Shikonin - a novel scar therapy

QUT

complete

Uyen (Thi) Than

23/07/12

1

MicroRNA in wound healing

QUT

2017

Dominic Guanzon

1/02/2013

1

MicroRNAS in the formation of keloid scars

QUT

2017

Tuo Zang

22/10/2014

1

Biomarkers for the prediction of paediatric wound severity

QUT

2018

Xiaoxiang He

1/01/12

2

Plant Bioactives

UniSA

2017

Roshan Vasani

18/02/2011

2

Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles

UniSA

complete

Hashim Alhmoud

16/02/2012

2

Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles

UniSA

complete

Gayathri Rajeev

2/05/2014

2

Nanoparticle delivery of Flii antagonists

UniSA

2017

Israt Biva

24/12/2012

2

Optimised serrulatane bioactives from Eremophila plants

UniSA

complete

Htwe Mon

5/03/12

2

Development of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory compounds

UniSA

complete

Robyn Rayner

1/08/12

3

RA Skin tears

Curtin

2016

Pam Morey

15/01/12

3

Rural and remote education program

Curtin

2016

Kylie Sandy-Hodgetts

1/11/2011

3

Surgical and post-caesarian wound dehiscence study

Curtin

2016

Michelle Gibb

1/08/12

3

WMNP models of practice

QUT

complete

Andrew Stevenson

11/07/2011

1

Epigenetics of scarring

UWA

submitted

Jasmine Straube

21/01/2013

1

Wound Fluid characterisation (proteomics analytics)

QFAB

submitted

Mansour Alghamdi

9/05/10

1

Role of Epigenetic Modification in Keloid Scar Pathogenesis

UWA

submitted

Peter Lazzarini

1/07/13

3

Foot disease in patients study

QUT

submitted

Nishtha Gaur

15/06/15

2

Simple effective anti-microbial and wound healing dressings

UniSA

2018

Jacqueline Burgess

13/01/2014

2

Prevention of paediatric hot beverage scalds

UQ

2018

Jeannette Travis

12/03/2015

1

Diabetic ulcers: biofilms and treatment therapies

SCU

2018

Ut Thi Bui

3/08/2015

3

Infection in chronic leg ulcers

QUT

2018

Pivan Sim

1/10/15

2

Role of pH in wound healing

UniSA

2018

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516


SME Engagement WMI CRC continues to engage with SMEs through a number of areas including: • • • • •

Technology development Education and training Implementation of best practice Development of clinical alliances New models of wound care

Two SMEs (Marinova Pty Ltd and Abregen Pty Ltd) are involved in WMI CRC Projects to develop new wound care technologies. In addition, the WMI CRC has service level agreements in place and holds ongoing collaborative discussions with medical device and software specialist SMEs such as Haines Medical, ISA Healthcare Solutions, LBT Innovations, Arkright technologies and Ethos Media. The WMI CRC’s Healthy Aging node provides educational and audit services which are targeted at both the aged care sector and also SMEs who do not have capacity to develop in house training systems.

Discussions have been held for educational services to Aged Care providers including The Society of Saint Hilarion Inc, Kincare, HCA Community care, Saint Lois Home Care, Arana, Anglicare, Rally Home Care and Auscare.

has held collaborative discussions with SME’s such as The Heart Foundation and Y Natural. Training has been provided to 4 professional, bodies, 2 public hospitals, 4 GP/community health services, and as part of 7 TAFE/ University courses.

The Healthy aging node has also held discussions education providers including Ademark Group, Black Knight Marketing Group, DPS publishing and Proactive knowledge. WHIA has regular sales meetings with SMEs for the provision of education services such as the use of online wound modules under licence. SMEs who have been provided with education or who are part of ongoing discussions include Challenger TAFE, Healthshare, Healthtimes, Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation, Aegis Healthcare and the Pharmaceutical Society Australia. In addition, the Healthy Ageing node has engaged with SME’s in the development of a “Healthy Skin” endorsement program and

21


Results As the CRC moves into its final years of operations, communication activities are centered on reinforcing the CRC’s position in the wound industry as a recognised global leader in chronic wound management.

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516


Utilisation and Commercialisation The WMI CRC has two Utilisation and Commercialisation themes – clinical translation of research outputs and industry guided development of promising wound technologies. In the reporting period the WMI CRC achieved 9 of 10 utilization milestones due, with one milestone delayed, but expected to complete in April 2017 due to delays in the examination phase, for PhD students which delays their entry into the workforce.

Clinical Translation The WMI CRC is leveraging completed CRC translational research to develop sustainable models of wound service, provide clinical education activities and mechanisms for increasing the uptake of evidence-based practice. These activities have been embedded in 5 clinicaltranslation focused business units and are underpinned by a significant body of work in health economics to raise awareness, and drive improved reimbursement for cost effective treatment modalities. Australian Wound Innovation Centre – Clinical Services The Australian Wound Innovation Centre - Clinical Services opening in Jan 2017 will be the cornerstone of the Wound CRC clinical translation activity and will be the nation’s central facility dedicated to the provision of expert wound care, clinical research and face-to-face training. AWIC - Clinical Services will leverage the CRC’s completed research to deliver outcomes of local, national and international significance. It is anticipated that the Clinical Services activities will be the hub, from which satellite clinics in other Australian States and Territories will be supported. Wound Healing Institute of Australia In December 2015 the Wound CRC completed a Licensing transaction that transferred the Intellectual Property that was formerly “WoundsWest” into a Wound CRC subsidiary company, called Wound Healing Institute of Australia (WHIA). This Agreement also triggered the start of commercial operations of WHIA. A key area of utilization activities for the WMI CRC is the dissemination of evidence-based best practice clinical resources to health care providers. WHIA

supports health professionals, patients and carers through the provision of education, training, advice, research and health promotion on wound prevention and management. WHIA’s services are offered nationally with a focus on education, practice and research reflected in the following key service delivery areas: • • • •

Online and clinical wound education service; A wound advisory and clinical patient care service for patients with wounds; Research and clinical audit services in wound management; and, Health promotion services to prevent or improve health and social outcomes for people with wounds.

WHIA has now transitioned from being a provider of educational modules at zero cost to consumers in the health sector (including health care providers and Universities), to a not-for-profit company selling educational services, products and tailored packages of services at a cost. This transition was necessary in order to make this service and education provider sustainable, following government funding cuts to its operations. WMI CRC Healthy Aging Node (Adelaide) The aged care industry is currently going through major reforms; unlike any it has been through before. Australia faces an ageing population, with an expected additional 3.9 million Australians to be aged 70 years and over by 2050. As a result, the industry is consolidating, facilities are growing in size and for-profit share of beds and revenue is increasing. There is also an increased focus on quality of life as life expectancy consistently rises. The WMI CRC recently funded a successful pilot of Wound Services into Aged Care that demonstrated that there is a growing clinical and commercial need for solutions in the prevention of wounds related to Ageing such as pressure injuries and skin tears. In recognition of this, a Healthy Ageing node has been established to: • Provide customised consultation services to the aged care sector for wound management • Commercial development of educational programs for the CRC, including those of the Wound Healing Institute Australia (WHIA,)

Establishing a ‘tick’ endorsement program for products and services related to wound prevention by promoting Healthy Skin Facilitate Industry driven research projects into the Aged Care sector

The node focuses on commercialisation of the outcomes of the CRC, such as fostering relationships with Aged Care providers. A roll-out of services into Aged Care is already in negotiation with one industry provider and will lead to expansion of this service and engagement with other residential and aged care providers. In addition, The Healthy Ageing node is facilitating Industry driven research projects by connecting industry partners such as 3M, Hartmann, Smith & Nephew with Aged care providers. Research projects are designed and facilitated to simplify decision making for staff and improve quality of care. The Australian Wound Repository The introduction of clinical registries to monitor health care performance and track clinical effectiveness and costeffectiveness of treatments in real-world clinical practice, is a proven strategy for improving service delivery. Clinical registries improve outcomes by engaging clinicians using credible data and fostering competition and they also help to encourage engagement among patients, families and/or caregivers and the community. The WMI CRC funded a project to provide the initial infrastructure and support to establish an Australian Wound Repository, which could ultimately generate sufficient revenue to meet its own expenses. This project has been the beneficiary of immense industry support, with over seven participants and other industry organisations participating in the Steering Committee. In early 2016 a strategic review of implementation and legal context led to a recalibration of certain aspects of the project, specifically around changes to Australian privacy law and data control, and the WMI CRC expects a revised implementation strategy to initiate in late 2016.

