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beat poverty We’ve Got What it Takes!

An Educational Resource for Young People in Grades 9-12


beat poverty We’ve Got What it Takes!


This educational resource was produced by World Vision Canada and adapted by World Vision Resources, World Vision United States, 2008. World Vision United States is grateful to Education and Public Engagement of World Vision Canada for allowing this resource to be adapted for use in the the United States. Copyright Š World Vision Inc., 2008. Editorial Director: Milana McLead Editor-in-Chief: Jane Sutton-Redner Project Editor: Laurie Delgatto Copy Editor: Brooke Saron Design: Journey Group, Inc. Sales and Distribution Manager: JoJo Palmer The Beat Poverty: We’ve Got What It Takes! study guide may be reproduced only with the written permission of World Vision, Mail Stop 321, P.O. Box 9716, Federal Way, WA 98063-9716, wvresources@worldvision.org.

Printed in the United States of America ISBN 978-0-9817927-5-0 During the preparation of this resource, all citations, facts, figures, names, addresses, telephone numbers, Internet URLs, and other pieces of information cited within were verified for accuracy. World Vision Resources has made every attempt to reference current and valid sources, but we cannot guarantee the content of any source and we are not responsible for any changes that may have occurred since our verification. If you find an error in, or have a question or concern about, any of the information or sources listed within, please contact World Vision Resources.


Overview Nelson Mandela explains: “Like slavery and apartheid, poverty is not natural. It is manmade and can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings.” Now more than ever—in terms of the money, the food, and the science needed—we’ve got what it takes to beat poverty. And now is the time to focus on poverty. Over the past few years, world leaders have begun to talk seriously about addressing this issue. Commitments have been made, and goals have been set. We need to act to ensure that leaders stick to their promises. The Beat Poverty: We’ve Got What It Takes! video (available for download at www.worldvisionresources.com) and this study guide encourage young people to address poverty issues. The participants are moved to challenge both their own perceptions about poverty in the world and what the United States is, and should be, doing to help end poverty.

Objectives Through the video and study guide, participants will: » increase their understanding of the role international aid plays in poverty reduction » develop an awareness of who’s doing what in terms of aid, including the United States’ involvement » reflect on their own roles and the role of the United States as a prosperous nation » acquire tools for contributing to positive change

Video Synopsis The Beat Poverty: We’ve Got What It Takes! video addresses issues of hunger, poverty, and health. It also challenges the participants to take action in their own lives. The video is available for viewing and download at worldvisionresources.com. Simply click on the “free resources” i con and go to “video resources.” Total running time: 2 minutes, 51 seconds

Leader Preparation Download the video from www.worldvisionresources.com. View the video. Choose which activities you will incorporate into a specific session based on time and objectives. Photocopy relevant pages, prepare newsprint, and other relevant materials, and set up viewing space and equipment.

Time Required 30–40 minutes for each activity

Table of Contents » Who’s the Richest? ................................................................................................ 6 - 7 » Perceptions of Poverty ........................................................................................... 8 - 9 » Hunger Quiz Show ............................................................................................ 10 - 12 » Video: Beat Poverty: We’ve Got What It Takes! ....................................................... 13 » How’s the United States Doing? ........................................................................ 14 - 17 » Stone Soup ............................................................................................................... 18 » Christian Generosity .......................................................................................... 19 - 20

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Who’s

The Richest?

I n this ac tivi ty, the participants are reminded that American citizens

Materials Needed

have many privileges, compared with most people in the world.

» a sheet of newsprint » a marker » a roll of masking tape

Activity Steps

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I n vit e t h e pa rt icipant s to stand in a line against one wall of the room with a large

empty space in front of them. If there are too many participants for this to work, ask for 10 volunteers. Introduce the activity in this way: » We’re going to find out who in this group is the richest. I’m going to name an item. If you have it, take one step forward. Do not offer any additional explanation. Simply begin reading the following list of items, inviting the participants to step forward for each one they have: » clothes to wear » clean water to drink » a bed to sleep in » an education » enough food to eat » a doctor to see when ill » the ability to read and write » some money of your own » shoes on your feet The participants probably won’t all end up in a straight line, because some will have taken bigger steps than others. But point out that they have all taken the same number of steps (as they all have these items). Have them shift so that they are all standing in a straight line once again.

