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Annual Report 2014-15


Annual Report 2014-15

Contents

01 02 03 Executive Summary

Research

Results

1.1 Achievements

2.1 Performance against activities

3.1 Utilisation and commercialisation

1.2 Risks and impediments

2.2 Education and training

3.2 Intellectual property management

1.3 End-user environment

2.3 SME engagement

3.3 Communications

1.4 Impacts

04 05 06 Resources 4.1 Governance – Board,

Other Activities

Additional Requirements 6.1 Third Year Review Recommendations

committees and key staff 4.2 Participants 4.3 Collaboration 4.4 Financial management

Annual Report FY1415

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Annual Report FY1415


Operational Areas

Research

Development

High impact, near term, industry led collaborations

Translation of research into next generation products Annual Report FY1415

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Education Education of Higher Degree Researchers and health care professionals

Clinical Translation Transforming the wound industry with sustainable legacies Annual Report FY1415

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01

Executive Summary

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Annual Report FY1415


1.1 Achievements The Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre (WMI CRC) has been a catalyst for change in the wound industry since its inception in 2010. Core to the CRC Programme is the unique collaboration between Australian academia, industry and end-user organisations to drive research to real world outputs. The WMI CRC consists of 19 Participants comprised of the nation’s leading scientists, clinical researchers, wound practitioners, wound care organisations and medical industry organisations. In the FY14-15 year, the WMI CRC has continued to progress its vision of transforming wound outcomes through industryled research, development of next generation products, producing industry ready graduates and the maturation of clinical translation activities into sustainable legacies. The CRC is in the final stages of forming its first subsidiary spinout company, Wound Healing Institute Australia, which is an exciting new venture expanding and commercialising the assets created through the WoundsWest Project. We believe that these services will continue into a nationwide, sustainable operation and lead to International exports. The FY14-15 reporting period was an intense period of activity that has advanced operations in multiple areas including developing the basis of the CRC’s legacy vehicles. In May 2014, the CRC underwent its Third Year Performance Review (3YR) where the CRC Executive Team and Governing Board presented the CRC’s proposed revised strategic plan and operational areas for its remaining term. As the WMI CRC enters its final 3 years of Commonwealth funding, four key operational areas have been identified that will steer the CRC toward its ultimate goal of transforming wound outcomes: • • •

Research: building on the successful elements of core research with a focus on near-term high impact activities; Development: next generation products to alleviate the suffering of people with wounds and generate commercial outcomes; Clinical translation: constructing sustainable legacy vehicles that disseminate evidence-based best practice clinical resources, reduce the impact of wounds on individuals and the economy, create jobs and address the Australian wound skills shortage; and Education: unifying clinical education and training; a legacy of an integrated and connected cohort of wound graduates.

This revised strategy, with these four operational activities as the central focus, has been overwhelmingly supported by Participants and endorsed by the Commonwealth Third Year Review Panel. The CRC National Office progressed plans with the official launch of this revised direction to its stakeholders through a series of face to face meetings and a Research ‘roadshow’. An important element of the revised strategy was

increasing efficiency and leverage for each dollar income through streamlining administration of research funding, enabling the CRC to focus on its operational areas. As a part of this process, the CRC developed two new, independent advisory groups: the Research Advisory Committee (RAC) and the Development Advisory Committee (DAC). These groups provide expert, independent review and advice on the CRC’s research and development portfolio and ensure that all the CRC’s activities are competitive and relevant to the wound industry. Other Cooperative Research Centres have shown an interest in understanding these systems and, during the reporting period, the WMI CRC has appointed members from allied medical health CRCs in advisory capacities and has signed a collaboration with the Cell Therapy Manufacturing CRC (CTM CRC). The CTM CRC has cellular based science and technology that can be applied to certain wounds. As these technologies mature, the WMI CRC will work with the CTM CRC to ensure timely roll-out to the wound management community. Paramount to signaling the change in strategy and direction was the need to revise the CRC’s visual identity and communications strategies. With strong support from Participants, the WMI CRC successfully re-branded and rolled-out the new identity and operational strategy to in the first half of the year. With the WMI CRC maintaining frequent communications and a strong and consistent corporate identity, the CRC’s stakeholders recognise the value proposition of the CRC and its capacity to use its collaborative resources to deliver meaningful change in the wound industry. Over the last year, the profile and reputation of the CRC has been widely recognised, demonstrated by increased industry and end-user engagement and collaborations, both nationally and internationally. In addition to these collaborations, the WMI CRC is now progressing plans to work with the Industry Growth Centre for Medical Technologies and Pharmaceuticals. This important engagement will enable the CRC to leverage its collaborations and vast network of experts to address the burden of chronic wounds and the multiple underlying chronic diseases that lead to wounds. Ultimately, both organizations can together influence the direction of improved workforce skills, reduce regulatory burdens, commericalise products and improve multi-national supply chains. The key achievements of the WMI CRC in FY14-15, summarized by area of operation, align closely with the Miles Review Recommendations and are highlighted over the following pages:

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Research Highlights An integral part of the CRC’s revised strategic direction has been the increased focus on clinical research, research translation and building on the fundamental research that has already demonstrated value. When considering the strategic roll out, it was acknowledged that Australia lacked meaningful research translation mechanisms in wound care. To address this gap, the WMI CRC commenced five projects to explore feasibility of proposed new clinical translation models (see more in Clinical Translation section). It is envisaged that these projects will ensure impact is realised and that the excellent research from the WMI CRC is implemented in the treatment of hundreds of thousands of Australians who suffer with wounds. This in turn will lead to significant savings in the Federal healthcare budget. The submission and selection process of new research projects into the CRC’s portfolio has been streamlined and enhanced to enable a timely and independent process. This has

been designed to address gaps in the industry and aligns with the CRC’s operational goals, strategies and transition plan. To provide expert international advice on this process is an independent Research Advisory Committee (RAC), appointed by the WMI CRC Governing Board. The RAC, in conjunction with industry experts and Program Leaders meet annually to discuss the CRC’s research priorities. Following Board approval this process results in the Research Priority Areas document. This document is available from the WMI CRC website and articulates the research areas the WMI CRC will seek to invest in to achieve the highest impact and satisfy the agreed commitments to the Commonwealth Government and Participants. The WMI CRC Research Priority Areas also acts as a guide to support and add value to other WMI CRC operational activities. The WMI CRC called for two Expression of Interest rounds during the reporting period. The RAC meet

twice formally in the reporting period to assess the resulting full proposals. Research proposals are assessed based on their alignment with the CRC’s Research Priority Areas and other factors, including: the quality of the science, clinical relevance and need, timeline for delivery of impact, end-user support, intellectual property, team track record and the financial commitment required to progress the research into the Development or Clinical programs. The CRC’s research portfolio is now divided across projects that lead to national legacies, new technologies and an empowered workforce. The dynamic mixture of leading industry Participants including product based companies and service providers enables the CRC to be uniquely positioned to create better supply chains, enhanced models of care and systems that can reduce the regulatory burden of clinical trials to release clinical development of the next generation of innovative wound products.

Some of the key research projects that have been funded as a result of this successful process are: Annual Report FY1415

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Health Economics and Healthcare Reform (QUT) The estimated cost of chronic wounds in Australia is conservatively estimated to be in excess of $2.85 billion each year,. The inclusion of data from wounds in the community setting could easily double this figure, representing around 4% of the Australian health care budget. The goals of the Health Economics and Reform Project are to: • • •

Smart Materials (RMIT)

Evaluate the current cost of wounds to the Australian economy and quantify the costs and benefits of adopting evidence-based practice; Influence health policy to provide incentives for low cost wound care in Australia; and Conduct economic and sustainability analyses for new models of wound care services (eg. Australian Wound Clinic and Aged Care Wound Services).

The CRC has engaged a full-time, independent Health Economist who is already delivering significant value to the CRC through quantifying specific research projects and publishing recommendations to reduce the economic burden of wounds which will be released in the next reporting period.

This project will develop new material structures to improve pressure management and may also be applied to next generation mattress and chair covers to minimize the formation of pressure injuries. These new materials also have the potential to be used in orthotics (therapeutic insoles) to create areas of differential pressure management to help ‘off-load’ foot ulcers.

CRC Education Project (QUT, AWMA)

Aged Care Services Pilot Project (UniSA) This project is assessing the financial sustainability and demand for commercial wound services in Residential Aged Care including education of staff, accreditation and monitoring, product recommendations and wound management support via case studies and telehealth services. Early indicators show that this project has the potential to enact cultural change within institutions with regards to best practice wound management education and resources in a financially sustainable manner.

The CRC’s Education Project has been revised following the end of the first phase of research. The highlights of the project in its first period were the creation of Cooperative Wound Clinics which are now being further explored as a sustainable model in other settings. The Education Project has now hired a highly experienced wound consultant to assist with project leadership (former Chair of the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) Education Sub Committee), Jan Rice. In conjunction with AWMA, the project will focus on the establishment of a process for national credentialing of wound experts. This credentialing will establish a national standard in the provision of wound management, enhance the quality of care provided to patients, promote professional standards and lobby for broader inclusion of wound management in the undergraduate curriculum of relevant training programs. This provides the education project with a route k toward significant profile raising of wound care that will see wound management become a clinical specialty, recognized across the vast health care spectrum where chronic disease and wound management are prevalent

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Development Highlights The projects in the development portfolio are high-impact, near-term, next-generation product developments that will generate revenues within the remaining term of the WMI CRC. The WMI CRC controls background IP, owns developed IP and has responsibility for Utilization and has created a pathway for value generation and financial returns to the WMI CRC to continue its activity base beyond Commonwealth funding. The CRCs Industry-led Development Advisory Committee (DAC) provides expert advice regarding the development options for research and development projects referred to the committee by the management team through the Expression of Interest process. The proposals that align with the CRC’s strategic direction and have the most commercial potential within the current competitive landscape are considered by the DAC. During the reporting period the DAC considered multiple proposals from across the CRC’s Participants. The DAC then provided advice on suitable projects to the Governing Board. The WMI CRC works with our Participants and RAC to identify mature and relevant technology in the wound care arena that fits with the WMI CRCs development portfolio aims

Through this process the CRC’s Development portfolio currently consists of four novel technologies. The intellectual property underpinning these technologies has been licensed and the technologies are undergoing further development by the WMI CRC. There is a short, well-defined path to market for each of these technologies, which have the capacity to transform the lives of patients living with diabetic foot ulcers, venous leg ulcers and abdominal wounds and to deliver significant commercial return to the Australian community. The prospect of delivering these commercial products has also been increased by more active engagement with Industry. The WMI CRC’s national outreach has enabled additional research partners to collaborate with the development teams. Southern Cross University provided some early validation and two additional collaborations between RMIT and other universities aimed at broadening the utility of the RMIT technologies in the wound arena are being developed.

of these technologies in the field of diabetic foot ulcers. Each of the three technologies have clear utility in the prevention, diagnosis or management of diabetic foot ulcers. In addition, it is anticipated that one of these technologies may be licensed for its use in facilitating abdominal closure, which would address a significant unmet need in the acute wound setting. There is already commercial interest in acquiring a licence for this use of the technology in this application. Another development technology, active pressure management garments, has the potential to be used to ensure that optimal compression is achieved for effective treatment of venous leg ulcers and burns and is also a candidate to be licensed in the next two years.

The WMI CRC is exploring the formation of a spinout company to facilitate timely commercialisation of three

The four key development projects are: Annual Report FY1415

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Hyperspectral imaging of cutaneous wounds (RMIT)

Insoles for diabetic patients (RMIT)

This project aims to demonstrate the efficacy of using hyperspectral imaging for a portable, low-cost device to detect peripheral perfusion in patients with diabetic foot ulcers to predict wound healing outcomes. The portable device would enhance clinical analysis of ulcers and a unique ability to treat and manage the patient. The device produced will use a commercial hyperspectral camera with bespoke image processing and visualisation technologies that would be used as part of a smart phone system. In the current reporting period the CRC has signed a significant cofunding agreement with the Defence Science Institute to explore the use of this technology in wound infection, detection and prevention in the military.

This project will develop an insole for diabetic ulcer management. The technology utilises a patented biosensor material and wireless technology to map the pressure distribution and alert the wearer if “hotspots” are detected. Near market prototypes are under development combining state of the art flexible electronics, wireless communications and advanced computer algorithms for pressure monitoring and biofeedback.

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (Smart Materials) (RMIT) Smart Compression (RMIT, UWA, QUT)

This project will develop new materials to improve open abdomen wound closure following surgery. The new materials will maintain their height but contract laterally under negative pressure to close the wound without using invasive mechanical devices. In these applications the structure can be tailored to deform in a controlled manner and manage force and its distribution unlike other ‘foam’ materials. this technology in wound infection, detection and prevention in the military.

This project will develop medical compression garments. The technology utilises a patented biosensor material integrated with a wireless detection technology. The WMI CRC believes these technologies will be useful in management of burns and VLU patients.

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Clinical Translation Highlights The WMI CRC’s Clinical Translation activities are centered on sustainable models of wound service, the provision of clinical education activities and mechanisms for increasing the uptake of evidencebased practice. These projects have been defined as core activities and key legacies that will lead to: industry growth, increased jobs, exports, productivity, integration into global supply chains, new technologies, products or services, increased revenues and intellectual property outputs. The WMI CRC believe that the maturation of these initiatives will lead to sustainable vehicles that will consolidate product and service delivery, increase the quality of wound care and significantly improve wound management outcomes nationally and internationally. The WMI CRC has identified, initiated and are actively managing five projects (business units) that have been established to form the basis of a legacy vehicle, either in a consolidated business unit or as individual

profitable entities. These projects will be executed as individual business units. As they become financially and clinically successful, it is envisaged that some combination of these assets will be consolidated in a self-sustaining entity. Each of these projects has the following common aspects: • •

• • • • •

They are currently missing from the Australian, and in many cases the global, wound landscape. When formed they would create profound value for Industry, healthcare systems and ultimately patients. They have the potential to be financially viable business units. They will create enhanced workforce capacity and new roles. They will draw upon and complement the activities of the other business units. They will introduce efficiencies and build new supply chains into wound management services; They will reduce costs and improve outcomes through providing evidence to drive healthcare reform.

They are underpinned by solid healthcare economics to influence reimbursement of cost effective products and services.

However, the true value is in their combination to form a better system of managing wounds and, more broadly, chronic disease. The WMI CRC will resource these ventures appropriately within our existing budgets to deliver upon the operational areas.

The five business units that have been developed in the reporting period are: Annual Report FY1415

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Wound Healing Institute Australia (WHIA)

Australian Wound Registry (AWR)

WHIA is a not-for-profit organisation formed as a spin-out from the WMI CRC and Participants WA Health, Curtin University and SilverChain. This exciting new venture expands on the recently wound-up WoundsWest Program (an initiative of WA Health, Curtin and SilverChain) and enables these services to continue into a nationwide, sustainable operation. WHIA will be dedicated to improving the life and health of Australians with wounds by supporting all health professionals, patients and carers through education, training, advice, research and health promotion on wound prevention and management. The WHIA will facilitate the continued dissemination of WMI CRC research outcomes and information on clinical best practice into clinical settings.

Currently the costs of wound management in Australia are not well understood. There is limited data, it is not consistently collected, and there is uncertainty that the data sets are connected. Without this information health care policy makers, care providers, industry, patients and carers are unable to make informed choices. To address this issue, the WMI CRC is building the Australian Wound Registry (“AWR”). The AWR will provide rich data to research and promote evidence-based practice in the management and prevention of wounds, inform healthcare policy and reimbursement, and generate a valuable industry database for product and marketing information. Building on this initiative, the AWR, Welsh Wound Innovation Initiative and the Canadian Association of Wound Care intend to form the International Wounds Registry.

Australian Wound Innovation Centre (AWIC) The WMI CRC is in the process of negotiating the establishment of Australia’s first financially sustainable facility dedicated to wound treatment, research and education, the Australian Wound Innovation Centre (“AWIC”). The AWIC is anticipated to be the flagship legacy vehicle, providing leadership in wound treatment, evidence-based research and education. The AWIC represents disruptive thinking in the provision of wound management services in Australia. As a centre of clinical excellence, it will exemplify what can be achieved for patients through the routine use of best practice. Its clinical research capacity will enable it to engage in disruptive thinking that can transform wound care outcomes. Its throughput will enable face-to-face education of the next generation of wound care clinicians with training in evidence-based practice. The WMI CRC is working closely with international collaborators to replicate and further the success of the Welsh Wound Innovation Centre model.

Australian Aged Care Services A key area of activity for the WMI CRC is the dissemination of evidence-based best practice clinical resources to health care providers. The implementation of evidence based best practice has been initiated in a number of GP clinics and Residential Aged Care facilities by providing hands on training and education resulting in improved knowledge and confidence in the treatment of wounds and improved patient outcomes . The CRC is expanding the Cooperative Wound Clinic concept towards selfsustainable business models that provide services beyond the CRC’s term. In collaboration with WHIA, the services offer a number of activities including online wound education programs, face to face training, educational resources and publications, wound prevalence surveys and a wound advisory service (telehealth). This service will improve outcomes for residents with wounds and promote organisational, clinical and educational strategies for the prevention of wounds in residential aged care. Tailored packages of services will be negotiated with aged care facilities based on their specific needs.

Diabetic Foot Australia (DFA) Globally, one diabetes-related amputation occurs every 20 seconds. Australia has a large, and increasing, diabetes-related amputation rate making it the second highest in the developed world. As such, Diabetic Foot Ulcers (DFUs) are an over looked issue of national significance and a silent epidemic. The DFA initiative will create a national body that will collaborate with related organisations and networks to empower patients, clinicians and researchers, and form a conduit for diabetes-related outcomes from the WMI CRC. A key output from the DFA Initiative will be the establishment of a national minimum dataset for DFU within Australia (which will also form part of the Australian Wound Registry). The database will capture existing data in a consistent format across Australia and will form the basis of a national DFU Dashboard that will publish national key performance indicators on DFU’s, their occurrence, healing times, amputations, treatments, trends etc. This registry will also link with other registries across Australia (e.g. Queensland Statewide High Risk Foot Database).

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Core Projects These projects will be executed as individual business units.

Diabetic Foot Australia

Australian Aged Care Services

Clinical Translation The WMI CRC is collaborating with and building on the strengths of its Participants to develop business units that can come together to form a unique system of wound management knowledge, education and training. Annual Report FY1415

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Australian Wound Registry

Australian Wound Innovation Centre

Wound Healing Institute Australia

Legacy Vehicles As the business units become financially and clinically successful, it is envisaged that some combination of these assets will be consolidated in a self-sustaining entity/legacy vehicles under the CRC’s Pty Ltd company.

WMI CRC Participants Essential Participants Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs) Government University Industry/Private Sector * Full Participant list on page 56

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Education Highlights The WMI CRC is on track to educate over fifty higher degree students, each of whom will be trained in a culture of collaboration and who will have forged strong connections with their peers in diverse disciplines, all of which are integral to wound management. The CRC has fulfilled its PhD milestones and is actively engaging its Participants to fulfill the remaining Honours and Masters Student milestones. The Student and Alumni cohort remain engaged and the CRC endeavors to produce employment opportunities through its clinical translation activities. During the reporting period the CRC held the first National Student and Early Career Researcher (“ECR”) Conference. The program boasted 2 very full days of stimulating and constructive sessions and social activities, focused on career opportunities and networking, grant writing and presentation workshops, career profile building and the management of Intellectual Property.

