Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

CHANGING THE WORLD WITH 127 PROJECTS.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD6 SMART DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION

9

PROJECT HANDOVER – REGIONS ON THE WAY TO INDEPENDENCE

10

“GIRL RISING” – INSPIRING STORIES

12

THE BOARD

14

THE EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT

15

75 EMPLOYEES SERVING WORLD VISION SWITZERLAND

17

INCOME STATEMENT

18

OUR FIELDS OF ACTIVITY AND DONATION WORLDS

21

CHILDREN’S RIGHTS + CHILD PROTECTION

26

WATER + HYGIENE

29

HEALTH + NUTRITION

30

EDUCATION + INCOME

33

EMERGENCY AID AND DISASTER RELIEF

34

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

37

PUBLIC FUNDING

38


FOREWORD

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Ulrich Steiner, President of World Vision Switzerland, and Reto Gerber, CEO / Managing Director World Vision Switzerland.

Unforeseeable events like Typhoon Haiyan are a prime example of the need for international support and immediate emergency aid. In such situations, we are happy that we can fall back on a global network. So, just two days after the typhoon, a cargo plane with 25 tonnes of World Vision relief supplies took off from Frankfurt to Manila. In addition to non-bureaucratic emergency aid, long-term development projects in particular were at the centre of our work in 2013.

AN INSIGHT INTO THE WORLD OF WORLD VISION SWITZERLAND Our vision is: “A world for children”. World Vision Switzer­ land has campaigned on a daily basis in development cooperation for this vision for over 30 years. It is our aim to present our organisation and our work openly, clearly and comprehensively. The Annual Report 2013 discloses the extent to which we have campaigned for this on a daily basis, the means by which we have done so, and the success we have had, so that “a world for children” will become a reality. The Annual Report provides an in-depth insight into the world of World Vision Switzerland and deliberately focuses on education in 2013, because education is a requirement for an independent life with a future.

We would like to thank our 60,000 sponsors, donors and benefactors for their valuable commitment, their confidence in our work and their continuing support of our vision. It is their support that will allow us to continue to do our best to provide a world for children well into the future.

LONG-TERM DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION Emergency aid is not enough. World Vision assists the af­ fected population with reconstruction and prevention over the long term. Therefore, in addition to our important work in the area of emergency aid and disaster relief, longterm development cooperation in particular in more than 30 countries belongs to our responsibilities and core competencies.


The ongoing crisis in Syria and the severe typhoon in the Philippines were covered widely by the world’s media. World Vision Switzerland also reported on the work on the ground. As a non-profit organisation, it is extremely important to demonstrate on the ground that our work is genuine.

Funded by various forms of sponsorship, this is at the heart of our activities. With the help of our donors and benefac­ tors, we campaign in various sectors for the development of entire regions. Children are the main focus of all our activities, because we are convinced that every child deserves the chance of a better future. We are convinced that World Vision Switzerland’s long-term development cooperation is the best basis for this.

of children who did not attend school dropped markedly. Nevertheless, the number decreased more rapidly in the earlier years of this period than today. For us, this is a sign that there is still work to be done in the area of education. Even in the areas of Children’s Rights + Child Protection, Water +  Hygiene and Health + Nutrition, a lot remains to be done. Let’s do it together.

EFFECTIVE DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION We create the conditions for people to determine their own destiny. There is no question that development coopera­ tion is both necessary and useful. The success that has come through the involvement of various organisations speaks for itself. A good example of this is malnutrition: in 1990, twelve million children died due to malnutrition or a lack of medicine. By 2012, this number had almost been halved globally. Another example is primary school education. According to the United Nations, between 2000 and 2011, the number

Ulrich Steiner President of World Vision Switzerland

Reto Gerber CEO / Managing Director World Vision Switzerland

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“Education is an important piece of the sustainable development puzzle.” Prof. Dr. Urs Gröhbiel

“Education is the strongest weapon to change the world” Nelson Mandela


SMART DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION Guest authors: Prof. Dr. Urs Gröhbiel, Delegate for Development Cooperation at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW) and Dr. des. Christoph Pimmer, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW).

Two girls in Nkayi, Zimbabwe, head off to school at 5 o’clock in the morning. They are separated from their next maths lesson by ten kilometres of dirt track and sandy “streets”. Is it worth the effort?

EDUCATION IS AN IMPORTANT DRIVING FORCE FOR DEVELOPMENT Numerous studies confirm that education is an important driving force for development. Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo, from the renowned MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), take it for granted that “with each school year, the income later increases.” Paul Collier, Professor at the University of Oxford and long-time director of the “Research Group for Development” at the World Bank has arrived at the conclusion that education is an important requirement for sustained improvement in “failed states”. He writes, in his best-selling book, The Bottom Billion, that “countries need a critical mass of educated people to implement a strategy for reform”.

EDUCATION IS THE FOUNDATION FOR PEACE Education has consistently been, and continues to be, an integral part of the political agenda of global development organisations. UNESCO describes education in particular as the foundation for peace, sustainable development and the key to reducing poverty. Two of the eight “Millennium Development Goals” that the United Nations wants to achieve by 2015 are related to education. However, the chances of both girls from Nkayi successfully completing school are rather poor: Only a few pass the final exam at the primary school, let alone the high school level – a problem for many schools in poor countries.

