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MANAGING FOR TOMORROW SOLUTIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS


OUR MISSION

TO MOVE HUMAN SOCIETY TO LIVE IN WAYS THAT PROTECT EARTH’S ENVIRONMENT AND ITS CAPACITY TO PROVIDE FOR THE NEEDS AND ASPIRATIONS OF CURRENT AND FUTURE GENERATIONS

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At WRI, we recognize that harm to the planet is systemic and must be tackled jointly by society, government and the private sector. Many issues are intertwined. Water affects energy, climate impacts food. We cannot address environmental impact at the expense of addressing poverty, nor can we build the economy and provide jobs at the expense of the equitable well-being of all. WRI brings together global expertise in food, forests, water, climate, energy, cities, business, governance, economics and finance. We work in partnership with governments, major companies and other NGOs on dozens of initiatives. We are known for our analytical heft and the integrity of our research. Working with companies is a critical part of our mission because we know that companies can innovate and scale solutions to our toughest problems. Businesses have important influence on governments, and their farreaching value chains offer an important global vision that complements the perspective of governments bound by national borders. We learn valuable lessons through this work and are a better institute for it. We look forward to working with you. Sincerely,

KEVIN MOSS Global Director, Sustainable Business World Resources Institute


MANAGING FOR TOMORROW

Leading companies realize they must embrace new ways of doing business to thrive in the decades ahead. Smart strategies based on science can drive sustainable growth while delivering key solutions to customers and communities.

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HOW WE DEFINE EXCELLENCE IN SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS

Corporate strategy is informed by scientific analysis of natural systems, ensuring a lasting supply of the resources we share. Innovative business models, such as those in the circular and sharing economies that do not rely on unchecked resource consumption, are sought and embraced. Stakeholders, peers, customers and political representatives are engaged to drive economy-wide change.


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HOW WE CAN WORK TOGETHER  SE WRI’S RESOURCES. Our research papers, data U analysis tools and other resources are available at no cost at wri.org/business. M  AKE A BOLD COMMITMENT. We can help you plan and prepare for your next ambitious sustainability milestone, such as setting a science-based emissions target, pledging zero deforestation in your supply chain or committing to 100 percent renewable energy. J OIN THE CORPORATE CONSULTATIVE GROUP (CCG). This group’s nearly 40 corporate members benefit from ongoing support on sustainable business development. CONTRIBUTE TO OUR RESEARCH OR JOIN A WORKING GROUP. Companies provide valuable project support as reviewers, pilot testers, interviewees or participants. LET US HELP YOU RESOLVE A CRITICAL SUSTAINABILITY

CHALLENGE. We lend our expertise to select projects that will advance sustainable business practice and help our corporate partners overcome key barriers. S UPPORT US. Our free resources and ongoing, cutting-edge research are made possible in part by financial and in-kind support of corporate donors.


IP PARTNERSH

SPOTLIGHT

PARAGUAYAN BANKS UNDERSTAND RISKS WITH GLOBAL FOREST WATCH

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When you take into account the size of Paraguay, you need technology in order to assess environmental risks. Global Forest Watch gives us the tools that we need to monitor and evaluate the environmental risks of our clients.� SEBASTIEN LAHAIE Member of the Board of Directors, Banco Sudameris, Paraguay

By investing in environmentally harmful projects, financial institutions increase their legal, financial and reputational risks. To better manage these risks, some banks are now turning to big data and geospatial technology to evaluate the impacts of their investments.

investment portfolios. Utilizing satellite remote data provided through WRI’s Global Forest Watch platform, Paraguayan banks can monitor their clients’ farms, mills and silos, as well as track deforestation patterns in areas of potential investment.

In Paraguay, where agriculture has taken a toll on forests, WRI worked with the FMO (Dutch Development Bank), the InterAmerican Investment Corporation and four local financial institutions to monitor deforestation and fire risks within their

Partnerships like these provide simple ways for financial institutions to incorporate forest monitoring into their evaluations and planning. This approach can be replicated by financial institutions and companies globally.