This event brought together a truly diverse range of disciplines. The result being an engaged, informed, united and, most importantly, energised group of Wound CRC researchers. Featuring Industry experts and an array of highly respected invited guest speakers, the conference was well attended by Program Leaders, Post-Docs, Higher Degree Research Students and the CRC’s National Office. During the event the CRC announced a collaboration with Cell Therapy Manufacturing CRC whereby the first prize for the best oral presentation was awarded exclusive attendance to an entire module of the CTM CRC’s newly launched ePhD course. This opportunity for cross CRC collaboration is a truly unique and memorable milestone.

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HDR Students

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49 students are currently engaged with the Wound CRC

New Students 9 New Phd, Master and Honours students commenced in FY14-15

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Alumni

15 PhD, Masters and Honours students have completed their degrees Annual Report FY1415

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Other Highlights National and international collaborations

Commonwealth Milestones and Impact Tool

The WMI CRC has over 20 international expert collaborators spanning 11 countries. In the reporting period the CRC signed its second significant international collaboration. Following from the success of the Welsh collaboration, signed in FY13-14, the CRC entered into a collaboration agreement with the Canadian Association of Wound Care (CAWC). The international collaboration will see a sharing of ideas, systems and initiatives to benefit the patients of two commonwealth nations with very similar healthcare systems. The CAWC is a national, multidisciplinary association focused on the prevention and treatment of acute and chronic wounds in addition to ensuring maintenance of skin integrity.

The Impact Tool was revised at the end of June 2015 and the overall benefit: cost ratio has increased from 2.34 in May 2014 to 2.70 in June 2015. The revised Impact Tool predicts total expected benefits of $298,531,343 and total expected costs of $110,715,111.

As a part of this initiative, WMI CRC PhD students were sponsored to present their CRC projects at the “Action 2014: Skin Health for Canada” conference, which was a joint initiative of the CAWC and the Canadian Association for Enterostomal Therapy (CAET) in Toronto. The Welsh and Canadian partnerships have also been integral to the development of several of the CRC’s Clinical Translation and Core Research projects, specifically the Australian Wound Innovation Centre, the Australian Wound Registry and Diabetic Foot Australia. The WMI CRC signed a collaboration agreement with the Cell Therapy Manufacturing CRC (“CTM CRC”). The CTM CRC, through intervention with smart materials, is committed to the cost-effective manufacture and rapid translation of cell therapies for a range of clinical conditions. The WMI CRC and CTM CRC will work together to develop and clinically evaluate these novel cell therapy based treatments, once prototypes are at a more mature stage. The CTM CRC has pioneered an entrepreneurial PhD (ePhD) program through which WMI CRC students will be able to enrol and participate. Both CRCs are committed to creating industry-ready graduates who will benefit from these educational activities and are collaborating to deliver a higher standard of student support. Communications The WMI CRC successfully launched its new branding and operational strategy, through its revamped visual identity. This coincided with the creation of a Branding and Communications Coordinator position which has enabled the branding to become a cornerstone of the CRC’s communication strategies. Increased communication activity and focus has led to the development of online communities, a national Student and Early Career Researcher conference, new online webinar seminar series, regular media releases and increased internal publications. The CRC has also reorganised its National Office to be directly involved in research and development activities and to improve collaboration and transparency. These changes will lead to better stakeholder relations and improved outcomes.

In April 2015, a number of changes to Commonwealth Milestones were finalized. The majority of the changes had already been contemplated in the documentation provided to the Commonwealth Third Year Review, however additional milestones were added to reflect new activities including the Health Economics research program and the creation of the Australian Wound Registry. The number of students in Programs Two and Three have increased and the number of intellectual property milestones in these programs have correspondingly increased. The WMI CRC has a strong focus on the utilisation and commercialisation of research outcomes and is on target to achieve and exceed expectations relating to the original utilisation milestones. To accommodate this strong performance, additional utilisation milestones in relation to expected outputs from key clinical translation projects have been added to the Commonwealth Agreement and these are also on target. Industry Engagement Since the inception of the revised strategy, the WMI CRC has grown a reputation in the wound industry which is now being reflected in the dramatic increase in the number of corporate partners interested in joining or collaborating with the CRC. As such, WMI CRC has engaged these new partners as Participants. Based on discussions to date, the CRC anticipates that several new global medical device corporations will join the CRC as Participants in the next reporting period. In addition, Other Participants, most notably Southern Cross Care, have the CRC on specific projects, such as the Aged Care Services Project The WMI CRC has been working with the Australian Wound Management Association (“AWMA”), whose membership includes a diverse range of wound care service providers and Industry partners, on several key initiatives including work on the credentialing of wound care experts, reimbursement of best practice wound care and a wound awareness campaign. With the addition of the RAC and DAC and ongoing relationships with existing Participants, the CRC is progressing a number of promising technologies, educational initiatives and industry specific research programs.

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1.2 Risks and Impediments Risks and impediments are evaluated regularly by management and the Board and a risk register is maintained and reviewed by the Audit & Risk Committee. The WMI CRC has recognized its reliance on a limited number of industry partners as a potential risk, as industry partners enable the CRC to maximize commercialization opportunities and assist with dissemination of the research, products and services to foster uptake of best practice wound management. To manage this risk, the WMI CRC have proactively focused on building and strengthening linkages with Industry partners. As a consequence, the WMI CRC is now in advanced negotiations with several wound product or management companies, who are interested in becoming Participants in the WMI CRC. The WMI CRC has also built new industry linkages through discrete projects, which have involved significant contributions from non-Participant Industry partners including Southern Cross Care (SA&NT) Inc., AbRegen Pty. Ltd., Wesley Centre for Hyperbaric Medicine, the Bethanie group Inc., and Amana Living Inc. and a number of general practice clinics and Medicare locals. It is worth noting that a number of projects, but particularly the Australian Wound Aged Care Service, have opened up additional Industry relationships with the aged care sector. The WMI CRC has been conscious of the risk of having insufficient time with Commonwealth funding to complete its translation and utilization activities in a timely manner. To address this risk, the WMI CRC has already substantially shifted its focus to activities that will ensure that its research outcomes are utilized. There are a number of examples of this clinical translation activity including: •

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Significant business planning for the establishment of an Australian Wound Innovation Centre (AWIC), which is likely to be the cornerstone of the WMI CRC clinical translation activities and Australia’s first dedicated facility for the provision of expert wound care, clinical research and face-to-face training. It is intended that the AWIC will be operated using a hub and spoke model, allowing its services to be broadly disseminated across the nation. In this, as in other clinical translation activities, liabilities will be managed by entering into appropriate insurance contracts, and by limiting the amount of exposed capital. The establishment of the Wound Healing Institute of Australia, to facilitate online education of wound care providers and support of clinicians with expert telehealth facilities. The WMI CRC has conducted a detailed business feasibility analysis which suggests that this company should be financially independent within

Annual Report FY1415

two years. However, should the company fail to meet its financial forecasts, it is possible to wind up the business with minimal cost to the CRC. •

The WMI CRC has completed a pilot study to assess the commercial potential for providing wound services into the aged care setting. The Australian Aged Care Wound Services (AACW) will leverage AWIC’s and WHIA’s services into the aged care sector by providing tailored online wound education programs, face to face training, educational resources and publications, wound prevalence surveys and a wound advisory service (telehealth).

The Australian Wound Registry project has completed its pilot phase and will soon be entering data from initial participants. The registry will create a sustainable mechanism for monitoring wounds in the Australian landscape, addressing the adage “that you can’t manage what you can’t measure”. This project also will enable pathways of care to be integrated into registry forms to facilitate adoption of best practice care. In assessing the feasibility of this project, the legal landscape has been carefully explored to ensure that the AWR is operating ethically and within all necessary legislation.

The WMI CRC has funded a three-year health economics project, led by QUT’s Doctor Rosana Norman and Professor Nicholas Graves. Over the last year, this project has made significant progress on evaluating the current costs of wounds on the Australian economy and quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting evidence-based practice. Doctor Norman also provides an economic assessment of all research project proposals for the Governing Board. This process ensures projected research outcomes are aligned to the CRC’s goals of influencing health policy in regard to patient-centered best practice wound management that minimizes healthcare costs. The WMI CRC has also engaged the services of THEMA consulting, a firm that provides advice on obtaining reimbursement for medical products and services. Key person risks with this project are mitigated by the fact that there are a number of trained health economists available to the project through the Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation (AusHSI).

The Diabetic Foot Australia (DFA) initiative will use the expertise of the Wound CRC and its Participants to create an Australian National body that will partner with related organizations and networks to empower patients, clinicians and researchers and form a conduit


for outcomes from the WMI CRC. The DFA Initiative will also support the National Wound Registry in the collection of data about diabetic foot ulcers, and will also develop pathways of care based on the latest evidence about best practice. One potential risk for DFA is that it will fail to generate sufficient momentum by the time Commonwealth funding ceases. This risk will be managed through the appointment of a Commercial Director. Emerging competition is a potential risk, particularly for the WMI CRC’s development activities. The WMI CRC monitors this risk through regular communications with industry leaders plus keeping abreast of relevant literature, patent databases and company announcements. The Program Leaders, Research Advisory Committee, Development Advisory Committee and Strategic Advisors also help ensure that the WMI CRC is aware of, and can respond to, the activities of any relevant competitors. One significant gap in wound management is the limited number of experts in the practice of wound management. This creates a risk for some of the WMI CRC’s educational activities, as they are reliant on trained staff to operate ongoing educational programs. With this in mind, the WMI CRC has adopted a “train the trainer” approach to many of its educational programs, to ensure that it is developing additional experts to continue the expansion of the wound workforce. As it enters its sixth year of operations, the WMI CRC is also cognisant of the need to ensure that projects are completed in a timely fashion before the conclusion of Commonwealth funding. With this in mind, new research and development projects are carefully evaluated to ensure that projects are achievable within the time remaining. Similarly, student projects are only supported if it is clear that the student will have sufficient support available to complete their studies.

continued to be plagued by technical issues, and some of the promising preliminary outcomes have failed to be replicated. As a consequence of this, and ongoing concerns about commercial interest in these markers, the WMI CRC has revised its expectations of success in developing these markers and has deprioritized biomarkers as a research priority. However, the CRC has funded a project to crystalize the value of the existing library of biomarkers. It is planned in the next reporting period to showcase these results to a number of potential corporate partners (after observing a Participant’s rights to commercialise the technology). This will be managed in collaboration with our Partners in Wales and through the relationships with Professor Keith Harding. The Education Project experienced some delays due to staff changes. During this time the project was reviewed and priorities changed. We are delighted that Jan Rice, a highly experienced wound consultant and former Chair of the AWMA Education Sub Committee has joined our Education project. Jan has exceptional experience in wound education, having driven the education agenda within AWMA for many years and having developed draft accreditation guidelines during her time there. We are confident that this project will now build on Phase 1 outputs to deliver sustainable high-quality outcomes. There have been some delays in launching WHIA’s full operations due to unexpected issues obtaining necessary legal documentation from WA Health. These issues arose as a consequence of staff changes and internal matters within WA Health and the WMI CRC anticipates that they will be resolved shortly.

The WMI CRC takes financial risks seriously. The WMI CRC financial systems and policies are regularly reviewed to ensure that there is appropriate management of funds and to mitigate against risks such as fraud or corruption. The WMI CRC has faced several impediments over the course of the year. Most notably, the work on developing and validating diagnostic markers associated with wounds has

The WMI CRC monitors emerging technologies through regular communications with industry leaders plus keeping abreast of relevant literature, patent databases and company announcements. Annual Report FY1415

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1.3 End-User Environment The need for wound management products and services continues to grow with the changing demographics of the global population. It is forecast that by 2050, the number of people over the age of 65 worldwide will have tripled to nearly 1.5 billion. Our expectations of medical care have also increased, with older people expecting to be active and independent for longer. There is an increased prevalence of many chronic diseases, such as diabetes, which are associated with an increased prevalence of wounds. The wound management industry consists of a diverse set of participants. Wound care services are provided by a range of public and private participants including general practitioners, hospitals, private practice, residential aged care, community and centre-based nursing, allied health, pharmacy and patient self-care. Wound care products are developed and distributed by a range of companies, ranging from small to medium-sized enterprises (“SMEs”) to large multinational companies. The majority of the WMI CRC’s participants are from industry and together with WMI CRC collaborators provide broad representation of the wound management industry. Many of the WMI CRC’s projects and translation efforts are focused on the wound management community as a whole, but some are targeted to specific subsets of the community. • • • •

• • • •

20

The key issues which face the wound management industry are: There is insufficient evidence around best practice wound care; There is a shortage of clinically proficient staff who are adopters of evidence-based practice; There is a lack of data about the scale of Australia’s wound problem. It has not been possible to determine how many Australians are affected by wounds, how their wounds are being treated and if those treatments are working; There is a need for development of new products or processes to assist in treatment of wounds which do not respond adequately to existing evidence-based practice; Wound care is not recognized as a specialty, and so patients are often not connected with appropriate services and do not receive best practice care; Wound care is highly fragmented making care inconsistent and supply chains inefficient; Health care providers are not properly incentivised to provide optimal care due to inadequacies in reimbursement of practitioner time and product costs.

Such issues cannot be addressed by any one industry partner. By collaborating, and through the assistance of federal government funding and academic partnerships, the WMI CRC has driven, and will continue to drive, improvements in the productivity and sustainability of the wound management industry.

Annual Report FY1415

Research Enabling Evidence Based Practice One of the WMI CRC’s greatest achievements to date has been delivery on research outcomes that will improve clinical practice. At the outset, the CRC made a commitment to undertake six clinical studies on new interventions, but the CRC has already undertaken seven. Data generated from these studies is already transforming clinical practice. For example, skin tears are reported to be the most common preventable wound found amongst older adults. Projects 3-06 and 3-07 assessed risk factors for skin tears and determined that twice daily moisturizing would prevent 50% of skin tears in older Australians. This work was confirmed in both an aged-care and hospital setting and these findings have been broadly disseminated using media, education and training strategies. The use of moisturiser in the prevention of skin tears has been successfully implemented at 14 residential aged care facilities (Project 3.06) and at the Greenslopes private hospital (Project 3.19). The moisturising regime is also undergoing broader uptake in the aged care setting through the Wound Healing Institute (WHIA) and Wound Aged Care Service Project (CR.14). Similarly, the pathways for implementing risk assessment tools have been considered for venous leg ulcers and skin tears with a feasibility analysis to conduct a prospective surgical wound dehiscence study underway (Project 3.30). Other non-clinical research also has important clinical implications. For example, Project 3-17 determined the degree of microbial contamination in open, but unused, portions of wound dressings and developed recommendations for storage, handling and use of wound dressings in home settings. Although this was a simple study, the outcomes have the potential to generate significant cost savings when amplified over the number of Australians requiring wound dressings. Shortage of Clinically Proficient Staff The WMI CRC recognizes that the shortage of clinically proficient wound care professionals is a significant impediment to the widespread use of best practice, and optimization of patient outcomes. The WMI CRC has four discrete strategies for reforming this situation: online education, face-to-face learning, train-the-trainer programs and accreditation of wound experts. The WMI CRC has established the Wound Healing Institute of Australia, a wholly owned, proprietary limited, company limited by guarantee, which will support all health professionals, patients and carers through education, training, advice, research and health promotion on wound prevention and management. One of WHIA’s services will be the provision of an online and clinical wound education service. WHIA will also provide support to health professionals in the


rural and remote setting on how to treat wounds through the operation of telehealth services.

implementing its strategic plan in FY16, which will see the registry start to be populated with data.

The WHIA will also continue the work of WoundsWest in providing health promotion services to prevent or improve health and social outcomes for people with wounds, including an Aboriginal Health Worker Wound Education Program. All of these activities will assist in increasing clinical proficiency amongst wound care providers.

The Diabetic Foot Australia (“DFA”) Initiative will develop a national minimum dataset for diabetic foot ulcers within Australia. This will be incorporated into the Australian Wound Registry, but will enable the publishing of a National DFU Dashboard that will provide updates on key performance indicators on DFUs including statistics on prevalence, healing times, amputations, treatments, trends etc. This registry will also link in with existing registries across Australia such as the Queensland Statewide High Risk Foot Database. Over the year, the DFA project has developed a strategic plan to reduce Australia’s diabetes related amputation rates by 20% within 5 years.

The WMI CRC’s education strategy includes a range of education and training initiatives. The WMI CRC has engaged Ms. Jan Rice to help develop a framework for credentialing wound clinicians to ensure wound experts meet established professional practice standards. The education strategy will also build on previous work on the Cooperative Wound Clinics and expand the offering into residential aged care. One gap in wound management training currently is the availability of quality face-to-face training. The WMI CRC hopes to bridge this gap as one of the outcomes of the Australian Wound Innovation Centre. The Australian Aged Care Wound Services represents a new model of wound service delivery, which is applicable to and expandable in, residential aged care facilities, hospitals and general practice clinics. In essence, this project helps extend WHIA’s and AWIC’s educational offering into the aged care sector. Quantifying Australia’s Wound Problem Currently the human and economic costs of wounds in Australia are not well understood. There is limited data available and it is not consistently collected. Without this information, health care policy makers, care providers, industry and patients are not able to make informed choices. To address this issue, the WMI CRC has conducted a pilot project to determine the feasibility, and support the establishment of an Australian Wound Registry. So far, there has been significant support from key stakeholders including industry, healthcare organizations and the Australian Wound Management Association.

The Wound Healing Institute of Australia will also assist in the quantification of wounds by conducting wound prevalence surveys. It is anticipated that the wound prevalence surveys will also facilitate uptake of the National Wound Registry. Development of New Wound Interventions Our medical system needs cost-effective interventions to assist the growing number of individuals suffering from wounds, so there is a growing demand for cost-effective, clinically efficacious products. The WMI CRC’s development pipeline consists of products that meet this need in providing costeffective products for prevention and treatment of wounds. A good example is the development of foot insoles that enable the monitoring of sub-plantar pressure, to enable offloading and the prevention of the development of diabetic foot ulcers. Other drivers of change in wound care include advances in technology that will demonstrate improved clinical benefits. Even with best practice wound care, there are still too many individuals suffering with chronic wounds that fail to be treated by existing therapeutic options. The WMI CRC’s pipeline contains innovative products that will address unmet clinical needs. A good example is a novel development product that will facilitate closure of wounds where underlying pressure has made it difficult to appose the wound edges.