23


Diabetic Foot Australia Globally diabetes-related amputations occur every 20 seconds. Australia has an increasing diabetes-related amputation rate making it the second highest in the developed world. Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are the leading cause of amputation and diabetesrelated hospitalization; resulting in 1,700 deaths, 4,400 amputations and 30,000 hospitalisations at an estimated direct cost of $AUD1 billion each year to the Australian healthcare system. In early 2015, the WMI CRC Board approved funding to help establish Diabetic Foot Australia (DFA) as a National body seeking to use Australia’s expertise in diabetic foot ulcer research and clinical practice to address the growing issue of DFUs in Australia. The key goal of DFA is to end avoidable amputations within a generation. To achieve this, DFA aims to: • • • •

Optimise national DFU evidence-based clinical practice, Stimulate national DFU clinical research, Reduce Australia’s national diabetes amputation rate, and, Empower Australia to become a leading nation in DFU management

DFA has established an information portal to disseminate information about clinical best practice and research outcomes to clinicians, patients, and other researchers and industry. This portal (www.diabeticfootaustralia.org), as well as the related Facebook and twitter accounts, contains a range of information on diabetic foot disease for the various target audiences, including the “DFA Guides You Through” series, patient information brochures, continuous updates on the latest research, diabetic foot clinical tools and campaigns. DFA aims to optimise the DFU evidencebased clinical practice footprint across Australia via education and training. Two major developments in 2016 are contributing to these aims. The first is the series of ‘What’s New in DFU’ events rolling out around Australia (Brisbane, Melbourne and Adelaide in 2016 and beyond in 2017) that aim to educate and integrate the Australian diabetic foot community of patients, clinicians, researchers and industry, with international diabetic foot experts. The inaugural “what’s new in DFU” in Brisbane attracted over 150 attendees. The second development is the collaboration with the successful Sydney International Diabetic Foot Conference to become the 2017 Diabetic Foot Australia conference in the Gold Coast in September 2017. This

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

conference typically attracts 400 attendees and with these proven collaborating partners this is expected to significantly increase in 2017. Organisation is well underway with dates, venues and four international keynote speakers. DFA also aims to stimulate and foster national clinical research collaborations to conduct well-coordinated, multi-centre studies in this complex condition. Two major developments in 2016 will contribute to this outcome. The first is publication of the “Diabetic Foot Ulcer Minimum Dataset – Dictionary & Starter Kit”. This is a list off 22-items that clinicians all over Australia should collect at each visit of a patient with diabetic foot disease. That not only ensures that clinicians and researchers all over Australia will “speak the same language”, but it will also facilitate multi-centre trials and retrospective research based on the data generated via this minimum dataset. Further, DFA has set up the framework for a Clinical Trials Network. Five experienced diabetic foot clinics have agreed to be the start-up sites within this network, and activities are expected to commence in the coming months. Health Economics Affordability underpins many of the issues relating to access to best practice care. The CRC has taken a robust approach to health economics, integrating cost effectiveness analyses in research projects and initiatives so that the clinical impact of new interventions or care pathways is measured alongside the cost and potential savings to the health care system of this approach. The CRC health economics team have published two papers, and are developing economic models for venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers and pressure injuries. In recognition of the importance of health economics to wound care, the team have been invited to present in the headline plenary session of both the 2016 Wounds Australia Conference and 2017 International Wound Practice and Research Conference. In addition, the health economics focus of the WMI CRC has drawn attention to the costs of wounds in Aged Care. As part of Project CR.14 (The Wound Service Project) a business case has been developed around the cost effectiveness of providing preventative wound education to staff rather than treatment. This business case has led to ongoing negotiations in the Aged Care sector and the potential to commercialize the service.

Industry guided development of promising wound technologies. The identification and development of promising wound technologies has been guided by the Development Advisory Committee which has provided commercial insight and high level expertise in selecting and managing the projects that will be moved into the development phase. The CRC portfolio of development focused activities includes: • • • • • • •

New imaging systems for wound diagnosis/prognosis New materials for open abdomen wound closure following surgery Integrated fabric sensor for use in medical compression Pressure sensing insole with integrated biofeedback for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers “Flightless” antibody for epidermidosis bulosa Plasma therapy. A diagnostic/therapeutic strategy relating to monitoring and controlling the microbial status of a wound


Intellectual Property Management The WMI CRC is committed to maximizing impact from its research activities and hence has a strong focus on intellectual property management and protection. The CRC’s intellectual property policy is distributed to all Project Leaders and new students are expected to complete the CRC’s online IP training. The CRC’s publication policy ensures that all publications and conference presentations are screened to ensure appropriate patent protection is in place prior to disclosure. All staff and students working on CRC projects sign Deed Polls to ensure that IP can

be managed within the framework of the WMI CRC’s Participant Agreement. The CRC proactively manages the patent portfolio in conjunction with Participants. Two new Provisional applications have been filed this year, and one CRC-developed patent has entered into National Phase. After thoroughly assessing commercial potential the CRC and Participants have taken the strategic decision to allow 5 patent applications to lapse.

As part of the CRC’s robust brand management strategy, a trademark for Diabetic Foot Australia has been registered. Registered intellectual property rights developed by the CRC as of 30th June 2016 is listed in the table below.

The WMI CRC adheres to the National Principles of IP Management for publicly funded research.

IP Developed FY 15-16

Type

Description of IP

number

Priority date

Patent

Optical Biosensor

PCT/AU2015/000118

12/06/2014

Patent

Wound sensor

PCT/AU2014/000988

12/05/2014

Patent

Plasma screens and uses thereof

PCT AU2015/000087

18/02/2014

Patent

A method for monitoring the metabolic state of a biological tissue.

2015903085

3/08/15

Patent

Compositions and methods for administering antibodies

PCT/AU2016/050314

30/4/15

Patent

Wound filler for negative pres-sure wound therapy

2015904144

12/10/15

Trademark

Diabetic Foot Australia logomark and logotype

1730389

26/10/15 Approved 9/6/16

25


Communications As the CRC moves into its final years of operations, communication activities are centered on reinforcing the brand’s position in the wound industry as a recognised global leader in chronic wound management. During FY15-16, two translation activities (WHIA and DFA) were successfully developed and launched as now operational brands of the CRC. The CRC has focused its communication strategies toward the establishment and promotion of these and emerging translation activities, while continuing to announce and publish key research outputs and outcomes via a number of channels internally and externally. The key communication activities of FY15-16 are elaborated below across the distribution channels; announcements; and media and events:

Internal and external communication channels: Email Marketing The CRC has gained hundreds of new email subscribers this reporting period and email marketing continues to be an important channel to keep stakeholders engaged and up to the date with the CRC’s activities. Email campaigns are sent regularly (at least 4 campaigns per month) and feature media releases, news, achievements, event promotion and quarterly newsletters (see announcements and media in the following section). Websites The CRC designed, developed and launched a brand new website in August 2015. Unlike previous sites managed by the CRC, the new site is optimized for mobile devices and presents a modern, professional and unique online presence. Featured on the site are each of the CRC’s areas of activity with latest project outcomes specially highlighted, along with high impact statistics and scrolling functionality that ensures the CRC reflects the latest and highest impact technology. Compared to the FY14-15 reporting period, in which the previous website was live; website sessions have increased by 48%, with 74% of overall visits new to the site and 40% arrived at the site through an organic search. Diabetic Foot Australia and WHIA both launched independent websites as a part of their operations in the reporting period. The

DFA site is regularly populated with current news, events and research listings. WHIA’s website focus is toward the commercial conversion of online education and a show case of its products and services. WHIA has an integrated state of the art e-learning suite that delivers the online education to consumers. The CRC is continuing to investigate further online and digital optimization for the next reporting period, including broader integration of social media.

