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Build Up Without Tearing Down Notes to help guide your leadership of the lesson.

M at e r i a l s

Pens, Bibles, white board, self-stick notes, markers, computer with Internet access, candles for each participant.

o n l i n e R e s ou rces from womenofvision.wordpress.com/hotm

» “Transforming Lives” video » “About the Global Food Crisis” handout (also included with lesson)

P r e pare fo r D is cus s io n

Discussion Group Guidelines Consider adding this step after the opening prayer. It may be helpful to establish guidelines for your time together. Some participants may have a lot of biblical or cross-cultural knowledge, while others have very little. Be sure to note that this is quite all right and that all are welcome. Ask the group to discuss guidelines that will help create a supportive, learning atmosphere. Record their suggestions on the white board. After all the group’s ideas are recorded, end the discussion, noting that you will make copies of these guidelines and distribute them at the next meeting.

S c ri p t u r e R e flect io n

The following commentary will help you prepare to lead the discussion during the Scripture Reflection portion of the lesson. Romans 12:4-16 We know that within the Body of Christ, we all have different gifts that have been given us by the Holy Spirit for the common good (1 Corinthians 12:7) and for the building up of the Church and the unifying of the Body (Ephesians 4:12). Jesus meant us to live in community with one another and gave each of us the spiritual gifts necessary to make the community work. Because we are part of one Body, none of us is more important than the other (1 Corinthians 12:12-30), and we should not consider ourselves more highly than others (Romans 12:3-6).

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This is the concept that the World Vision model of community development relies on. Recognizing the gifts God has bestowed upon us is important. So is acknowledging the gifts of others and inviting them to bring those gifts to the table as God’s people make plans for transforming a community to be more life-giving for its members.

E x p lo r i ng Worl d Vision’s Asset-Base d C o mmu n i t y D ev elopm ent

Jesus meant us to live in community with one another and gave each of us the spiritual gifts necessary to make the community work.

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Break into small groups. Instruct each group to complete the gifts assessment activity for their group (rather than individually), and then apply their gifts to one of the situations outlined in the four scenarios listed.

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The Bread of Life— More than spiritual food Notes to help guide your leadership of the lesson.

M at e r i al s

Pens, Bibles, computer with Internet access, and a video player

ONLINE RESOURCEs from womenofvision.wordpress.com/hotm » “Water and Food for All Gallery Walk” handout (also included here) » “Water for All” video » “Lonica’s Story” handout (also included with lesson) INTRO DUCTION AN D OP ENING P RAYER

Ask the participants to share with the group their water and food usage records. As they speak, make a list for all to see of the different ways they have used water and consumed food and where it came from.

S c ri p t u r e R e flect io n

The following commentary will help you prepare to lead the discussion during the Scripture Reflection portion of the lesson. Genesis 26:1 A lack of food caused Isaac and his family to move from Beer Lahai Roi, where his children were born, to Gerar and to appeal to the king of the Philistines, Abimelech. The need for food and water forced Isaac to seek the help of this fierce tribe of nomadic people and also put him in a situation where he felt he had to lie to save himself and his family. Exodus 3:8 God saw the suffering of His people and came to their rescue. Luke 9:12–16 The disciples want Jesus to send the people away so that they can get food. Jesus instructs them to provide food for the people. They say it’s impossible: “All we have is five loaves and two fish.” Jesus takes what they have, blesses it and multiples it to feed everyone, and there are 12 baskets left over. John 21:1–14 Communities Transformed: Leaders Notes for Lesson Two | Page 4


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After Jesus’ death, the disciples go fishing. After an unsuccessful night, they see a man on shore. He tells them to cast their net on the other side of the boat and their net becomes full of fish. Once on shore, they see that Jesus has been cooking fish. He takes the bread and the fish and gives it to the disciples. If the discussion doesn’t raise the following, you might add these: » What does food cause people to do in each passage? It is the driving, motivating force in their actions. » How does each of these actions demonstrate providing the “bread of life”? God gives the people in each verse the sustenance they need—both physically and spiritually. » What relevance do you think these passages have to people today who lack food and water? They provide hope.