The WMI CRC has minimized the risk of this project by collaborating with the Welsh Wound Innovation Initiative, who have developed registry resources and trialed them in the UK over the last five years. Over the course of the year, the pilot phase of the Australian Wound Registry project was completed and funding has been approved to commence Phase 1 of

Wounds disproportionately affect older individuals and so the aged care and residential care sectors tend to experience a high rate of wounds. Annual Report FY1415

21


There are three options for the economic exploitation of the development portfolio. The most likely possibility is that several of the technologies will be commercialized through a spin out company of the CRC. Given that some of the development assets are potentially synergistic, it may make sense to commercialize them as a “bundle”. It is anticipated that the exit for a spin-out company may come in the form of a trade sale or listing. A trade sale is certainly plausible in the current environment. There have been several examples of consolidation in the industry, the most obvious example being the merger of Kinetic Concepts, Inc (KCI), LifeCell Corporation (LifeCell) and Systagenix Wound Management into one company, which has been rebranded as Acelity L.P. Inc. Several of these companies are looking to grow their product portfolio through acquisition of companies developing innovative wound technologies. A listing on a stock exchange is another possible exit strategy, which may be preferred, depending on the economic environment at the time of exit. One of the stand-alone technologies has attracted commercial interest for a licensing deal, which might also be a suitable exit strategy for other development assets. Connecting People with Wounds with Wound Management Experts The WMI CRC has been working closely with the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) on several strategic initiatives including a national wound awareness campaign to assist people with wounds to find wound management experts who can ensure that they are getting best practice treatment. The Australian Wound Management Association is in the process of becoming a national body, Wounds Australia. Delays in finalizing this corporate change has resulted in the launch of the National wound awareness campaign being postponed until the Wounds Australia rebranding effort is ready. It is anticipated that future joint initiatives will be easier to facilitate through a nationalized body. As mentioned previously, the work of the Wound Healing Institute of Australia will also support rural and remote Australians, including indigenous Australians, through their telehealth programs and their Aboriginal Health Worker Wound Education Program. Aged Care/Residential Care Wounds disproportionately affect older individuals and so the aged care and residential care sectors tends to experience a high rate of wounds. The Australian Aged Care Wound Services Project represents a new model of wound service

By

delivery, which is applicable to and expandable in, residential aged care facilities, hospitals and GP clinics. One of the projected key outputs of this project, in addition to improved resident, staff and statutory outcomes; is demonstrating the cost efficiencies of using specialist wound services and prevention strategies to the Aged Care organization. This project is an expansion of the Cooperative Wound Clinic initiative and will attempt to expand and monetize the concept of best practice service and training. The pilot phase of the project is complete and it has already had significant commercial interest in expanding this business. The Australian Aged Care Wound Services Project has a significant opportunity for International expansion. A recent report by Corrs Chambers Westgarth1 points to the massive opportunities for Australian aged care service providers to utilize their expertise in overseas markets, highlighting China as a particularly prominent opportunity. The China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA) negotiations were concluded in November 2014 (subsequently signed in July 2015), opening an opportunity for Australian wholly owned aged care providers to be established in China. The proportion of China’s population aged 65 years or over is forecast to grow much faster than Australia (from 8% currently to 25% by 2050)2. There are also social trends in China driving increased demand for aged care facilities, with traditional family based care becoming less common as younger people move to cities, leaving behind their extended families. The Aged Care Project clearly has the capacity to expand to fill the growing need for training and management of wounds in this massive, and growing market. The Australian Department of Social Services has announced new national voluntary quality indicators (QI) for aged care are being developed to measure aspects of service provision which contribute to the quality of care and services given by the provider, and consumers’ quality of life and experiences. The QI include various indicators related to wounds, which will be another driver of uptake of the Australian Aged Care Wound Services. In home care is a growing section of the aged care services market. The WMI CRC has a number of participants servicing this portion of the aged care market including Blue Care, the Silver Chain Group (incorporating RDNS SA) and Royal District Nursing Service Limited. These participants are closely aligned with the CRC’s activities and their involvement has included active participation in a number of research projects, in addition to being involved in planning for the Australian Wound Registry.

2050


Developing Incentives to use Evidence Based Practice One of the significant challenges faced by the wound management industry is lack of data around the cost of wounds to the Australian economy and evidence to guide how the Australian public dollar could be better spent to improve wound outcomes. The WMI CRC’s health economics research project primary goals are to: • •

Evaluate the current cost of wounds to the Australian economy and quantify the costs and benefits of adopting evidence-based practice Influence health policy to provide incentives for low cost wound care in Australia

Over the last year, several economic models have been created, which will be populated with interim data generated from historical research databases. Ultimately this project will be able to populate the model with more comprehensive data from the Australian Wound Registry. This project also results in the provision of economic advice at the outset of clinical projects, to ensure that the correct data is collected to inform economic analysis. In some cases, there is already economic data to support the reimbursement of certain wound interventions. A good example is for the use of compression bandages to treat venous leg ulcers, where the intervention has been demonstrated to be cost effective. The WMI CRC has sought advice from THEMA Consulting to determine how to seek reimbursement for compression therapy and this work is ongoing as at June 30, 2015.

By adopting a tiered “hub and spoke” (service partner) model of health service delivery, the implementation of similar models throughout Australia will be facilitated and ultimately ensure the provision of services where people most need them. The AWIC will be the “Hub” that provides a single face to the consumer while seamless extensions, or “Spokes”, are leveraged to provide services, distributed across multiple locations throughout Australia. The AWIC also offers the capacity to rollout a number of initiatives that have shown promise during earlier projects managed by the WMI CRC, such as Cooperative Wound Clinics and similar clinical activities in aged care facilities and residential care facilities. Australia’s track record for best practice diabetic foot care is poor. Australia rate second last amongst a number of developed nations with 18 amputations per 100,000 people. Diabetic Foot Australia was formed to help bring together the diverse group of clinicians responsible for diabetic foot care, with the common goal of reducing Australia’s diabetes-related amputation rate by 20% within five years. http://www.corrs.com.au/thinking/insights/five-aged-care-trends-towatch-in-2015/ 2 https://news.agedcareguide.com.au/2015/01/16/aged-care-trendsto-watch-in-2015/ 1

Consolidation of Fragmented Wound Services The WMI CRC is preparing to establish Australia’s first financially sustainable facility dedicated to wound treatment, clinical research and education, the Australian Wound Innovation Centre (“AWIC”). The AWIC’s overarching strategic imperative is to provide a model of service delivery that is sustainable and replicable in other health service contexts.

Is predicted to be nearly the number of people

over

65

years

Globally


The revised Impact Tool predicts total expected benefits of

$298,531,343

24

Annual Report FY1415


1.4 Impacts The Impact Tool has been revised as at the end of June 2015. In summary, the overall benefit: cost ratio has increased from 2.34 in May 2014 to 2.70 in June 2015. The revised Impact Tool predicts total expected benefits of $298,531,343 and total expected costs of $110,715,111.

In April 2015, a number of changes to Commonwealth Milestones were finalized. The majority of the changes had already been contemplated in the documentation provided to the Commonwealth Third Year Review, and as such, were summarized in the 2014 Annual Report.

Several of our lead technologies are applicable to the management of diabetic foot ulcers. The spinout of Diabetic Foot Australia will help translate new diabetic foot technologies into a broader clinical setting than what was originally anticipated in the tool.

Although we anticipate having generated at least five new prototype wound diagnostics and prognostics by June 2017, some of these prototypes have been discontinued or are facing significant development hurdles.

We have strengthened our relationship with Industry through activities such as the Australian Wound Registry and the Australian Aged Care Wound Services and through enhanced communication efforts.

The most significant increase in the forecast benefit:cost ratio is in Research Program 3, which has increased from 3.05 in 2014 to 3.89 in 2015. These changes are justified by the significant investment that has been made in clinical translational activities:

We anticipate significantly exceeding the number of clinical studies that we will undertake over the life of the CRC. We anticipate undertaking at least nine clinical studies, against an original forecast of six.

The outcomes of research and clinical studies can be translated more broadly than originally anticipated, through several activities established by the CRC including the spinout of the Wound Healing Institute of Australia, and the formation of Diabetic Foot Australia, the intended creation of the Australian Wound Innovation Centre and through the operation of the Australian Wound Aged Care Service. It is anticipated that pathways of care can also be incorporated into the Australian Wound Registry to increase implementation of evidence-based best practice care.

The WMI CRC are in negotiations with the West Australian government to commercialize the assets of the entity formerly known as WoundsWest. This will enable us to commercialize online wound education modules that will significantly assist in the translation of our research outcomes into the clinical setting.

We are more closely aligned with our Industry EndUsers. We have built on pre-existing relationships and established new relationships with companies producing wound care products and providers of wound care services.

Since then, additional changes to the Commonwealth Milestones include: • New milestones were added to reflect new activities including a health economics research program and the creation of a wounds registry. • The number of students anticipated to graduate from Program One has decreased, but the number of students proposed to graduate from Programs Two and Three have increased. There were no anticipated changes in the timing of these students commencing and completing their studies. The number of patent applications filed from Program One has decreased, but the number of intellectual property milestones in Programs Two and Three have correspondingly increased. In addition to those activities specifically contemplated in the milestones, we have significantly increased our level of clinical translation activity to ensure that evidence-based best practice is widely implemented. These activities include the establishment of Diabetic Foot Australia and the Wound Healing Institute of Australia and significant work to underpin the establishment of The Australian Wound Innovation Centre and the Australian Aged Care Wound Services. The benefit:cost ratio of Research Program 1 has decreased from 0.37 to 0.11. This change is primarily driven by the lack of commercial interest in our lead diagnostic markers. Discussions with the Development Advisory Committee, and other Industry contacts, have caused us to downgrade our expectations regarding the commercial interest in our diagnostic marker portfolio currently. In addition, several of the former lead biomarkers have not been successful in the validation phase. This led to investment in a project to crystalize the value in the existing biomarker set, rather than to continue to collect further samples. This has been undertaken in an attempt to leverage some value from the historical investments made by the WMI CRC in sample collection projects. The benefit:cost ratio of Research Program 2 was 3.04 in 2014 and has increased to 3.19 in 2015. This change is driven by the following changes in assumptions: •

We have advanced the development portfolio through funding additional projects that support the development

of the lead assets and through the appointment of two additional staff who are dedicated to progressing the development of diagnostic/prognostic devices;

Annual Report FY1415

25


02

Research


2.1 Performance Against Activities The research projects that have commenced and completed thus far are on track to meet the majority of the 20142015 research milestones and have additionally completed sample collection and bioinformatics milestones due in June 2016. Training of higher degree research students and the generation of publications are currently exceeding milestone requirements and are creating long term impact via the generation of future wound researchers and disseminating valuable knowledge to the scientific literature. In July 2014 the CRC established a new funding process for research projects, clearly identifying the CRC’s current research priorities with a two-step application process for funding, with recommendations made by the WMI CRC’s Research Advisory Committee. This process has broadened the CRC’s research base amongst Participant organisations and ensures that future projects consist of high impact, near term, industry led or industry relevant research. In concert with this strategy, the WMI CRC accessed 4 technologies at RMIT University via the CRC’s Utilisation Agreement structure and provided development support, including providing access to industry experienced product development specialists to mature these technologies into commercial prospects that meet needs of end users. Medical devices have a shorter and less expensive development pathway than early stage therapeutics and diagnostic discovery leads. As a consequence, the WMI CRC is on track to meet its development milestones, despite the decision to reduce the emphasis on the early stage therapeutic and diagnostic discovery projects which were conceptualized at the start of the WMI CRC.

Research Program 1: Enabling Technologies A/Professor Flavia Huygens Research Program 1 is focused on improved understanding of the wound microenvironment and the application of this knowledge to identify new diagnostics, prognostics and therapeutics, including preclinical models. The majority of the initial projects in this area have been completed with the WMI CRC funding some follow on development and validation studies and engaging with the CRC’s Development Advisory Committee to assess appropriate development pathways for these projects. Key outcomes from within this program include: •

Evaluation of the commercial value of biomarkers as

• •

diagnostic and prognostic tools for wound management A diagnostic/therapeutic strategy relating to monitoring and controlling the microbial status of a wound A diagnostic that assesses burn severity

Output 1.1 World’s largest library and database of protein, metabolite and microbiological composition of clinical samples from wounds established: An extensive library of clinical samples from wounds and associated patient records has been established, with a total of 479 patients recruited and an estimated 2867 samples collected against a June 2016 target of 2200 samples, completing the output. These clinical samples, clinical datasets and informatics tools are serving as a foundation for other CRC projects both in program 1 (validation of biomarkers from projects 1.02, 122, 1.15), and in the health economics core project. Output 1.2 A minimum of 15 biomarkers associated with wound healing with susceptibility to chronic wounds and scarring identified and validated (out of several dozen investigated): Over 80 biomarkers associated with wound healing have been identified and at least 20 of these have been validated with associations between diagnostic indicators and wound severity/susceptibility identified for several biomarkers including microbial biomarkers and protein biomarkers. The utilisation and commercial potential for lead biomarkers is under further development as part of project 1.22 and biomarker data has been reviewed by the WMI CRC Development Advisory Committee (DAC) and WMI CRC Principal Advisor Professor Keith Harding. Output 1.3 New bioinformatics tools for the integration and interrogation of biological and clinical data developed: A bioinformatics software package for the identification of biomarkers integrating multiple analyses has been validated and optimized and the completed package and workflow is available online (http://mixomics.qfab.org), and as a downloadable package for advanced bioinformatics users. The software has also been the subject of 6 refereed journal articles and delivered to researchers at four international conferences. Output 1.4 Development of improved in-vitro and in-vivo preclinical models and methodologies for assessing wound therapies, including skin integrity products: A human skin equivalent model was developed within the CRC and has been made available both internally and externally for research purposes. Similarly, animal models of wounds

Annual Report FY1415

27


have been developed. These resources have supported biocompatibility and preclinical evaluation of novel dressings developed in program 2, including plasma polymers, porous silicon and hydrogels. Output 1.5 Key education and dissemination outputs: A minimum of 15 PhD and 15 Honours students completed and a minimum of 30 papers and 1 patent and know-how generated. This research program has: • 20 PhD, 8 Honours and 5 Masters students commenced; • 6 Honours, 4 Masters and 1 PhD student completed; • 16 refereed papers, 3 review articles and 1 book chapters published; • 80 conference presentations; • 1 patent

Research Program 2: Tools and Therapies Professor Allison Cowin RP2 is focused on the development of new wound management products including bioactives, diagnostics and dressings. Due to the cost of development and long timelines involved in early stage therapeutic development, the WMI CRC deprioritized research projects that were focused on the identification and testing of discovery stage wound treatments. The WMI CRC licensed four novel medical device technologies from RMIT University and established development stage projects at RMIT with support by experienced medical device product development specialists. These technologies include hyperspectral imaging to monitor and predict wound healing, new materials for open abdomen wound closure following surgery, an integrated fabric sensor for use in medical compression, and a pressure sensing insole with integrated biofeedback for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers. Output 2.1 A minimum of 12 new bioactives for wound therapies (including skin integrity products) identified, produced and characterised (emphasis on antimicrobials and antiinflammatories and synthetic fusion proteins): As reported previously, 75 active compounds were isolated and chemically-characterized, but due to the time frames, costs and risks of bioactive drug development, projects related to this milestones have been deprioritised. However, follow up research to evaluate, characterise and publish the potential of these candidate bioactives remains the subject topic for three higher degree research projects. Output 2.2 At least 5 new prototype wound diagnostics and prognostics that will guide clinical decision making: Diagnostics/prognostics were initially developed around the

28

Annual Report FY1415

following criteria: temperature and pH, pressure; uric acid concentration (validated clinically by the CRC); microbial profile; paediatric burns markers and flightless antibody. Commercial potential of these projects was reviewed by the WMI CRC’s Development Advisory Committee and suggested that the commercial landscape and lead times for some of these diagnostics/prognostics did not warrant further investment by the WMI CRC. However development of flightless antibody and microbial profiling warranted further investment, and research is ongoing in the area of paediatric burns markers. Additionally the WMI CRC has funded development of hyperspectral imaging as a diagnostic/prognostic initially for diabetic foot ulcers. Output 2.3 At least 5 prototype advanced wound care products (therapies, dressings and skin integrity products) comprising conventional or novel wound dressings incorporating bioactives and/or biosensors developed for clinical evaluation: The CRC has continued to support the development of a range of potential wound care prototype products focusing on: • New materials for open abdomen wound closure following surgery • Integrated fabric sensor for use in medical compression • Pressure sensing insole with integrated biofeedback for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers • “Flightless” antibody (with the SME Abregen) • Anti-bacterials or metabolites to redress imbalance in wound microbes • Plasma therapy • Scaffolds and dressings which are modified to bind active ingredients. After review by the WMI CRC’s Development Advisory Committee the CRC discontinued development of reformulated allopurinol after completion of an initial safety trial as the IP position was insufficient to support a sustained therapeutic development campaign. Output 2.4 Utilisation and SME engagement output: The Development efforts of the CRC are now guided by a Development Advisory Committee comprising industry experts in development, regulatory approvals and commercialisation of medical devices and particularly wounds management technology. This Committee oversees the management of development phase projects and considers pathways to commercialisation for the outputs of research phase projects. The WMI CRC continues to engage Australian SMEs, and through the revised research funding process applications for funding from a number of SMEs developed in conjunction with WMI CRC Participants. In addition, the WMI CRC is broadening


SME engagement by working in collaboration with several non-participant Aged care providers and GP clinics to ensure that research outcomes are refined and translated to meet end user needs. Output 2.5 Education and dissemination outputs: A minimum of 11 PhD students completed and a minimum of 15 papers and 7 patents and know-how generated. To mid 2015 the following educational outputs have been generated: • 17 PhD students commenced; 2 submitted • 1 Honours student commenced and completed • 26 papers and 4 review articles published, • 2 book chapters published; • 42 conference presentations; • 10 patent applications

Research Program 3: Clinical Application Professor Helen Edwards Research Program 3 is focused on delivery of best practice wound care, including conducting clinical studies, developing risk assessment tools and translating evidence-based care into practice, including education of health-care practitioners. This Research Program will continue to focus on the delivery of best practice wound care with key activities surrounding clinical research and its translation to adapt to an environment of constrained health-care budgets and growing patient need. Output 3.1 At least nine proof of concept studies and/or clinical trials on new wound interventions that are developed internally or externally to the CRC, or existing interventions with a limited evidence base: The following clinical studies have been conducted to-date: • • • • • • •

Use of moisturiser to prevent skin tears in residential aged-care (complete); Effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to treat chronic venous leg ulcers (complete); Testing of allopurinol in patients (complete); Use of moisturiser in a hospital setting (complete); Effectiveness of exercise to prevent chronic venous leg ulcers (complete); Remote diagnosis of diabetic foot ulcers using mobile phone technology (ongoing) Investigating the effectiveness of skin moisturising cleanser for reducing the incidence and costs of skin tear injuries (ongoing)

In addition, the WMI CRC is in the final stages of refining new proposals that link researchers with industry partners

in high impact projects for the treatment of surgical wound dehiscence and venous leg ulcers; and preventative strategies for pressure injuries in aged care. Output 3.2 New wound risk assessment tools for wound occurrence, recurrence and scarring and new strategies for the prevention of wounds and hypertrophic scarring trialed and published: The following wound risk assessment tools have been evaluated, or are in the process of evaluation: • • • • • •

Risk assessment tool for the prevention of skin tears (clinical trial complete, undergoing analysis); Risk assessment tool for delayed healing of venous leg ulcers (complete); Risk assessment tool for the prevention of the recurrence of venous leg ulcers (complete, further validation ongoing); Risk assessment tool for the prevention of surgical wound dehiscence (clinical trial complete, validation study ongoing) Development of an improved method of scar assessment (clinical trial complete). Relationship between malnutrition and wound healing

Output 3.3 Translation of evidence based-care into practice in community, hospital and residential aged care settings: Evidence based care has successfully been implemented into practice in several WMI CRC initiatives including: • • • • • •

Training and education into GP clinics and aged care facilities through the Co-operative Wound Clinic Project Translation of best practice into residential aged care in the Wound Service Project Translation of research demonstrating the effectiveness of moisturiser in preventing skin tears Risk assessment tools for the delayed healing and recurrence of venous leg ulcers Risk assessment tools for the prevention and recurrence of skin tears Risk assessment tools for surgical wound dehiscence

The use of moisturiser in the prevention of skin tears has been successfully translated into practice at 14 residential aged care facilities and a hospital setting. The pathways for translating risk assessment tools have been considered for venous leg ulcers and skin tears with a feasibility analysis to conduct a prospective surgical wound dehiscence study underway. Training sessions to promote the uptake of evidence based care have been delivered within several WMI CRC projects into community, hospital and residential aged care settings. Translation of evidence based care will also be implemented

Annual Report FY1415

29


through the establishment of key activities within the WMI CRC including the Wound Healing Institute, Diabetic Foot Australia, the Australian Wound Innovation Centre, the Australian Wound Registry and the Aged Care Wound Services initiative. Output 3.4 Education outputs: suite of educational packages developed for key clinicians, patients and carers AND training of 6 PhD students and 4 Honours students Training programs have been conducted across Australia in WA, Qld, SA, Vic and Tas at more than 35 sites including GP clinics, hospitals and Aged Care. Where collected, data indicates that the education sessions have resulted in improved patient outcomes and an increase in knowledge and confidence of staff. Registered nurses, enrolled nurses and personal carers from more than 28 aged care facilities have been provided with skin tear incidence reporting and classification with more than 300 participants receiving training. Remote and rural education continues to be delivered through the WHIA Wound Education Program (WEP) and Wound Advisory Service (WAS). To June 2015, 11 PhD students and 3 Masters Students have commenced, with 1 PhD and 1 Masters student have graduated. 23 papers, and 52 conference presentations have leveraged the research funded through program 3. Output 3.5 New sustainable models of care and clinical services developed for the management of wounds in the community: The CRC is now developing several new financially sustainable models for wound care. The Cooperative Wound Clinic (CWC) wound management model (Project 3.21) has been published as a CWC Resource Kit and is available online and in hard copy format. Building on this initiative the Aged Care Wound Services Project represents a new model of wound service delivery, which is applicable to

30

Annual Report FY1415

and expandable in, residential aged care facilities, hospitals and GP clinics. This project will expand and monetize the concepts of best practice service and training generated by the CWC project. The WMI CRC is also establishing a financially sustainable facility dedicated to wound treatment, clinical research and education, the Australian Wound Innovation Centre (“AWIC�) which will provide a model of service delivery that is sustainable and replicable in other health service contexts.