Through the channels mentioned above, the CRC has published and distributed the following in the reporting period: Media Releases • • •

Yammer The CRC launched a Yammer secure online community in 2015 and the membership of this has continued to grow. All updates and news are shared via this medium and the CRC highlights the top threads in its quarterly newsletters.

• • • •

Collaborative partnerships The CRC works collaboratively with its partners to release joint announcements and disseminate media where possible. This includes, but is not limited to: Participant communication departments, Cooperative Research Centers Association, Life Sciences Queensland, CRC Department, KnowHow and trade magazines

• • • • •

Social Media Through the launch of Diabetic Foot Australia, the CRC activated and manages Facebook and Twitter profiles for the brand, and continues to post relevant content to You Tube during the reporting period. As at the current reporting period, Diabetic Foot Australia has a growing reach of 374 Facebook likes and 101 Twitter followers. These channels are used to promote Diabetic Foot Australia and Wound CRC key outcomes, events, activities and the latest research, including special tweet series (#DFAguidesyouthrough).

74%

Increase in new website visits since FY14-15 The CRC designed, developed and launched a brand new website in August 2015.

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

Announcements and Media

Southern Cross Care and Wound CRC – Partnering to Improve Wound Outcomes Nationally Website Launch A Collaboration to Lead the Battle on War Wounds – Defense Science Institute partnership Mölnlycke Health Care Join Wound CRC as Industry Partner Acelity Join Wound CRC as Industry Partner What's New in DFU – Diabetic Foot Australia’s inaugural event launch Wound CRC Launches New Start-Up Company Wound Healing Institute Australia (WHIA) Mölnlycke Health Care joins Wound CRC as a New Industry Participant University of Melbourne joins Wound CRC Wound CRC Welcomes HARTMANN Australia as New Industry Participant Wound CRC Signs 3M as New Industry Participant Wound CRC Board Augmented, Refreshed and Poised to Translate Industry Led Research

Publications • • • • •

Wound CRC Newsletters – 3 published Diabetic Foot Australia Newsletters – 8 published Australian Research Transforming Wound Outcomes – article in Hospital and Healthcare Bulletin Healthy Healing and Wound Prevention – article in InformAGE article Research project journal publications please see the research section of this report.


Two translation activities were successfully developed and launched as now operational brands of the CRC. Shown is the new visual identities and online platforms for both brands.

Email campaigns • • •

• • • •

Research Expressions of Interest – 2x funding application rounds CRC Seminar Series: Videos launched in August and December 2015, featuring clips from the Evening With Keith event ‘Vote for Wound CRC Project’ in The Australian Innovation Awards. CRC Project nominated as finalist for the annual award. 2016 Research meets Industry Roadshow – invite and updates What’s New in DFU – DFA event promotion Apply for Wound CRC Masters and Honours Studentships – funding application round Invitation: Understanding Biofilms: How

the science is changing clinical practice. WHIA co-partnered event with industry webinar promotion 11x media releases as per above

Events Wound CRC events – internal August 2015: “An Evening with Keith” Prof Keith Harding, internationally renowned expert in wound healing and thought leader in the field, was on Australian shores as a part of the Welsh-Australian collaboration with the Wound CRC. Prof Harding worked with the Wound CRC’s Clinical Director, Michelle Gibb, in the establishment of the CRC’s Australian Wound Innovation Centre and other key activities. The ‘Evening With

Keith’ special event was attended by a packed audience of the CRC’s key industry representatives, clinical and research leaders. The event celebrated the Welsh-Australian CRC collaboration where Prof Harding presented his work to date with the Welsh Wound Innovation Centre (WWIC) and how the Wound CRC and WWIC are working closely to advance the CRC’s key activities. The event also featured a special preview and launch of the WMI CRC’s Clinical Translation activities and business units.

27


August 2015: ‘A Masterclass with Prof Keith Harding: Is TIME Still Relevant?’ Capitalising on Prof Harding’s Australian visit, an invite only Masterclass workshop was conducted to explore the debated TIME concept (an approach for wound bed preparation) and if there were additional factors to be considered with patient wound care. Invited guests brought along case studies that were discussed with Prof Harding during the masterclass. November 2015: Development Advisory Committee Industry Showcase: The CRC’s Development Advisory Committee met to give expert advice on our product development portfolio. The meeting, attended by the CRC Executives, industry Participants and independent industry advisors, provided a platform to meaningfully engage our new industry partners. This information ensures the CRC’s projects will be on target to achieve their milestones and ultimately have products in the market within the CRC’s term. The CRC invited the new and existing partners to privately discuss their specific industry challenges, trends and opportunities to work with the CRC in the development of emerging technologies. October 2015 and April 2016: DFA national steering committee meetings. The steering committee consists of some of Australia’s leading diabetic foot multidisciplinary clinical, research and industry experts, including: A/Prof Paul Wraight (DFA Co-Chair, Melbourne Endocrinologist & Researcher), Mr Peter Lazzarini (DFA Co-Chair, Brisbane Researcher & Podiatrist), Prof Rob Fitridge (Adelaide Vascular Surgeon & Researcher), Mr Matthew Malone (Sydney Podiatrist & Researcher), Dr Jenny Prentice (Perth Researcher & Nurse Practitioner), Dr Byron Perrin (Bendigo Researcher & Podiatrist), Ms Jennifer Byrnes (Darwin Wound Care Nurse Consultant), Mr Ewan Kinnear (Brisbane Podiatrist & Researcher), Dr Ian Griffiths (WMI CRC CEO) and Mr Sharif Sethi (DFA Commercial Director). December 2015: CRC Miles Review Meeting, Sydney In line with Recommendation 10, the Wound CRC underwent a review in late 2015 and the feedback from the CRC Review panel couldn’t be more complimentary of our strategy and direction. In particular, the CRC Advisory Committee was pleased to see that the Wound CRC is meeting all of its obligations against the Commonwealth Agreement, is on track to achieve its stated outcomes and noted the CRC’s transition plan is well advanced. To paraphrase the review letter: The Committee is pleased to see the ongoing engagement with the Medical Technologies and Pharmaceuticals

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

Growth Centre and commended the focus and rapidly expanding international involvement and reputation of the CRC. It noted the CRC’s portfolio and pipeline of meaningful, deliverable and affordable products and technologies, and the value this has created. The Committee acknowledges the CRC’s awareness and role in bringing wound management to a more central position in the health and medical sector, and its understanding for the need for health economics and policy in driving required change in the health care system. February 2016: Wound CRC Research meets industry Roadshow The Wound CRC joined forces with our industry partners to visit research and University-based Participants in each state during February 2016. These special seminars were held in Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne and Brisbane to coincide with the Wound CRC’s February Expression of Interest round. The roadshow seminars cemented the CRC's commitment to ensuring our activities are not only industry-led and outcome focused: we presented a strong collaborative presence to catalyse meaningful and productive relationships for targeted research proposals. During each seminar, each of the Wound CRC’s industry Participants were invited to present their key research interests, while the CRC National Office team provided an overview of the CRC’s activities, research priorities and the EOI process. The seminars were an enormous success and well attended by a large range of research schools including engineering, public health, nursing and applied sciences. The CRC is very pleased with the high quality and targeted proposals that have been submitted. Outcomes of the Expression of Interest round were issued in March 2016 and funding outcomes will be available in June.