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Who’s The Richest (continued)

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Ask t h e part icipa nt s how they feel after this activity. Note that it’s easy for us to look at

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R e m ind th e gr oup that it’s easy to take what feel like basic things for granted, but that many

other people in our society and feel that we don’t have very much. But compared with most people in the world, Americans are very rich. Many people who are poor don’t have access to the items on the list and so wouldn’t have taken many (if any) steps.

people in the world don’t have these things. Share the following points: » One child dies every three seconds because of a poverty-related reason. » One-sixth of the world’s population lives on less than $1 a day. » 800 million people go to bed hungry each night. Review the list of items from step 1. Ask how the lack of these things affects people’s lives. Record the participants’ responses on a sheet of newsprint and post it where all can see. Be sure the discussion includes these points: » Without clean water, people are at risk of disease, and they can’t water their crops adequately or keep themselves clean. » Without an education and the ability to read and write, people can’t access information about how to take care of themselves and avoid disease; they can do only unskilled work instead of learning trades; they often have difficulty finding work that could give them a better income. » Without the availability of medical care, people don’t have access to even simple medicines that can make them well. » Without enough food, people do not have the energy to look after their homes, let alone work. They are also more susceptible to illness. » Clothes, shoes, and a bed to sleep in are basics that make our lives comfortable and give us dignity. » Without money people cannot buy food if their crops fail. In many countries where there is famine, there often is enough food for everyone in the country, but those who are the poorest just can’t afford to buy it. (This activity is drawn from the Poverty: Youth Leader’s Resource produced by World Vision, United Kingdom, 2005.)

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Perceptions of Poverty

Materials Needed

In this activity, the participants explore their own perceptions of the state of the world.

» copies of handout 1, “My Perceptions,” found on pages 22-23, one for each participant » pens or pencils, one for each participant » a sheet of newsprint » a marker

Activity Steps

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B e gin by p o sin g the following rhetorical questions and comments:

» Have you ever had to think about where your next meal was coming from? » Does our country produce or import enough food to meet everyone’s needs? » Does your family earn enough money to purchase the food it needs? » Is the food you eat safe and nutritious? » Could drought or crop damage wipe out your supply of food? » These are questions we rarely (if at all) think about, but millions of people throughout the world face them daily. Today we are going to explore why this is and what we as a country, and as individuals, can do to help change poverty in the world.

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Dist ribut e t o e ach pa rt icipant a copy of handout 1 and a pen or pencil. Ex-

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I n vit e t h e pa rt icipant s to form small groups of five or six to share their responses

plain that the handout invites them to think about their own outlook on poverty and to comment on their own perceptions about the state of the world. Ask the participants to read over and think about each of the statements on the handout. For each one, they are to put a dot on the line underneath to indicate their degree of agreement or disagreement.

to the statements. Then ask the small groups to rank the statements in order from 1 (“agree with most”) to 15 (“agree with least”).

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R e g at he r t h e pa rt icipant s into the large group and lead a discussion using the following questions: » Which statement did your group most agree with? Why? 8


Perceptions of Poverty (continued) » Which statement did your group least agree with? Why? » Have you met anyone who has expressed views similar to these? If so, how did you react? » What do you think would be an appropriate way to challenge a viewpoint you disagree with?

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O f f e r t he f o l l owin g key po int s :

» Now more than ever—in terms of the money, the food, and the science needed—we’ve got what it takes to beat poverty. » Poverty, at its most simple, could be defined as a lack of the resources needed to live a “normal life.” However, notions of what is needed to live a normal life vary significantly. Similarly, ideas about what “normal” really means are subject to considerable debate. » Poverty is about more than money or the lack of it. Poverty is about a connection between people everywhere, about the effects of the ways people think, act, and react. Poverty is about hopes and dreams, and about how many people are prevented from dreaming. Poverty affects young and old, body and soul. Poverty is exacerbated by the complexity of our world and its structures. » Now is the time to focus on poverty. Over the past few years, world leaders have begun to talk seriously about addressing this issue. Commitments have been made, and goals have been set. We need to act to ensure that leaders stick to their promises. » Citizens the world over are challenging the belief that poverty is inevitable. Progress will continue to be step-by-step; no one person can do the job alone, but every person can help.