As at

FY

1415

65

Referred Articles

7Reviews 3 11

Patents Filed

Book Chapters

169

Conference Presentations Annual Report FY1415

31


95% Of attendees rated the event as good or excellent

“A worthwhile event that enabled students to network and understand the CRC’s programs”

“It was great to meet lots of people and learn so much. Hearing about the various career options post-graduation and learning presentation skills were valuable”

2.2 Education and Training 2.2.1 Higher Degree Research Students: As at June 2014 the CRC has one of the most successful student programs, including a high volume of Higher Degree Research students, graduates, chapters, papers and presentations that have been acknowledged internationally. The WMI CRC continues to actively support HDR Student Engagement with the WMI CRC, training the next generation of wound care researchers and to exceed Commonwealth milestones for student engagement. Under the CRC’s post-graduate scholarship program 7 new PhD students, 1 Masters and 1 Honours student commenced their studies in FY2015 and as of June 30th 2015 the program included a total of 49 students actively engaged with the CRC along with 15 CRC alumni who have completed all requirements for their degrees:

32

Annual Report FY1415

• • •

45 PhDs (an additional 3 complete) 3 Masters (an additional 5 complete) 1 honours students (an additional 7 complete).

The CRC has achieved or exceeded all milestones relating to PhD student commencement, publications and patents to date. However, student completion milestones and graduate destination milestones are delayed due to the extended length of time taken over thesis preparation and the lengthy examination process associated with PhDs and the substitution of scholarships for one year honours students with two years master student scholarships. The WMI CRC anticipates that PhD completion milestones will be achieved. The WMI CRC has instituted a student completion bonus scheme to ensure that students remain engaged with the CRC through their write up and examination periods and beyond. Both completed PhD students are working in the academic research sector, with Dr Christina Parker appointed as a Lecturer


at QUT and Dr Daniel Broszczak as a post-doctoral researcher at QUT. In conjunction with the WMI CRC’s Student Association the CRC hosted a Student & Early Career Researcher Conference in March 2015, which was well attended by current PhD and Masters Students and also Alumni and Early Career Researchers. The conference provided students with an opportunity to understand the breadth of research being undertaken by the CRC, network with the Head Office team and other students, and benefit from a series of workshops on effective science presentations, grant writing, career pathways, product development and intellectual property. Students immediately implemented their new found presentation skills, presenting 5 minute summaries of their work to their peers, with awards for Best Overall Presentation (Pam Morey), Best Science Presentation (Dario Stupar) and Best Clinical Presentation (Robyn Rayner). The WMI CRC has introduced a Yammer social network to provide a forum for communication between students, supervisors and the Head Office team. 95% of attendees rated the event in follow up survey as Good or Excellent overall and particularly high praise was given to the social networking events, project synopsis presentations and sessions on health economics, IP, career development and effective presentations. Some comments recorded after the event include: “Overall a worthwhile event that enabled students to network and understand the CRC’s programs” “Presentations all excellent and very relevant” “Overall the Head Office members presented very much as a team and projected their energy and positivity”

FY

1415

“It was great to meet lot of people and learn so much. Hearing about the various career options post-graduation and learning presentation skills were valuable” 2.2.2 Wound Healing Institute Australia Through the Wound Healing Institute Australia, best practice education and training in relation to wound management will be available to a global audience. WHIA is the realization of the assets created through the WoundsWest Program, and allows these highly-regarded resources to continue to be available through a sustained operation that will form a key legacy and commercial vehicle of the CRC. Through WHIA, education will be accessible in the form of accredited online education modules on key topics of wound management and care. In addition, face to face learning will be available to organsiations and groups on wound best practice and workplace efficiency to enable the uptake of best practice. 2.2.3 CRC Education Project The WMI CRC continues to develop its Education Project in response to a changing environment and strategic direction and development of legacy vehicles. The CRC’s Education Project has been revised following the completion of phase 1. The Education Project has now hired a highly experienced wound consultant and former Chair of the AWMA Education Sub Committee, Jan Rice. In conjunction with AWMA, the project will focus on the establishment of a process for national credentialing of wound experts. This enables the education project to raise the profile of wounds with the goal that wound management will become a recognized clinical specialty across the vast health care spectrum where chronic disease and wound management are prevalent.

1Honours 1Masters

7

PhDs


CRC PhD Students Name

Start

Program

Title

Institute

Expected completion date

Jane O'Brien

1/05/11

3

The VaLUE (Venous and Leg Ulcer Exercise) Study

QUT

complete

Nasir Mehmood

28/02/13

2

Wireless Telemetric Sensors for Wound Dressings

UniSA

complete

Christina Parker

28/02/2011

3

Predicting the likelihood of non-healing: a venous leg ulcer risk assessment tool

QUT

complete

Uliya Gankande

8/08/11

3

Diagnostic markers of wound healing

UWA

complete

Daniel Broszcack

21/02/11

1

Molecular profiling of exudate from chronic ulcerated wounds

QUT

complete

Sirhari Sharma

1/01/13

1

Wound fluid characterisation

QUT

submitted

Fransiska Krismatuthi

16/07/2012

2

Sensors for wound status

UniSA

2015

Ais Jenie

1/07/11

2

Sensors for wound status

UniSA

2015

Thomas Michl

1/12/2011

2

Surfaces for rapid wound closure and infection control

UniSA

submitted

Dario Stupar

20/01/2015

1

Wound fluid characterisation (proteomics)

QUT

2016

Carla Daunton

14/02/2011

2

Point of care wound diagnostic

UniSA

2016

Ann Stewart

9/04/2012

3

Risk Assessment Tool Recurrent Venous Ulcers

QUT

2018

Sumeet Sandhu

1/09/2014

1

Understanding the Diabetic Foot Microbiome

QUT

2018

Claire Nelson

24/02/2014

3

Malnutrition in Patients with Chronic Wounds

QUT

2017

Natalie Benbow

16/02/2015

2

Biopolymer Films for Enhanced Wound Management

UniSA

2018

Suresh Parmar

1/03/2015

2

Venous Ulcer Smart Compression Device

RMIT

2018

Adin Tan

1/10/2014

2

Development of Smart Insole for Diabetic Patients

RMIT

2018

Asif Husein

1/11/2013

1

Bacterial diversity in wounds

QUT

2016

Lipsa Mohanty

25/07/2011

1

Role of EM transition in wound healing

QUT

2016

Stuart Johnson

2/09/2013

1

Cell clustering in wound healing

QUT

2017

Lucas Wager

1/02/12

1

MicroRNA in wound healing

QUT

2016

Chen Fan

27/02/2012

1

Shikonin - a novel scar therapy

QUT

submitted

Uyen (Thi) Than

23/07/12

1

MicroRNA in wound healing

QUT

2016

Dominic Guanzon

1/02/2013

1

MicroRNAS in the formation of keloid scars

QUT

2016

Tuo Zang

22/10/2014

1

Biomarkers for the prediction of paediatric wound severity

QUT

2018

Stefani Griesser

28/03/11

2

Application of technologies for anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory bioactives

UniSA

2015

Xiaoxiang He

1/01/12

2

Plant Bioactives

UniSA

2015

Roshan Vasani

18/02/2011

2

Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles

UniSA

2015

Hashim Alhmoud

16/02/2012

2

Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles

UniSA

2015

Gayathri Rajeev

2/05/2014

2

Nanoparticle delivery of Flii antagonists

UniSA

2017

Israt Biva

24/12/2012

2

Optimised serrulatane bioactives from Eremophila plants

UniSA

2015

Htwe Mon

5/03/12

2

Development of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory compounds

UniSA

2016

Robyn Rayner

1/08/12

3

RA Skin tears

Curtin

2016

Pam Morey

15/01/12

3

Rural and remote education program

Curtin

2016

Kylie Sandy-Hodgetts

1/11/2011

3

Surgical and post-caesarian wound dehiscence study

Curtin

2016

Michelle Gibb

1/08/12

3

WMNP models of practice

QUT

2016

Andrew Stevenson

11/07/2011

1

Epigenetics of scarring

UWA

2015

Jasmine Straube

21/01/2013

1

Wound Fluid characterisation (proteomics analytics)

QFAB

2016

Mansour Alghamdi

9/05/10

1

Role of Epigenetic Modification in Keloid Scar Pathogenesis

UWA

2016

Peter Lazzarini

1/07/13

3

Foot disease in in patients study

QUT

2016

Nishtha Gaur

15/06/15

2

Simple effective anti-microbial and wound healing dressings

UniSA

2018

Jacqueline Burgess

13/01/2014

2

Prevention of paediatric hot beverage scalds

UQ

2018

Jeannette Travis

12/03/2015

1

Diabetic ulcers: biofilms and treatment therapies

SCU

2018

34

Annual Report FY1415


2.3 SME Engagement The WMI CRC continues to grow an already impressive level of engagement with SMEs through a number of areas including: • • • • •

Technology development Education and training Implementation of best practice Development of clinical alliances New models of wound care

In the development of new technologies, the WMI CRC holds ongoing collaborative discussions with device and software specialist SMEs such as Abregen Pty Ltd, Marinova Pty Ltd, MediGroup, Traxmedica, Calzada, ISA Healthcare Solutions, LBT Innovations, and Electric Effect. As part of the ongoing development of novel technologies, the WMI CRC Research Priority Areas have been revised to enhance SME engagement and the WMI CRC’s Development Advisory Committee provide policies and processes and mentoring to ensure products are developed in collaboration with industry collaborators such as these SME’s.

the capacity to establish the IT requirements for the capture and retention of wound data. Through the Australian Wound Registry SME’s will be provided with the software to upload data into a central repository and be part of the national approach to collect and integrate wound information. A particularly strong and expanding area for SME engagement in the WMI CRC is through the establishment of WHIA and the commencement of the Aged Care Wound Service Project. These two activities are not only translating evidence into practice in SME’s that provide wound care but are also providing commercially sustainable models to deliver the education and translation objectives of the WMI CRC into the future.

Tailored education and training programs have been developed in collaboration with SME’s such as Southern Cross Care (SA&NT) to meet their staff and organisational needs. These and other education programs have been delivered to numerous SME’s who provide wound care to train staff and translate evidence based care into these organisations. Examples of SME’s that have been provided with WMI CRC education programs include GP practices (Newport, Rosanna/ Viewbank, Calamvale Medical Centre, Mt Gravatt Community Centre), Aged Care (Southern Cross Care (SA&NT), Hall and Prior, Amana Living), Community Nursing (RDNS, Silverchain, Bluecare) and Hospitals (Greenslopes, Ramsay Group). The establishment of the Australian Wound Registry has galvanised interest from SME’s that provide wound care across Australia as many of these organisations do not have

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03

Results


3.1 Utilisation and Commercialisation The WMI CRC has a strong focus towards the utilisation and commercialisation of research outcomes and is on target to achieve and exceed expectations relating to the original utilisation milestones. To accommodate this strong performance additional utilisation milestones have been added to the Commonwealth Agreement and these are also on target. The WMI CRC research outputs are channelled towards utilisation and/or commercialisation through several mechanisms including: • • • •

Industry guided development of promising wound technologies Education and training programs Translation of evidence based care into practice Development of new sustainable models of wound care

The identification and development of promising wound technologies has been guided by the Development Advisory Committee which has provided commercial insight and high level expertise in selecting and managing the projects that will be moved into the development phase.

practice at 14 residential aged care facilities and a hospital setting. In addition, training sessions to promote the uptake of evidence based care have been delivered within several WMI CRC projects into community, hospital and residential aged care settings. The WMI CRC has also established a number of core initiatives which will ensure uptake of research and education outputs. The Wound Healing Institute of Australia, will support health professionals, patients and carers through education, training, advice, research and health promotion on wound prevention and management. The Diabetic Foot Australia (“DFA”) Initiative will also provide a utilisation vehicle providing podiatrists with a central organisation through which best practice and education can be provided. Utilisation of research outcomes will also be implemented through the establishment of the Australian Wound Innovation Centre, the Australian Wound Registry and the Aged Care Wound Services initiative.

Lead projects from within RP1 and RP2 include: • • • • • • • •

Hyperspectral imaging as a diagnostic/prognostic tool New materials for open abdomen wound closure following surgery Integrated fabric sensor for use in medical compression Pressure sensing insole with integrated biofeedback for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers “Flightless” antibody Plasma therapy Scaffolds and dressings which are modified to bind active ingredients. A diagnostic/therapeutic strategy relating to monitoring and controlling the microbial status of a wound

In addition to the commercialisation of technologies, the WMI CRC is committed to the utilisation of clinical project outcomes such as education materials and evidence based best practice. For example, the use of moisturiser in the prevention of skin tears has been successfully translated into

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37


3.2 Intellectual Property Management The documents that form the basis of the WMI CRC have a number of provisions relating to the management and utilization of the Intellectual Property created by the WMI CRC research activity. Under these provisions the WMI CRC has an obligation to ensure that the WMI CRC outputs are utilized and may act as the utilization agent to facilitate these activities. The legal and beneficial ownership of the IP created from WMI CRC research outputs are owned by the parties making contributions to that research. As such this can lead to a complex ownership structure which has the potential to inhibit utilization and commercialisation activities. After a period of consultation with industry partners, third party industry organisations and the Commonwealth it was recognised that the commercial end user environment and the CRC IP structure were not optimally aligned. The Board and Executive made a decision to create a regime whereby the WMI CRC could mature IP from ‘research output’ to ‘commercially ready’ – IP created through this process would be subject to a Utilization Agreement. Within the Utilization Agreement, IP created by research output can be vended into the Agreement as background IP which upon commercialisation will yield royalties for the vending party and the WMI CRC.

Under the guidance of the Development Advisory Committee and subject to the approval of the Governing Board, the WMI CRC will invest in the development and utilization of the IP. The WMI CRC has used this model to progress 4 development stage technologies with RMIT. We believe that this will yield outcomes that are not only more relevant to the Industry end user environment but will have a significantly higher value in a licensing transaction for the WMI CRC and the participants. The WMI CRC revised and disseminated its intellectual property policy, and provided IP training for students at the WMI CRC 2015 Student Conference. Further dissemination is due to occur in the next reporting period. The current IP generated by WMI CRC Projects is listed below. As part of our industry engagement program the Board and management are actively engaging with Australian SME’s with interesting wound management IP that may be developed through the Utilization Agreement. The identification of Intellectual Property from our Research is achieved through Program and Project Leader awareness, through a publication approval process and through quarterly progress reports. These reports are reviewed by the CEO and Director of Research & Development. An IP registry has also been established. The WMI CRC adheres to the National Principles of IP Management for publicly funded research.

Project

Description of IP

Utilisation agent

Status

Patent number

Project 2-01 and 2-05

Stimulus responsive substrates

UniSA/ITEK

PCT

PCT/

Project 2-01 and 2-05

Optical Biosensor

UniSA/ITEK

PCT

PCT/

Project 2-07 New therapies

Growth factor binding surfaces and uses thereof

UniSA/ITEK

PCT

PCT/

Project 2.10 Wireless telemetric sensors

Wound sensor

UniSA/ITEK

PCT

AU 2014901689)

Project 2.11 A new portable plasma device

Plasma screens and uses thereof

UniSA/ITEK

PCT

AU 2014900507

Project 2.07 New Therapies

Methods for improving cell yields in cell expansion and cell culture

UniSA/ITEK

Provisional

2015900198

Project 2.11 A new portable plasma device

Plasma activated fluid therapy

UniSA/ITEK

Provisional

2014903043

Project 2.07 new therapies

Improved wound dressings and scaffolds

UniSA/ITEK

Provisional

2014901604

Project 2.15

Hyperspectral imaging – a method for monitoring the metabolic state of a biological tissue

WMI CRC

Provisional

2015903085

Project 2.08

Compositions and methods for administering antibodies

UniSA/ITEK

Provisional

2015901533

38

Annual Report FY1415


3.3 Communications In early 2015 the CRC appointed a Full Time Communications and Branding Coordinator to manage all aspects of the CRC’s design and communication and branding strategies. This position has resulted in proactive communication activities that focus on the CRC’s achievements and opportunities. Increased communication activity and focus has led to the development of online communities, a national student and ECR conference, new online webinar seminar series, regular media releases and increased internal publications. The CRC has also expanded its National Office to be directly involved in management of selected research and development activities and enable improved collaboration and transparency to lead to the delivery of increased stakeholder relations and Milestone achievements. With the WMI CRC now maintaining a strong and consistent corporate identity following its re-branding, the CRC’s stakeholders recognise the value proposition of the CRC and the capacity of its combined resources to deliver significant and sustainable change in the wound industry. As the CRC moves into its sixth year of operations, and the CRC’s clinical translation activities are beginning to deliver exciting outcomes, the communication strategies are being further streamlined to ensure key highlights, achievements, opportunities for partnerships and collaborations are being made available to a broader audience. In the current reporting period the CRC has launched a new website and is working on further digital strategies that integrate and leverage the unique value of each of the CRC’s activities and ensure broad dissemination and promotion of the CRC’s research outcomes. Key activities and highlights of the CRC’s internal and external communications in the reporting period include the following.