Wound CRC events – external October 2015: ePhD – Cell Therapy Manufacturing In the previous reporting period, the CRC ran a dedicated Student and ECR Conference. As a part of the collaboration with CTM CRC, the ‘best oral presentation’ competition winner would go on to attend a module of their choice in the ePhD Program. PhD student Pam Morey was the winner and in October attended the Entrepreneurship module. Pam noted: “In my journey to complete my PhD, and pursue new opportunities in the field of wound management, my choice was to attend the module on Entrepreneurship. Through this,

I have become aware of new techniques and tools to develop business models; Entrepreneurship and innovation which leads to the development of start-ups and new business, ultimately provides economic and experiential growth, employment and, in innovative organisations, a culture which fosters enterprise.” April 2016: What’s New in DFU? An evening with international and industry leaders in diabetic foot disease Diabetic Foot Australia’s acclaimed inaugural event brought together national and international leaders in diabetic foot disease. “What’s New in DFU”, held on April 19th 2016, was a sell-out event at QUT‘s Room 360 in Brisbane. Delegates included allied health professionals, medical specialists and researchers, all excited to hear the latest from a number of DFA’s vast network of experts. With thanks to Acelity Australia, guests enjoyed canapés and drinks with a stunning view of the city skyline. The opportunity to network with international and national speakers was very well received. Feedback has been overwhelming, with resounding support for an engaging evening of high quality, informative presentations. Our Industry partners, who supported the event, were pleased to engage with new customers and contacts at their trade displays and enjoyed the selection of quality speakers. In the current reporting period, 1 further ‘what’s new’ event has occurred and one more is in about to be live in November 2016. The events are significant as they constitute a part of DFA’s sustainability and ability to continue its establishment as the peak body in Australia for DFU. Conferences – external • • • • • •

March 2016 – Cooperative Research Centres Association (CRCA) Conference, Brisbane, Australia Staff attended: Dr Ian Griffiths, Ms Shelley Morris, Dr Jaap Van Netten November 2015 – Wounds UK Annual Conference, Harragate England Staff attended: Dr Ian Griffiths Michelle Gibb European Wound Management Association (EWMA) 2015, London, UK Staff attended: Dr Michelle Gibb


Clockwise, From top left: Dr Jaap van Netten at ‘What’s New in DFU’; Prof Keith Harding presents the keynote at the ‘What’s New’ event; Dr Ian Griffiths presents at the Research Meets Industry Roadshow; ECR Dr Chris Turner at the Innovation Challenge award night; Phd Student Pam Morey attend the CTM CRC’s ePhD Module awarded from the 2015 CRC Conference and Prof Harding and Tim Stack of Acelity at ‘An evening with Keith’

29


Resources The WMI CRC includes individuals from 22 research, community and industry partners and will have over 43 full time equivalent researchers from Participant organisations involved in CRC Projects.

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516


Organisational Structure as at 30 June 2016

Governing Board of Directors Prof RobSale (Chairman) Dr Susan Pond Mr Steven Carmody

Chief Executive Officer Dr Ian Griffiths

Chief Operating Officer

Board Sub-Committees: Audit & Risk Committee and Nomination & Review Committee

Ian Landreth

Development Advisory Committee

Corporate Services Manager Legal Counsel Emma Gierke

Dr Ian Griffiths (Chair) Prof Mark Richardson Prof Kishore Udipi Dr Steve Gower Dr Jason Loveridge

Mr Sharif Sethi Dr Jaap Ven Netten

Prof Nick Gough (Chair) Dr Ian Griffiths Prof Nick Santamaria Prof Anne Gardner

Finance Management

Branding & Communications Coordinator

Research Program Leaders

Clinical Director

Ass. Prof Flavia Huygens Prof Allison Cowin Prof Helen Edwards

RNA Solutions

Dr Anthony Dyer

Shelley Morris

Michelle Gibb

Research & Development Director Dr Tamsin Terry

Wound Healing Institute Australia Dr Jenny Prentice (CEO)

Prof Keith Harding Dr Jane Andrews

Special Projects & Initiatives Director

Research Advisory Committee Diabetic Foot Australia

Strategic Advisors

Executive Assistant Jessica Engle

Research Administration Nora Foley

Product Development Project Leader Dr Tom Tomac

Product Development Project Leader Robert Smith

The Participants in the WMI CRC are bound by the Commonwealth Agreement and the Participants Agreement. The Participants established an Unincorporated Joint Venture (UJV) which in turn established a privatelyheld management company, the Wound Management Pty Ltd (WMPL) as the

vehicle for implementing WMI CRC processes and securing the outcomes of the Joint Venture.

The organisational structure is shown above.

The WMI CRC’s National Office is located at West End in Brisbane with activities in Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania.

31


4.1 Governance Arrangements The fully independent Board of Directors is the same for both the UJV and Pty Ltd. The Board of Directors of the WMI CRC have established two committees to review and make recommendations to the Board in regard to their respective Charters.

• • •

These Committees are the Finance Audit and Risk Committee and the Nomination & Review Committee. Further details on these committees are provided later in this report. The Executive Management Team has established a set of policies and procedures for the organisation. During this reporting period, the board was refreshed and invigorated, to drive commercialisation and building the CRC’s legacy activities.

• •

Membership of the Board Membership of the Board, including the key skills of Board Members, is detailed below. The Board conducts activities of the WMI CRC through the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and delegates specific powers and responsibilities to the CEO. During the reporting period, all Board Members resigned on 31 Mar 2016 and Mr Ian Landreth was appointed to the role of Company Secretary on 3 February 2016. New Board Members appointed on 1 Apr 2016 are:

Prof. Robert Sale (Chair) Dr Susan Pond AM, FTS FAAHMS Mr Stephen Carmody

Outgoing Directors for this reporting period are:

• • •

Dr Peter Riddles Resigned 12 Aug 2015 Dr Jurgen Michaelis Resigned 10 Aug 2015 Ms Cheryl Herbert Resigned 31 Mar 2016 Mr John Lee Resigned 31 Mar 2016 Dr Mary Corbett Resigned 31 Mar 2016

The Board is responsible for ensuring that an effective internal control framework is in place. The development of a set of policies, procedures and practices enables the Board to monitor compliance to statutory, legal, stakeholder and best practice requirements. This framework is regularly reviewed. The Board’s role is to govern the WMI CRC by provision of appropriate leadership, contributing to and approving the WMI CRC’s strategic plans, approving operational plans and budgets to ensure consistency with the goals and objectives, monitoring performance of the WMI CRC and its management, assessing risks and ensuring that appropriate risk management strategies are in place; and setting and promoting appropriate values and standards.

Board Meeting Attendance FY 15-16

Director

Meetings Eliglbe Meetings attended to attend

Dr Peter Riddles

1

1

Dr Jurgen Michaelis

1

1

Ms Cheryl Herbert

6

6

Mr John Lee

6

6

Dr Mary Corbett

6

6

Ms Susan Pond

3

3

Professor Robert Sale

3

3

Mr Stephen Carmody

3

Leave Granted

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

9 meetings of the Governing Board were convened during the reporting period: • • • • • • • • •

22 July 2015 (Brisbane, Queensland) 26 Aug 2015 (teleconference) 13 Oct 2015 (teleconference) 28th Oct 2015 (teleconference) 2 Dec 2015 (teleconference) 3 Feb 2016 (Brisbane, Queensland) 5 May 2016 (teleconference) 8 June 2016 (teleconference) 28 June 2016 (Brisbane, Queensland)

Committee Membership & Function The Board conducts its activities through the CEO and delegates specific powers and responsibilities to the CEO as set out in the Board Charter and Delegation of Authority Policy. Committees have also been established to assist the Board in fulfilling its responsibilities. Each Committee has its own Charter setting out the authority delegated to it by the Board and detailing the manner in which the Committee is to operate. At this time, the Board has established a Finance and Audit Risk Committee and a Nominations and Review Committee. Special Purpose Committees may also be established as and when required by the Board.