C o n s i d e r O u r Wo rld To day

The following information might be useful during the water discussion: » 963 million people do not have enough to eat; 907 million of them live in developing countries. » Nearly 5 million (4.8 million) children under the age of 5 die every year from causes related to malnutrition. This calculates to more than 13,000 children each day or one child every 7 seconds dying from causes related to malnutrition. » One in seven people worldwide do not get enough to eat. » One out of three people in developing countries is affected by vitamin and mineral deficiencies and is, therefore, more subject to infection, birth defects, and impaired physical and psychointellectual development. » More than 157 million children under the age of 5 worldwide are underweight. » The number of undernourished people in the world increased by 75 million in 2007, largely due to higher food prices. » The poorest people in developing countries can spend up to 75 percent of their income on food. » Thirteen percent of the world’s population consumes drinking water from unimproved sources. About half of them live in Asia. » In sub-Saharan Africa, the richest 20 percent of the population is five times more likely to use

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an improved sanitation facility than the poorest 20 percent. » Unsafe drinking water, lack of sanitation, and poor hygiene together contribute to about 88 percent of the under-5 deaths occurring each year due to diarrheal diseases. This means that more than 1.45 million children below the age of 5 are lost annually; that is nearly 4,000 die each day. »E  very 22 seconds a child under the age of 5 dies from illnesses attributed to poor hygiene practices, unsafe drinking-water supplies, and inadequate access to sanitation. (Sources: World Food Program Facts and Figures, Hunger on the Rise, 2008; UNICEF State of the World’s Children, 2009; WHO Nutrition for Health and Development, 2007; World Bank Policy Research Working Paper, 2008; WHO/UNICEF JMP Progress on Drinking Water and Sanitation, 2008)

C lo s i ng P ray er

If you have access to peaceful, meditative music, or someone in your group is musical, you might set the mood for prayer by playing or singing a song and sitting in silence before or after the closing prayer.

O P TIONAL ACTIV ITY

Create four “experiential stations” as noted below: Station One: Fetching Water Place at this station two buckets filled with water and page one of the gallery walk resource you downloaded. Station Two: Food Preparation Place at this station a mortar and pestle with dried corn or other grain and page two of the gallery walk resource you downloaded. Station Three: Food Safety Place at this station cut up fruit or vegetables on a plate with a knife and page three of the gallery walk resource you downloaded. Station Four: Food Choices Place at this station a small amount of rice and beans in a bowl and page four of the gallery walk resource you downloaded. Divide the participants into pairs. Explain that the goal of this activity is for participants to

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experience what it’s like to live without adequate food and water. After completing all of the stations, reconvene the group and ask the following questions: » Which station made the biggest impact on you? Why? » On what basis would you make decisions about who gets food if there’s a limited amount? » If you faced these sorts of tasks and questions daily, what would be your overall outlook on life?

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Be prepared to help participants understand that the fruit and vegetable station relates to the cleanliness of water that might have been used to wash the fruit or vegetables as well as the plate and knife. If these things are cleaned with contaminated water, those contaminants can be passed on.

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Lesson Two – Resource

water and food for life gallery walk

Station One Fetching Water Walk around the room once carrying both buckets. How many buckets of water do you think you would need for your daily tasks?

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Lesson Two – Resource

water and food for life gallery walk

Station Two Food Preparation Try grinding this grain so you can prepare your family’s meal. How much more time do you think you would spend preparing food daily if you had to make it from scratch?

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Lesson Two – Resource

water and food for life gallery walk

Station Three Food Safety What could be the danger of eating this food in a community without clean water?

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Lesson Two – Resource

water and food for life gallery walk

Station Four Food Choices You have three children under the age of 7 and a husband. Next week is the harvest. If this is the only food you have, who gets to eat it?

