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FC March 2013_FC December 06 20/02/2013 10:58 Page 1

WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

proudly presents

1998 Gulfstream IV-SP Serial Number 1338 See page 27 for further details

Business Aviation & The Boardroom: pages 22 - 67

March 2013


Project1_Layout 1 27/02/2013 15:06 Page 1

PRE-OWNED FALCON

WE BUILT THESE PLANES, WE TRACKED THEIR LIVES, WE KNOW THEM BEST. No one knows a pre-owned Falcon like we do. No one knows more about its past. Because we record the details of every Falcon’s history in our databases. And no one cares more about helping you get the best out of it. Because wherever you fly your pre-owned Falcon, our reputation flies with you.

Visit falconjet.com/preowned France: +33.1.47.11.60.71 - US: +1.201.541.4556


Project1_Layout 1 27/02/2013 16:04 Page 1

Falcon 50EX

2000 • s/n 289 • 2,773 hrs. total time • Very low time • EUOPS 1 compliant • Dec 2012 2C check, 2011 landing gear overhaul • Dec 2012 new white paint • Dec 2012 partial refurbishment • Iridium Satcom

Falcon 2000EX EASy

2005 • s/n 063 • 2,360 hrs. total time • 8 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • Engines on JSSI, APU on MSP • Aug 2011 C check, new white paint scheme and winglets installation • Swift 64 Satcom: 3FMS, 3IRS, 3VHF, 2EFB

Falcon 2000EX EASy

2006 • s/n 075 • 3,064 hrs. total time • 8 passengers • EASA / EUOPS1 compliant • Head up display • HVS full provision • Swift 64 Satcom • Engines on CSP, APU on MSP • FalconCare covered • Fresh C, mid life LDG, “dry bay” modification

Falcon 2000EXy

2007 • s/n 103 • 2,530 hrs. total time • 12/10 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • Engines on JSSI, APU on MSP • To be delivered with fresh C check and mid life landing gear overhaul • Aero H+ Swift 64 Satcom • 3rd IRS, 3rd VHF (with VDL function)

Falcon 2000LX

2008 • s/n 154 • 1,811 hrs. total time • 10 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • FalconCare covered. ESP/MSP covered • HUD, EFVS, 2 EFB, 3 IRS & 3 FMS • Aircell Axxess II Satcom • Dual Securaplane video cameras

Falcon 7X

2007 • s/n 004 • 4,146 hrs. total time • 15 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • FalconCare covered ESP & MSP (Gold) covered • HUD, Swift 64 Satcom, 3 FMS, 3 IRS, 3 VHF


AC Index March13 21/02/2013 12:50 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

CESSNA

X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, XL . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 63, 152, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 60, 68, 500 Eagle. . . . . . 47, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 4, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 47, CJ1+ . . . . . . . . . . 20, 47, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 33, 44, 47, 91, CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 4, 21, 45, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 33, 53, 60, 97, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 65, 151, Columbia 300 . . 61, Encore . . . . . . . . 43, 75, 97, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 60, 155, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 45, 47, 145, Mustang . . . . . . . 20, 60, SII . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, Sovereign. . . . . . 21, 33, 35, 39, 45, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 53, 63, 65, 71, Stallion . . . . . . . . 44, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 33, 146,

Challenger

Citation

Conquest

300 . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 20, 37, 103, 155, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 600 . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 39, 60, 601-1A/3A . . . . . 91, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 20, 68, 156, 601-3R . . . . . . . . 29, 141, 156,

ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 60, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 45, 60, 142, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 44, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 60, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,

I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61, II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61,

AIRBUS A310. .. . . . . . . . . 156,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 11, 24, 25, 34, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 737. . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 737-500 VIP . . . . 148, 757-200 . . . . . . . . 75, MD 87 VIP . . . . . 53, S27-200 . . . . . . . 75, Super 727-200 . 53,