WORLD VISION PILOT PROJECT IN NKAYI A pilot project with the school in Nkayi set up by World Vision Switzerland and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwest Switzerland in the past year shows how such challenges can be tackled. Together with external ex­ perts, the teachers developed modern teaching scenarios and aids for exam preparation that were supported by mobile devices (iPads). The results will help to optimise measures for the improvement of children’s test results and to implement these in other schools with similar conditions.

IMPROVING EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES REMAINS A LONG-TERM GOAL Development organisations such as World Vision analyse education needs and potential on the ground, directly with those involved, supporting locally based measures and having them reviewed by independent bodies. They will be able to provide important contributions to achieving the international community’s “Post-2015 Goals”, which are cur­ rently under discussion, in the area of education and beyond.

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Education is an important driving force for the sustainable social and economic development of a country. There are numerous studies by renowned researchers to prove this. With proven and innovative pedagogical approaches, development organisations such as World Vision have a lasting impact, not only on the individual child but also on the society that the child will help to shape in the future.


PROJECT HANDOVER – REGIONS ON THE WAY TO INDEPENDENCE

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Development cooperation works when people in developing countries are given the chance to determine their future themselves. In the scope of long-term development projects, World Vision Switzerland equips them with the essential tools to do so. Five development projects in the last year have been handed over to local managers.

EL PINO SPONSORSHIP PROJECT, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Located to the north of Santo Domingo is Sabana Perdida. The former rural area was a melting pot of displaced people settling from the countryside. Half of the population gets by on less than 2 dollars per day. After 15 years of project work, the progress is clear. A total of 98% of the children go to school. A vocational training centre increases the chances of a regular income. The project activities benefited 20,000 people, and 2,572 children were integrated into the sponsor­ ship programme.

DUARS SPONSORSHIP PROJECT, INDIA In the state of West Bengal, World Vision Switzerland has car­ ried out the Duars sponsorship project. The people in the project area live from agriculture and cattle farming. The health and hygiene conditions at the start of the project were poor. But after 16 years of dedication, the situation has clearly im­ proved. The level of very poor households has decreased from 58% to 9%, while 99% of all children under 5 received all the important vaccinations in 2013. The activities of the project benefited 48,000 people, and 1,827 children were integrated into the sponsorship programme.

KAMPENA SPONSORSHIP PROJECT, MALI Mali is one of the poorest countries in the world. Previously, the population in the Kampena region did not have an adequate healthcare system or water supply. Children, in particular, died from preventable diseases. After 17 years, the living conditions of the population have changed for the better.

World Vision helped the communities to construct two water pipelines and 56 wells, while 2 new health centres were built. The activities of the project benefited around 50,000 people in 89 villages, and 1,860 children were integrated into the sponsorship programme.

LALITPUR SPONSORSHIP PROJECT, NEPAL Poor hygiene conditions were just one of many problems in Lalitpur. World Vision Switzerland began its activities there in 2000. Today, children are developing healthily and families have enough income. Thanks to mothers being educated on nutrition, the rate of malnourished children has decreased from 42% to 4%. At the time of the project handover to local managers, practically all the households in the project area had a toilet. The activities of the project benefited 51,000 people, and 2,062 children were integrated into the sponsorship programme.

SINDENI SPONSORSHIP PROJECT, TANZANIA World Vision launched the Sindeni sponsorship project in 1994. At that time, mother and child mortality rates were very high, people had no clean drinking water and there were only very few schools. Amongst other things, World Vision supported the construction of a vocational training centre, 12.5 kilometres of water pipelines and 7 health centres. Towards the end of the project, 97% of all children in the project area were attending a school. The activities of the project benefited 51,000 people, and 2,700 children were integrated into the sponsorship programme.


Following the withdrawal of World Vision Switzerland, it is our goal for people on the ground to be able to continue the projects independently with local organisations and partners. That’s why we place great importance on involving the local population and authorities from the beginning. To improve the sustainability of our projects, evaluations are also carried out after the project handover. The knowledge gained is integrated into the design of future projects.


“GIRL RISING” – INSPIRING STORIES

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12 Azmera and Ruksana are two of nine girls whose stories are told in “Girl Rising”. They are sponsored by World Vision development projects.

Around 66 million girls worldwide are unable to attend school. The documentary film “Girl Rising” tells the true story of nine such girls. World Vision Switzerland ran the film for the first time throughout Switzerland in collaboration with the computer chip manufacturer, Intel, in 2013 and thus pointed out the right that every girl has to an education. In keeping with the focus on education, the film will continue to accompany the child welfare organisation in the near future.

IN OCTOBER 2013, “GIRL RISING” WAS SHOWN FOR THE FIRST TIME IN SWITZERLAND Oscar-nominated director Richard E. Robbins’ documentary film reports separately on the true stories of girls realising their dream of education, despite adverse living conditions. “Girl Rising” shows how attempts are made to prevent girls from attending school. Some are given away, married during their childhood or abused as workers. In many cases, the financial circumstances of the family make it impossible for the daughter to attend school.

WHEN DREAMS COME TRUE Defying these factors, the nine girls in “Girl Rising” show why it is still worthwhile for them to fight for their dreams. Despite their different family backgrounds, the girls definitely have one thing in common: They are standing up for their right to an education. Two of the girls are doing so in a World Vision development project. Personalities such as Meryl Streep and Alicia Keys narrate in the documentary.

THE DOCUMENTARY FILM CAUSED A WORLDWIDE SENSATION IN 2013 Around 66 million girls globally are prevented from attend­ ing school, although studies show that young, educated women bring indispensable potential for every economy. In order to achieve the UN Millennium Development Goal of eliminating gender disparity at all levels of education by no later than 2015, a lot of work still needs to be done to raise awareness. Campaigns such as “Girl Rising” contribute to this goal.