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the Sick and Tired Fall Harder Notes to help guide your leadership of the lesson.

M at e r i al s

Pens, Bibles, computer with online access, and a video player

o n l i n e R e s ou rce from womenofvision.wordpress.com/hotm

“Through the Eyes of the Poor Gallery Walk” resource

C o n s i d e r ou r wo rld to day

Consider including the following additional information in your discussion on health. Malaria Malaria is one of the world’s greatest threats to children. Though entirely preventable and treatable, it is a leading cause of death and illness—mostly among young children and pregnant women. Malaria flourishes in more than 100 countries and is transmitted by a common mosquito. Approximately 50 percent of the world lives with the routine threat of malaria. Malaria largely affects the poor. It slows economic development, perpetuating the cycle of poverty. And malaria becomes even more deadly when accompanied by malnutrition and AIDS. In many developing

nations, malaria is one of the leading threats to a child’s life, resulting in an estimated 750,000 child deaths per year globally.

Malaria is a life-threatening parasitic disease transmitted by mosquitoes. Today approximately 50 percent of the world’s population, most of whom live in the world’s poorest countries, is at risk of malaria. In many developing nations, malaria is one of the leading threats to a child’s life, resulting in an estimated 750,000 child deaths per year globally. Each year, malaria kills nearly 1 million people—approximately 85 percent of whom are children—and infects an estimated 250 million individuals.

Malaria is the fourth-leading cause of child death around the world; in sub-Saharan Africa, it is a leading cause of death for children. Tragically, malaria causes 2,000 child deaths per day in Africa, more than double the number of children per day who die from AIDS. Malaria kills a child every 40 seconds. Malaria results in 8 percent of the total deaths worldwide of children younger than 5, or

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approximately 750,000 children younger than 5 die from malaria each year. Many children who survive an episode of severe malaria may also suffer from learning impairments or brain damage. Pregnant women and their unborn children are also particularly vulnerable to malaria. Malaria symptoms appear about nine to 14 days after the bite of an infected mosquito. Typically, malaria produces fever, headache, vomiting, and other flu-like symptoms. If drugs are not available for treatment or the parasites are resistant to them, the infection can progress rapidly to become life-threatening. Malaria can kill by infecting and destroying red blood cells and by clogging the capillaries that carry blood to the brain or other vital organs. Malaria, together with HIV and AIDS and TB, is one of the major public health challenges undermining development in the poorest countries in the world.

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In addition to the personal impact, malaria has a broad impact on communities. Malaria accounts for $12 billion in lost economic productivity each year in sub-Saharan Africa. In some countries with a very heavy malaria burden, malaria may account for as much as 40 percent of public health expenditures, 30 percent to 50 percent of inpatient admissions, and up to 60 percent of outpatient visits. Malaria further threatens individuals vulnerable to other major diseases. For example, malaria and the AIDS virus are often referred to as the deadly duo—malaria makes AIDS worse and vice versa. A person with malaria is more susceptible to contracting HIV when exposed to the virus, and people infected with HIV are more likely to transmit the virus or become seriously ill when infected with malaria. (Sources: State of the World’s Children UNICEF, 2008; World Hunger Series, World Food Program, 2007; Malaria in Pregnancy, World Health Organization.)

HIV and AIDS HIV infects some people; AIDS affects everybody. Essentially, HIV and AIDS threaten the quality of life, economic progress, and social structure of entire communities and countries. AIDS is leaving a generation of orphans and vulnerable children whose daily lives and futures are at risk. In many parts of the world, the disease is actually reversing years of development progress made on community projects. Women and girls carry the greatest responsibility of caring for people who are suffering from HIV and AIDS. Females are getting infected with HIV at an earlier age and are dying younger than males. AIDS is a disease that comes draped in stigma and fear. It can be a difficult topic to discuss because of biases and stereotypes that surface when someone is said to be HIV-positive or to have AIDS.