Overview of Key Communications The Third Year Review outcome continues to impact and direct the CRC’s communication activities. In particular, during this reporting period, the CRC launched a number of initiatives as per the review and panel recommendations, including: rebranding, and making consistent branding a cornerstone of the CRC’s communication strategy; appointing a communications manager; stronger ties with PhD and Post Doc alumni; face to face events; and other events and materials that enable the achievements of the CRC to be disseminated. These activities are expanded further below:

Re-brand A key activity for the CRC was the re-branding that was rolledout to Participants nationally with a roadshow and face to face meetings. The rebrand occurred at a pivotal time in the CRC’s life where clinical translation activities are starting to form core projects leading to business units and ultimately possibly to spin-out companies. The head branding of the CRC provides these activities with sub identities that ensures they have close linkages to the CRC, not only from joint communication leveraging, but in terms of synergies and collaborations. The re-brand allowed the CRC to define and clearly articulate its value proposition to its stakeholders in the CRC’s vision of ending suffering for people with wounds. The WMI CRC’s new logo and branding represent every aspect of the CRC’s operational goals going forward, both through the design and accompanying communication and branding strategies. Integral aspects of the new brand are the logomark, the iconography which represents the operational areas of activity and accompanying marketing and branded material, including the website, presentation materials and collateral. The rebrand involved a stock take of all of the CRC’s materials for its internal stakeholders, including: introducing documents and guidelines for the use of the corporate identity; streamlined publication clearance process and documents and a handbook which enables research staff to understand the branding and reporting requirements while engaged in a CRC project. These materials were launched during the re-brand events in each Participant state in October during the roll-out. The roll-out was positively embraced by the CRC’s Participants, End-Users, corporate partners and by the Commonwealth. The CRC’s new branding provides the WMI CRC with a professional corporate identity that is reflective of its high quality outputs and operations. However, it also provides a recognisable and consistent front to all areas of the CRC’s activities; creating value, awareness and empowerment for the better treatment of wounds in Australia and Internationally. Through this our Participants, healthcare providers, policy makers and ultimately, patients, can trust the WMI CRC as a badge of quality and impartiality. The CRC’s revised image and strategy has generated renewed energy and engagement in the CRC, in particular from potential industry partners who are now in progress to join the CRC in various capacities.

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CRC Seminar Series

The WMI CRC launched a new communication initiative, CRC Seminar Series in October 2014. These seminars are held every 2-3 months and are hosted from a Participant or the CRC National Office and broadcasted online via Go-To technology, where participants can ask questions and participate in realtime. The Seminar Series are an evolution of internal project meetings that were originally held in person at QUT and allows the information to be shared nationally with all Participants. The Seminars enhance communication and collaboration across the CRC, increasing awareness of the achievements and milestones of the CRC’s activities including those from research projects, national office activities, end-users and higher degree students. The CRC successfully held 2 hour Seminars in October 2014, December 2014, February 2015 and April 2015 during the reporting period.

• •

Media Releases and online marketing The CRC continues to grow a strong email list and utilizes this to distribute media releases, achievements, promotion of events and campaigns and other highlights on a regular basis to keep stakeholders engaged and informed. The CRC has had a 50% increase it its mailing list in the past financial year due to the increased activity and communications of the CRC. The CRC also works collaboratively with other associations to push out stories including the Cooperative Research Centers Association, Life Sciences Queensland, KnowHow and various Participant Communication departments. The WMI CRC announced the following through these various channels in FY14-15. • • • • •

A Commonwealth Partnership to Enhance the Lives of Patients With Wounds Wound CRC Launches new branding and operational strategy and event invites Wound CRC: Update on research resources (corporate identity, publications, reporting) A call to action: CRC Students Wound CRC Announces New Research Program Leader

• • • • • • •

Smart Sole Support For Diabetic Feet (from CRCA KnowHow magazine) Wound CRC Welcomes Wound Awareness Week 2015 Showcasing Wound Management Technology at Parliament House Wound CRC And Cell Therapy Manufacturing CRC Collaborate To Transform Wound Outcomes Seminar Series invites and promotion (x4 over the reporting period) AWMA, AWTRS event cross-promotion Expressions of Interest: Research proposals (x2 over the reporting period) Wound CRC Student and ECR Conference (multiple email updates as the event planning progressed) Diabetic Foot Australia inaugural announcement and second update (to separate subscriber base from the Diabetic Foot Conference) Newsletters – 3 issues during reporting period

As a part of the rebrand the CRC updated its website to a new platform and continues to populate its YouTube and LinkedIn profiles as news and events occur. There has also been a notable increase in the CRC’s website activity over the reporting period, with 80% more new visitors engaging with the site. This website interest is expected to increase over the next reporting period, with a full year’s access to the more accessible website and with more announcements as the CRC matures various of its activities. The WMI CRC is working toward stronger digital strategies and broader marketing in the next financial year, including an exciting Wound Awareness campaign in 2016.

Student and ECR Conference The Wound CRC worked closely with its Student Association and newly formed Alumni group to develop the very first Student and Early Career Researcher (ECR) Conference. Held in Brisbane in March 2014, this 2 day event was well attended by the majority of the CRC’s students and alumni with a program full of relevant and stimulating content. The program included: Intellectual Property and Commercialisation training, academic and Industry career training, effective oral and visual

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40


presentations workshop, grant proposal writing workshop, career preparation and academic profile workshop, online community launch and networking and social events. The event featured presentations from Industry, researchers, patent attorneys, head office staff and most importantly, the students themselves. Feedback suggests that attendees returned to their respective institutes with renewed energy, strengthened networks and knowledge of the CRC, their career options within industry and more broadly and understanding of internal policies and procedures (notably Intellectual Property).

contain important updates, progress and achievements in each of the CRCs’ operational areas, which continue to be the focus of each publication. The newsletters also includes wrap-ups of the CRC’s media releases, online community activity and news from the global wound industry in the areas of wound awareness, clinical practice and new discoveries and therapies. WMI CRC research has also been published in world leading and highly regarded scientific journals (as per appendix 1) will be inserted final document) as well as broadly disseminated healthcare bulletins and online news sources.

Online Community

Collaborative Events – Participants and International Partnerships

The Wound CRC officially launched its secure and collaborative online community at the Student and ECR Conference in March 2015. The Wound CRC has utilised the Yammer Social Enterprise platform to enable instant communication and collaboration across all operating areas of the CRC. The Yammer interface is simple, user-friendly and easy to navigate, not dissimilar to many social network platforms, and has the ability for users to create their own groups, send private instant messages/live chat, share links and resources, upload and collectively edit documents, plus more as it becomes further integrated into Microsoft and Office 365. There are two ‘external networks’ that the Wound CRC has created: the Wound CRC Online Community - which is for all involved in the CRC and the Wound CRC Student Association - this network is for HDR students only. The Yammer platform has enabled the sharing of content including: Key conferences, events, webinars and news; Scholarship and Industry Placement opportunities; Professional Development opportunities; Media releases, newsletters, annual reports and publications; Expression of Interest funding round updates and project outcomes; Research Priority Areas releases ; Policies and procedures; Forms and templates and more frequent, direct and instant communications. Yammer is governed by a usage policy and moderated to ensure content is adhering to this policy and that all content shared and discussed is positive, collaborative and useful.

Newsletters and Publications

August 2014 – “Science of Wound Healing” This special one day seminar event, held in collaboration with Australian Wound Management Association, presented a unique opportunity for health professionals and scientists to come together to showcase innovative practice and latest scientific research in wound management. CEO Dr Ian Griffiths delivered an opening address that focused on the need for a wound registry and stronger collaboration. In a separate session, PhD students from Research Program 1, Lucas Wager and Daniel Broszczak, presented an energetic and engaging session on how profiling of chronic wounds works and research outcomes on their projects to date. November 2014 - Action 2014: Skin Health for Canada The international collaboration between the Wound CRC and the Canadian Association of Wound Care (CAWC) provided an opportunity for 2 Wound CRC PhD students to submit an abstract to be selected to present their CRC project and travel internationally. The 2 successful PhD students were Kylie SandyHodgetts and Htwe Htwe Mon. This was an incredibly positive experience for both students, in particular Htwe Htwe, where she reported: “I was very excited to attend my first international conference and present my PhD work. I had the opportunity to link my scientific research work with the real wound situation in the hospital and the community nursing setting. I also received positive feedback from those who attended my oral presentation, which has influenced the design of the next set of my experiments.”

The WMI CRC continues to publish newsletters and released 3 newsletters during the reporting period. During the rebrand activity, the newsletter format was revised and streamlined to

About the new branding: The logomark represents a symbolic overview of a wound bandage; it is unwinding, creating a pathway to healing. It is also subtly in the shape of Australia, emphasising the unique collaboration between participants nation-wide. It is also positioned within a circle, which is representative of the globe: the CRC will affect the wound landscape globally as well as locally. The accompanying branding elements that reinforce the CRC’s value proposition and focus of operations includes iconography, colour palate, naming conventions and other design elements that remain consistent across the CRC’s activities.

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If all Australians with Diabetic Foot Disease lived in Canberra...

The whole city has a Diabetic Foot Ulcer 300,000 people have diabetic foot disease in Australia, the approximate population of Canberra

The hospital only has Diabetic Foot Patients 500-600 people are in hospital around Australia each night due to diabetic foot disease. Canberra hospital has approximately 550 beds

A football team lose a limb daily 12 people have an amputation procedure each day in Australia due to diabetes

During the CRC Showcase at Parliament House,(see Page 43) the alarming statistics of the prominence of Diabetic Foot Ulcers were communicated alongside the insole prototype (See page 11) Annual Report FY1415

42


November 2014 - Nurse Practitioner and Advanced Wound Specialist Forum The Nurse Practitioner and Advanced Wound Specialist Forum is an annual meeting of Australia’s leading nurse practitioners and specialists with an interest in wound care. Deputy CEO, Dr Jane Andrews, was invited to present to the meeting to discuss developments at the CRC and to explore areas of unmet need and potential research collaboration with leading wound experts. The meeting provided an opportunity to seek feedback on the Australian Wound Registry and resulted in a geographically diverse group of stakeholders having a keen interest in participating in this, and other, important initiatives of the CRC. November 2014 - AWMA and APNA National Meetings and Stakeholder discussions In November 2014 the WMI CRC was invited to the AWMA National Board Meeting to present an overview of the CRC and to discuss broadening and strengthening both organisations’ engagement and partnering opportunities. The Executive Team also attended stakeholder meetings with the Australian Practicing Nurses Association (APNA) during the reporting period. As a result, we anticipate the release of engagement programs, joint campaigns and collaborations with both APNA and AWMA to be detailed in the next reporting period. April 2015 - Sydney Diabetic Foot Conference The WMI CRC co-partnered with the Liverpool Hospital to successfully deliver the 2015 Sydney Diabetic Foot Conference. The conference, consisting of international diabetic foot experts and multiple national experts, was a sold-out event with more than 400 delegates. Aimed toward those involved in the broad field of the foot in diabetes, the conference focused particularly in the areas of: vascular disease, in-patient management, Australian diabetes foot research, woundcare and biomechanics. This event was strategically aligned with Diabetic Foot Australia, where Project Leader Peter Lazzarinni delivered the opening address and announced funding of the DFA project. The delegates were invited in the DFA email list and

the list remains engaged and informed and is continuing to grow as DFA gains momentum and public interest. May 2015: Life Sciences QLD CEO Dr Ian Griffiths was invited to present at the Life Sciences Futures showcase on 22nd May 2015 at Brisbane Technology Park, QLD, attended by researchers, academics, investors, commercialisation bodies, MPs and other industry stakeholders. In this presentation, Dr Griffiths discussed the CRC’s emerging technologies and innovations that ultimately will provide individualised diagnostic and treatment techniques that have the potential to diminish avoidable amputations and significantly improve the quality of life for people with wounds. May 2015 – CRC Showcase at Parliament House During the annual CRCA conference, held this year at Canberra’s Parliament House, a special showcase of CRC outcomes was held in the Great Hall. Attended by almost 400 people, the evening was a resounding success and enabled the Wound CRC to demonstrate a prototype wireless foot insole being developed as part of the CRC’s development portfolio. CEO Ian Griffiths and RMIT PhD student Adin Tan and other WMI CRC staff and Board attended and demonstrated the prototype to a captivated audience eager to try it out. In attendance were a large number of MPs, most notably the Hon. Ian Macfarlane, Minister for Industry and Science, who spent a considerate amount of time with the WMI CRC prototype.

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04

Resources


4.1 Governance Arrangements The WMI CRC includes individuals from 19 research, community and industry partners and will have over forty full time equivalent researchers. The Participants in the WMI CRC are bound by the Commonwealth Agreement and the Participants Agreement. The Participants established an Unincorporated Joint Venture (UJV) which in turn established a privately-held management company, the Wound Management Pty Ltd (WMPL) as the vehicle for implementing WMI CRC processes and securing the outcomes of the Joint Venture. The WMI CRC’s National Office is located at West End in Brisbane with activities in Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania. The organisational structure is shown on the following page. The fully independent Board of Directors is the same for both the UJV and Pty Ltd. The Board of Directors of the WMI CRC have established two committees to review and make recommendations to the Board in regard to their respective Charters. These Committees are the Audit Committee and the Nomination & Review Committee. Further details on these committees are provided later in this report. The Executive Management Team has established a set of policies and procedures for the organisation. During this reporting period, there were several management changes experienced, which reflected the CRC’s change in strategic direction towards a more commercially focused entity.

The Board’s role is to govern the WMI CRC by provision of appropriate leadership, contributing to and approving the WMI CRC’s strategic plans, approving operational plans and budgets to ensure consistency with the goals and objectives, monitoring performance of the WMI CRC and its management, assessing risks and ensuring that appropriate risk management strategies are in place; and setting and promoting appropriate values and standards. All decisions of the Governing Board are binding on all Participants. Seven meetings of the Governing Board were convened during the reporting period: • • • • • • •

7th August 2014 (Brisbane, Queensland) With Apologies from Dr Mary Corbett and Dr David Munro (Company Secretary) 27th August 2014 (Brisbane, Queensland) With apologies from John Lee 14 October 2014 (Brisbane, Queensland) 26th November 2014 (Brisbane, Queensland) With apologies from Peter Riddles 28th January 2015 (Brisbane, Queensland) 25th February 2015 (Brisbane, Queensland) 13 May 2015 (Brisbane, Queensland) With apologies from Mary Corbett

Membership of the Board

The current CEO, Dr Ian Griffiths, attended all meetings (by invitation). Dr Jane Andrews (Deputy CEO) attended meetings (by invitation) on 7th August2014, 27th August 2014, 14th October 2014, 26th November 2014, 28th January 2015 and 25th February 2015.

Membership of the Board, including the key skills of Board Members, is detailed below. The Board conducts activities of the WMI CRC through the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and delegates specific powers and responsibilities to the CEO. During the reporting period, David Munro retired as Company Secretary and Mr John Lee was appointed in the role of Company Secretary on 26 November 2014.

The Governing Board undertook a review of its membership in the reporting period and resolved to add at least one additional Director, in response to changes in corporate strategy and feedback from the third year review. Directors will possess the appropriate skills to oversee the planned increase in commercial activity and provision of health policy recommendations to Government.

The Board is responsible for ensuring that an effective internal control framework is in place. The development of a set of policies, procedures and practices enables the Board to monitor compliance to statutory, legal, stakeholder and best practice requirements. This framework is regularly reviewed.

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Wound Management Innovation CRC Organisational Structure as at 30 June 2015

Governing Board of Directors Dr Peter Riddles (Chairman) Dr Jurgen Michaelis Dr Mary Corbett Mr John Lee (Company Secretary) Ms Cheryl Herbert

Chief Executive Officer Dr Ian Griffiths

Finance & HR Manager Kylie Stewart

Board Sub-Committees

Clinical Director

Audit & Risk Committee

Michelle Gibb

Mr John Lee (Chairman) Dr Jurgen Michaelis Ms Cheryl Herbert Mrs Vanessa de Waal (external) Dr Ian Griffiths (by invitation)

Executive Assistant

Nomination & Review Committee Dr Peter Riddles (Chairman) Dr Mary Corbett Dr Ian Griffiths (by invitation) Mr John Lee (by invitation)

Development Advisory Committee Dr Ian Griffiths (Chair) Prof Mark Richardson Prof Kishore Udipi Dr Steve Gower Dr Jason Loveridge

Research Advisory Committee Prof Nick Gough (Chair) Dr Ian Griffiths Prof Nick Santamaria Prof Anne Gardner

Strategic Advisor Prof Keith Harding

Dee Chin

Special Projects & Initiatives Director

Strategic Advisor Dr Jane Andrews

Dr Anthony Dyer

Branding & Communications Coordinator Shelley Morris

Research & Development Director Dr Tamsin Terry

Research Administration

Strategic Advisor Dr Douglas Queen

Research Program Leaders Ass. Prof Flavia Huygens Prof Allison Cowin Prof Helen Edwards

Faye Austen-Brown

Product Development Project Leader Dr Tom Tomac

Development Consultant Robert Metzke

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Governing Board

Mr John Lee

(Brisbane, Queensland) Director Company Secretary (from October 2014) • •

• •

Independent Strong background in employment and industrial relations, strategic finance, corporate governance and commerce experience. Director since July 2010. Company Secretary since October 2014.

John Lee B.Com B.Ed (p/g) MBA (Melb) FAICD S A Fin - has a broad range of commercial skills and experiences in both the public and private sectors. Having held senior management roles in the then Federal Department of Employment and Industrial Relations, John was also Senior Private Secretary and principal adviser to the Hon. Tony Street MP, a senior federal cabinet minister. In the private sector, John has held senior executive positions with a number of major corporations including Myer Emporium Limited, Henry Jones IXL &, Elders IXL Limited (General Manager, Personnel and Corporate Relations) and, Chief General Manager, Corporate, with Woolworths Limited. He has been and is a Chairman or Non-Executive Director of a number of listed and unlisted companies concentrating mainly in the biotech and mining sectors and is a Foundation Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. In 1987 John also founded Stockholder Relations, a management consultancy specialising in corporate advisory, investor relations and corporate governance. Chair of the WMI CRC Audit& Risk Committee.

Dr Mary Corbett

Ms Cheryl Herbert

• •

• •

(Boonah, Queensland) Director

• •

Independent Extensive health leadership and management Extensive Governance experience Director since July 2013

Mary has over 17 years’ experience as a Company Director in the scientific research and development area and in education and training. She has significant board and corporate governance experience gained across a range of organisations. She is currently Chair of the West Moreton Hospital and Health Service, the fastest growing region in Queensland, which incorporates Ipswich Hospital and 4 rural hospitals and serves a population of some 300,000. She is currently Chair of the Cotton Research and Development Corporation. She has recently completed a 2 year term as Deputy Chair of Southbank Institute of Technology Board, one of Queensland’s leading providers of highlevel vocational and technical education and was previously Deputy Chair of the Australian Agriculture College Corporation. Mary also served on the Boards of Food Science Australia from 2004-2009 and the Sugar Research and Development Corporation from 2002-2008. Mary has extensive experience as Chair and member of a number of board subcommittees, including Audit and Risk Management, Intellectual Property and Remuneration and Nominations. Mary is Managing Director of Australian Business Class, an executive consulting organisation which specialises in providing senior executive training and facilitation. Mary’s expertise lies in the areas of strategy, leadership, emotional intelligence and building personal and organisational resilience. She has a BSc (Hons) in Applied Biochemistry and a PhD in Clinical Physiology. Member of the WMI CRC Nomination & Review Committee.

(Brisbane, Queensland) Director

Independent Extensive health leadership and management experience, as well as industry innovation and collaboration leadership. Director since July 2010.