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C o l l e c t the participants’ copies of handout 1 and hang onto them for the “Video: Beat Poverty: We’ve Got What It Takes!” activity. Conclude this activity by noting that the remaining activities will help the participants more fully explore their perceptions (and misperceptions) about poverty.

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Hunger

Quiz Show

t his ac tivi ty reinforces an understanding of the issues surrounding hunger.

Materials Needed

» a sheet of newsprint » a marker » a roll of masking tape » a stopwatch » pens or pencils, one for each participant » blank sheets of paper

Activity Steps

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D ivide th e l a rge gr oup into small groups of five or six. Assign each team a number or

name. Note these numbers or names on a sheet of newsprint and post it where all can see. This will serve as your scorecard. Invite someone to serve as a timekeeper and give him or her the stopwatch. T e l l t he t e a ms they will be participating in a quiz show, answering a number of questions you will pose. Explain that when you have asked each question, the first team to make a buzzer noise will have 30 seconds to respond with an answer. If their answer is wrong, the other teams will have an opportunity to answer. Each correct answer is worth five points. If the question defaults to another team, the correct answer is worth three points. Should the question remain unanswered, you will then need to provide the correct answer. Make sure everyone understands the rules, and then proceed with the game using the following questions (answers noted in brackets): » The world produces enough food for everyone to have 2,500 calories a day. That’s 150 more than the basic minimum. True or false? [True, if distributed equally.]

» How many people in the world go hungry each day—9 million, 90 million, more than 900 million? [963 million people do not have enough to eat.] » In developing countries, how many children die every year from preventable and treatable causes—10 million, 50 million, 90 million? [Every day, on average, more than 25,000 children under the age of five die around the world, most from preventable causes. This calculates to 9.2 million children each year.] » In the United States, how many children live in households where people have to skip meals or eat less to make ends meet—1 million, 5 million, more than 10 million? [11.7 million. That means one in ten households in the United States is living with hunger or is at risk of hunger.] » Hunger is worse in rural areas among native people in Latin America than in the cities. True or false? [True] b e at p o v e r t y

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Hunger Quiz Show (continued) » The largest number of poor and hungry people is found where—in Africa or in Asia? [Asia in terms of sheer numbers, but Africa has a higher proportion of hungry people among its total population.] » In Tanzania, over a three-year period, a community-based nutrition program has cut severe malnutrition in half. True or false? [True] » If everyone in the world lived as the richest 20 percent do, people would use 10 times as much fossil fuel and 200 times as many minerals. True or false? [True] » Which developing country has increased its per capita food consumption (in terms of calories per day) and has its wealth distributed relatively equally, but is criticized in the international community for its lack of respect for human rights? [China] » A baby born in Shanghai, China now has a better chance of surviving its first year than one born in New York City. True or false? [True, due to the efforts of China to improve the health of its people.] » If farmers around the world would add synthetic fertilizer to their land, they could produce more food. True or false? [False. Studies show that heavier applications of synthetic fertilizer have had little effect on increasing yields.] » List three main causes of hunger. [Possible answers include: lack of food, wages, and shelter; illness; no access to land or education; war; environmental degradation; weather conditions; unequal trading; debt.] » How are environmental problems linked with poverty and hunger? [Very closely. For example, deforestation can result in topsoil being blown away, which leads to desertification. Another example is water pollution, which kills fish and other marine life.] » What is the difference between famine and chronic hunger? [Famine is relatively sudden and short-term, is often precipitated by drought or war, causes severe hunger and high death rates, receives high media attention, and often receives a high level of international response. Chronic hunger is ongoing and long-term; it is sometimes called the “invisible emergency” because millions more people die every year due to the effects of chronic hunger. But the issue receives little media and international attention for developing solutions because the causes are perceived as more complex.]