SWISS FILM PREMIERE IN ZURICH The world premiere of “Girl Rising” was celebrated in the spring with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon. The Swiss premiere of “Girl Rising” was held in Zurich on 10 October 2013. The screening took place on the eve of International Day of the Girl Child, a day of action initiated by the United Nations, pointing out the current discrimination in the world against girls. World Vision Switzerland is planning further screenings in Switzerland in 2014.


Around 66 million girls are not receiving an education. That’s 66 million girls that the world needs as educated women to counter poverty and injustice.


THE BOARD

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1 | Ulrich Steiner

2 | Dr. jur. Ueli Vogel

3 | Dr. med. Madeleine Rothen

4 | Annemarie Pfeifer

5 | Rinaldo Lieberherr

6 | Yves Ettlin

7 | Manuel Bollier

The seven members of the Board of World Vision Switzerland share our vision of “a world for children”. In their primary function, they are responsible for overseeing and advising the executive management and helping to determine the strategic direction of World Vision Switzerland.

THE SEVEN MEMBERS OF THE BOARD PROVIDE THEIR SERVICES IN AN HONORARY CAPACITY

3 | Dr. med. Madeleine Rothen | Assessor (since 2008), Physician Madeleine Rothen sees a lot of parallels between her work as a lead physician and her voluntary activities: It’s about people, they are the focus.

The term of office for members of the Board is three years, and re-election is permitted up to three times. In World Vision’s international network, the members of the Board are also the link between World Vision Switzerland as a legally independent non-profit organisation and World Vision International.

4 | Annemarie Pfeifer | Assessor (since 1999), Psychologist / Author The author is convinced that World Vision Switzerland’s aid is getting through and the people in developing countries benefit holistically.

1 | Ulrich Steiner | President (since 2006), Engineer ETH Since 2006, the father of four children has been committed to ensuring that children gain the prospect of a life that is both fulfilling and worth living.

6 | Yves Ettlin | Assessor (since 2006), Business Economist FH / CFO With his commitment, the father of five wants to help those who need it most.

2 | Dr. jur. Ueli Vogel | Vice President (since 2002), Attorney The father of two sons has already travelled to several developing countries and seen things on the ground for himself. His conclusion: “development work is succeeding”.

7 | Manuel Bollier | Assessor (since 2012), Lawyer He has already worked on social missions in Costa Rica and Venezuela and thereby acquired valuable knowledge in the field of development cooperation.

5 | Rinaldo Lieberherr | Assessor (since 2004), Entrepreneur Private entrepreneur, Rinaldo Lieberherr, wants to make a personal contribution to bringing about change. With World Vision Switzerland, he can do exactly that.


THE EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT

1 | Reto Gerber

2 | Valeria Habersatter

3 | André Mebold

4 | Martin Suhr

5 | Giovanni Miraglia

The executive management team consists of five members and is responsible for the operational management of the Swiss child welfare organisation with its 75 employees.

THE EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT TEAM ENSURES EFFICIENT USE OF DONATIONS

1 | Reto Gerber | CEO / Managing Director

The members of World Vision Switzerland’s executive management are responsible for their respective depart­ ments. The five members work well together as a team when it comes to coordinating the individual areas. Thus, they ensure that processes are optimised and resources are used efficiently.

3 | André Mebold | Director of Customer and Partner Relations

Reto Gerber takes the chair as CEO / Managing Director. He takes care of the operational management of the non-profit organisation. Together with Martin Suhr, Valeria Habersatter, André Mebold and Giovanni Miraglia, Gerber ensures that the vision, “a world for children”, is implemented over the long term. Even in the daily work of the executive management team, children are the priority at all times.

2 | Valeria Habersatter | Director of Marketing and Communications

4 | Martin Suhr | Director of International Programmes 5 | Giovanni Miraglia | Director of Finances and Controlling

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These employees stand for the vision of World Vision Switzerland: “A WORLD FOR CHILDREN” October 2013.

Working for World Vision Switzerland is a job like no other. Ultimately, it’s about helping to ensure that people in need in less privileged parts of our world have a future with new prospects.


75 EMPLOYEES SERVING WORLD VISION SWITZERLAND

WORKING AS PART OF A NETWORK IN AN INTERNATIONAL SETTING In essence, the various parts of our organisation do not actu­ ally look any different from companies in the private sector: customer service, communication, finance and controlling, human resources and others. The awareness of cost efficiency is high and firmly rooted in our processes. It is important to us that we show our sponsors, donors and benefactors the professional nature of our daily work. Being part of World Vision Switzerland also means being part of a large international network. The possibility of obtaining important information from developing countries is always there and consultation with local employees in their daily work is a big advantage. Nevertheless, World Vision Switzerland is an independent part of the extensive network with its own projects and its own funding from Switzerland. It is precisely this international environment that is very attractive for many staff.

OTHER CULTURES ARE A SOURCE OF DIALOGUE FOR OUR EMPLOYEES The international setting also poses demands: Correspond­ ence is often conducted in English, Spanish or French. Many of us have a passionate interest in other cultures and their ways of working and beliefs. The team itself is colourfully mixed: Young employees are interspersed with experienced World Vision Switzerland specialists. Religious and cultural diversity is also common in every sense.