Cheryl is currently Chief Executive Officer for the Institute for Healthy Communities Australia Limited was previously Chief Executive Officer of the Health Quality and Complaints Commission from 2006 -2014. Cheryl has extensive health leadership and management experience. Prior to leading the Health Quality and Complaints Commission Cheryl had 10 years’ CEO experience as Executive Director of Spiritus Care Services which comprised the recently merged St Luke’s Nursing Service, Anglicare and Anglican Care of the Aged and previously CEO of St Luke’s Nursing Service. Cheryl has qualifications in nursing and midwifery and is a Fellow of the Australian College of Nursing, and an adjunct Professor of University of Queensland. Cheryl has been noted as an innovative and collaborative industry leader. She has worked closely with some of Australia’s near neighbours to share skills and expertise, and has served on the many panels and boards. Cheryl has accompanied the Australian Ministers for Ageing and Foreign Affairs in 1998, 2000 and 2002 to Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia and Japan to showcase Australian Aged Care. She presently retains membership on the board of Lives Lived Well Pty Ltd, Peachtree Perinatal Wellness Inc, Greater Metro Brisbane South Medicare Local Pty Ltd, External Advisory Council for School of Nursing & Midwifery of University of Queensland and QUT Faculty of Health advisory committee. Member of the WMI CRC Audit & Risk Committee.

Previous Board Members and Company Secretary: Dr Peter Riddles (Brisbane, Queensland) Chairperson (retired August 2015) • Independent • Broad life science industry, commercialisation, policy and strategic development experience.

Dr Jurgen Michaelis (Adelaide, South Australia) Director (retired August 2015) • Independent • Extensive life science industry, biotechnology, commercialisation and capital raising experience

Mr David Munro (Brisbane, Queensland) Company Secretary (May-October 2014) • Independent • Corporate governance

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Committee Membership & Function

The Board conducts its activities through the CEO and delegates specific powers and responsibilities to the CEO as set out in the Board Charter and Delegation of Authority Policy. Committees have also been established to assist the Board in fulfilling its responsibilities. Each Committee has its own Charter setting out the authority delegated to it by the Board and detailing the manner in which the Committee is to operate. At this time, the Board has established an Audit Committee and a Nominations and Review Committee. Special Purpose Committees may also be established as and when required by the Board.

(a) Audit & Risk Committee The role of this Committee is to undertake the following tasks and where appropriate make recommendations to the Board: • • •

• • • • •

Review interim and annual financial statements Review internal control systems to ensure integrity of financial reporting Ensure the WMI CRC’s policies and procedures properly reflect compliance with current Australian legislation, accounting standards and generally accepted accounting principles Ensure consistency with Commonwealth, Participants and Manager’s Agreements and CRC program guidelines Review risk management procedures, including insurance covers and disaster recovery Ensure processes are in place to monitor compliance with laws and regulations, in particular Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S) Evaluate the performance of, and ensure the independence of, the auditor Review and consider with the external auditors any fraud, illegal acts, deficiencies in internal controls or other similar issues

One meeting was convened during the reporting period: •

8th October 2014 22nd October 2014

(b) Nomination and Review Committee The role of the Nomination and Review Committee is to undertake the following tasks and as appropriate make recommendations to the Governing Board: • Appointment of Board Members • Induction programs for new Board Members • Review, evaluate and suggest modifications for the skills/ competency mix of the Governing Board • Ensure rotation of Board Members in accordance with the Participants Agreement Schedule 3 Clause 3 • Review Governing Board processes, including that of the Chairman • Review remuneration and incentives for the CEO

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23 September 2014: Ian Griffiths (CEO) and Jane Andrews (Deputy CEO) were present by invitation.

(c) Research Advisory Committee The primary function of the Research Advisory Committee (RAC) is to provide independent and expert advice regarding the quality and appropriateness of research proposals and projects. The Research Advisory Committee (RAC) will: •

• •

Two meetings were convened during the reporting period: • •

Review remuneration for Board Members in accordance with the Participants Agreement Clause 4.5 Review remuneration of Chairs and Members of Board Committees in accordance with the Participants Agreement Clause 4.5 Consider succession planning for Board Members and Senior Executives

• • •

Assist management to evaluate and respond to expressions of interest for WMI CRC research activities to form a shortlist of applications to go to more detailed due diligence. Evaluations will consider all relevant matters including, but not limited to, alignment with WMI CRC objectives and Milestones, quality of the science, clinical relevance and need, timeline for delivery of impact, enduser support, intellectual property, team track record and financial and time commitment required. Critically review all aspects of the shortlisted projects such that a well prepared proposal can be submitted to the Board for consideration. Oversee the portfolio of approved research projects through a quarterly review process. (All material variations or recommendations to discontinue projects ceasing investment will be referred by the CEO to the Board for consideration). Provide advice on the composition and relevance of the WMI CRC’s research portfolio in terms of commercial, economic, clinical and social impact. Advise on future wound research needs, advances, gaps and opportunities. Build strategic relationships with the WMI CRC and other wound research organisations. Where appropriate, act as advocates and ambassadors for the WMI CRC.

2 meetings were convened during the reporting period: • •

26th October 2014 24th April 2015


(d) Development Advisory Committee The primary function of the Development Advisory Committee (DAC) is to provide independent and expert advice regarding the development options for projects referred to the committee by the management team.

• • •

The Development Advisory Committee will: • •

Advise management on the composition and relevance of the WMI CRC’s development portfolio for commercial and social impact. Critically review projects in light of relevant matters such as intellectual property position, budget, regulatory process, timelines, relevance, competitive landscape, and commercial terms. Review the development portfolio through a six monthly

review process. Advise the WMI CRC Board and Management on commercial, regulatory and industry trends and developments. Build strategic relationships between the WMI CRC and third parties. In addition, it is anticipated that the DAC members will act as advocates and ambassadors for the WMI CRC.

2 Meetings were convened during the reporting period: • •

12th November 2014 11th June 2015

(a) Audit & Risk Committee

Name

Role

Key Skills

Independent/ Organisation

Mr John Lee (Brisbane)

Chair

Strong background in employment and industrial relations, strategic finance, corporate governance and commerce experience.

Independent

Dr Jurgen Michaelis (Adelaide)

Director

Extensive life science industry, biotechnology, commercialisation and capital raising experience

Independent

Ms Cheryl Herbert (Brisbane)

Director

Extensive health leadership and management experience, as well as industry innovation and collaboration leadership.

Independent

Ms Vanessa de Waal (Brisbane)

External Audit Committee member

Extensive experience in external audit, accounting, business advisory services and taxation

Independent

(b) Nomination & Review Committee

Name

Role

Key Skills

Independent/ Organisation

Dr Peter Riddles (Brisbane)

Chair

Broad life science industry, commercialisation, policy and strategic development experience.

Independent

Dr Mary Corbett

Director

Corporate governance, leadership, emotional intelligence.

Independent

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(c) Research Advisory Committee

Name

Role

Key Skills

Independent/ Organisation

A. Prof Nick Gough (Melbourne)

Chair

Broad life science industry, commercialisation, policy and strategic development experience.

Independent

Chair

Biomedical research and cancer biology, in the biotechnology industry, CRC Programme governance, biopharmaceuticals technology development

Independent

Prof Nick Santamaria (Melbourne)

Member

Wound research, Nursing Research, Translational Research

Independent

Prof Ann Gardner (Canberra)

Member

Clinical nursing practice, post-registration education and clinical research in of infection control and wound care

Independent

(d) Development Advisory Committee

Name

Role

Key Skills

Independent/ Organisation

Dr Ian Griffiths (Brisbane)

Chair

Executive Management, commercialising innovative medical devices, licensing & acquisitions, capital raising

WMI CRC

Dr Jason Loveridge (France)

Member

Venture capital, biotechnology and medical device development

Independent

Dr Kishore Udipi (U.S.A)

Member

Product development, patents, biomaterials, drug delivery, polymer blends, coatings, implantable polymers

Independent

Dr Mark Richardson (UK)

Member (S&N Projects)

Wound product development, biotechnology, global distribution chains

Smith & Nephew

Mr Chris Selwa (Brisbane)

Member

SME medical device distribution and manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, start up companies

Independent

Dr Steve Gower (Melbourne)

Member (RMIT Projects)

IP management, commercialisation, research contracts, CRC Programme product development

RMIT University

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Key Staff and Consultants There are nine key staff in the WMI CRC National Office. Their roles, location and time committed are outlined in the table below. There were several staff changes over the reporting period, which are reflective of the CRC’s increase in activities and focus on commercial legacy vehicles, which are a result of the shift in strategic direction and as per Third Year Review Recommendations. The CRC’s staff contingent is skilled and experienced across multi-disciplinary fields related to the operational areas of the Wound CRC including: clinical wound management, nursing, medical device commercialisation and product development, start-up companies, business development, brand management, biomedical electronics engineering, regulatory affairs, clinical trials, finance management, academia, biotechnology and life sciences. Michelle Gibb was appointed as Clinical Director, Dr Tamsin Terry was appointed as Research & Development Director, Dr Nina Ilic appointed as Product Development Director (later resigned), Ms Sue Hunt resigned as Finance Officer and was replaced by Kylie Stewart as Finance Manager. Dee Chin was appointed as Executive Assistant, Faye Austen-Brown as Research Administrator, Dr Tom Tomac appointed as Development Project Leader and Shelley Morris moved into the new role of Branding & Communications Coordinator.

During the reporting period the CRC disbanded the Executive Committee of Program Leaders to allow for independent advisory committees and processes for project proposal submitting and selection. This allows the Research Program Leaders to be more active in their Program portfolio and advocate for the CRC in new students, project proposals and collaborations. The Program Leaders convened 4 meetings during the reporting period: • • • •

26th November 2014 26th February 2015 21th April 2015 10th June 2015

The Program Leaders join the RAC and DAC in a high level capacity to set the Research Priority Areas and subsequent document during a Strategy Day, which form the basis of criteria for the CRC’s research proposals. One Strategy Day was convened in the reporting period on 1 June 2015. The CRC’s Program Leaders also meet on an informal basis to update the CRC’s Executive team on milestones, highlights, outputs and other project related business.

Research Programs – Key Personnel There was one change in the research program leadership during the reporting period with the retirement of Dr Gary Shooter. Dr Shooter moved on from QUT and hence his position with the WMI CRC. The role of research program leader 1 was replaced by Associate Professor Flavia Huygens as soon as practical after Dr Shooters departure. Although Prof Zee Upton has not been involved with the WMI CRC since 2012, she briefly rejoined the team to present Research Program 1 outputs at the 3rd year review. The WMI CRC would like to thank Prof Upton for her assistance at extremely short notice and also as her presentation was well received by the 3rd year review panel.

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National Office Dr Ian Griffiths

Dr Anthony Dyer

Dr Tom Tomac

Dr Griffiths commenced as CEO of the Wound Management Innovation CRC in September 2013. Dr Griffiths previously held the position of Principal Advisor at RMIT University in Melbourne, finding commercial outcomes for RMIT University Research and providing expert advice on technology issues and emerging trends to both the Platform Technology Institute and the College of Science Engineering and Health. Dr Griffiths was also the CEO of AorTech Pty Ltd, COO of AorTech International plc, CEO of PolyNovo Pty Ltd and CEO of Novoskin Pty Ltd. Ian has worked for more than 20 years in commercialising innovative medical devices and specifically in wounds management products, as well as serving on a number of public and private company boards. Dr Griffiths has a PhD from the University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology with his thesis based on instrumentation physics and polymer chemistry. Dr Griffiths has been a guest speaker at numerous public events, conferences and investment forums and has a distinguished academic publication list. He has an extensive background in business development, licensing & acquisitions, medical technology commercialisation, capital raising and critical stakeholder management.

Anthony has a PhD in Molecular Biology from Flinders University and has a wide knowledge of cell biology and proteins involved in wound healing, inflammation and cell signalling gained from working in both academic research and the biotechnology sectors. Anthony has extensive experience working in commercial environments and has managed projects in drug manufacture, regulatory affairs and clinical trials. Anthony sits on the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) Scientific Advisory Committee, the Joanna Briggs Institute Wound Healing and Management expert reference group, the Australian Wound and Tissue Repair Society Committee and is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Dr Tom Tomac is a Biomedical Electronics Engineer with over 25 years’ experience in Research, Design and Development of medical devices specialising in clinical diagnosis, monitoring and control encompassing sleep analysis, neurology, brain research, cardiology, intracranial arteries, cochlea, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Tom obtained a PhD and Master’s Degree in Engineering from Swinburne University in Melbourne, Australia and embarked on a career acquiring a wealth of knowledge and experience across the discipline of Electronics and Biomedical Engineering that helped develop his skills in Telecommunications, Robotics, Industrial Control, Bioelectronics, Embedded Systems, Software, Project Leadership and Engineering Management.

(Brisbane, Queensland) Chief Executive Officer Time Committed: 100%

Dr Tamsin Terry

(Brisbane, Queensland) Research & Development Director Time Committed: 50% Tamsin Terry has more than 16 years of experience in the UK and Australian pharma-biotech sector with particular expertise in preclinical development of small molecules, biologics and vaccines and has extensive experience directing Industry-Academic research collaborations. Tamsin was previously Research Director for Implicit Bioscience, a Brisbanebased biotech focusing on immunomodulatory therapies, and previously managed research and development for two Brisbane based startups (Genetraks Pty Ltd and Vacquel Pty Ltd), and worked for Acambis, UK after obtaining a PhD in Biochemistry from Cambridge University, UK.

Ms Shelley Morris

(Brisbane, Queensland) Branding & Communications Coordinator Time Committed: 100% Shelley commenced with the CRC in February 2012 and currently oversees the communications, marketing, design and brand management of all areas of the WMI CRC’s activities. Shelley’s background and qualifications are in graphic design, web design, marketing, events, business administration, accounting and human resources

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(Adelaide, South Australia) Special Projects & Initiatives Director Time Committed: 100%

Ms Michelle Gibb (Brisbane, Queensland) Clinical Director Time Committed: 100%

Michelle commenced with the WMI CRC in February 2015 as Clinical Director, and previously led the Wound Healing Service at Queensland University of Technology as Wound Management Nurse Practitioner. She has extensive experience in wound management and has worked in a range of clinical settings. Michelle has been awarded numerous prestigious awards for her contribution to nursing and wound care including a Churchill Fellowship in 2010. Michelle is also currently undertaking her PhD exploring wound management nurse practitioner models of practice.

Mrs Faye Austen-Brown (Brisbane, Queensland) Research Administration Time Committed: 20%

Faye commenced with the WMI CRC in March 2015 and is currently assisting with the drafting of policy documents, reviewing research agreements and reassessing intellectual property provisions of various contractual arrangements. She has a legal background as well as years of experience in research and administration.

Mrs Dee Chin

(Brisbane, Queensland) Executive Assistant Time Committed: 50% Dee joined the CRC National Office in September 2014 and is currently the Executive Assistant and also assists the team in various administrative capacities. Dee has over 10 years’ experience in Office administration.

(Brisbane, Queensland) Development Project Leader Time Committed: 50%

Ms Kylie Stewart

(Brisbane, Queensland) Finance Manager (from May 2015) Time Committed: 100% Kylie is an enthusiastic and result focused Finance Manager taking on complex issues, meeting timelines and delivering quality performance with a demonstrated ability of implementing financial controls, budgets and processes. Kylie’s specialties include: Financial reporting, Business tax issues, forecasting, budgeting and cash management, Internal controls, project budgeting, problem solving skills, time management, payroll, data analysis, research, account reconciliation, accounts payable, accounts receivable, team building, stakeholder engagement, process improvement, mentoring. Kylie has tertiary qualifications in Accounting, HR Management and was previously Finance Officer with the CRC for Rail Innovation for 5 years until its wind-up.

Dr Jane Andrews

(Brisbane, Queensland) Deputy CEO (until May 2015) Principal Consultant (from May 2015) Time Committed: 50% Jane has extensive experience in the biotechnology industry. Prior to joining the WMI CRC, Jane worked as a private consultant to industry, academia and government on strategy, intellectual property, commercial feasibility, due diligence and new government initiatives. In 2004, Jane co-founded Implicit Bioscience Limited, where her role as Director of Corporate Strategy saw her involved in acquisitions, life cycle management, product extension strategies and management of the intellectual property portfolio. Jane has a PhD in the life sciences, Graduate Diploma in Applied Finance and Investment and venture capital experience at Gresham Rabo Management Limited and Queensland Investment Corporation.


ExpertAdvisors Advisors Expert Research Program 1 Leader: A. Prof Flavia Huygens (Time Committed: 50%)

Flavia is a molecular microbiologist, who received her PhD in Medical Microbiology from the University of Pretoria, South Africa and later received her post-graduate certificate in education from the University of Queensland. Flavia has achieved significant success in research outcomes that are evident by the number of publications, patents, technology transfers, and collaborations both with industry and government agencies. Since 2007, Flavia has also established a significant number of collaborations including Pathology Queensland, Queensland Health Forensic Science Services, Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR), the Department of Natural Resources and Water Queensland, Universite Paris-Est Creteil France, University of Rosario, Colombia, and Immunexpress, USA.

Research Program 2 Leader:

Professor Allison Cowin (Time Committed: 50%) Allison is an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and Professor of Regenerative Medicine at the University of South Australia. Professor Cowin is a leading researcher in the area of wound healing and scar formation with over 60 peer-reviewed papers in top international journals. Professor Cowin heads a team of 12 staff and students who have established a world-leading and unique position in which to further define the mechanisms involved in wound healing particularly in relation to the role of the cytoskeletal protein Flii. Her team are developing new antibody-based therapies for the treatment of chronic wounds and burn injuries and her research has received special recognition from the NHMRC by inclusion in the 2008 ‘10 of the best projects’ publication. In 2009 she was awarded the MS McLeod Medal for Research Excellence. Prof. Cowin has served on NHMRC peer review panels including the Inflammation GRP in 2007-2008 and acted as Deputy Chair in 2009. In 2012-13 she was a member of the Early Career Research Fellowships review panel. She is on the Editorial Advisory Board and acts as Associate Editor for the American Journal “Wound Repair and Regeneration”. Prof. Cowin is also the current Joint Editor of the Australian Journal: Wound Practice & Research. She is on the Scientific Advisory Board of The Australasian Blistering Diseases Foundation and an invited member of

the international expert panel for the Wound Healing and Management node of the Joanna Briggs Institute which is developing new clinical guidelines to influence clinical practice within the wound community. Prof Cowin was the founder and inaugural President of the Australasian Wound & Tissue Repair Society (2007-2012) and was a member of the AWMA national committee (2007-2012).

Research Program 3 Leader: Professor Helen Edwards OAM (Time Committed: 50%)

Helen is Head of the School of Nursing at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Queensland, Australia and a member of the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation. Professor Edwards is internationally recognised for her work in ageing, chronic disease and wound management. Her clinical research is focused on evaluating models of care for people with chronic wounds and self-management of chronic disease. She leads the wound management research team in the Faculty of Health at QUT and works with multi- disciplinary teams and in partnership with industry. Her team conducted the first clinical trial in Australia to demonstrate the effectiveness of a chronic disease self-management model of care for people with venous leg ulcers. Following this research several ‘Leg Clubs’ were set up across Australia including a Wound Healing Community Outreach Service at QUT which is in its fifth year of operation. In collaboration with Professor Zee Upton, Professor Edwards established the $110 million Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre. Professor Edwards is also involved in several research programs related to aged care and dementia and is the Director of the Queensland Dementia Training and Study Centre (Funded by Commonwealth Government) which is located at QUT.