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AIDS represents one of the biggest crises the world has ever seen. It is killing more people than any war or famine in history. By 2010, AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa will orphan an estimated 15.7 million children; globally, 20.2 million children will be so orphaned. AIDS destabilizes families and entire societies, leaving children without the care and support necessary to grow up healthy and thrive. Since the epidemic began, about 60 million people have contracted HIV; a third of them have died, leaving behind millions of grieving family members.

AIDS represents the biggest crisis the world has ever seen. It is killing more people than any war or famine in history.

Currently, 33 million people are living with HIV or AIDS, and an estimated 2 million of these people are children. Fifteen million children worldwide have lost one or both parents to AIDS; that number is expected to reach 25 million by the year 2010. Every day nearly 7,400 people become infected with HIV and more than 5,400 people die from AIDS. Two million adults and children have died as a result of AIDS.

(Sources: UNICEF, August 2006; International Labor Organization, November 2006; AIDS Epidemic Update, UNAIDS, December 2006; Africa’s Orphaned and Vulnerable Generations, UNICEF, August 2006; UNAIDS Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic, 2008.)

Child Health Every day, on average, more than 25,000 children under the age of 5 die around the world, most from preventable causes. This calculates to 9.2 million children each year. Half of the world’s under-5 deaths occur in Africa, which remains the most difficult place in the world for a child to survive until age 5. Asia accounts for 41 percent of global under-5 deaths. Approximately 3.7 million children die within the first 28 days of life. The greatest risk is during the first day after birth, when it is estimated that between 25 and 45 percent of neonatal deaths occur. Around three-quarters of newborn deaths, or 2.8 million, occur within the first week of life. On average, nearly 1,500 women die each day from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Some 86 percent of newborn deaths globally are the direct result of three main causes: severe

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infections—including sepsis/pneumonia, tetanus, and diarrhea—asphyxia, and preterm births. Severe infections are estimated to account for 36 percent of all newborn deaths. Low birthweight, which is related to maternal malnutrition, is a casual factor in 60 to 80 percent of neonatal deaths. In 2007, 148 million children under the age of 5 in the developing world were underweight for their age. Two-thirds of these children live in Asia, and just over one-quarter live in Africa. Together, Africa and Asia account for 93 percent of all underweight children under the age of 5 in the developing world. Once children have reached one month of age, and up until the age of 5 years, the main causes for loss of life are pneumonia, diarrhea, malaria, measles, and HIV.

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(Sources: Newborns, Infants, and Children; WHO; State of the World’s Children, UNICEF, 2009)

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Literacy means Life Notes to help guide your leadership of the lesson.

M at e r i al s

Pens, Bibles, two pieces of plain cloth (large enough to place over the head and face of participants), two small hammers, a container of pistachio nuts, and a timer

O n l i n e re s ou rce

from womenofvision.wordpress.com/hotm “The Challenge of Education Gallery Walk Stations” resource (also included as handout)

EXP ERIENCE T HE CH ALLENGE OF ILLITERACY Additional information you might use for the literacy introduction:

» Worldwide, 776 million adults lack basic literacy skills—about two-thirds are women. » In 2006, some 75 million children of primary school-age children, 55 percent of them girls, were not in primary or secondary school; almost half were in sub-Saharan Africa. » In 2006, some 513 million students worldwide—or 58 percent of the relevant school-age population—were enrolled in secondary school, an increase of nearly 76 million since 1999. However, in sub-Saharan Africa, 75 percent of secondary school-age children are not enrolled in secondary school. » Worldwide, only 37 percent of countries have reached gender parity at the secondary school level. »O  nce girls are in school, their progress is often hampered by teacher attitudes and genderbiased textbooks that reinforce negative gender stereotypes. » I n 2004, North America and Western Europe alone accounted for 55 percent of the world’s spending on education but only 10 percent of the population ages 5 to 25 years old. South and West Asia represent one-quarter of the world’s population and just 7 percent of spending.