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Hunger Quiz Show (continued) » List five factors that affect food security. [Possible answers include: land and water, fuel, water and sanitation, transportation, jobs, family and culture, research and development, exchange rates, peaceful conditions, political structures and government policies, education, media.] » How is poverty linked to hunger? [Poverty is the main cause of hunger. Poverty means lack of access to proper nutrition, clean water, sanitation, income, and health care. All these factors contribute to hunger.] » How does land use affect hunger in developing countries? [In many developing countries, land is mostly owned by relatively few wealthy and powerful people or by large foreign companies. Land is used to produce crops like coffee, bananas, and cotton for export, because these crops bring in high prices in international trade.]

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Add up t he sco r e s and announce a winning team. Then offer the following key points:

» Globally more than 963 million people go each day without the food their bodies need for healthy development. This chronic undernourishment feeds a never-ending cycle of disease, stunted growth, delayed development, and poverty. » The effects of chronic or ongoing hunger are worlds apart from this temporary hunger. Chronic hunger has far-reaching impacts on individuals and their families and, by extension, on communities and whole societies. » Malnutrition is a leading cause of disease and premature death in the developing world. Those most affected include fetuses, children, and pregnant and nursing women. Their bodies have the extra demands of growth and development—their own, or in the case of mothers and mothers-to-be, their children’s. Over the longer term, malnutrition feeds a vicious cycle of hunger and poverty. » It is well established that poverty is a leading cause of hunger. But the reverse is equally true: Hunger is part of a downward spiral within households that traps families in poverty for generations. » Now, for the first time in history, the world has what it takes to end hunger.

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C o nc l ude by noting that these facts and figures offer just a glimpse into the issues that

people of the world face in regard to poverty.

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Video:

We’ve Got What It Takes!

Materials Needed

I n this act ivi ty, the participants view the video and then explore their own perceptions about poverty in the world.

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» the video Beat Poverty: We’ve Got What It Takes! available at worldvisionresources.com » a television and a DVD player » pens or pencils, one for each participant » the participants’ copies of handout 1 from the “Perceptions of Poverty” activity

Activity Steps G at he r t h e pa rt icipant s around the television. Play the video. I nvi t e t he pa rt icipant s to return to their copy of handout 1 and respond to any of the

statements that they may feel differently about now. Rather than changing their earlier responses, they should use a different symbol to note changes in opinion for any statement. As k t he pa rt icipa nt s to form small groups of five or six to share their revised responses to

the statements on the handout. Invite the small groups to share about the changes in perceptions they might have developed after watching the video. C o nc l ude t he a c t ivi ty by inviting each small group to share with the large group some highlights from its discussions. Be sure to incorporate the following comments into the discussion: » Like everybody else, you yourself have probably been affected by some measure of poverty. Maybe you have noticed the cold and hungry figures huddling in a doorway in the street or crouching on a bench in the park. Maybe your family has struggled to pay the telephone bill or the rent. In general though, extreme poverty seems to be the exclusive domain of developing countries, mostly in subSaharan Africa, Asia, and South America.

» Poverty is a problem because humankind allows a world of inequality to exist. This is a world where wealth is divided unequally, and war and conflict are rife. This is a world where we fail to care for our environment and, by our failure, jeopardize the livelihoods of those dependent on the land. Without a voice, the voiceless cannot speak; without just governance, the poor will continue to be oppressed. » But poverty does not have to be a terminal disease. Children don’t have to die of hunger, abuse, or exploitation. A more equal world is possible. And ultimately, like poverty, equality comes down to people’s actions and choices. Making the changes is all about how we choose to act. Just as important, it is about what we refuse to ignore.

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How

is The United States Doing? I n this act ivi ty, the participants explore their own perceptions of the

M at e r i als N e e de d

United States.

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» a sheet of newsprint » 10 markers » a roll of masking tape » copies of handout 2, “Millennium Development Goals,” found on page 24, one for each participant » 10 sheets of blank paper

Activity Steps B egi n b y e x p l ai n i ng that, although there are different approaches and solutions to

tackling poverty in the world, the focus of this lesson is international aid—the resources that governments in wealthy countries provide to poorer countries to assist in their development efforts.

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As k t he pa rt icipa nt s to pair up with the person beside them. Then direct the pairs to

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W he n the pairs are done discussing regather everyone into the large group and invite

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As k t he pa rt icipa nt s if anyone has heard of the Millennium Development Goals.