“The most common reason why someone applies to us is the desire to have a meaningful job.”

OUR VISION: “A WORLD FOR CHILDREN” People from the most diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds work at World Vision Switzerland and also in the project countries. Christian values such as responsibility, justice and respect are at the heart of the everyday work. The employees of World Vision Switzerland treat each other as equals, respect the opinions of others and are fully aware of the high level of personal responsibility their role entails. These are all conditions and reasons that speak in favour of committing to World Vision Switzerland. Erica Maurer, HR manager at World Vision Switzerland, spoke of the biggest motivation for becoming involved in a world for children: “The most common reason why someone applies to us is quite simply the desire to have a meaningful job.”

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It is important to us to communicate the work of World Vision Switzerland to the Swiss population openly and transparently in the projects. With their respective duties, all of our employees help to ensure that the donation money entrusted to our organisation is being used carefully and efficiently in projects.


INCOME STATEMENT

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Notes

INCOME

01.10.2012 to 30.09.2013

01.10.2011 to 30.09.2012

32,301,718

33,620,136

in CHF

Regional development projects Emergency aid and disaster relief Priority projects

434,728

1,205,358

2,262,516

1,767,331

Public sector contributions

7

5,690,090

5,928,866

Food and emergency aid

8

4,178,468

3,244,444

1,946,845

410,228

19,980

21,000

1,150

1,000

338,262

492,232

47,173,757

46,690,595

10 – 35,271,524

– 37,022,411

– 201,831

– 513,645

– 2,010,983

– 2,407,343

– 148,693

– 181,244

– 37,633,031

– 40,124,643

– 4,584,477

– 4,288,242

– 128,081

– 169,999

Unrestricted donations Sponsorship contributions Membership fees Other income

9

Total INCOME

EXPENDITURE

in CHF

Project work Information work and legal fees Personnel expenses

12

Travel and representation expenses EXPENDITURE ON PROJECT WORK

Personnel expenses

12

Travel and representation expenses Fundraising

– 1,903,939

– 4,389,273

Office and administration expenses

– 475,228

– 591,186

Expenses for premises (rent, heating, electricity)

– 364,974

– 341,367

Maintenance expenses

– 365,325

– 342,781

– 17,284

– 15,239

– 244,193

– 232,969

– 8,083,499

– 10,371,056

1,457,227

– 3,805,104

Other expenses Depreciation of tangible and intangible assets EXPENDITURE ON INLAND WORK OPERATING RESULT

11


01.10.2011 to 30.09.2012

42,867

35,182

– 51,758

– 73,380

FINANCIAL INCOME

– 8,891

– 38,198

Income from outside the organisation

15,070

7,720

OTHER INCOME

15,070

7,720

1,463,406

– 3,835,582

45,202,715

45,782,935

– 44,366,061

– 49,411,714

836,654

– 3,628,779

6,626,752

– 206,803

– 1,150

– 1,000

– 625,602

207,803

0

0

in CHF

Financial income Financial expenditure

13

ANNUAL INCOME BEFORE FUND RESULT

Allocation of restricted funds Use of restricted funds CHANGE IN RESTRICTED FUNDS ANNUAL INCOME BEFORE ALLOCATIONS /  WITHDRAWALS FROM ORGANISATIONAL CAPITAL

of which memberships fees paid in Withdrawal from acquired free capital

6

ANNUAL RESULT (SURPLUS / WITHDRAWAL AFTER ALLOCATION)

NOTE The detailed financial section of the Annual Report 2013 can be found attached. If it is missing, please download it from www.worldvision.ch or order it by phone on +41 44 510 15 15.

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01.10.2012 to 30.09.2013

Notes


127 DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS IN 38 COUNTRIES

LATIN AMERICA Bolivia Dominican Republic Haiti Nicaragua Peru

EASTERN EUROPE AND THE MIDDLE EAST Armenia Bosnia and Herzegovina Georgia Lebanon Romania


OUR FIELDS OF ACTIVITY AND DONATION WORLDS

Together with donors and sponsors, the welfare organisation World Vision Switzerland is implementing its vision of creating a world for children, step by step. Through long-term development projects, non-bureaucratic aid or by defending children’s rights – wherever our help is needed most.

BROAD-BASED FINANCING

FOCUS ON THREE FIELDS OF ACTIVITY

For 30 years, long-term development cooperation financed by private donations and sponsorships, as well as donations and sponsorships from foundations and corporations and public funds, has been at the heart of our work. In addition, World Vision Switzerland provides emergency aid and disaster relief, and acts as an ambassador for children’s rights.

The Swiss child welfare organisation, World Vision, focuses its work as a non-profit organisation and central partner of the global World Vision Network on three fields of activity: emergency aid and disaster relief, development cooperation and ambassador for children’s rights.

NEW DONATION OPTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS AND FOUNDATIONS In 2013, World Vision Switzerland revised the donation and sponsoring options for individuals as well as for companies and foundations.

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For over 30 years, the Swiss child welfare organisation has been working with a focus on three fields of activity: emergency aid and disaster relief, long-term development work and ambassador for children’s rights.

In keeping with the philosophy of corporate social respon­ sibility, four sponsorship areas are available for companies: theme sponsorship, project sponsorship, programme sponsorship and individual sponsorship.


CHILD Sponsorship The personal relationship which is made possible through child sponsorship gives development cooperation a face. The correspondence, photos, periodic reports and visits give the sponsor a direct insight into project development. With their long-term donations, sponsors contribute to lasting improvements in the living conditions of the child, his or her family and the overall environment. World Vision Switzerland uses the donated funds for projects in the areas of water, health, nutrition and education.