CLIMATE & ENERGY

Companies that rely on rigor and ambition to manage their impacts on the environment reduce their risks, discover new growth opportunities and enhance their reputation as leaders on climate action. WE HELP COMPANIES:

 easure and report emissions, including M those originating in the value chain (Scope 3)

H ave productive conversations with local utilities that lead to increased renewable energy supply

Track and influence climate policy

We need to peak emissions by 2020 to meet international climate change goals. How major corporations purchase and use energy has a lasting impact on our power grid and infrastructure, and their support for low-carbon development can drive

developments through collective action

innovation and political cooperation.

S et emissions targets that are sciencebased and aligned with stakeholder expectations

Navigate the utility landscape and increase the portion of their business that runs on clean, renewable energy

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@WRIClimate


SCIENCE BASED TARGETS

This joint initiative with World Wildlife Fund International, CDP and UN Global Compact helps companies set emissions targets in-line with the global effort to limit warming to less than 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F) and establish themselves as leaders on corporate climate action. sciencebasedtargets.org | @sciencetargets

NEW CLIMATE ECONOMY

Led by a Global Commission, this project provides groundbreaking evidence of how climate action and economic growth go hand-in-hand and inspires more ambitious action by countries, companies and investors. newclimateeconomy.net | @newclimateecon

GREENHOUSE GAS PROTOCOL

The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol, developed by WRI and World Business Council on Sustainable Development (WBCSD), sets the global standard for how to measure, manage and report greenhouse gas emissions. ghgprotocol.org | @ghgprotocol

WRI’s ELECTRICITY INITIATIVE

WRI’s electricity initiative convenes companies and utilities to expand clean energy in China, India, the United States, Southeast Asia and Latin America. It is part of the Renewable Energy Buyer’s Alliance (REBA), a collaboration of BSR, Rocky Mountain Institute and World Wildlife Fund USA. wri.org/our-work/project/charge | @WRIenergy


IP PARTNERSH

SPOTLIGHT

GENERAL ELECTRIC PARTNERS WITH WRI TO ADVANCE THOUGHT LEADERSHIP ON THE WATER-ENERGY NEXUS 10 WRI.ORG/BUSINESS


The water-energy nexus is one area where we are focused on developing new innovations and exploring new business opportunities. This report explains why and offers ideas for how. We chose WRI as our strategic partner on this project because we knew that their analytical capabilities and passion for big ideas would make it a success.� DEBORA FRODL Global Executive Director, GE Ecomagination

It takes a huge amount of energy to treat and distribute water and a huge amount of water to produce energy. At some point in their value chains, most companies are heavily dependent on these two linked resources.

The report offers strategies for overcoming commercial and social barriers, coordinating investment in critical infrastructure projects and forging public-private partnerships for improved water and energy management.

General Electric partnered with WRI to produce a landmark report on the relationship between water and energy and ideas for how industries can act, especially in places where water and energy supplies are strained.

The report was featured in the Harvard Business Review and shared with highlevel decision makers around the world. It is an example of how WRI and corporate partners can work together to advance mutual sustainability priorities and identify opportunities for business innovation.


FOOD

Companies can make significant progress towards sustainability goals—and enjoy impressive cost savings—by improving the way they produce, handle and sell food. Our initiatives help them capture this opportunity. WE HELP COMPANIES:

 easure and report the quantity of M food that is wasted throughout their value chain Identify opportunities to reduce food waste and cut costs U nderstand the environmental impacts of food production E xplore marketing strategies for sustainable food products

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The world must increase food production by 70 percent to feed 9.5 billion people in 2050. This is more than our planet can provide under current practices, but companies are helping to change our food system so that everyone can eat.

@WRIFood


CHAMPIONS 12.3

This initiative convenes executives from governments, businesses, international organizations, research institutions, farming groups and civil society to accelerate progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 12.3, which calls for cutting per capita global food waste in half by 2030. Champions123.org FOOD LOSS AND WASTE (FLW) PROTOCOL

Companies can follow this standard to properly quantify and report on food waste, the first step in reducing the amount of food wasted throughout their supply chain. flwprotocol.org

BETTER BUYING LAB

This initiative brings together the brightest and best minds from consumer research, behavioral economics and marketing strategy—along with companies in the food industry—to develop, test and scale new strategies and plans that help consumers select sustainable foods. wri.org/our-work/project/better-buying-lab