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P r o vide e a ch pa rt icipant with a copy of handout 2. Allow a few minutes for the

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think about and discuss some of the common opinions and perceptions other countries have about the United States in terms of our character and the type of people and country we are. Prompt further discussion by having the participants consider what it means to tell others that they are Americans when traveling abroad. Participants who have traveled or lived in other countries may be able to contribute specific examples.

the participants to share some of the perceptions they discussed in their pairs. Note these key ideas on a sheet of newsprint and post it where all can see.

Explain that these are a set of goals that emerged from a United Nations Assembly in 2000, when all the countries of the world agreed to set goals to significantly reduce poverty. All 191 countries came to an agreement that the goals should be reached by the year 2015.

participants to review the goals. Then explain the following: » The Millennium Development Goals are not unrealistic or overly ambitious goals. They are very achievable if we make them a priority. The video points out that we have the resources. It is a question of will. 14


How is The United States Doing? (continued) » We can speed up progress toward a more equal world by acknowledging that within our own hands, we hold the power to defeat poverty. We can all take a stand. » We can refuse to forget the millions of people who live in circumstances so intolerable they feel like they are being punished for crimes they didn’t commit. We can love our neighbors better. As Mother Teresa said: “We think sometimes that poverty is only being hungry, naked, and homeless. The poverty of being unwanted, unloved, and uncared for is the greatest poverty. We must start in our own homes to remedy this kind of poverty.” Ask the participants if they agree with Nelson Mandela when he says that poverty “is manmade and can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings.”

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E x p l a in t h e f o l l o wi ng points about international aid:

» International aid is also called foreign aid or development assistance. International aid is when one country helps another country through some form of donation. Usually this refers to helping out a country that has a special need caused by poverty, underdevelopment, natural disaster, armed conflict, and so on. » Currently the world gives about $80 billion in aid, but $140 billion is needed to eradicate extreme poverty. To put this in perspective, as of 2009 United States has spent $180 billion per year for the last three years in Iraq. » In 1975 the United Nations established the goal of every rich country donating 0.7 percent of its gross national income to poorer countries. If the world’s richest nations gave this percentage, extreme poverty could be ended. » Every year Europeans and Americans spend nearly $20 billion on pet food alone. According to the United Nations, for roughly the same amount, we could eliminate malnutrition worldwide for an entire year.

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Ask for ten volunteers to come to the front of the room. Provide each a blank sheet of pa-

per and a marker. Randomly assign them one of the following 10 countries listed in bold. Do not assign the countries in order. Do not provide the volunteers with the number beside each country. 1. Norway .95% 2. Sweden .93% 3. Luxembourg .9% 4. Netherlands .81% 15

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How is The United States Doing? (continued) 5. Denmark .81% 6. Ireland .54% 7. Austria .49% 8. Belgium .43 9. Spain .41% 10. Finland .4% 11. France .39% 12. Switzerland .37% 13. Germany .37% 14. United Kingdom .36% 15. Canada .28% 16. New Zealand .27% 17. Italy .19% 18. Japan .07% 19. Australia .3% 20. Portugal .19% 21. United States .16% 22. Greece .16% (These statistics are from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Web site.)

Ask these volunteers to write the names of their countries on the sheets of paper you provided them and then to hold up the papers for everyone to see. Indicate that all these countries are considered to be high-income countries.

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I nvi t e t he r e m a inder of the participants to try to put the 10 countries in the correct

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W he n the m aj o ri t y of the group has come to an agreement about all 10 countries,

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order along a continuum from the highest percentage “givers” to the lowest percentage “givers.” As the participants come to consensus about a particular country, the volunteer holding the sign for that country should move to the corresponding spot on the continuum and continue to hold his or her sign so all can clearly see it. Allow time for the participants to figure and refigure based on group consensus. Help facilitate if the participants are having difficulty.

use the list in step 7 for reference and begin to move any volunteers that are out of place by providing the aid percentage values for each country. Refer to the United States’ placement once all the other countries have been placed in order, and have the participants try to place the United States in the right spot. (Quickly review the countries from the list in step 7 that have not been mentioned.)