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»M  ore than 27 million teachers work in the world’s primary schools, 80 percent of them in developing countries. »P  rojections for 134 countries, accounting for some two-thirds of out-of-school children in 2006, suggest that some 29 million children will be out of school in 2015. (Source: UNESCO EFA Global Monitoring Report, 2009)

» While the problem of lack of education and the resulting illiteracy is not strictly a gender issue, the impact of limited resources for educating people in the developing world falls squarely on the shoulders of women and girls. Conversely, when you educate a woman or girl, the whole community benefits. »K  ofi Annan, former Secretary-General of the United Nations, had this to say about education for women: We know from study after study that there is no tool for development more effective than the education of girls and women. No other policy is as likely to raise economic productivity, lower infant and maternal mortality, improve nutrition, promote health—including the prevention of HIV/AIDS—and increase the chances of education for the next generation. Let us invest in women and girls. Experience the Challenge of Illiteracy Activity Divide the participants into groups of three to four. Assign each group one of the scenarios found in the lesson. Explain that the goal of this activity is for participants to experience what it’s like to be unable to read. Instruct the groups to read through the scenario and answer and discuss it. After the discussions are complete, ask each group to share its scenario with the larger group. When they finish, read the English translation of their answer and identify the language on their card. The translations are noted below: Scenario 1 Serbian for: Take 1/2 teaspoon. three times a day until medicine is gone. Scenario 2 Korean for: Unscrew the top of the pump. Pull up the piece around the pump stem.

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Scenario 3 Portuguese for: For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son. Scenario 4 Danish for: Please list the service or product you provided in the past three months, how much your expenses were, and how much profit you made. Scenario 5 Hebrew for: Mary and Jane loved helping their father in the garden.

SCRIP TURE REFLECTION

The following commentary will help you prepare to lead the discussion during the Scripture Reflection portion of the lesson. Most references to teaching and education in the Bible are in regard to teaching about life and faith. In Deuteronomy, Moses explains to the Israelites the laws and decrees they must keep, explaining that the Lord has instructed him to teach these things (see 4:1–14). The psalmists long for the Lord to teach the people his ways (see 27:11): wisdom (see 51:6), decrees (see 119:12), laws (see 119:108), and statutes (see 132:12). The key here is obedience to God. All the Gospels are about education. They are about the life-changing and world-changing impacts of a remarkable, charismatic teacher, whom followers called “Rabbi.” Jesus’ teachings are radically different from the teachings of his time: » A movement from a subject focus to a person focus. » A movement from listener to participator. » A movement from memorizing to changing behavior. » A movement from insistence to choice. » A movement from individual to community. It is often said that the later New Testament writings would not have been necessary if the early church had been problem-free. The educational style of the letters is corrective: “You did A; you should be doing B.” Paul reminded the Romans that teaching was a specific gift (see 12:7). Ephesians 4:11 links the gift of teaching to pastoring. An elder should be able to teach. The teacher should be a “reliable man” (see Timothy 2:2), known for integrity, seriousness, and soundness of speech (see Titus 2:7). Further recurring themes include an admonition against false doctrine (see Timothy 1:3) and false teachers (see 2 Peter 2:1); and a desire to move on from elementary to mature, or more complex, matters (see Hebrews 5:11-6:2). Communities Transformed: Leaders Notes for Lesson Four | Page 18


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A Christian perspective on learning and education cannot be built solely upon these references. Also crucial is an understanding of the biblical basis of freedom and opportunity that God gives equally to all. Key passages include the creation narratives and the reminder in Galatians 3:28 that we are all one in Christ Jesus. We are all here to populate and look after the earth, and we are all equally responsible for that. So if one person does not have the same opportunity as another to learn how best to live, then we are denying that person the freedom God originally gave him or her to be equally responsible.