THEME Sponsorship With theme sponsorship, donors support one of four theme areas. In each of these theme areas, individual theme projects are summarised. Children’s Rights + Child Protection (issues include street kids, female circumcision and child refugees) Water + Hygiene (issues include drinking water, irrigation and sanitary facilities) Health + Nutrition (issues include food security, malaria prevention and infant nutrition) Education + Income (issues include youth development, microfinance and teacher training)


SUPPORTERS Together with sponsors and donors in around 100 devel­ opment projects, World Vision Switzerland ensures that children and their parents are able to live in dignity. In addition, our organisation is also active as a committed ambassador for children’s rights and child protection. With targeted media work, congresses and training courses, we promote relevant awareness-raising initiatives among the public, authori­ ties and governments. By making an annual donation, patrons of World Vision Switzerland assist us in our fight against hunger, disease, poverty and injustice, as we strive for a world in which children can develop safely and happily.

VILLAGE Sponsorships Village sponsorships make it possible for people to take part in the extensive development of several villages of a region, with a personal visit to the site, if desired. With their regular donations, village sponsors support measures in the areas of water, health, nutrition and education in the region of their choice. In this way, they create development spaces where children can grow up healthy and cherished. Periodic reports enable sponsors to experience the way that the lives of thousands of families are gradually changing for the better.


SPONSORING

for Corporates

Together with World Vision Switzerland, companies can campaign so that our vision of creating a world for children gradually becomes a reality. In keeping with the philosophy of corporate responsibility, companies can become involved in four sponsorship areas. In addition, there are different ways to become involved as a strategic partner or charity partner of World Vision Switzerland. Theme sponsorship Project sponsorship Programme sponsorship Individual sponsorship

EMERGENCY AID AND DISASTER RELIEF During emergencies and disasters, World Vision Switzerland supports and assists the affected population in the areas of emergency aid, reconstruction and prevention. Thanks to the networking with partner offices in around 100 countries, trained teams are on the ground within a short time. They provide vital emergency aid and assist in reconstruction. Furthermore, during humanitarian crises or severe emergencies, we support victims, especially children, with emergency aid. World Vision works closely with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the World Food Programme (WFP), and can also carry out longer-term development work after emergency measures have been completed.


AFRICA Angola Chad Congo Ethiopia Ghana Kenya Lesotho Malawi Mali Mauritania

Mozambique Niger Senegal Somalia Sudan South Sudan Tanzania Uganda Zimbabwe

ASIA Bangladesh Cambodia India Mongolia Myanmar Nepal Pakistan Philippines Vietnam


CHILDREN’S RIGHTS + CHILD PROTECTION

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In 2013, World Vision Switzerland also supported the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, which is intended to guarantee the survival, development and protection of children. Our support begins at the roots: Staff on the ground helped to support and educate needy children, their families and their communities. Together with local institutions such as schools, hospitals and government agencies, we created safe spaces for play and development, where children can grow up cared for and respected.

PROTECTION THROUGH EDUCATION

RAISING AWARENESS OF CHILDREN’S RIGHTS

World Vision adopted potential victims such as orphans, street kids and child refugees to protect them from human traffickers. This was also the case in the project for street kids in Calcutta, India, where 148 children learned how they can protect themselves from human traffickers.

In order to implement changes for child protection, action is required at different levels. Using culturally appropriate methods such as theatre, songs or discussions, children and adults were made aware of their opportunities and rights.

To counteract forced and early marriages and female circumci­ sion, World Vision raised awareness in entire village communities of the need for changes to behaviour. In the Velingara project in Senegal, for example, we supported the development of around 2,000 girls by working together with the people to find ways of emphasising and reinforcing positive aspects of their traditions. However, at the same time, harmful practices were identified and jointly discussed. To provide the girls with room for growth, the focus was on encouraging them to attend school and be strong, independent individuals.

SUPPORT THROUGH CARE Girls and boys who were victims of violence or abuse need care and safety. World Vision supported them with medical, legal and psychosocial care. With secure accommodation, they had the opportunity to enjoy leisure activities and to complete their education or vocational training. For example, in the rehabilitation centre “Neavea Thmey” in Cambodia, we cared for 65 girls aged from 9 to 17. Many of them were at risk of forced prostitution. We also supported 104 girls in court who had filed a lawsuit against those ex­ ploiting them.

In the Kapan project in Armenia, 100 young people dis­ cussed their rights in our children’s clubs. World Vision helped them organise a demonstration with dancing and screen messages in the square in front of the town hall, to inform the population of their rights.

148 CHILDREN in Calcutta (India) learned to protect themselves from human traffickers. 2,000 GIRLS in Senegal benefited from a project to help their development. 65 SEXUALLY EXPLOITED GIRLS were cared for in the rehabilitation centre in Cambodia.


Around the world, some 120 million girls and boys between the ages of 5 and 14 perform child labour under exploitative and unhealthy conditions. As an ambassador for children’s rights, World Vision Switzerland is raising awareness of the rights and con­ cerns of children in such situations. With lectures at schools and churches, as well as events and publications, we are drawing people’s attention to the rights of children around the world.


Every minute, a child dies as a result of drinking contaminated water. Clean drinking water gives life. Every year, the deaths of around 1 million children could be easily prevented. Clean drinking water and improved hygiene ensure that water becomes a source of health – not one of sickness and death.