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How is The United States Doing? (continued) 10

C a l l o ut t h e n a m es of the countries that have met the 0.7 percent target. Ask the

volunteers holding those signs to step forward and be recognized (they may curtsy or bow). Then note: » Many of these countries do not currently meet the target of 0.7 percent. Five countries not only don’t meet the goal, but they have not set a timeline or committed themselves to a plan to reach 0.7 percent before 2015. Ask the participants to try to identify these five countries. Then call out the names of the countries that have no plan to meet the 0.7 percent donation goal by 2015: Australia, Canada, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States. Share that for each $100 earned in the United States, only $0.16 is donated in aid.

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As k t he pa rt icipa nt s to take some time to reconsider the position and reputation the

United States holds on the world stage. Use the following debriefing questions: » What surprises you about these results? » How do you feel knowing that a wealthy country like the United States has not lived up to its commitment to donate 0.7 percent of its total income to poor countries? » Return to the group’s statements about perceptions of the United States and the way the United States is represented and perceived on the world stage. Are you comfortable with the gap between perception and current reality? If not, what would you propose to bring the two closer together?

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C o nc l ude t he a c t ivi ty by noting that we can either change people’s perceptions of the United States to better match our actions, or we can change our actions to match the good perceptions!

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Stone

Soup

I n this act ivi ty, the participants identify individual responses that can

M at e ri als Needed

make a difference in addressing local and global hunger.

» a copy of the book Stone Soup, by Marcia Brown (Aladdin Books, 2005) » index cards, one for each participant » pens or pencils, one for each participant » a pot (a basic kitchen cooking pot) » copies of handout 3, “What You Can Do,” found on page 25, one for each participant

Activity Steps 1

R e a d S t o n e S o up aloud to the participants. You may wish to animate the reading by

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As k t he pa rt icipa nt s for their interpretation of the story using the following discus-

sharing it among several group members—one could be the narrator, another the beggar or soldier, others the villagers.

sion questions: » What does the story have to say about solutions to hunger in our world? » What parallels do you see to how your own actions can contribute to ending hunger? » What about the contributions governments can make?

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D ist ribut e a n in dex c a rd and a pen or pencil to each participant. Invite the par-

ticipants to think of something concrete (no matter how small) they can personally do to challenge hunger. Have them write their suggestions on their index cards. Then ask them to think of something the United States can do to combat hunger internationally. They should note these ideas on the other side of their index cards. When all the participants are done writing, pass around the pot and ask them to drop their cards into it.

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Pa ss t he p o t around again, this time asking the participants to each take out a card and

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C o nc l ude by providing the participants with a copy of handout 3 and reviewing the list of

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read aloud the suggestions written on it. Then discuss the following: » If these words were actions, what would we have accomplished?

ideas they might want to consider.

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Christian

Generosity

M at e r i als N e ed e d

t his ac t ivi ty shows the participants how a biblical text can shed light on our role in the fight to end hunger.

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» Bibles, one for each participant » index cards, six for each participant » pens or pencils, one for each participant

Activity Steps D ist ribut e t o e ach pa rt icipant three index cards and a pen or pencil. Tell

everyone to imagine they have been granted three wishes. They must wish for things for themselves, although it is okay if their wishes would benefit others too. Allow a few minutes for them to write each wish on an index card. Then collect the cards and read a few random wishes to the group. I nvi t e t he pa rt icipant s to form small groups of three. Then ask them to discuss

each of the following questions: » What would you take to the top floor of your house if floodwaters were rising? » What would you take onto the roof? » What would you put in a helicopter?

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N o t e t he f o l l owing:

» Psychologist Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs says that humans need these things, in this order: » Biological and physiological needs: air, food, water, shelter, warmth, intimacy, sleep, etc. » Safety needs: protection from the elements, security, order, law, limits, stability, etc. » Belongingness and love needs: work group, family, affection, relationships, etc. » Esteem needs: self-esteem, achievement, mastery, independence, status, dominance, prestige, managerial responsibility, etc. » Self-actualization needs: realizing personal potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences 19

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Christian Generosity (continued) » So, for instance, a person needs food before status. A person will seek safety from harm before improving her or his relationships.