IP PARTNERSH

SPOTLIGHT

MARS, INCORPORATED AND WRI EXPLORE COMPREHENSIVE, SCIENCE-BASED SUSTAINABILITY TARGETS 14 WRI.ORG/BUSINESS


M&MS FACTORY IN TOPEKA, KS

We take our responsibility for our products and the supply chain behind them seriously. For us that means understanding the science not only behind those impacts, but behind the limits we must all learn to operate within. This project helped us take a leap forward in our understanding.� KEVIN RABINOVITCH Global Sustainability Director, Mars, Incorporated

Leaders at Mars, Incorporated, the company behind M&M’s, Pedigree pet food, Uncle Ben’s rice and dozens of other household brands, wanted to be sure they had strong internal sustainability targets. WRI worked with the company to analyze its footprint and develop targets that consider the latest science on the global carbon budget, water stress and other ecological limits. Lessons from this project were documented in a working paper,

From Doing Better to Doing Enough: Anchoring Corporate Sustainability Targets in Science. Companies that commit to working within ecological limits are better prepared to lead in a future characterized by a rapidlygrowing, global middle class and acute resource constraints. This partnership gave Mars a meaningful framework for sustainability targets that respects ecological limits.


FORESTS

Innovative supply chain management technologies paired with insightful analysis helps companies preserve and restore forests, reduce supply chain risks and meet stakeholder commitments. WE HELP COMPANIES:

Identify and track deforestation in their supply chain in near real-time Engage suppliers to drive forest-friendly practices, including through sourcing timber-based products E xplore business models that help restore degraded forests Map opportunities to invest in restoration Comply with global markets’ laws demanding legal forest products

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Only 15 percent of the world’s forests remain intact. But with greater knowledge and action, companies can ensure healthy forests for future generations, which are critical to a stable climate and productive communities.

@WRIForests


GLOBAL FOREST WATCH

This openly accessible, online platform provides the latest and most powerful data available to measure connections between deforestation and climate change, fires, water security and commodity supply chains. Global Forest Watch is set to launch a corporate supply chain management system, GFW Pro. This online platform uses the latest and most powerful data available to help companies and financial institutions analyze how key commodities such as palm oil, beef and soy in their supply chains and portfolios are impacting the world’s forests. globalforestwatch.org | pro.globalforestwatch.org | @globalforests NEW RESTORATION ECONOMY

This initiative analyzes scalable and profitable business models for restoring degraded land, leading to economic growth, captured carbon emissions and biodiversity. wri.org/our-work/project/new-restoration-economy

FOREST LEGALITY INITIATIVE

This initiative helps corporate supply chain managers and compliance officers make informed decisions, exercise due care and manage the risk of illegally sourced products in their supply chains. forestlegality.org | @forestlegality


IP PARTNERSH

SPOTLIGHT

UNILEVER PILOTS WRI’S PALM RISK TOOL

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We are committed to working with others to eliminate deforestation from the world’s commodity supply chains. To do this we need to ensure our own purchases are fully traceable and certified sustainable, and encourage whole industries to set and meet high standards. The PALM Risk Tool will facilitate increased transparency, help us identify high risk mills and support us as we work to drive the transformational change needed in the palm oil industry.� DHAVAL BUCH Chief Procurement Officer, Unilever

Many companies have committed to eliminating deforestation in their supply chains, and to do this they need a clear view of where that deforestation is happening. The production of palm oil, frequently found in health, beauty and food products, is a major driver of deforestation. In 2016, WRI developed the PALM Risk Tool, which analyzes satellite imagery within 50 km (31 miles) of each palm mill and ranks the mill as either a low, medium or high threat

to the surrounding forests. The tool can be found on the Global Forest Watch platform. Unilever was one of the first companies to pilot this tool. They initially found 29 high-risk mills and are now able to encourage more sustainable practices among their suppliers. Unilever gained actionable intelligence from its participation in the pilot stage, while helping to develop a practical tool that makes the impacts of a widely-used commodity transparent to its purchasers.