WATER + HYGIENE

INSTALLATION OF WELLS AND WATER SYSTEMS In order to provide easily accessible water sources, experts bored wells at sites that had been checked beforehand, and provided them with pumps. Water pipelines were also installed or repaired. In practical training, members of the local water committees learned to carry out necessary installations or repairs independently. The water committees took over the responsibility for long-term maintenance and funding of wells and water systems. In the Neguela project in Mali, World Vision installed 10 wells. Around 5,000 people now have access to clean drink­ ing water. Girls and women no longer have to walk three to five kilometres to the nearest water source, and 16 local water committees were trained for their roles.

SANITARY FACILITIES HELP TO PREVENT DISEASES About 2.5 billion people worldwide do not have a suitable toilet in or near their home. They are forced to relieve them­ selves behind the house or at the roadside. Many people are not aware that this leads to the spread of disease. World Vision has raised awareness amongst the people on how important functioning toilets are for their health, and guided them in building suitable latrines and using them properly. In the Lamjung project in Nepal, World Vision built 65 toilets for households. An additional 127 households were encour­ aged in training courses to build toilets themselves. A church

declared its area a faecal-free zone and also provided better waste management. The streets and squares have been much cleaner ever since then.

HYGIENE TRAINING FOR LASTING CHANGES TO BEHAVIOUR Healthy living spaces can only be obtained long term through changed hygiene awareness. Using culturally appropriate methods such as theatre performances, songs or lectures, local staff provided the population with an understanding of hygienic practices. In the Ukane project in Mozambique, 200 adults and 54 children attended training on the proper use of water and sanitary facilities.

5,000 PEOPLE in Neguela (Mali) gained access to clean drinking water thanks to 12 wells. 192 HOUSEHOLDS in Lamjung (Nepal) now have a toilet directly at the house. 254 ADULTS AND CHILDREN learned how to handle water properly and how to apply hygienic practices.

29 A WORLD FOR CHILDREN  |  ANNUAL REPORT 2013 |

World Vision Switzerland enabled remote village communities, schools and health centres to have easy access to drinking water and sanitary facilities. This not only reduced diarrhoeal diseases such as cholera but also freed women and children from the burden of fetching water daily. In addition, our local staff conducted regular health and hygiene training courses.


HEALTH + NUTRITION

A WORLD FOR CHILDREN  |  ANNUAL REPORT 2013 |

30

Family and community are vital to the health and development of a child. For this reason, during the 2013 financial year, World Vision Switzerland also campaigned for disease prevention and involved families and local leaders in the development work. We promoted the healthy nutrition of mother and child and easy access to medical care. At the same time, we supported small farmers and families to cultivate a diverse range of foods.

IMMEDIATE AID AGAINST HUNGER AND MALNUTRITION

LASTING SUPPORT TO SECURE THE FOOD SUPPLY

We trained local health workers to save nursing mothers and their infants from acute malnutrition. They ensured that severely malnourished children were given medical treatment and supported with a special nutritional diet. In the Sebkha project in Mauritania, 826 children under the age of 5 were cared for with a special nutrient-rich diet and 17 women learned how to prepare the nutrient-rich diet themselves.

World Vision supports small farmers and families with highquality seeds and with training on improved farming methods. In addition, we helped the local population to gain access to markets and discussed the efficient use of available resources with them.

In crises, food was also distributed to provide children and families with the most important foods in the short term.

PREVENTATIVE MEASURES FOR HEALTHY GROWTH World Vision took the necessary measures to ensure that children were able to grow healthily from the time in the womb until their second year. These included classes on nutrition, immunisation, HIV/AIDS testing and malaria and diarrhoea prevention. In the Muktagacha project in Bangladesh, 3,174 mothers learned in practical nutrition courses how to prepare balanced meals for their children from local foods. The children were weighed at the beginning and the end of the course: 2,799 initially malnourished children put on a considerable amount of weight.

In the barren highlands of Bolivia, 1,051 families benefited from a multi-year, broad-based food security project. In the Seniwe project in Mali, courses on modern farming methods and seed propagation for 250 participants were planned. Alarmed by the drought in 2012, 1,187 small farmers rushed to the courses to guard against future droughts.

826 SEVERELY MALNOURISHED CHILDREN in the Sebhka (Mauritania) project received a special nutrient-rich diet. 167 FAMILIES in the Harobanda Est (Niger) project received food in an emergency situation. 3,174 MOTHERS in the Muktagacha (Bangladesh) project learned in courses to feed their children a balanced diet.


Every 5 seconds, a child dies before its 5th birthday – mainly due to preventable diseases like diarrhoea, malaria or pneu­ monia. Sufficient nutrient-rich food in the first 1,000 days of life is crucial to ensure that the brain and bodily functions of a child fully develop, so that he or she grows and is capable of fighting off diseases.


One in 10 children can neither read nor write. Later in life, these children have hardly any chance on the labour market and are at high risk of poverty and human trafficking. The main reason for deficient education is the extreme poverty of the parents, who are not able to provide for their children themselves. Education paves the way out of a life of poverty and dependence to a future with new prospects.


EDUCATION + INCOME

CHILD-ORIENTED EDUCATION TO FURTHER THEIR POTENTIAL To support the healthy development of young children up to the age of 5, World Vision held special classes for parents. Here they learned to further the physical and intellectual abilities of the children. In our two projects in the Dominican Republic, 364 infants benefited from early childhood development. To ensure that more girls attend school, World Vision raised the awareness of the importance of education among parents and made it possible for the girls to attend school. Because of the new wells in the village, they needed less time to fetch water. Thanks to the bicycles, they made the long trip to school and back before dark. In the Duars project in India, 234 girls received a bicycle.