Ms Carole Green Strategic Advisor

Carole is a Director of the Autism CRC and has held positions within a number of Cooperative Research Centres including Strategic Manager Wound Management Innovation CRC, as well as Chief Operating Officer Construction Innovation CRC. She has also been Company Secretary within CRC contexts. She has experience in establishment, strategic direction, implementation of processes and systems within CRCs, and exploitation of research outputs. Carole also has more than 15 years’

experience working with tertiary education, government, and industry across science, health, education, business, and IT. She has a wealth of experience in complex environments with multiple stakeholders, establishing and operating business structures, quality assurance and risk management. Carole’s qualifications include Master of Business Administration, Master of Information Technology, Grad Diploma Computer Education, Grad Diploma Corporate Governance, B. Applied Science (Computing), Certificate of Teaching, GAICD.

Prof Keith Harding Principal Advisor

Prof Harding, CBE FRCGP FRCP FRCS, has had a longstanding interest in wound healing. He has undergone training in both general surgery and general practice. He was appointed as the first Director of the Wound Healing Research Unit in 1991. From 2011 – 2013 he was Director of TIME Institute (Translation, Innovation, Methodology and Engagement) in the School of Medicine and Head of Wound Healing Research Unit, Cardiff University. In September 2013 he was appointed as Dean of Clinical Innovation at Cardiff University. His clinical practice is exclusively focused on treating patients with wound healing problems with a wide range of aetiologies. He has held external professorial appointments at universities in the UK and Australia. He has authored over 400 publications in the field of wound healing and has written a number of chapters and books in this area. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the International Wound Journal published by Wiley. He was the First President of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, First Recorder of the European Wound Management Association and is a Past President of the European Tissue Repair Society. He was Chair of the International Working Group on Wound Healing in Diabetic Foot Disease, Chair of the Expert Working Group that produced a range of International Consensus Documents from 2004 – 2011. He has obtained funding of over £45 million from a range of academic, commercial and clinical sources since the Wound Healing Research Unit was created in 1991. He was awarded the CBE in the New Year Honours list in January 2013 for Services to Medicine and Health Care. In 2013 he was awarded £4.2 million to set up the Welsh Wound Innovation Initiative. The centre is designed to coordinate academic activity, both in terms of teaching and research, in addition to providing a coordinated approach to the care of patients with wounds. In 2014 he was elected to Fellowship of the Learned Society of Wales.

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Dr Douglas Queen

Prof Nick Santamaria

Douglas Queen. BSc, PhD, MBA, has been in the wound care arena for 30 years. Doug completed his PhD in Biomedical Engineering studying Wound Care Dressings in 1986 and his MBA in 1996. His initial career was with ConvaTec, both in Research & Development and also Sales & Marketing. His experience included both Europe and North America. Douglas was previously Commercial Director, Welsh Wound Innovation Centre and is currently Director, International Business & Strategic Development, Canadian Association of Wound Care (CAWC). He is an Editor of the International Wound Journal and publisher of Wound Care Canada and Diabetic Foot Canada eJournal.

Nick is the Professor of Nursing Research, Translational Research at the University of Melbourne and the Royal Melbourne Hospital. He chairs the Skin Integrity Committee for Melbourne Health and was involved in establishing the Wounds West Project in WA. He has recently completed a large RCT investigating the effectiveness of silicone dressings in the prevention of pressure ulcers in critically ill ED/ICU patients. Other areas of Nick’s research include the calculation of healing rate methods in diabetic foot wounds and venous leg ulcers and the investigation of the antimicrobial properties of electrolyzed water in infected wounds.

Development Advisory Committee

Prof Ann Gardner

Development Advisory Committee

Strategic Advisor

A. Prof Nick Gough

Research Advisory Committee (Chair) Prof Gough has extensive experience in biomedical research and cancer biology, in the biotechnology industry, and in the Australian Cooperative Research Centres program. Inventor of technologies underpinning biopharmaceuticals and biotechnology products, marketed internationally and in clinical trials, including GM-CSF – one of the first pharmaceuticals based on Australian science and intellectual property. Key past appointments include: Head, Molecular Haematology Laboratory, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Research Director AMRAD Corporation Limited, CEO Cerylid Biosciences Limited, CEO Cooperative Research Centre for Genes for Common Human Diseases, Director, Molecular and Genomic Discovery ES Cell International Pty Ltd (Singapore). Freelance biotechnology research and strategy consultant, operating at the interface of basic research and its commercial development or end-user engagement. Chairman and Principal Consultant, Nick Gough & Associates Pty Ltd Biotechnology and BioIndustries Consultants. Associate Professor (Honorary), Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne. External Scientific Advisor, Cancer Therapeutics Cooperative Research Centre. Recipient of the 2011 Clunies Ross Medal of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering for the application of science and technology for the benefit of Australia.

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Research Advisory Committee

Research Advisory Committee Professor Anne Gardner is Professor of Nursing at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine at the Australian Catholic University. Prof Gardner has an extensive health industry background in clinical nursing practice, post-registration education and clinical research. Her clinical interests are primarily in the areas of infection control and wound care. She has an international profile as a researcher into nurse practitioner competency standards and scope of practice, and is one of the four researchers on the recently completed nationally funded research project entitled “Reforming Healthcare: Nurse practitioners and workforce re-design”. Prof Gardner supervises several higher degree students including both PhD and Masters students.

Dr Steve Gower

Development Advisory Committee (RMIT Projects) Dr Steve Gower works for RMIT University in Melbourne as Director– Research Collaborations and Partnerships. Leading a small team, he is responsible for IP management, commercialisation of RMIT University research, research contracts as well as research partnerships with industry government and universities, both nationally and internationally; including Cooperative Research Centres. Previously he has held positions at the Australian Synchrotron, the Victorian Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional Development, the Australian National University, the University of Wollongong and BHP Research. Dr Gower has a physics double major degree and a PhD in plasma physics and high power microwave engineering, the latter undertaken through the CRC program.

Dr Jason Loveridge

Dr Loveridge has been working with growth orientated businesses in the biotech and medtech industries for over 20 years. As an active venture investor he has established a lengthy track record of successful participation in European, US and Israeli-based healthcare companies. Based in Europe he also has considerable international experience at board level. Dr Loveridge’s current directorships include: Warambi Sarl; Corticrine Limited; JDS BioPharma Limited; Actinogen Medical Pty Ltd and Anaconda SAS.

Dr Kishore Udipi

Dr. Kishore Udipi received his Ph.D. in Polymer Science from the University of Akron and was a NASA postdoctoral fellow at Princeton. He has had over 30 years of successful industrial experience at Phillips, Monsanto and Medtronic Cardiovascular. There he led projects in areas such as biomaterials, drug delivery, polymer blends, coatings, implantable polymers among others. He was a Senior Science Fellow at Monsanto, a position less than 1% of the scientists attain. At Medtronic, Dr. Udipi was Director of Polymer Research and Distinguished Scientist. He is the co-inventor of BioLinx® Polymer System employed in Resolute, one of the two leading drug eluting stents globally generating billions of dollars of revenue. He has 45 awarded US patents; and scores of awarded foreign patents. He has authored and coauthored book chapters and >40 papers in peer reviewed journals. He has made presentations and chaired sessions at national and international polymer and biomedical conferences. A gold medalist from University of Bombay, Dr. Udipi was named a Distinguished Alumnus in 2013. He was inducted into the prestigious College of Fellows, American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers and was awarded the Society for Biomaterials Technology, Innovation and Development Team Award, both in 2014.


Expert Advisors Dr Mark Richardson

Development Advisory Committee (Smith and Nephew Projects) Mark is the VP of Research and Technology at Smith and Nephew Wound Management in Hull, England and he has over 25 years’ experience in the Wound Management Sector within S&N bringing Innovative products to Global Markets. He has worked on Products as diverse as Allevyn, Dermagraft and NPWT. Mark has a first Degree in Microbiology, a PhD in Biochemistry and an MBA. He is particularly interested in Open Innovation and the importance of fully understanding customer needs. At present his team are particularly focused on understanding the technology roadmap for meeting these clinical needs. He lives in York in the UK.

Mr Chris Selwa

tenure market share more than doubled. He has successfully led the launch of 24 medical devices at the national level. Later, based in Belgium, he was an Associate Director for International Sales and Marketing Organization at AstraZeneca - a role that spanned all non-US sales and marketing and all therapeutic areas. In California, USA he advised the medical device industry on the development of new products: R&D processes, organization and strategy. Clients included blue chip device companies. Chris draws on these skills spanning R&D, through to commercial launches in devices and intimate knowledge of the wound care market to contribute to the Wound CRC Development Advisory Committee. Chris holds a Bachelors and Masters of Engineering from Cambridge University in the UK and an MBA, with distinction, from INSEAD, France.

Development Advisory Committee

Mr Robert Metzke, Development

Chris is Managing Director and Founder of MediGroup EBI, a successful SME medical device distribution and manufacturing business. Chris has a successful track record in the medical device and pharmaceutical industries with experience gained in the USA, UK, and Mainland Europe. His P&L, sales and marketing experience includes start-up phase, mid size growth and large corporate.

Robert is an experienced medical device product development professional with a technical engineering background, business foreground and international experience. He has over 19 years of experience in product development through to post market launch with management experience across in vitro diagnostic and medical device fields.

Project Advisor

MediGroup EBI has focused on introducing ground breaking innovations into the medical device market. MediGroup’s business unit, dedicated to launching advanced wound technologies, has introduced multiple wound market firsts into Australia: a gel based dressing, ultrasonic debridement, self-drying cross polymerized scar gels, multi-layer compression, dynamic tissue closure for abdominal reconstruction and other wounds, real time digital wound measurement, sub bandage compression measurement and truly portable unique dynamic compression, and many others. Prior to MediGroup, Chris established a peripheral vascular intervention business for Guidant (now Boston Scientific) in the UK, and went on to run their national cardiac intervention marketing in the UK, during his

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4.2 Participants WMI CRC Participants are shown in the table on the following page. Participants include “Essential Participants” as listed in the Commonwealth Agreement as well as “Other Participants” that are not listed in the Commonwealth Agreement, but are party to the Participants Agreement. Tissue Therapies retired as Participant from the CRC during the reporting period. The CRC is in negotiations with a number of Industry, SME and University organisations who have expressed interest in joining the CRC as Participants.

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Participant’s Name

Participant Type (Essential/Core or Other/ Supporting or Third Party)

ABN or ACN

Organisation Type (Australian Government, State Government, University, Industry/ Private Sector, SME, International or Individual)

Curtin University of Technology

Essential

99 143 842 569

University

Queensland University of Technology

Essential

83 791 724 622

University

Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University

Essential

49 781 030 034

University

Smith & Nephew Pty Limited

Essential

68 000 087 507

Industry/Private Sector

Southern Cross University

Essential

41 995 651 524

University

University of South Australia

Essential

37 191 313 308

University

Australian Wound Management Association Inc.

Other

69 104 482 963

SME

Blue Care

Other

96 010 643 909

Industry/Private Sector

Department of Health South Australia

Other

97 643 356 590

State Government

Department of Health Victoria

Other

74 410 330 756

State Government

Ego Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd

Other

86 005 142 361

Industry/Private Sector

Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation

Other

42 077 750 693

Industry/Private Sector

Metropolitan Health Service/Wounds West

Other

13 993 250 709

Industry/Private Sector

Queensland Health

Other

66 329 169 412

State Government

Royal District Nursing Service Limited

Other

49 052 188 717

Industry/Private Sector

Silver Chain Group (Incorporating RDNS SA)

Other

77 119 417 018

Industry/Private Sector

South East Queensland Hyperbaric Pty Ltd

Other

67 077 871 053

Industry/Private Sector

The University of Queensland

Other

63 942 912 684

University

University of Western Australia

Other

37 882 817 280

University

Southern Cross Care (SA & NT)

Third Party

53 682 143 626

SME

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4.3 Collaboration Core to the CRC Program is the unique collaboration between Australian academia, industry and end-user organisations to drive research to output. The WMI CRC has successfully brought together a growing total of19 participants comprising the nation’s leading laboratory based scientists, clinical researchers, wound practitioners, wound care organisations and corporate industry organisations. The WMI CRC has 21 International collaborators in 11 countries with scores of collaborations across Australia from city centres to remote and rural areas. Recent highlights demonstrating the innovative and collaborative approach of the WMI CRC include: •

International collaboration agreements with the Welsh Wound Innovation Initiative and the Canadian Association of Wound Care (CAWC) regarding “best practices” in scientific, clinical research and education. These collaborations will see a sharing of ideas to benefit the patients of these commonwealth nations with very similar healthcare systems. Leveraging the strengths of the CRC Program by entering a collaborative agreement with the Cell Therapy Manufacturing CRC (CTM CRC). The two CRCs have signed a collaboration agreement to ensure cooperation and interaction in the development of new technologies and therapies for a brighter future for wound sufferers. Building innovative business models for improving skin health in residential aged care. In collaboration

with Southern Cross Care (SA & NT) this approach has developed a sustainable model of wound care to transform the lives of residents and avoid hospitalisations. A strengthened alignment with the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) on several strategic initiatives including a national wound awareness campaign to assist people with wounds receive the best possible care. Establishing the Australian Wound Registry by drawing together the necessary stakeholders, like-minded national peak bodies, existing state-based bodies and commercial stakeholders to collaborate in the development and utilisation of the registry. Collaborating closely with end user Industry Participants to develop new WMI CRC projects. At the end of the reporting period two additional Industry Partners were in the process of joining the CRC.


4.4 Financial Management In its fifth year of operation the WMI CRC has continued with established management processes and financial systems. The WMI CRC will continue to refine and adapt processes to accommodate changes within the organisation and research activities. The CRC has established various financial systems including detailed Project budgets and forecasting tools. These systems allow the WMI CRC to closely monitor and manage funds and cash position in regards to research activities.

Cash Contributions In the 2014/2015 financial year, the WMI CRC has received cash contributions from Participants totalling $1,507,336, contributions came slightly under budget. The WMI CRC also received Commonwealth funding of $4,000,000 funded by the Cooperative Research Centre program. An additional $30, 000 was received from Southern Cross Care (third party contribution). Two Participants are currently overdue for Participant payments. The outstanding amounts for FY2014/15 are anticipated to be made in FY2015/16. The WMI CRC has no bad debts for the 2014/15 financial year.

In kind and Non Staff In kind Contributions For the 2014/15 financial year, the WMI CRC reported 14.6 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) budget for staff in-kind contributions, causing a slight decrease against the Commonwealth Budgeted amount of 16.4 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) the difference being 1.8 FTE (Full Time Equivalent). This result was due to a number of factors, primarily research projects finishing early in the FY2014/15 period. The CRC will monitor in-kind contributions for the next financial year. The WMI CRC reported total non-staff in-kind contributions of $2,642,945 against a budget of $3,790,000. This result is due to research projects being finalised.

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Annual Report FY1415

Expenditure Expenditure for the year totalled $5,363,417 which included $1,584,913 used to support administration functions including communications, marketing and corporate governance, with $3,778,504 utilised in supporting research and development activities. There was no capital equipment acquired by the WMI CRC during the reporting period. The WMI CRC is in a sound financial position as at 30 June 2015. It has $5.726m cash at bank, with net assets of $3.291m.


Commonwealth Agreement In Kind Contributions to 30 June 2015

Actual: 14.88 FTE Contract Agreement: 16.5 FTE

Commonwealth Agreement Non staff In Kind Contributions to 30 June 2015

$5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 0

Actual: $2,642,945 Contract Agreement: $3,790.000

Commonwealth Agreement Cash contributions to 30 June 2015 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 0 Actual Contract Agreement

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05

Other Activities

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The WMI CRC continues to build on the International collaborations and have visited the Welsh Wound Innovation Centre (WWIC) in Cardiff and the Canadian Association of Wound Care (CAWC) in Toronto. The former was part of visit coordinated with Prof Harding to develop a range of opportunities for collaboration and commercial activities around the Wounds UK trade show. Dr Queen of the CAWC has joined the WMI CRC team as an Expert Advisor to assist in the deployment of certain assets that have already gained success in Canada. Prof Harding joined WMI CRC as part of the 3rd Year review team and spoke to the potential of the collaboration and the value of the synergies of some of the assets of both organisations.

We have now developed a range of clinical translation activities that are starting to materialize and add value as a novel system of Wound care assets. Encouragingly our corporate involvement and exposure has extended as interest grows around these assets forming a knowledge system that has not previously existed. Each of these opportunities has been matured with one or more Participants and are showing great promise of becoming WMI CRC legacies.

The WMI CRC has developed systems and infrastructure that after the Third Year Review has been passed on to other CRC’s to help them streamline aspects of their operations.

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06

Additional Requirements


6.1 Third Year Review Recommendations Recommendation 1:

That the CRC Board increase its capabilities in the health policy/health economics area at least on a contract or part time basis. In June 2014, the WMI CRC commenced negotiations to commence a full time independent health economist which by late 2014 was filled by Dr Rosana Norman from Essential Participant QUT. Dr Norman has made significant progress for the CRC in the Health Economics Project, which is evaluating the current costs of wounds on the Australian economy and quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting evidence-based practice. Dr Norman also provides an economic assessment of all research project proposals for the Governing Board. This process ensures projected research outcomes are aligned to the CRC’s goals of influencing health policy in regard to patient centred best practice wound management that minimises healthcare costs. Health economics and healthcare policy will continue to be core research and translation activities, including the following core activities: Australian Wound Registry As a part of the WMI CRC’s international collaboration with the Welsh Wound Innovation Initiative (WWII), the WWII has offered for the WMI CRC to adopt a National Registry system that has been developed and trialled in the UK over the past 5 years. The WMI CRC Australian Wound Registry (AWR) pilot project, conducted from December – May 2015, demonstrated the need for, and feasibility of, implementing a national wound registry. Now in its first phase of operations, the AWR will provide rich data to enhance evidence-based practice in the management and prevention of wounds; ultimately leading to informing healthcare policy and reimbursement and generating a valuable industry database for product and marketing information. As such it is envisaged that this will form a financially sustainable legacy beyond the funding of the Wound CRC and place Australia as a World leader in knowledge of wounds management. Reimbursement of wound care The WMI CRC has sought the advice of an Australian firm, THEMA Consulting, to provide guidance into achieving reimbursement of compression bandages for the treatment of venous leg ulcers. The WMI CRC will build on the advice and experience to seek reimbursement for other evidence-based practices to ultimately influence healthcare policy reform.