WATER

Water scarcity poses a major risk to business, but smart companies are using data and analysis to proactively monitor and plan around water supply. WE HELP COMPANIES:

Map regions where water stress poses a threat to operations Set water use targets that are tailored to the limits of watersheds and the needs of local communities Understand and protect natural systems that purify and disseminate water

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About one-fifth of the world’s population lives in water-scarce areas. We help companies manage their water use in ways that ensure that this vital resource remains available for future operations and others who use the same watershed.

@WRIAqueduct


AQUEDUCT

This openly accessible, online water risk mapping tool helps companies, investors, governments and other users understand where and how water risks are emerging worldwide. wri.org/our-work/project/aqueduct | @WRIAqueduct

CONTEXT-BASED TARGETS FOR WATER

This joint research project with WWF, The Nature Conservancy, CDP and The CEO Water Mandate examines how companies can set water use targets based on the limitations of watersheds and the needs of local communities. CEOwatermandate.org

NATURAL INFRASTRUCTURE FOR WATER

This initiative examines innovative approaches taken by companies and utilities to protect “natural infrastructure,� such as forest protection, watershed restoration and sustainable management of landscapes. wri.org/natural-infrastructure-water


HT

IP SPOTLIG

PARTNERSH

CARGILL REDUCES WATER AND DEFORESTATION RISK WITH WRI’S TOOLS AND ANALYSIS 22 WRI.ORG/BUSINESS


Our partnership with WRI includes work on internal greenhouse gas reductions, water risk analyses, deforestation and food loss and waste initiatives. This broad collaboration is helping Cargill solve key sustainability and business issues at a high level.” MARK MURPHY Global Head for Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability at Cargill

In March 2016, Cargill and WRI announced a two-year partnership to better manage deforestation and water risk across the company’s value chains. Cargill, a major player in the food and agricultural industry, sources large quantities of soy from South America and palm oil from Indonesia. WRI’s researchers used the satellite imagery and supplier data found on the Global Forest Watch platform to assess how Cargill’s supply

chain contributed to deforestation across these regions. This has enabled Cargill’s management to make more informed procurement decisions and to make progress against its commitment to have a 100 percent sustainable palm oil supply in place by 2020. WRI has also worked with Cargill to develop a methodology for evaluating water quality impacts on freshwater systems, so that water quality can be preserved in the communities in which Cargill operates.


RESEARCH TO GUIDE CORPORATE STRATEGY FOR COMPANIES

Tomorrow’s markets will be shaped by a much larger human population with fewer people living in poverty, leading to unprecedented demand for goods and services. While this presents exciting business opportunities, we are on track to triple our consumption of natural resources by 2050—which is impossible, therefore posing a threat to business growth. The Elephant in the Boardroom: Why Unchecked Consumption is Not an Option in Tomorrow’s Markets urges business leaders to look beyond incremental sustainability improvements to create innovative new business models in the circular and sharing economies, overcoming current dependence on unchecked natural resource consumption. PRE-PUBLICATION VERSION: EMBARGOED UNTIL MAR 23

PRE-PUBLICATION VERSION: EMBARGOED UNTIL MAR 23

WORKING PAPER

DOWNLOAD AT

wri.org/publication/ elephant-in-theboardroom

THE ELEPHANT IN THE BOARDROOM: WHY UNCHECKED CONSUMPTION IS NOT AN OPTION IN TOMORROW’S MARKETS

SAMANTHA PUTT DEL PINO, ELIOT METZGER, DEBORAH DREW, AND KEVIN MOSS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY There has been a sea change in business leadership on environmental and sustainable development issues over the past 20 years. Many CEOs speak “sustainability,” and many multinational companies have invested resources to build internal capacity on sustainability. It has become common for these companies to establish greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets and renewable energy goals and to address water risk and deforestation. Indeed, it is difficult to imagine how the historic Paris Agreement on climate change or the United Nations’ wide-ranging Sustainable Development Goals could have been cemented without the support of business. However, underneath this welcome progress lies an uncomfortable truth: Most businesses’ growth is still predicated on more people buying more goods. The world will have more than 9 billion people by 2050, and the middle class will have swelled by 3 billion by 2030. On top of this, consumer expectations for yet more are being stoked by trends such as fast fashion. The rapid expansion of consumption-driven markets in the coming decades is the anticipated engine for continued business growth. The problem is that the planet’s natural systems and finite resources cannot keep up. Studies cited in this paper show that we are already at or close to the limits of the planet’s ability to provide. A continuation of business as usual would mean not just a slight additional strain, but three times as much consumption of the planet’s already overused resources.