PROFESSIONAL COURSES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE We taught 12 to 18-year-olds in youth development projects skills to prepare them for employment and daily life. In various projects, they were also able to complete a basic apprenticeship or attend business training. In the Xochiltlepec project in Nicaragua, 65 young people took part in a two-year carpentry apprenticeship offered by World Vision, with 11 completing the final apprenticeship examination in the year of the report. We made it possible for a further 18 young people to take part in courses on entrepreneurship, so that they can go into business for themselves.

TRAINING FOR SMALL BUSINESS PEOPLE In the Quan Son project in Vietnam, we trained 480 small farmers in rice cultivation with organic fertiliser. As a result, their harvest rose by 25%. In the area of microfinance, we offered support for cooperative savings and credit groups. In the Makindube project in Tan­zania, we formed and trained ten savings and loan groups with a total of 80 women and 40 men. With the loans, they purchased agricultural products to increase their income.

364 INFANTS benefited from early childhood education in two projects in the Dominican Republic. 234 GIRLS received a bicycle for the long trip to school in the Duars project (India). 120 WOMEN AND MEN benefited from 10 newly formed savings and loan groups in the Makindube project (Tanzania).

33 A WORLD FOR CHILDREN  |  ANNUAL REPORT 2013 |

In 2013, World Vision Switzerland ensured that more children and young people have easy access to a good basic education. In doing this, we campaigned strongly for the education of girls, for whom the right to education all too often remains an unattainable privilege. With vocational courses for young people, training for small businesses and advancement through microfinance, we enabled people to pay for their livelihood themselves.


EMERGENCY AID AND DISASTER RELIEF

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34

Two events last year had a particularly strong influence on our work. The civil war in Syria escalated and, in November, typhoon “Haiyan” raged through the Philippines. With violent winds of over 300 kilometres per hour, it made over four million people homeless. World Vision was on the ground for both events and is providing non-bureaucratic help.

THE SITUATION IN SYRIA IS SPIRALLING OUT OF CONTROL Almost three years after the start of the civil war, the situation for Syrian refugees at the end of last year was becoming in­ creasingly desperate. According to the UNHCR, more than 2.2 million refugees to date have been registered in neigh­ bouring countries. Over half of them were registered last year alone. Over 1 million children have fled the country. Many border towns in neighbouring countries have reached breaking point. Therefore, in the past year, World Vision not only helped in Syria but also in Jordan and Lebanon. To date, the children’s charity has supported around 300,000 people. In Lebanon, water and hygiene supplies were provided, child protection zones were established and, where possible, temporary school classes were organised. Around 190,000 children and adults have benefited from this. In Syria, the assistance to date has concentrated exclusively on providing an effective emer­ gency response. For example, health and hygiene parcels were distributed to some 70,000 people.

World Vision has been active in the Philippines for 55 years and provided much needed relief immediately following the storm. This was, however, complicated by severe damage to infrastructure. Many of the areas destroyed could not be reached initially.

41 CHILD PROTECTION ZONES ESTABLISHED IN DISASTER AREA Despite difficult conditions, World Vision distributed food and hygiene kits in the initial days following the disaster in northern Cebu and Iloilo. Above all, children were supported. Child protection areas located directly in the disaster area received temporary protection from the massive consequences of the typhoon. In these special child protection zones, children are being cared for and receiving medical assistance, protection and social care. World Vision’s assistance for people in the Philippines

5,000 TENTS were delivered and set up in child protection zones.

HAIYAN HITS THE PHILIPPINES WITH FULL FORCE

1,000 HOUSEHOLDS in Ormoc received food parcels.

Images of devastated stretches of land were broadcast around the world. In the first week of November, one of the fiercest storms ever hit the Philippines. According to UNICEF, around 5.5 million children were affected by it.

25,000 KILOS OF RELIEF SUPPLIES were flown in by air freight to Manila. 24,000 PEOPLE in northern Cebu and Iloilo were supplied with food and hygiene kits.


9.5

Million

PEOPLE HAVE BEEN AFFECTED BY TYPHOON HAIYAN

2.3

MIllion

Earthquakes, storms and violence present threats every year. During emergencies, rapid expert assistance is needed. World Vision assists and supports those affected with emergency aid, reconstruction and pre足 ventative measures.

SYRIANS HAVe FLED TO NEIGHBOURING COUNTRIES.


Unilateral efforts in development cooper足 ation are anything but sustainable. World Vision Switzerland works with strong partners on the projects, and also in the organisational area. Synergies from joint pro足 jects are important for efficient work in the long term. It is precisely from partnerships between private sector organisations and NGOs that valuable prolonged associations can emerge.


CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

VALUABLE SUPPORT FROM THE GRIWAGROUP The GriwaGroup is made up of different companies from the fields of architecture, fiduciary services and planning in the Grindelwald region. Together with World Vision Switzerland, the GriwaGroup is active in Mongolia. In the Khentii village, thanks to commitment by the real estate specialists amounting to 23,900 Swiss francs, every year particularly disadvantaged families can afford a new home. In 2013, six Mongolian families received a new home.