Aged Care Services Project The Australian Aged Care Wound Services Project represents a new model of wound service delivery, which is applicable to and expandable in, residential aged care facilities, hospitals and GP clinics. One of the projected key outputs of this project, in addition to improved resident, staff and statutory outcomes; is demonstrating the cost efficiencies of using specialist wound services and prevention strategies to the Aged Care organisation. This project is an expansion of the Cooperative Wound Clinic initiative and will attempt to expand and monetise the concept of best practice service and training. Credentialing and Education In conjunction with Participant AWMA (Australian Wound Management Association), the WMI CRC has revised the Education Project objectives to focus on the establishment of a process for national credentialing of wound experts. This credentialing will establish a national standard in the provision of wound management, enhance the quality of care provided to patients. Promoting professional standards and lobbying for broader inclusions of wound management in the undergraduate curriculum of relevant training programs. In light of the above initiatives, Recommendation 1 of the 3rd Year review and as part of usual Board processes, the WMI CRC governing board considered its composition on 27th February 2015. After extensive discussion, the Board resolved to recruit an additional member(s) to focus on advancing the CRC’s commercial, product and enterprise development and provide further alignment with the objectives of the Industry Growth Centres. Further the Governing Board were satisfied with the Executive Team’s progress with engaging in health economics and policy experts in its Participant partnerships. These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • • • • • •

Recommendation 1 Recommendation 2 Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 6 Recommendation 12 Recommendation 18

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Recommendation 2:

That the CRC Board focus on details of the transition plan such as funding options, associated financial details and risks. The WMI CRC Governing Board led the process of planning for the WMI CRC’s remaining term and conducted a strategy day on the 13 May 2015 to fully explore the options, finances and associated risks. This formed the basis of the draft of the recently submitted Transition Plan and Research Priorities documents. Due to the Transition Plan being confidential and not for public disclosure, please refer to the separate document in full for comprehensive details. These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • • • • •

Recommendation 1 Recommendation 2 Recommendation 3 Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 6

Recommendation 3:

That the CRC Board clearly distinguishes what activity is considered research within the CRC, and provide direction on what is appropriate research and what cannot be considered appropriate research to give some clarity and focus to the CRC. Following the Third Year Review process, the WMI CRC engaged several expert independent consultants to form part of a new streamlined, independent process of research and development project approvals. This included an extensive overview of the then current CRC’s research Projects and their respective Programs. As a part of the revised strategy presented to the 3YR panel, the CRC, under the direction of the Board, responded to its changed environment since the bid process in 2009. This has resulted in a restructuring and rebranding its activities into 4 operational areas: Research, Development, Education and Clinical Translation. This natural evolution of the ‘RP1, 2 and 3’ model is reflective of the maturity of the research projects within the CRC. These four areas, described below, are linked to the CRC’s utilisation and output objectives and clearly articulate the CRC’s legacy pathway. This revised strategy was communicated and disseminated widely to Participants through interstate presentations and regular seminars, website, newsletters, email updates and is a key feature of the CRC’s new branding and ongoing communications. Research: The WMI CRC research topics have been revised to meet current industry needs, as advised by the CRC’s new independent Research Advisory Committee (RAC) with support

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Annual Report FY1415

from the Development Advisory Committee (DAC). The research topics are developed through strategy days with the Governing Board, Program Leaders, RAC, DAC and the CRC Executive Team into a Research Priority Areas document that is a part of a twice yearly research funding process. Since the 3YR panel report, the Governing Board has resolved to fund two rounds of Research Projects in the period based on the streamlined and enhanced system. Research projects selected are those that have the potential for a significant impact on wound healing and prevention and delivery on the WMI CRCs goals and objectives, including clinical and development priorities. Development: As the CRC enters its final years of its term, translation of research into commercially viable outputs of is a key legacy of the CRC. As a part of the CRC’s revised research translation process, the CRC accepts development projects that have a clear regulatory and development path to commercialisation and a well-defined intellectual property position. As such early stage research such as bioactive discovery or therapeutic target identification have timelines to impact that are not compatible with the remaining WMI CRC term or the WMI CRC’s remaining financial capacity. The projects in the development portfolio are high-impact, near-term, next-generation product developments that we envisage will generate revenues within the remaining term of the WMI CRC. The WMI CRC, under license, controls background IP, owns developed IP and has responsibility for Utilization and as such has created a pathway for value generation and sustainability. Return and modelling of revenues are considered further in the current Transition Plan. Education: The WMI CRC is on track with its plans to educate over fifty higher degree students, who will be trained in a culture of collaboration and who will have forged strong connections with their peers in diverse disciplines, all of which are integral to wound management. The CRC has fulfilled its PhD milestones and is actively engaging its Participants to fulfil the remaining Honours and Masters Student milestones. The Student and Alumni cohort remain engaged and the CRC endeavours to produce employment opportunities through its clinical translation activities. Through these student Research projects we have addressed, and are addressing, some of the broader topics within Wounds management. This is a cost effective mechanism for selection of future Research project investment. Clinical Translation: The WMI CRC’s Clinical Translation activities are centred on sustainable models of wound service, the provision of clinical education activities and mechanisms for increasing the uptake of evidence-based practice. These projects have been defined as core activities and key legacies that will lead to: industry growth, increased jobs, exports, productivity, integration into global supply chains, new technologies, products or services, increased revenues and intellectual property outputs. The Wound management industry in Australia is fragmented and confused. WMI CRC believe that the maturation of these


initiatives will lead to a sustainable vehicle(s) that will better organise product and service delivery, significantly shaping and improving the wound management landscape Nationally and Internationally. These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • • • • •

Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 6 Recommendation 7 Recommendation 12 Recommendation 15

Recommendation 4:

That the CRC explore more commercial and industry partners, in particular those that can: • Provide networks to facilitate the rollout of the CRC’s best practice wound management throughout Australia; • Help commercialise technologies under development; and • Widen the source of opinions on what industry is looking for Since the inception of the revised strategy, the WMI CRC has grown a reputation in the wound industry which is now being reflected in the dramatic increase in the number of corporate partners. As such, WMI CRC has engaged these new partners as Participants. WMI CRC is also currently in negotiations with other Participants and partners, including several large medical device companies. In addition, Other Participants, mostly notably Southern Cross Care, have joined the CRC in collaboration with a significant project investigating new models of sustainable wound care in aged care sites. With the addition of the RAC and DAC and ongoing close relationships with existing Participants, the CRC is progressing a number of promising technologies, educational initiatives and industry specific research questions. Spin-out vehicles from our Clinical Translation activities have been specifically designed to reflect the current and forecasted wound industry needs. The CRC has incorporated its first subsidiary spin-out, Wound Healing Institute Australia (WHIA). This new company, formed with a charitable status, will enable national and international roll-out of best practice accredited education and training services. It also provides the option for philanthropic funding in the future. As such excess revenues generated through this spin-out / charity will be re-invested back into wound research with WMI CRC Participants.

Australian Wound Innovation Centre (AWIC) project will offer patient and clinician best practice wound management services and training. The WMI CRC has a clearly articulated IP and commercialisation strategy which is communicated within the Participant base and through the DAC committee has access to expert opinion. The recent success of attracting large medical device companies as Participants and partners demonstrates the effectiveness of the strategies that have been deployed to translate WMI CRC research outcomes. These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • • • •

Recommendation 2 Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 6 Recommendation 7

Recommendation 5:

That the CRC develop a strategy to ensure national rollout of its best practice wound management education and training, while recognising that the CRC itself cannot be the delivery mechanism. The strategy should recognise the limited resources of the CRC and leverage the resources available through partner organisations. The WMI CRC has triaged the wound industry and landscape with respect to what is achievable within the CRC’s term and from the Participant base what opportunities can be exploited to ensure roll-out of best practice wound management education and training. The CRC has taken a view on pieces of research that are most valuable and provided opportunities for these to mature into valuable assets. One of these assets is the expansion of WoundsWest Program into WHIA. This allows its products and services to roll out both nationally and internationally with the support from the CRC’s international partnerships. Another opportunity to roll out best practice is utilising partnerships with AWMA and QUT to implement credentialing program through the CRC education Project, which has a direct impact on all the CRC’s other Clinical Translation activities including AWIC, AASP and DFA. These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • • • •

Recommendation 2 Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 6 Recommendation 7

The CRC will enable roll-out of best practice education and practice through the other clinical translation activities which have been developed to be unified, self-sustaining business units with close synergies. In addition to WHIA and the Aged Care services project, Diabetic Foot Australia (DFA) and the

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Recommendation 6:

That the CRC consciously address capturing feedback from Research Program 3 to inform research activities and projects in Research Programs 1 and 2. As outlined in Recommendation 3 response, the CRC has adjusted to the changing environment and industry needs of the wound community and as such, has refined its operations in research activities to incorporate a more holistic approach in its 4 operational areas. During this time, the RAC, DAC Program Leaders and key wound management leaders have, through their respective areas of expertise and connectivity to the wound environment, influenced the key research questions in the CRC’s Research Priority Areas. This has allowed significantly increased levels of intra-disciplinary and intra-organisational collaboration in the new wave of Research projects. An example of this is the Pressure Injury Delphi report that was developed through one Participant group (Curtin University) with the assistance of multiple Participant experts. This report has now been incorporated into the July 2015 Research Priority areas document. As such all Participant’s have the benefit of the collective expert knowledge and gaps in the current research into Pressure Injuries. This has already stimulated a number of expressions of interest for Research projects from a range of Participants and industry. These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • •

Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 17

Recommendation 7:

That the CRC explore ways of providing further assistance to PhD and Postdoctoral researchers to promote career opportunities in research and in other fields. After feedback from the 3YR Panel and in consultation with the WMI CRC’s Student Association representatives, the CRC Executive and the Student Association worked together to best approach this Recommendation to ensure the CRC maintained an informed and engaged student cohort. The result was a number of opportunities that were presented over a 12 month period and will continue to evolve with further consultation and a greater industry engagement with the WMI CRC. The first was an opportunity to attend the 2014 Canadian Association of Wound Care National conference to present CRC Research. After rigorous peer review, two student’s abstracts were accepted and spent a week networking and presenting their research to a large group of experts and industry representatives. The second initiative was a 2 day conference focused on important student topics including IP management, presentation skills, grant writing

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Annual Report FY1415

workshop and professional development workshops from product industry, academia and clinical services. The conference, brought together current students, student alumni and Early Career Researchers from across the nation. The conference events featured the CRC’s industry representatives, specialist guests and key academic leaders. This fostered networking and collaboration during the event and at the social functions. During the conference two new initiatives were launched: access to the Cell Therapy Manufacturing CRC’s, ePhD course and an online community where students and the CRC can have ongoing communication. In addition, the CRC is exploring career opportunities by actively engaging current and alumni students in clinical translation and National Office activities. For example, Michelle Gibb, a CRC PhD student and clinical nurse practitioner wound expert, now works for the CRC Executive and is leading several key projects. WMI CRC has also funded a project that has the aim of cross collaboration with International Partners in Wales. The Early career researcher will, when finished further data collection, attend the Cardiff campus and the Welsh Wound Innovation Centre to build on their research and the WMI CRC’s investment to date in this project area. These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • •

Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 6

Recommendation 8:

That the CRC clearly define the purpose and goals of its current and proposed training programs, including Wounds West, and map them in the context of existing professional training available, to develop a clear value proposition and path to market for each component of training developed. Since the 3YR, the CRC, in response to WA Health discontinuing the WoundsWest Program, comprehensively pursued this as a key spin-out company (WHIA) to exploit the commercial value of the assets and to allow for national and international adoption of these best practice products and resources. These include: Accredited online wound education modules; Nationwide telehealth wound management services; Clinical audit services in wound management for a range of organisations; World leading research in partnership with the Wound CRC; and Health promotion, education and health services in wound management to rural, remote and indigenous communities. WHIA has established and will maintain close working relationships with key organisations such as universities, hospitals, health networks, medical research entities, statutory bodies, and charitable foundations which work in the fields of advanced wound management and disease prevention. The market for education and training can be broadly defined


as all nursing and allied medical staff who deal with wound prevention and treatment. This includes 323,297 registered nurses, 30,681 registered general practitioners and 4,000 podiatrists in Australia alone. The market for a wound advisory service and wound prevalence surveys includes all public and private hospitals and aged care facilities, and to a lesser extent individual medical centres and domiciliary services. As at June 2013, there were 729 acute public hospitals and 281 private hospitals and 5,123 residential aged care facilities in Australia. In the 2015 Transition Plan, the CRC clearly articulated its key legacy activities within its clinical translation program. These 5 activities have been mapped to work in unison with each other, allowing maximum uptake of the educational components of each. Full details on the business aspects of each of these activities is available in the Transition Pan. WMI CRC is also working with AWMA on unifying the clinical education landscape. The WHIA assets are an important, but discrete, aspect of wound education and training. These resources are aimed at high-level nurses and medical professionals. Patient and other levels of clinical professionals are yet to be fully mapped and the best resources unified for each expertise level and disease state. It is envisaged that this work will be completed in the term of the WMI CRC and will likely be administered and managed in conjunction with AWMA and one of the WMI CRC vehicles.

Recommendation 9:

That the CRC clarify their IP strategy and develop a coherent IP policy that is disseminated to all affected parties, including PhD researchers. A significant part of the student and ECR conference was training against our IP management policies and more broadly we engaged an expert speaker to address the delegates. As such we attempted to ensure training against the existing policy was enhanced along with general understanding of IP management within a CRC. The CRC’s IP current Policy has been enhanced as part of our normal review of policies and procedures. This will be launched through our student on-line community with a live Q&A session. Further the changes to the policy will be highlighted in the newsletter for review by all of the Participants. These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • •

Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 15

These activities are also aligned with the following 2015 Miles CRC Programme Review Recommendations: • • • • •

Recommendation 4 Recommendation 5 Recommendation 6 Recommendation 15 Recommendation 18

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Appendix 1: 2014/15 Publications Project 1.05 Xie Y, Fan C, Dong Y, Lynam E, Leavesley DI, Li K, Su Y, Yang Y, Upton Z, Functional and mechanistic investigation of Shikonin in scarring. Chemico-Biological Interactions, Volume 228, 25 February 2015, Pages 18-27 Project 1.18 Johnston ST, Simpson MJ, McElwain DL, Binder BJ, Ross JV Interpreting scratch assays using pair density dynamics and approximate Bayesian computation. Open Biol. 2014 4 140097; . Published 10 September 2014 Project 1.19 Tanzer C, Sampson DL , Broadbent JA, Cuttle L, Kempf M, Kimble RM, Upton Z, Parker TJ. Evaluation of haemoglobin in blister fluid as an indicator of paediatric burn wound depth. Burns. 2015 Aug; 41(5):1114-21 Project 2.04 Banbury LK, Shou Q, Renshaw DE, Lambley EH, Griesser HJ, Mon H, Wohlmuth H. Compounds from Geijera parviflora with prostaglandin E2 inhibitory activity may explain its traditional use for pain relief. 2015, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Vol 163, 251255

Turner C, McInnes S, Cowin AJ. Therapeutic antibodies for improved wound healing. Wound Practice & Research, Journal of the Australian Wound Management Association 2015. Vol. 23, No. 1;16-24

Project 3.11 O’Brien J, Finlayson KJ, Kerr G, & Edwards HE Perspectives about exercise from adults with venous leg ulcers: an exploratory study. Journal of Wound Care. 2014. 496-8, 500-9

Project 2.10 Nasir M, Hariz A, Voelcker NH. Calibration of sensors for reliable radio telemetry in a prototype flexible wound monitoring device. Sensing and Bio-Sensing Research. Dec 2014. 2; 23–30

O’Brien J, Finlayson KJ and Kerr G, Edwards HE. Testing the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention for adults with venous leg ulcers : protocol of a randomised controlled trial. BMC Dermatology. Oct 2014. Vol 14:16.

Nasir M, Hariz A, Templeton S, Voelcker NH. An Improved Flexible Telemetry System to Autonomously Monitor Sub-Bandage Pressure and Wound Moisture. Sensors. Nov 2014. 14(11):21770-90

Project 3.18 Gibb M., Edwards HE. & Gardner, GE. A scoping study into wound management nurse practitioner models of practice. 2015. Australian Health Review. 39(2):220-7.

Nasir M, Hariz A, Templeton S, Voelcker NH. A flexible and low power telemetric sensing and monitoring system for chronic wound diagnostics. BioMedical Engineering OnLine, 14(1), pp.1–17.

Project 3.20 Carville K, Leslie G, Osseiran-Moisson R, Newall N, Lewin G. The effectiveness of a twice-daily skin-moisturising regimen for reducing the incidence of skin tears. International Wound Journal, August 2014. Volume 11, Issue 4, pages 446–453

Project 2.11 Szili EJ, Hong S-H, Short RD. On the effect of serum on the transport of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species across phospholipid membranes. Biointerphases 2015, 10, 029511

Project SP12-2 Krismastuti FSH, Bayat H, Voelcker NH, Schönherr H. Real Time Monitoring of Layerby-Layer Polyelectrolyte Deposition and Bacterial Enzyme Detection in Nanoporous Anodized Aluminum Oxide. Analytical Chemistry, 2015, 87, 3856−3863.

Project 2.05 Alhmoud HZ, Guinan TM, Elnathan R, Kobus H, Voelcker NH. Surface -assister laser desportion/ionization mass spectrometry using ordered silicon nanopillar arrays. Analyst, Nov 2014, 139 (22); 5999-6009

Szili EJ, Oh JS, Hong S-H, Hatta A, Short RD. Probing the transport of plasma-generated RONS in an agarose target as surrogate for real tissue: dependency on time, distance and material composition. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 2015, 48, 202001.

Alhmoud H, Delalat B, Elnathan R, CifuentesRius A, Chaix A, Rogers ML, Durand JO, Voelcker NH. Porous Silicon Nanodiscs for Targeted Drug Delivery. Advanced Functional Materials (2015), 25 (7), 1137-1145

Szili EJ, Hong S-H, Jenkins T, Short RD. Ionized Gas (Plasma) Delivery of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) into Artificial Cells. J Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 2014, 47, 362001

Project SP22-1 Than UTT, Guanzon D, Wager L, Manton KJ, Hollier BG, Leavesley DI. An analysis of exosomes from keratinocytes and fibroblasts. International Conference on Biomedical Engineering (IFMBE). 2015. Vol. 46, pp. 137141.

Oh J-S, Szili EJ, Gaur N, Hong S-H, Furuta H, Short RD, Hatta A. In-situ UV absorption spectroscopy for monitoring transport of plasma reactive species through agarose as surrogate for tissue. Journal of Photopolymer Science and Technology Impact Factor & Information. 2015. Vol 28, 439-444.

Project SP25-3 Sandy-Hodgetts K, Watts R. Effectiveness of topical negative pressure in the prevention of surgical wound complications; a systematic review and meta-analysis. The JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports. v. 13, n. 1, p. 253 – 303.

Vasani RB, Losic D, Cavallaro A, VoelckerNH. Fabrication of stimulus-responsive diatom biosilica microcapsules for antibiotic drug delivery Journal of Materials Chemistry B, 2015, Vol 3, 4325-4329 Project 2.08 Turner C, McInnes S, Voelcker N, Cowin AJ. Therapeutic Potential of Inorganic Nanoparticles for the Delivery of Monoclonal Antibodies. Journal of Nanomaterials, 2015, Article ID 309602. McInnes SJP, Turner CT, Airaghi Leccardi MJI, Lad H, Rollinger L, Irani Y, Williams KA, Cowin AJ, Voelcker NH (2015). Surface engineering of porous silicon to optimize therapeutic antibody loading and release. J Mater Chem B. First published online 05 May 2015.

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Annual Report FY1415

Project 3.05 Finlayson K, Wu M-L,Edwards HE. Identifying risk factors and protective factors for venous leg ulcer recurrence using a theoretical approach: A longitudinal study. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 2015.,52(6), pp.1042–1051 Parker CN, Finlayson KJ, Shuter P, Edwards HE. Risk factors for delayed healing in venous leg ulcers: a review of the literature. Int J Clin Pract. 2015 Apr 1.


Annual Report FY1415

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Copyright Š Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre 2015

General enquiries: enquiries@woundcrc.com Research enquiries: research@woundcrc.com Partnership enquiries: partner@woundcrc.com

Wound CRC Annual Report FY 14-15  

The Wound Management Innovation Cooperative Research Centre Annual Report for FY 14-15

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