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As k t he s m a l l gr oups to compare Maslow’s list with the wishes they made earlier.

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N o w r e ad Philippians 4:10–13. Then use the following questions to lead a large-group

How many of the things on their lists are really wants rather than needs? Allow some time for the small groups to discuss.

discussion: » What would Paul put on his list? » What might it mean to be content in all circumstances? » How might a person achieve that? » Is it possible to be content even though your life might be full of disappointments or difficulties? How?

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D ist ribut e bib l e s to the participants. Ask them to conduct a search for Scripture

passages that pertain to generosity and the needs of the poor. The following is a list of some options if the small groups have difficulty locating passages: » Deuteronomy 15:1–11 » Proverbs 14:31, 17:5, 19:1, 22:2, 22:9, 22:16, 28:6, 28:27 » Amos 2:6b–7a; 8:5,6 » Matthew 6:1–4, 6:19–21, 26:11 » Acts 6:1–7, 9:36, 10:4, 24:17 » Galatians 2:10 » James 2:1–13 » John 3:17 » 2 Corinthians 8:9 Allow time for the small groups to locate at least one passage.

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I nvi t e e a ch s m a l l gr o up to share its chosen passage and the message. Dist ribut e three new index cards to each participant. Ask the participants to revisit the

three wishes they asked for at the beginning of the activity. Knowing what they know now, how would they change those wishes? Invite them to take a few moments to write down three new wishes. Collect the cards and select a few to share aloud with the large group. C o n c l ud e th e ac tivi ty by inviting everyone to join in prayer:

» Lord, we have so much. Most of us have food, shelter, people who love us, jobs, nice clothes to wear, safety, and opportunities for growth and development. May we never take your good gifts for granted. Help us to use our position of relative luxury to meet the needs of those less fortunate. Amen. (This activity is adapted from the What Is Poverty? Church Resource, produced by World Vision, United Kingdom, 2005.)

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Handouts and Resources 21

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Handout 1

My Perceptions Strongly Agree

Strongly D i sagree

Thinking about global issues is depressing. Some problems in the world are just too big to solve. ______________________________________________________________________________ We produce enough food to feed the entire world population. ______________________________________________________________________________ Each day thousands of people die of AIDS. There is nothing we can do to help those already infected. ______________________________________________________________________________ It’s not up to me to fix the world. It’s the responsibility of governments and humanitarian organizations. ______________________________________________________________________________ As much as we may want to put an end to poverty, we just don’t have the money to do so. ______________________________________________________________________________ My actions at a local level are a part of global change. ______________________________________________________________________________ Most of the talk about the world’s “starving millions,” and so on, is an exaggeration. The problems aren’t nearly as serious as people make them out to be. If we stopped worrying so much, these problems would sort themselves out. ______________________________________________________________________________ The poor countries can’t catch up to the rich ones because the rich ones got rich by conquering the poor ones. And they stay rich by controlling the world’s trade system. ______________________________________________________________________________

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Handout 1

My Perceptions (continued) Strongly Agree

Strongly D i sagree

The best way to fight poverty is to change ourselves. As individuals we need to be more generous, live simpler lives, care more about the people around us, and waste less. ______________________________________________________________________________ Sooner or later, poor countries are going to get together and force the rich ones to give them fairer prices for their products. The big question is whether this can be done peacefully or whether there will be wars. ______________________________________________________________________________ Most countries have great inequalities among their own populations. A rich minority is in charge, and everyone else is poor. The internal inequalities are the cause of poverty more than are the inequalities between countries. ______________________________________________________________________________ The main causes of poverty are related to climate and environment. You can’t expect much progress when people have to deal with tropical heat, poor soils, dense jungles, deserts, mosquitoes, and a lack of clean water. ______________________________________________________________________________ There have always been people who are poor, and there always will be. There will always be lazy people who don’t mind living in poverty and who stupidly have children they can’t feed. ______________________________________________________________________________ The biggest problem in the world today is the population explosion. There are just too many people to feed and clothe. The answer is to increase the use of birth control in poor countries. ______________________________________________________________________________ Both richer and poorer countries should be aiming for self-reliance: regions and countries growing their own food. This can be done most effectively by giving land-reform farmers and peasants their own land. ______________________________________________________________________________ Handout 1: Permission to reproduce is granted. © 2008 by World Vision Inc.