Prof Robert Sale Chairman Brisbane, Australia Independent Extensive medical device and commercialisation experience From 1 April 2016

• • •

Prof Sale has 25 years of accomplishment in the research, medical device and technology/innovation sectors. Prof Sale is Adjunct Professor - Faculty of Health - Queensland University of Technology and has a strong background in commercialisation, governance and leadership skills with operations, finance, clinical understanding and management, fund raising in both private and public sectors and international IPO success.

• • • •

Sydney, Australia Independent Extensive health care and science industry leadership, commercialisation, policy and strategic development experience From 1 Apr 2016

The role of this Committee is to undertake the following tasks and where appropriate make recommendations to the Board:

• •

• •

Review interim and annual financial statements Review internal control systems to ensure integrity of financial reporting Ensure the WMI CRC’s policies and procedures properly reflect compliance with current Australian legislation, accounting standards and generally accepted accounting principles Ensure consistency with Commonwealth, Participants and Manager’s Agreements and CRC program guidelines Review risk management procedures, including insurance covers and disaster recovery Ensure processes are in place to monitor compliance with laws and regulations, in particular Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S)

• • • •

Evaluate the performance of, and ensure the independence of, the auditor Review and consider with the external auditors any fraud, illegal acts, deficiencies in internal controls or other similar issues

One meeting was convened during the reporting period. The newly appointed Board are currently in the process of recruiting additional Directors and will reconvene the Finance Audit and Risk Committee in due course. In the meantime, the full Board carries out the duties of the Finance Audit and Risk Committee. (b) Nomination and Review Committee The role of the Nomination and Review Committee is to undertake the following tasks and as appropriate make recommendations to the Governing Board: • •

Perth, Australia Independent Extensive science industry leadership and management experience From 1 Apr 2016

Stephen has spent 30 years in health care, working in a variety of settings in the private and public sector, metropolitan, rural and remote environments. Stephen was previously COO of Silver Chain Group and held various managerial roles with the organisation for 15 years. Stephen’s professional qualifications began in 1982 with the completion of a hospital based Diploma of Nursing, followed by a Certificate in Midwifery in 1986. He also has completed Bachelor of Health Science (1987), Master of Business (1999) and Graduate Diploma in Pastoral Studies (2000).

Dr. Susan Pond has a distinguished record in academia and industry. After her tenure as Professor of Medicine at the University of Queensland, Susan held senior executive roles in Johnson & Johnson, including as Chairman & Managing Director of Johnson & Johnson Research Pty Limited. Dr. Pond was formerly Chair of AusBiotech Ltd, Vice-President of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE) and Board member of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Innovation Australia, Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology and Commercialisation Australia. Currently, Dr. Pond is Director of Biotron Ltd, Chair of the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and Adjunct Professor at the University of Sydney.

(a) Finance Audit & Risk Committee

Mr Steven Carmody Chairman

Dr Susan Pond Director

• • • • • •

Members Review, evaluate and suggest modifications for the skills/competency mix of the Governing Board Ensure rotation of Board Members in accordance with the Participants Agreement Schedule 3 Clause 3 Review Governing Board processes, including that of the Chairman Review remuneration and incentives for the CEO Review remuneration for Board Members in accordance with the Participants Agreement Clause 4.5 Review remuneration of Chairs and Members of Board Committees in accordance with the Participants Agreement Clause 4.5 Consider succession planning for Board Members and Senior Executives

Appointment of Board Members Induction programs for new Board

33


(c) Research Advisory Committee The primary function of the Research Advisory Committee (RAC) is to provide independent and expert advice regarding the quality and appropriateness of research proposals and projects. The Research Advisory Committee (RAC) will: •

Assist management to evaluate and respond to expressions of interest for WMI CRC research activities to form a shortlist of applications to go to more detailed due diligence. Evaluations will consider all relevant matters including, but not limited to, alignment with WMI CRC objectives and Milestones, quality of the science, clinical relevance and need, timeline for delivery of impact, end-user support, intellectual property, team track record and financial and time commitment required. Critically review all aspects of the shortlisted projects such that a well prepared proposal can be submitted to the Board for consideration. Oversee the portfolio of approved research projects through a quarterly review process. (All material variations or recommendations to discontinue

• • •

4 meetings were convened during the reporting period, with all members attending all meetings: • • • •

Melbourne, Australia Independent

Prof Gough has extensive experience in biomedical research and cancer biology, in the biotechnology industry, and in the Australian Cooperative Research Centres program. Inventor of technologies underpinning biopharmaceuticals and biotechnology products, marketed internationally and in clinical trials, including GM-CSF – one of the first pharmaceuticals based on Australian science and intellectual property. Key past appointments include: Head, Molecular Haematology Laboratory, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research; Research Director AMRAD Corporation Limited, CEO Cerylid Biosciences Limited; CEO Cooperative Research Centre for Genes for Common Human Diseases; Director, Molecular and Genomic Discovery ES Cell International Pte Ltd (Singapore); Chairman and Principal Consultant, Nick Gough & Associates Pty Ltd - Biotechnology and BioIndustries Consultants; Associate Professor (Honorary), Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne; and External Scientific Advisor, Cancer Therapeutics Cooperative Research Centre.

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

18th Aug 2015 (teleconference) 14th Oct 2015 21st Mar 2016 (teleconference) 24th May 2016

(d) Development Advisory Committee The primary function of the Development Advisory Committee (DAC) is to provide independent and expert advice regarding the development options for projects referred to the committee by the management team.

A. Prof Nick Gough RAC Chair • •

projects ceasing investment will be referred by the CEO to the Board for consideration). Provide advice on the composition and relevance of the WMI CRC’s research portfolio in terms of commercial, economic, clinical and social impact. Advise on future wound research needs, advances, gaps and opportunities. Build strategic relationships with the WMI CRC and other wound research organisations. Where appropriate, act as advocates and ambassadors for the WMI CRC.

The Development Advisory Committee will: •

• • • •

Advise management on the composition and relevance of the WMI CRC’s development portfolio for commercial and social impact. Critically review projects in light of relevant matters such as intellectual property position, budget, regulatory process, timelines, relevance, competitive landscape, and commercial terms. Review the development portfolio through a six monthly review process. Advise the WMI CRC Board and Management on commercial, regulatory and industry trends and developments. Build strategic relationships between the WMI CRC and third parties. In addition, it is anticipated that the DAC members will act as advocates and ambassadors for the WMI CRC.

1 Meeting was convened during the reporting period, which was attended by all DAC members: •

Two-day meeting 24-25th Nov 2015

Prof Ann Gardner RAC Member

Prof Nick Santamaria RAC Member • • •

Melbourne, Australia Independent

Nick is the Professor of Nursing Research, Translational Research at the University of Melbourne and the Royal Melbourne Hospital. He chairs the Skin Integrity Committee for Melbourne Health and was involved in establishing the Wounds West Project in WA. He has recently completed a large RCT investigating the effectiveness of silicone dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers in critically ill ED/ICU patients. Other areas of Nick’s research include the calculation of healing rate methods in diabetic foot wounds and venous leg ulcers and the investigation of the antimicrobial properties of electrolyzed water in infected wounds.

• •

Canberra, Australia Independent

Professor Anne Gardner is Professor of Nursing at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine at the Australian Catholic University. Prof Gardner has an extensive health industry background in clinical nursing practice, post-registration education and clinical research. Her clinical interests are primarily in the areas of infection control and wound care. She has an international profile as a researcher into nurse practitioner competency standards and scope of practice, and is one of the four researchers on the recently completed nationally funded research project entitled “Reforming Healthcare: Nurse practitioners and workforce re-design”. Prof Gardner supervises several higher degree students including both PhD and Masters students.