CONSI DER OUR WORLD TODAY Create four “experiential stations” as noted below:

Station One: Ways of Dress Place at this station two pieces of plain cloth that participants can drape over their heads with the instructions; place a copy of page 20 at this station as well. Station Two: Classrooms Place at this station a copy of page 21. Station Three: Resources Place at this station a very old (look at the copyright date), torn, and tattered book and a copy of page 22. Station Four: After School Place at this station two small hammers, several pistachio nuts in the shell, a timer, and a copy of page 23. Divide the participants into pairs. Explain that the goal of this activity is for participants to experience common impediments to education throughout the world. After completing all of the stations, reconvene the group and ask the following questions: » Which station made the biggest impact on you? Why? » If you had to walk a mile with your head and face covered in a desert climate, how do you think you would feel physically when arriving at school? » If you faced these sorts of obstacles to graduating from school, how likely would you be to pursue your education?

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Lesson Four – Resource

The challenge of education gallery walk

Mary Kate MacIsaac/ World Vision 2006

Station One Way of Dress

Put this over your head and face and walk around the room once. How do you think you would feel about the world with this point of view all day?

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The challenge of education gallery walk

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Station Two Classrooms

How does this classroom compare to where you went to school?

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The challenge of education gallery walk

Station Three Resources

How would you complete your homework every night if you had to share this schoolbook with two sisters?

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The challenge of education gallery walk

Mary Kate MacIs aac/W orld Visio n 2006

Station Four After School

Although you have homework to do, you also have chores to complete for the financial well-being of your family. One of your chores is to crack open pistachio shells and retrieve the nuts. How many nuts can you crack and extract in 60 seconds? How might this chore affect your schooling?

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economic development one loan at a Time Notes to help guide your leadership of the lesson.

M at e r i al s

Pens, Bibles

P RE PARE FOR LESSON STEPS Learn about Microenterprise Development:

Divide the participants into groups of three to four. Explain that the goal of this activity is for participants to consider what people need to start small businesses. Instruct the groups to read through the scenario noted in the session and answer and discuss the noted questions. After the discussions are complete, ask each group to share their scenario and solutions with the larger group.

SCRIP TURE REFLECTION

The following commentary will help you prepare to lead the discussion during the Scripture Reflection portion of the lesson. Economic activity is OK. In fact, God expects us to be wise investors of what He has entrusted us with. The point is that all that we have is God’s, and He wants us to use it wisely—for His kingdom. Those who were good stewards of what the master had entrusted them with, were blessed with even more. The one who did not use the master’s gift wisely lost everything. He had a wrong view of the master as a hard taskmaster, and it affected how he used what he had been given. He used his view of the master as an excuse for personal irresponsibility. As a result, not only did he lose the talent, he was thrown outside, away from fellowship with the master and the two faithful servants. Those who use well what has been given them multiply their resources. Those who do not gain nothing. Hard work and imagination pay off.

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What we have has been entrusted to us by God. And we are to be good stewards. All that we have and are come from God’s gracious hand. See Deuteronomy 8:10-14. If we forget that all we have comes from God and we are responsible to Him in our use of it, then we will become proud and forget God.

Worldwide, women own less than 1 percent of all property.

We often think of this Proverbs passage in regard to character, but what does it say about this woman’s ability to be enterprising? She is never idle, she gets up while it’s still dark and stays up late at night, she works vigorously, she is strong and physically fit, she is generous and cares for the poor, she anticipates and is prepared for the future, she is strong, dignified, wise, gives good advice, and loves the Lord. She is a busy woman, a wool merchant and weaver, a real estate agent, a farmer, a trader, a seamstress, a teacher.