CONTENTS

Executive Summary ......................................1 Introduction ...............................................4 How Consumption Is Changing in the 21st Century ...6 A Closer Look at Implications for Three Products .....10 Consumer Durables—Cars ...............................11 Consumables—Beef ......................................15 Fast-Moving Consumer Goods—Clothes ...............23 Recommendations .......................................28 References ................................................31 Endnotes...................................................35 Acknowledgments ........................................36 Working Papers contain preliminary research, analysis, findings, and recommendations. They are circulated to stimulate timely discussion and critical feedback, and to influence ongoing debate on emerging issues. Working papers may eventually be published in another form and their content may be revised. Suggested Citation: Putt del Pino, S., E. Metzger, D. Drew, and K. Moss. “The Elephant in the Boardroom: Why Unchecked Consumption Is Not an Option in Tomorrow’s Markets.” Washington, DC: World Resources Institute, March 2017. Available online at http://www.wri.org/publication/elephant-inthe-boardroom.

WORKING PAPER | March 2017 | 1

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FOR INSTITUTIONAL INVESTORS

Economic drivers are making sustainability an issue that long-term investors simply cannot ignore. A survey of over 100 investment professionals shows that institutional investors— including pensions, foundations, universities and NGOs—are increasingly considering the material importance of social, environmental and governance factors in constructing their portfolios. Despite the enthusiasm and increased capital flows, WRI found key gaps in the market that prevent even the most motivated asset owners from deploying capital sustainability. For those starting on their journeys to sustainable investing, Navigating the Sustainable Investment Landscape provides answers to common questions and initial steps investors and their partners can take to overcome barriers and advance in the market. WORKING PAPER

DOWNLOAD AT

wri.org/publication/ sustainableinvestmentlandscape

NAVIGATING THE SUSTAINABLE INVESTMENT LANDSCAPE ELIZABETH LEWIS, ARIEL PINCHOT, AND GIULIA CHRISTIANSON

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Global natural resource scarcity, climate change, population growth, demographic shifts, and extreme poverty are impacting the way investors view the future. Many already recognize the materiality of such risks to long-term portfolio performance and are starting to incorporate relevant environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors into decision making in building a portfolio. With thoughtful implementation, these sustainable investing strategies have a positive, or at least non-negative, association with financial performance over the long term (Friede et al. 2015; Trunow and Linder 2015; Mercer 2009; Morgan Stanley 2015a), while also generating co-benefits. But the landscape for sustainable investing is changing rapidly and is difficult to navigate. For most asset owners, it isn’t easy to translate consideration of long-term sustainability into portfolio investments. This paper informs asset owners about the current state of sustainable investing for US institutional investors. Drawing on the experiences of over 100 asset owners and investment professionals—as well as evidence from WRI’s own endowment—the paper constructs a detailed outline of sustainable investing. It highlights the underlying motives and drivers, governance structures, relevant data and standards, investment vehicles, and key barriers that shape opportunities for implementation. It describes how some US-based asset owners are pursuing sustainable investing, and distills lessons for investment practitioners as they contemplate their own strategies. The paper concludes with initial recommendations for asset owners in overcoming preliminary market barriers and strategic

CONTENTS Executive Summary....................................................... 1 Introduction................................................................... 5 Section I. Sustainable Investment Trends and Concepts .. 6 Section II. Contours of a Changing Landscape ........... 10 Section III. Systemic Barriers ...................................... 32 Conclusion.................................................................. 37 Appendix A. Sustainable Investor Networks and Associations ......................................................... 40 Appendix B. Select Sustainable Investment Frameworks and Guidance .......................................... 42 Appendix C. Interview Protocol and Guide .................. 44 References................................................................... 47 Endnotes ..................................................................... 51 Working Papers contain preliminary research, analysis, findings, and recommendations. They are circulated to stimulate timely discussion and critical feedback and to influence ongoing debate on emerging issues. Most working papers are eventually published in another form and their content may be revised. Suggested Citation: Lewis, E., A. Pinchot, and G. Christianson. 2016. "Navigating the Sustainable Investment Landscape." Working Paper. Washington, DC: World Resources Institute. Available online at http://www.wri.org/ publication/sustainable-investment-landscape.