Dr Kishore Udipi DAC Member • •

California, United States Independent

Dr. Kishore Udipi received his Ph.D. in Polymer Science from the University of Akron and was a NASA postdoctoral fellow at Princeton. He has had over 30 years of successful industrial experience at Phillips, Monsanto and Medtronic Cardiovascular. There he led projects in areas such as biomaterials, drug delivery, polymer blends, coatings, implantable polymers among others. He was a Senior Science Fellow at Monsanto, a position less than 1% of the scientists attain. At Medtronic, Dr. Udipi was Director of Polymer Research and Distinguished Scientist. He is the co-inventor of BioLinx® Polymer System employed in Resolute, one of the two leading drug eluting stents globally generating billions of dollars of revenue. He has 45 awarded US patents; and scores of awarded foreign patents. He has authored and co-authored book chapters and >40 papers in peer reviewed journals. He has made presentations and chaired sessions at national and international polymer and biomedical conferences.

• •

Paris, France Independent

• •

Dr Loveridge has been working with growth orientated businesses in the biotech and medtech industries for over 20 years. As an active venture investor he has established a lengthy track record of successful participation in European, US and Israeli-based healthcare companies. Based in Europe he also has considerable international experience at board level. Dr Loveridge’s current directorships include: Warambi Sarl; Corticrine Limited; JDS BioPharma Limited; Actinogen Medical Pty Ltd and Anaconda SAS.

Brisbane, Australia Independent

Chris is Managing Director and Founder of MediGroup EBI, a successful SME medical device distribution and manufacturing business. Chris has a successful track record in the medical device and pharmaceutical industries with experience gained in the USA, UK, and Mainland Europe. His P&L, sales and marketing experience includes start-up phase, mid-size growth and large corporate. Prior to MediGroup, Chris established a peripheral vascular intervention business for Guidant (now Boston Scientific) in the UK, and went on to run their national cardiac intervention marketing in the UK, during his tenure market share more than doubled. He has successfully led the launch of 24 medical devices at the national level. Later, based in Belgium, he was an Associate Director for International Sales and Marketing Organization at AstraZeneca - a role that spanned all non-US sales and marketing and all therapeutic areas. In California, USA he advised the medical device industry on the development of new products: R&D processes, organization and strategy. Chris holds a Bachelors and Masters of Engineering from Cambridge University in the UK and an MBA, with distinction, from INSEAD, France.

England, United Kingdom Smith and Nephew Projects

Mark is the VP of Research and Technology at Smith and Nephew Wound Management in Hull, England and he has over 25 years’ experience in the Wound Management Sector within S&N bringing Innovative products to Global Markets. He has worked on Products as diverse as Allevyn, Dermagraft and NPWT. Mark has a first Degree in Microbiology, a PhD in Biochemistry and an MBA. He is particularly interested in Open Innovation and the importance of fully understanding customer needs. At present his team are particularly focused on understanding the technology roadmap for meeting these clinical needs. He lives in York in the UK.

Dr Steve Gower DAC Member

Mr Chris Selwa DAC Member • •

Dr Mark Richardson DAC Member

Dr Jason Loveridge DAC Member

• •

Melbourne, Australia RMIT University Projects

Dr Steve Gower worked for RMIT University in Melbourne as Director– Research Collaborations and Partnerships. Leading a small team, he was responsible for IP management, commercialisation of RMIT University research, research contracts as well as research partnerships with industry government and universities, both nationally and internationally; including Cooperative Research Centres. Previously he has held positions at the Australian Synchrotron, the Victorian Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional Development, the Australian National University, the University of Wollongong and BHP Research. Dr Gower has a physics double major degree and a PhD in plasma physics and high power microwave engineering, the latter undertaken through the CRC program. Dr Gower resigned from RMIT University and hence the WMI CRC DAC on 23rd Dec 2015.

35


Staff and Consultants As of 30 June 2016 the WMI CRC National Office employed 10 staff. Their roles, location and time committed are outlined on the following pages. There were several staff changes over the reporting period, including the appointment of a Chief Operations Officer and a Corporate Services Manager which are reflective of the CRC’s increase in activities and focus on commercial legacy vehicles, which are a result of the shift in strategic direction and as per Third Year Review Recommendations.

The CRC’s staff contingent is skilled and experienced across multi-disciplinary fields related to the operational areas of the Wound CRC including: clinical wound management, nursing, medical device commercialisation and product development, start-up companies, business development, design, brand management, biomedical electronics engineering, regulatory affairs, clinical trials, finance management, academia, biotechnology and life sciences.

Dr Ian Griffiths Chief Executive Officer • •

Brisbane, Austrlia 100% Time Committed

Dr Griffiths commenced as CEO of the Wound Management Innovation CRC in September 2013. Dr Griffiths previously held the position of Principal Advisor at RMIT University in Melbourne, finding commercial outcomes for RMIT University Research and providing expert advice on technology issues and emerging trends to both the Platform Technology Institute and the College of Science Engineering and Health. Dr Griffiths was also the CEO of AorTech Pty Ltd, COO of AorTech International plc, CEO of PolyNovo Pty Ltd and CEO of Novoskin Pty Ltd. Ian has worked for more than 20 years in commercialising innovative medical devices and specifically in wounds management products, as well as serving on a number of public and private company boards. Dr Griffiths has a PhD from the University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology with his thesis based on instrumentation physics and polymer chemistry. Dr Griffiths has been a guest speaker at numerous public events, conferences and investment forums and has a distinguished academic publication list. He has an extensive background in business development, licensing & acquisitions, medical technology commercialisation, capital raising and critical stakeholder management.

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

Ian Landreth was appointed as Chief Operating Officer, Emma Gierke as Corporate Services Manager, Jessica Engle replaces Dee Chin as Executive Assistant, Nora Foley replaces Faye Austen-Brown as Research Coordinator, Dr Robert Smith joined the staff as Product Engineer, replacing Special Advisor Robert Metzke on the Development Portfolio. RNA Solutions were appointed to provide outsourced bookkeeping services, and the preparation of management accounts in place of the Finance Officer function.

Dr Anthony Dyer

Mr Ian Landreth Chief Operating Officer • •

Brisbane, Austrlia 100% Time Committed

Ian Landreth has had a successful history in leadership, and the growth and establishment of health organisations in both the profit and NFP sectors. Ian has previously delivered Consultancy services for eight years for many industry sectors, from small entrepreneurial start-ups, government departments to multi-nationals in both Australia, and New Zealand. Ian has extensively with business leaders facilitating strategic planning, executive coaching and mentoring, change management, business development, system realignment and quality improvement. Ian has delivered many workshops on personal and team development and trained managers in performance management of staff. Ian has worked with, and been published in, the area of Valuesbased recruitment and has been a speaker on many occasions across a wide sector of topics at regional, state and international conferences. Ian is trained and experienced in Corporate Governance with experience of Directorship and Company Secretary with responsibility in risk management and compliance over many years.

Special Projects Director • •

Adelaide, Australia 100% Time Committed

Anthony provides leadership and commercial direction for the CRC clinical translation activities. These initiatives are aimed at generating genuine impact from research by establishing financially sustainable business units and improvements in patient care. With a particular focus in Aged Care, Anthony is developing sustainable business models to drive change and reduce the number of wounds through education, early intervention and prevention strategies. Anthony provides commercial oversight and input into the five key Wound CRC transaltion activities. Prior to his appointment with the Wound CRC, Anthony was the Clinical Program Leader at TGR BioSciences Pty Ltd. Anthony has worked in drug manufacture, regulatory affairs and clinical trials and spent four years developing therapeutics for the prevention of the side effects of chemotherapy. A molecular biologist by training, Anthony has a PhD from Flinders University, is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and is an inventor of drug screening and diagnostic tools which are now available commercially worldwide.