CONSI DER OUR WORLD TODAY

Consider providing the following information about women and small loans: » Although they work two-thirds of the world’s labor hours, and produce one half of the world’s food, women around the world earn only about 10 percent of the world’s income. » In most developing countries, women lack legal and traditional rights to own land and other assets. »W  orldwide, women own less than 1 percent of all property. When her husband dies, a woman’s land and other property goes to her father-in-law or brothers-in law, who can then evict the widow and her children with impunity, leaving them without a home or the opportunity to earn an income. » I f her marriage breaks down or if a daughter displeases her parents, a woman stands a good chance of becoming homeless. »B  ecause most poor women are unable to get loans or credit, women’s employment is concentrated in low-return, insecure, informal occupations, all of which encourage women to leave their traditional homes and migrate into urban centers where they are even more vulnerable. »W  orse than being shut out of the opportunity to earn income, women in places like Southern Sudan are traded as commodities, inherited like chattel when widowed, and valued in society by their bride price, the number of cows they fetch at marriage.

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Through the distribution of microenterprise loans, almost half a million new jobs for women were created last year alone through World Vision’s microfinance initiative. The average size of each loan was only $315, but even this small amount can mean the difference between being destitute and the ability to care for one’s family. These loans are used to buy things like sewing machines, pigs, and raw materials for manufacturing. You might want to share one of two women’s stories from Reneé Stearns, wife of World Vision President Richard Stearns: In Guatemala, I was given a camales from Sarah, a young mother of five. A camales is a large clay platter, about a foot and a half across, on which to fry tortillas. World Vision, through its microfinance program in Guatemala, gave Sarah a small loan to start a business making and selling these camales to her neighbors in the local market. Like tens of thousands of other poor women around the world who have been helped through World Vision microfinance loans, Sarah would never have been able to qualify to receive a loan from a normal bank because she has no collateral and the amount of money she needed to get started in her business was just too small. But with the money she has received, she provides for her family and was even able to make the muchneeded repairs to her small home damaged during Hurricane Mitch. In Armenia, a country with a failed economy and sky-rocketing unemployment, my husband met a middle-age woman who had received a $300 loan from World Vision. She had used that money to buy herself a sewing machine and fabric to make several items of clothing. When she sold enough clothing to repay the loan, she took out another, larger loan to buy more fabric and more equipment.

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In 2004, this woman employed 40 other women in her clothing factory, making tailored suits for men, women, and children throughout Eastern Europe, which she sold through a glossy, four-color catalogue. Her pride was obvious. Her remark to my husband: “Not bad for a woman, huh?”

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Changed Lives Change Lives Notes to help guide your leadership of the lesson.

M at e r i al s

Pen, Bible, computer with Internet access, video player, a cross, a large wooden or ceramic bowl, self-stick notes

O n l i n e re s ou rce

“Journey of Transformation” video

from womenofvision.wordpress.com/hotm

CONSI DER OUR WORLD TODAY

Assign each participant one of the roles noted in the lessons. Then read the Village Information in the lesson to the group. You will be the “community facilitator” whose role is to be affirming of the villagers and their contributions while providing minimal guidance in playing their roles. You should, however, remind the group to focus on children (in support of World Vision’s mission statement) and to seek direction from God (as a demonstration of World Vision’s grounding faith). Ask each village member to read the brief description of who they are. Spend 10 minutes or so in discussion about how the village might improve education and literacy. Use the questions in the participant guide to shape the discussion.

CLOSING P RAYER

Gather the group in a circle around a cross or a large wooden or ceramic bowl. Give everyone a selfstick note. After reading and reflecting on the chosen Scriptures, move to the next step. As the group sits in silence, read each question slowly, allowing time for participants to reflect between questions. When the group finishes this activity, prompt everyone to join hands (if people are comfortable doing so). Invite anyone who would like to voice her prayers aloud to do so. As each person finishes praying, you may choose to say together out loud, “Lord, hear our prayer.”

Communities Transformed: Leaders Notes for Lesson Six | Page 27

CommunitiesTransformed With Change that Lasts Bible Study - Leader's Notes  

Provides needed istructions for leading the Communities Transformed with Change That Lasts - Study

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