WORKING PAPER | December 2016 | 1


OUR CORPORATE CONSULTATIVE GROUP The Corporate Consultative Group (CCG) brings together nearly 40 Fortune 500 companies and the best minds in sustainability to advance business practices that mitigate risks and support sustainable growth. CCG MEMBER BENEFITS

▶▶ Access to cutting-edge research and data-driven tools across WRI’s global network so that you can take informed actions and speak confidently about complex, critical issues ▶▶ Focused support and advice from world-renowned experts, and discounted rates on advisory services for extended assistance ▶▶ Admission to MindShare, WRI’s flagship sustainable business event, bringing together corporate partners and experts over one and a half days of interactive sessions, discussions and networking ▶▶ Monthly member-only newsletter and invitations to virtual and in-person activities, curated to help you stay informed of key developments within the sustainability agenda ▶▶ Relationship manager who will understand your needs and proactively connect you to the latest research, tools and knowledge products that will benefit you and your team ▶▶ Opportunities to share experiences and insights that help shape WRI’s corporate tools, research and analysis to ensure relevance and practical application 26 WRI.ORG/BUSINESS


CCG MEMBER COMPANIES (AS OF JUNE 2017)

Abbott Laboratories

DuPont Company

PepsiCo, Inc.

Alcoa Foundation

Edison Energy

Pfizer Inc.

Baker & McKenzie

Exelon Corporation

Related

Bank of America

FedEx Corporation

Statoil

Best Buy Co., Inc.

General Motors

Tetra Pak International

BNY Mellon

The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Tyson Food, Inc.

Caesars Entertainment Corporation

Google Inc.

Unilever

Cargill Corporation

Hewlett Packard Enterprise

United Parcel Service, Inc.

Johnson Controls

VFC

Johnson & Johnson

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

Kimberly-Clark Corporation

Walt Disney Company

Mars, Incorporated

Weyerhaeuser Co.

NestlĂŠ

Xylem

Caterpillar Inc. CitiGroup, Inc. Colgate-Palmolive Company Dow Chemical Company

ADVISORY SERVICES WRI provides one-on-one support on a limited basis to companies on the projects described on preceding pages and much more. Advisory services are available to CCG members and non-members.


SUPPORT WRI

The financial support of our corporate partners helps to keep WRI at its best. It’s through these funds that WRI can test new ideas and stay innovative.

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THANK YOU TO OUR 2016–2017 CORPORATE SUPPORTERS STRATEGIC RELATIONSHIPS Alcoa Foundation Cargill, Incorporated Caterpillar Foundation Citi Foundation FedEx Corporation FEMSA Generation Foundation Google Inc. Johnson Controls International plc Qualcomm Incorporated Shell Foundation UPS Foundation Walmart and Walmart Foundation

PROGRAM/PROJECT PARTNERS Abbott Laboratories Accenture ADM Capital Foundation Antea Group Arconic Foundation Baker & McKenzie Bank of America Foundation Bloomberg L.P. Colgate-Palmolive Company ConAgra Foods CPS Energy Deutsche Bank DLA Piper Driscoll’s Eco Consulting Group Ecofys Ecolab Eileen Fisher, Inc. Esri Facebook, Inc. FMO—Netherlands Development Finance Company General Electric Company

General Motors Foundation Godrej & Boyce Mfg. Co. Ltd Google Inc. 41 Google Earth Outreach Johnson & Johnson Kimberly-Clark Foundation MAP Royalty, Inc. Mars, Incorporated McDonald’s Corporation McKinsey & Company, Inc. Nestlé Nestlé Waters North America Nike NRG Energy PepsiCo, Inc. Procter & Gamble Sodexo Switch SUPERNAP Triniti Marketing Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. Urthecast VF Corporation Walburg Pincus Foundation Wells Fargo

SUPPORTERS American Express Foundation Angeleno Group Antares Group Inc. Autodesk Blistex Inc. Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation Calvert Investments, Inc. Dentons Emission Information Inc. Firsthand Capital Management The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Green Strategies, Inc. IBM