Dr Michelle Gibb Clinical Director • •

Brisbane, Australia 100% Time Committed

Michelle commenced with the WMI CRC in February 2015 as Clinical Director, and previously led the Wound Healing Service at Queensland University of Technology as Wound Management Nurse Practitioner. She has extensive experience in wound management and has worked in a range of clinical settings. Michelle has been awarded numerous prestigious awards for her contribution to nursing and wound care including a Churchill Fellowship in 2010. Michelle has also completed her PhD as a part of the Wound CRC’s student program. Her thesis explores wound management nurse practitioner models of practice.

Ms Shelley Morris • •

amsin Terry has more than 16 years of experience in the UK and Australian pharma-biotech sector with particular expertise in preclinical development of small molecules, biologics and vaccines and has extensive experience directing Industry-Academic research collaborations. Tamsin was previously Research Director for Implicit Bioscience, a Brisbane-based biotech focusing on immunomodulatory therapies, and previously managed research and development for two Brisbane based startups (Genetraks Pty Ltd and Vacquel Pty Ltd), and worked for Acambis, UK after obtaining a PhD in Biochemistry from Cambridge University, UK.

Corporate Services Manager • •

Dr Robert Smith Project Engineer

Development Project Leader • •

Melbourne, Australia 60% Time Committed

Dr Tom Tomac is a Biomedical Electronics Engineer with over 25 years’ experience in Research, Design and Development of medical devices specialising in clinical diagnosis, monitoring and control encompassing sleep analysis, neurology, brain research, cardiology, intracranial arteries, cochlea, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Tom obtained a PhD and Master’s Degree in Engineering from Swinburne University in Melbourne, Australia and embarked on a career acquiring a wealth of knowledge and experience across the discipline of Electronics and Biomedical Engineering that helped develop his skills in Telecommunications, Robotics, Industrial Control, Bioelectronics, Embedded Systems, Software, Project Leadership and Engineering Management.

Brisbane, Australia 100% Time Committed

Emma is a commercial lawyer with more than 7 years’ experience in private and government practice and as in-house counsel. Her breadth of business experience spans the not-for-profit and resource sectors in addition to her depth of experience in the legal arena. Emma brings to the CRC many years of operational experience in corporate governance and business intelligence systems. These skills and years of experience will support the day to day operation for the CRC and support continuous improvement of the entire organisation. Emma manages the corporate and legal operations of the CRC and supports the Chief Operating Officer in managing the CRC’s administrative and staff resources

Dr Tom Tomac

Research & Devlopment Director Brisbane, Australia 70% Time Committed

Brisbane, Australia 100% Time Committed

Shelley commenced with the CRC in 2012. As Branding & Communications Coordinator, Shelley develops and oversees the following activities for the CRC and it’s key translation brands: communication and brand strategies; in-house creative (graphic design, branding, websites, print design) and marketing (copy-writing, social media, websites and events). Shelley’s tertiary qualifications and background cover graphic design, brand management, web design, marketing and events management.

Dr Tamsin Terry • •

Ms Emma Gierke

Branding & Communications

• •

Melbourne, Australia 60% Time Committed

Robert Smith is an electronic engineer with 21 years’ experience in the telecommunications industry. He worked in South Africa, England and Australia as product manager and solution architect responsible for designing upgrades for major operators globally toward converging their mobile and fixed networks onto a common IP platform. During that time Robert was successful in winning several hundred millions of dollars of business as part of specialised multi-discipline tender teams, many of which he also served as the bid manager. Robert also has a PhD from RMIT University in Melbourne, his thesis combined mechanical & electronic engineering with optical physics to produce a highly sensitive three dimensional displacement sensor based on optical interferometry. .

37


Dr Jane Andrews Principal Consultant

Prof Keith Harding Principal Advisor Prof Harding CBE FRCGP FRCP FRCS, has had a longstanding interest in wound healing. From 2011 – 2013 he was Director of TIME Institute (Translation, Innovation, Methodology and Engagement) in the School of Medicine and Head of Wound Healing Research Unit, Cardiff University. In September 2013 he was appointed as Dean of Clinical Innovation at Cardiff University. His clinical practice is exclusively focused on treating patients with wound healing problems with a wide range of aetiologies. He has held external professorial appointments at universities in the UK and Australia. He has authored over 400 publications in the field of wound healing and has written a number of chapters and books in this area. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the International Wound Journal published by Wiley. He was the First President of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, First Recorder of the European Wound Management Association and is a Past President of the European Tissue Repair Society. He was Chair of the International Working Group on Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Disease, Chair of the Expert Working Group that produced a range of International Consensus Documents from 2004 – 2011. He has obtained funding of over £45 million from a range of academic, commercial and clinical sources since the Wound Healing Research Unit was created in 1991. He was awarded the CBE in the New Year Honours list in January 2013 for Services to Medicine and Health Care. In 2013 he was awarded £4.2 million to set up the Welsh Wound Innovation Initiative. The centre is designed to coordinate academic activity, both in terms of teaching and research, in addition to providing a coordinated approach to the care of patients with wounds. In 2014 he was elected to Fellowship of the Learned Society of Wales.

Prof Helen Edwards, OAM Research Program Leader Helen is Head of the School of Nursing at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Queensland, Australia and a member of the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation. Professor Edwards is internationally recognised for her work in ageing, chronic disease and wound management. Her clinical research is focused on evaluating models of care for people with chronic wounds and self-management of chronic disease. She leads the wound management research team in the Faculty of Health at QUT and works with multi-disciplinary teams and in partnership with industry. In collaboration with Professor Zee Upton, Professor Edwards established the $110 million Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre. Professor Edwards is also involved in several research programs related to aged care and dementia and is the Director of the Queensland Dementia Training and Study Centre (Funded by Commonwealth Government) which is located at QUT.

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

Jane is the former Deputy CEO of the Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre, where she played a key role in managing the activities of the Research Advisory Committee, Audit and Risk Committee, the Nominations and Review Committee and the Development Advisory Committee. Most importantly, she successfully led the CRC through a significant external review, which involved considerable strategic reform and management of a large number of internal and external stakeholders. Prior to joining the Wound CRC, Jane worked as a private consultant to industry, academia and government on strategy, intellectual property, commercial feasibility, due diligence and new government initiatives. In 2004, she co-founded Implicit Bioscience Limited, where her role as Director of Corporate Strategy saw her involved in acquisitions, life cycle management, product extension strategies and management of the intellectual property portfolio. Jane also served as Company Secretary at Implicit for six years. Jane is a Non-Executive Director of TechnologyOne Limited, Erdnarp Enterprises Pty Ltd and The Magic Pudding Company Pty Ltd. She is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

A. Prof Flavia Huygens Research Program Leader Flavia is a molecular microbiologist, who received her PhD in Medical Microbiology from the University of Pretoria, South Africa and later received her post-graduate certificate in education from the University of Queensland. Flavia has achieved significant success in research outcomes that are evident by the number of publications, patents, technology transfers, and collaborations both with industry and government agencies. Since 2007, Flavia has also established a significant number of collaborations including Pathology Queensland, Queensland Health Forensic Science Services, Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR), the Department of Natural Resources and Water Queensland, Universite Paris-Est Creteil France, University of Rosario, Colombia, and Immunexpress, USA.

Prof Allison Cowin

Research Program Leader Allison is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and Professor of Regenerative Medicine at the University of South Australia. Professor Cowin is a leading researcher in the area of wound healing and scar formation with over 60 peer-reviewed papers in top international journals. Professor Cowin heads a team of 12 staff and students who have established a world-leading and unique position in which to further define the mechanisms involved in wound healing particularly in relation to the role of the cytoskeletal protein Flii. Her team are developing new antibody-based therapies for the treatment of chronic wounds and burn injuries and her research has received special recognition from the NHMRC by inclusion in the 2008 ‘10 of the best projects’ publication. In 2009 she was awarded the MS McLeod Medal for Research Excellence.