RENOVATED CANTEEN FOR CHILDREN IN CUMPANA The social canteen in Cumpana, Romania, was given a new kitchen. Due to financial difficulties, many families in Cumpana are unable to provide their children with money for food. Thanks to the valuable support from Switzerland, the children can now have a nourishing meal before starting their lessons. This was made possible through the donation of over 17,800 Swiss francs from Zbären Kreativküchen AG. Thanks to the renovations, more than 80 underprivileged children can continue to eat at the canteen.

ROYAL DSM – ON THE GROUND IN DAR ES SALAAM WITH THE “MILLER’S PRIDE PROGRAMME” Since the start of the project in May 2013, the focus has been on enriching corn with micronutrients. The addi­ tional nutrients in staple foods should, first and foremost, better protect children from malnutrition. The parties have entrusted the task of enriching such foods to Royal DSM, a company with many years of experience in the food industry. World Vision’s experience in development cooperation again comes into play when it comes to designing an innovative project. Still in 2013, the first local millers from the WFP (World Food Programme) were trained in the new manufacturing process. The local producers also benefited: With the enriched flour, they can differentiate themselves from other producers and improve their chances against the competi­ tion. The project “Miller’s Pride” is an excellent example of the beneficial cooperation between non-profit organisations and private companies.

STRONG SPONSORSHIP PARTNERS ARE INDISPENSABLE IN THE FIELD Local partnerships are just as important as partnerships in Switzerland. A good example of this is the project “Miller’s Pride” in Dar es Salaam, the largest city in the eastern African country of Tanzania. Together with Royal DSM, World Vision is managing a project which aims to improve the population’s food situation in the long term.

The Sponsors

Z B Ä R E N   

  S W I S S

KITCHEN MANUFACTURE

37 A WORLD FOR CHILDREN  |  ANNUAL REPORT 2013 |

Every company, regardless of the industry and business sector, bears social responsibility. World Vision Switzerland offers companies the opportunity to get involved in an area of their choice and to support our vision of “a world for children”.


PUBLIC FUNDING

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38

World Vision Switzerland has over 30 years of experience in development cooperation. This experience comes into play in the daily project work and, more often than not, it is a valuable tool for other organisations. It is important to us to also use our expertise in project work with our local partners. In this way, together, we are taking a large step closer to creating our vision of “a world for children”. Funding for projects with UN agencies such as the World Food Programme (WFP) or UNICEF is also entered as public finds.

EXPERTS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PROJECTS

THE WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME (WFP) COUNTS ON WORLD VISION

In April 2013, in the context of international cooperation with governments, World Vision Switzerland signed a cooperation agreement with the British Department for International Development (DFID). The equivalent of almost six million Swiss francs is being made available from the DFID to up­ grade the antiquated water supply of the city of Bulawayo in south-west Zimbabwe. This will result in a total of 76,000 children in 80 schools receiving access to clean drinking water and sanitary facilities.

Cooperation with the WFP, the largest humanitarian organisation in the world, is also an important part of our work on the ground. World Vision works closely with the UN organisation when it comes to distributing food or making it accessible where it is urgently needed. An innovative example is in Lebanon, where the WFP commissioned our local office to distribute food vouchers. Our specialists on the ground ensure that the distribution of vouchers reached the poorest refugees and that they can actually buy the desired food at the agreed price.

CLOSE COOPERATION WITH UNICEF In Zimbabwe, World Vision implemented a project in the areas of water, sanitation and hygiene in close coopera­ tion with UNICEF. A UNICEF study in the small city of Plumtree in 2010 revealed that it was a quickly growing community with questionable hygiene standards. Together with World Vision, the goals were set of drastically reducing deaths from lack of hygiene, water or sanitary facilities and significantly raising the hygiene standards in Plumtree. In the following months, the two partners implemented several measures: The water supply was overhauled. Pump­ ing stations, water treatment plants and the water mains, including sewers, were replaced. In the areas of hygiene and healthy living, educational measures – for example, on waste disposal and waste separation – were implemented.


Transparency is important to us. On page 2 of the Annual Report, you will find a chart showing our sources of income for 2013. Public funding made up 20.9% of World Vision Switzerland’s income.


ABOUT US PUBLISHER EDITING

World Vision Switzerland, Dübendorf Mathias Gehrig (Editorial Director), Monika Hartmann and Thomas Wirth (World Vision), Dr. Thomas Hauser (HDK) GUEST Prof. Dr. Urs Gröhbiel, Delegate for Development Cooperation at the University of Applied CONTRIBUTORS Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW) Dr. des. Christoph Pimmer, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW) CONCEPT / LAYOUT Haus der Kommunikation AG (HDK), Zollikon PHOTO CREDITS World Vision PRINTING Ostschweiz Druck AG, Wittenbach PAPER Printed on BALANCE: 100% recycled, FSC-certified, CO2-neutral


worldvision.ch World Vision Switzerland is certified in accordance with ISO 9001 for efficient quality management. With the NPO label for management excellence our organisation also has neutral NPO quality certification for a high level of transparency. The Ideas Aidrating label stands for transparency with regard to content.

  facebook.com / WorldVisionSchweiz   twitter.com / WorldVisionCH   youtube.com / WorldVisionSchweiz Donor account: PC account 80-142-0

P / 103Ae / 02.14

World Vision Switzerland Kriesbachstrasse 30 8600 Dübendorf T +41 44 510 15 15 info@worldvision.ch www.worldvision.ch

World Vision Annual Report 2013  

Detailed background report on projects, products, and the allocation of funds.

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