KSS Architects LLP WSP USA Corporation

MATCHING AND WORKPLACE GIVING American Express Charitable Gift Fund Ameriprise Financial Matching Program Apple, Inc. Autodesk BD Group Boston Consulting Group Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation Cambia Employee Giving Campaign Carolyn Foundation EarthShare GE United Way Campaign Genentech, Inc. GEICO Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Google Inc. The Hartford Fire Insurance Company Hewlett-Packard Huron Consulting Group Intuit Just Give.org Kauffman Foundation Matching Gifts Program McGraw Hill Financial Microsoft Matching Gifts Program PayPal Giving Fund Phillips-Van Heusen Foundation, Inc. Salesforce TPG Capital, L.P. Wells Fargo Community Support Campaign World Bank Community Connections Fund


ABOUT WRI World Resources Institute (WRI) is a global research organization that spans more than 60 countries, with offices in Africa, Brazil, China, Europe, India, Indonesia, Mexico and the United States. Our nearly 700 experts and staff turn big ideas into action at the nexus of environment, economic opportunity and human well-being.

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WHAT WE DO RESEARCH

Corporate leaders use WRI’s evidence-based analysis to develop smarter sustainability strategies. All WRI research undergoes a rigorous, standardized review process that involves internal and external experts. TOOLS

WRI’s tools provide practical direction for strategy implementation. Companies can now see clearly where deforestation exists in their supply chain, where water scarcity poses a risk to growth, how their emissions compare to competitors’ and more. STANDARDS

WRI has standardized critical processes such as emissions accounting, food loss and waste measurement and science-based emissions target setting. CONVENING

WRI’s initiatives convene companies to share knowledge, resolve systemic challenges, amplify common concerns during public policy debates and signal corporate leadership. SERVICES

WRI provides tailored support to help companies overcome their toughest sustainability challenges. Lessons learned during service delivery enhance WRI’s body of knowledge and often lead to new research products.


HOW CAN WE HELP YOUR COMPANY? On a scale of 1–5, rate your company’s success on these typical sustainability projects. This self-assessment can serve as a useful starting point for conversations with our corporate relations team.

PROJECT

LESS SUCCESSFUL

MORE SUCCESSFUL

Briefing executives on sustainability issues

1

2

3

4

5

Context-based targets for water

1

2

3

4

5

Food loss and waste management

1

2

3

4

5

Forest restoration

1

2

3

4

5

Long-term sustainability strategy

1

2

3

4

5

Natural infrastructure

1

2

3

4

5

Renewable energy procurement

1

2

3

4

5

Science-based emissions targets

1

2

3

4

5

Scope 1 & 2 emissions inventory

1

2

3

4

5

Scope 3 inventory

1

2

3

4

5

Sourcing legal forest products

1

2

3

4

5

Supply chain deforestation mapping

1

2

3

4

5

Supply chain water risk analysis

1

2

3

4

5

Sustainable investing

1

2

3

4

5

Responsible climate policy advocacy

1

2

3

4

5

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PROGRAMS & INITIATIVES

BETTER BUYING LAB

TM

PHOTO CREDITS: Cover Mike Wilson; pg. 2 Alex; pg. 4 Asian Development Bank; pg. 6, 26 WRI/Bill Dugan, pg. 8 Daniel Hoherd; pg. 10 Juergen Adolph; pg. 12 IRRI Photos; pg. 14 Mars, Incorporated; pg. 16 TEIA; pg. 18 WRI/Ariana Alisjahbana; pg. 20 Lawrence Murray; pg. 22 CIAT; pg. 24 WRI/Robin Murphy; pg. 28 WRI; pg. 30 John Cole.

Copyright 2017 World Resources Institute. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. To view a copy of the license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/


GET IN TOUCH

JP Leous Senior Manager, Corporate Relations JP.Leous@wri.org +1 (202) 729-7874 Emily Neagle Manager, Corporate Consultative Group Emily.Neagle@wri.org +1 (202) 729-7626

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Managing for Tomorrow: Solutions for Sustainable Business  
Managing for Tomorrow: Solutions for Sustainable Business  

At WRI, we recognize that harm to the planet is systemic and must be tackled jointly by society, government and the private sector. Working...

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