Participants WMI CRC Participants are shown in the table below. Participants include “Essential Participants” as listed in the Commonwealth Agreement as well as “Other Participants” that are not listed in the Commonwealth Agreement, but are party to the Participants Agreement.

The University of Melbourne, Hartmann Australia, Acelity and 3M all joined the WMI CRC as other Participants. As planned the Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation and South East Queensland Hyperbaric Pty Ltd retired from the CRC on conclusion of their respective projects.

Participants FY15-16 Name

Participant Type

ABN/ACN

(Essential/Core or Other/ Supporting or Third Party)

Organisation Type (Australian Government, State Government, University, Industry/ Private Sector, SME, International or Individual)

Curtin University of Technology

Essential

99 143 842 569

University

Queensland University of Technology

Essential

83 791 724 622

University

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University

Essential

49 781 030 034

University

Smith & Nephew Pty Limited

Essential

68 000 087 507

Industry/Private Sector

University of South Australia

Essential

37 191 313 308

University

Wounds Australia (Australian Wound Management Association Inc.)

Other

69 104 482 963

SME

Blue Care

Other

96 010 643 909

Industry/Private Sector

Department of Health South Australia

Other

97 643 356 590

State Government

Department of Health Victoria

Other

74 410 330 756

State Government

Ego Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd

Other

86 005 142 361

Industry/Private Sector

Metropolitan Health Service

Other

13 993 250 709

Industry/Private Sector

Queensland Health

Other

66 329 169 412

State Government

Royal District Nursing Service Limited

Other

49 052 188 717

Industry/Private Sector

Silver Chain Group (Incorporating RDNS SA)

Other

77 119 417 018

Industry/Private Sector

The University of Queensland

Other

63 942 912 684

University

University of Western Australia

Other

37 882 817 280

University

University of Melbourne

Other

84 002 705 224

University

Mölnlycke Healthcare

Other

65 096 897 657

Industry/Private Sector

Hartmann Australia

Other

35000 099 589

Industry/Private Sector

3M

Other

90 000 100 096

Industry/Private Sector

Acelity

Other

47 056 073 468

Industry/Private Sector

Southern Cross University

Other

41 995 651 524

University

39


Collaboration Core to the CRC Program is the unique collaboration between Australian academia, industry and end-user organisations to drive research to output. The WMI CRC has facilitated an extensive amount of collaborative research with Participants, end-users and non-participant organisations from a broad background of Australian wound care practitioners, clinical researchers, and related industry organisations. Collaborations have occurred in both city centres and regional and remote areas, the involvement of key researchers resulting in the direct uptake and utilisation of CRC research outcomes. The collaborative nature of CRC-initiated research is demonstrated by the number of projects that include more than one participant or industry organisation, the addition of two industry partners as participants to the CRC, and engagement with multiple SME’s across a broad range of projects.

techniques, to develop new standards of treatment for both venous leg ulcers and preventing surgical wound dehiscence. This addresses the need for high quality studies in the area, and provides research into best practice models of care for the treatment of chronic wounds, integrating nursing, research and biotechnology, and presenting opportunities for clinical translation of research into chronic wound healing.

In Addition to this, the WMI CRC has worked to develop international associations with key researchers, sharing knowledge of wound assessment, prevention and treatment techniques, as well as translation of evidence-based practice and educational techniques for delivery of training for key clinicians and carers, to deliver ‘best practice’ wound care. Recent highlights demonstrating the innovative and collaborative approach of the WMI CRC include: •

Initiating studies into the occurrence, prevention and ‘best practice’ treatment of pressure injuries, bringing together research and clinical expertise, to reduce the incidence of pressure injuries in critically ill and aged care populations. Initiating collaborations with researchers and end user Industry Participants utilising negative pressure wound therapy and ultrasonic debridement

These projects provide research and collaborative opportunities to groups not typically involved in research such as aged care, GPs and community nursing, which enables translation, benchmarking and knowledge transfer of project outcomes.

Global impact

20 5 6 Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516

International expert collaborators

Leading multi national wound care product companies are Industry Participants Clinical Trials funded in FY15-16 to answer key industry questions for best practice for wound care and prevention.


Financial Management The WMI CRC revised financial management processes appointing RNA Solutions to provide outsourced bookkeeping services, and the preparation of management accounts. UHYN Accountants provided accounting, tax and audit advice and SRJ Walker were appointed as auditors.

Cash Contributions In the 2015/2016 financial year, the WMI CRC has received cash contributions from Participants totaling $1.327 million, $291,000 less than budget of $1.618 million at the end of the financial year. The WMI CRC also received Commonwealth funding of $4,000,000 funded by the Cooperative Research Centres Programme.. As of June 30th 2016 8 Participants were overdue on Participant payments. These were paid in early FY17 meeting budgeted cash contributions.

In kind and Non Staff In kind Contributions For the 2015/16 financial year, the WMI CRC Participants contributed 15.4 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) for staff in-kind contributions, reflecting a slight decrease against Budgeted amount of 16.3 FTE. The WMI CRC reported total non-staff in-kind contributions from Participants of $2,428,000 against the original CRC budget for FY16 of $3,789,000. The CRC has directly employed staff to manage the translation activities that will form the CRC’s legacies and device development personnel who interface with academic teams, which has reduced in-kind commitments from Participant teams. Additionally, legal negotiations delayed 4 major studies, which have now started.

Expenditure Expenditure for the year totaled $5,828,000 which included $3,220,000 used to support National Office administration functions including research, development and clinical expertise and project leadership, communications, marketing and corporate governance, with $2,608,000 utilised in supporting research and development activities. There was no capital equipment acquired by the WMI CRC during the reporting period. The WMI CRC is in a sound financial position as at 30 June 2016. It has $6,809,000 cash at bank, with net assets of $6,016,000. These funds are committed in FY17 and FY18 to ongoing Projects and Activities to achieve the WMI CRC contracted milestones and develop the WMI CRC’s clinical translation-focused business units.

The WMI CRC has no bad debts for the 2015/16 financial year.

Contributions - Actuals FY15-16

$2,428,000 Non-Staff in-kind contributions

$1.327million Cash contributions

15.4 FTE Staff in-kind contributions

41


Other Activities The CRC are engaging with MTP Connect, the Industry Growth Centre, with the aim of partnering closely to deliver outcomes and generate additional opportunities for industry focused research.

Wound CRC Annual Report FY1516


The WMI CRC’s revised strategy of improving research commercialisation, establishing industry-led research and improving the productivity of the wound industry aligns closely with the Commonwealth Government’s new vision of the CRC Programme. Building on this, we are engaging with MTP Connect, the Industry Growth Centre, with the aim of partnering closely to deliver outcomes and generate

additional opportunities for industry focused research. The WMI CRC provides a unique pathway between researchers, institutes and the wound industry. Our research is structured into priority areas that lead to national legacies, new technologies and an empowered workforce.

and service providers. Hence, the WMI CRC is uniquely positioned to create better supply chains, enhanced models of care and systems that can reduce the regulatory burden of clinical trials to release clinical development of the next generation of innovative wound products.

The WMI CRC has a unique mixture of Industry Participants, both product based companies

43


©Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Resrarch Centre, 2016 Street Address: Oxley House Level 2, 25 Donkin St West End QLD 4101 Postal Address: PO BOX 2375 Toowong DC QLD 4066 www.woundcrc.com + 61 07 3088 6666 enquiries@woundcrc.com

Wound CRC Annual Report FY 15-16  

The Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre Annual Report for FY 15-16

Advertisement