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handout 2

The Millenniem Development Goals The Millennium Development Goals to be reached by 2015: » Eradicate extreme hunger and poverty. » Achieve universal primary education. » Promote gender equality and empower women. » Reduce child mortality. » Improve maternal health. » Combat HIV and AIDS, malaria, and other diseases. » Ensure environmental sustainability. » Develop a global partnership for international aid.

Handout 2: Permission to reproduce is granted. © 2008 by World Vision Inc.

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handout 3

What You Can Do To support efforts to end poverty and hunger around the world, you can . . . » Organize or take part in a 30 Hour Famine fundraiser. The 30 Hour Famine is a great way to learn more about hunger and raise money to help end it. Check out www.worldvisionresources.com and click on “programs and events” for more information. » Sponsor a child and help his or her community through World Vision’s Child Sponsorship Program. Visit www.worldvisionresources.com for more information. » Buy fair trade goods when you can. Fair trade helps to ensure that producers earn a living income from their crafts and products. » Write to your government officials. Ask if they think we are on track to meet global commitments and if they are holding the government accountable. When you write, ask if there is any way you can help. » Take action! Advocate for increased food aid funding to help alleviate the suffering of children and families affected by the food crisis. Go to www.worldvisionresources.com for additional ideas. » Do something that supports people who may be without sufficient food in your own community. » Pray for those around the world who are hungry. Pray for wisdom for government leaders who are seeking effective means of addressing food insecurity. » Buy an alternative gift for a friend or loved one and help make a difference to a poor community.

Handout 3: Permission to reproduce is granted. © 2008 by World Vision Inc.

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»About World Vision W or ld V isi on is a Christian humanitarian organi-

zation dedicated to working with children, families, and their communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice. Motivated by our faith in Jesus Christ, World Vision serves alongside the poor and oppressed as a demonstration of God’s unconditional love for all people. We see a world where each child experiences “fullness of life” as described in John 10:10. And we know this can be achieved only by addressing the problems of poverty and injustice in a holistic way. That’s how World Vision is unique: We bring over 60 years of experience in three key areas needed to help children and families thrive: emergency relief, long-term development, and advocacy. And we bring all of our skills across many areas of expertise to each community we work in, enabling us to care for children’s physical, social, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Partnering with World Vision provides tangible ways to honor God and put faith into action. By working, we can make a lasting difference in the lives of children and families who are struggling to overcome poverty. To find out more about how you can help, visit www.worldvision.org. ab o u t w o r l d visio n r e s o urc es

Ending global poverty and injustice begins with education: understanding the magnitude and causes of poverty, its impact on human dignity, and our connection to those in need around the world. World Vision Resources is the publishing ministry of World Vision. World Vision Resources edcates Christians about global poverty, inspires them to respond, and equips them with innovative resources to make a difference in the world. For more information about our resources, contact: World Vision Resources Mail Stop 321 P.O. Box 9716 Federal Way, WA 98063-9716 Fax: 253-815-3340 www.worldvisionresources.com

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Now more than ever—in terms of the money, the food, and the science needed—we’ve got what it takes to beat poverty. And now is the time to focus on poverty. Over the past few years, world leaders have begun to talk seriously about addressing this issue. Commitments have been made, and goals have been set. We need to act to ensure that leaders stick to their promises. Progress will continue to be step by step; no one person can do the job alone, but every person can help. The Beat Poverty: We’ve Got What It Takes! curriculum encourages older adolescents to address poverty issues. Through various lessons and activities, participants are moved to challenge both their own perceptions about poverty in the world and what the United States is, and should be, doing to help end poverty.

Copyright © 2008 by World Vision Inc. Mail Stop 321, P.O. Box 9716, Federal Way, WA 98063-9716 worldvision.org

Beat Poverty - We've Got What It Takes - An Educational Curriculum  

According to UNICEF, one child dies every three seconds due to poverty-related causes. It’s outrageous—and it doesn’t have to be this way. N...

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