BOMBARDIER Global 5000 . . . . 29, 37, 156, Global 6000 . . . . 156, Global Express . 18, 25, 29, 69, 97, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, Global Express XRS.. 13, 18, 34, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 156,

4

601-3A ER . . . . . 20, 91, 151, 601 w/3A . . . . . . 155, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 37, 43, 44, 53, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 68, 155, 156, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 12, 34, 37, 68, 97, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 156, 850ER. . . . . . . . . 12, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 68,

Learjet 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 44, 61, 97, 103, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 103, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 97, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 44, 140, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 57, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 21, 41, 51, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 25, 69, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 44, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 15, 21, 35, 51, 91, 85 . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

EMBRAER Legacy 600 . . . . 18, 37, 47, 97, Phenom 100 . . . 47,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 7, 51, 135, 148, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 156, 20F-5BR . . . . . . . 44, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 29, 43, 44, 68, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 50-3D . . . . . . . . . 136, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 3, 29, 44, 154, 155, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 154, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 51, 63, 97, 137, 154, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 19, 154, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 4, 19, 29, 75, 154, 900EX EASy . . . 7, 19, 40, 154, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 13, 44, 57, 2000 DX EASy . . 68, 2000EX EASy . . 3, 68, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 3, 19, 156, 5000 . . . . . . . . . . 68,

Grand Caravan

GULFSTREAM

208B. . .. . . . . . . . 150, 152,

IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 44, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 19, 25, 41, 53, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156,

DORNIER Dornier 328 . . . . 21,


AC Index March13 21/02/2013 12:51 Page 2

- IN THIS ISSUE

03.13

• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 1, 14, 18, 27, 53, 54, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 156, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 69, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 95, 103, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 7, 29, 41, 43, 57, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103, 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 138, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 14, 15, 18, 25, 43, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 63, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 18, 55, 63, 69, 91, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151, Aero Commander 681..65,

700A . . . . . . . . . . 139 750 . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 91, 149, 800B . . . . . . . . . . 37, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 63, 69, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 5, 63, 69, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 41, 57, 63, 97, 143, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 1000B . . . . . . . . . 37, 1900D . . . . . . . . . 61, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 20,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT

Astra . . . . . . . . . . 44, Astra 1125SP . . 155, Astra SPX. . . . . . 29, 43, 65,

Beechcraft 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 44, 150, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 35, 47, 51, 61, 95, Premier 1A. . . . . 63, 95, 144,

King Air

IAI

PIAGGIO Avanti II . . . . . . . 97, 103,

200XPR . . . . . . . 45, 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 47, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 45, 61, 63, 97, 103, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 47, 61, 63, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 45, 63, 97, 145, C90A . . . . . . . . . . 61, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 97, 151,

PIPER Malibu . . . . . . . . . 33, Navajo. . . . . . . . . 61, PA31-Navajo . . . 150, Seneca . . . . . . . . 33,

Hawker

SABRELINER

400XP . . . . . . . . . 44, 63,

65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 45,

Amjet Aviation Company®

2008 Gulfstream G200

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

EC135T2i . . . . . . 97, EC155B1 . . . . . . 134,

SOCATA TBM 700A . . . . . 95, TBM 700B . . . . . 95, 149, TBM 850. . . . . . . 95, 151,

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD 600N . . . . . . 63,

SIKORSKY S-76C+ . . . . . . . . 35, S-92 . . . . . . . . . . 21,

HELICOPTERS AGUSTAWESTLAND AW 109E. . . . . . . 134, AW 109S Grand. 35, 134, AW 109SP . . . . . 97, Koala. . . . . . . . . . 63,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS Aircraft Engine /Support . 79, 85, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 123, 147, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 81, 115, Finannce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 147, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 147,

BELL 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 149, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 149, 230 . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 407 . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 412EMS . . . . . . . 149,

EUROCOPTER AS 350 B3 . . . . . 97, AS 355 N . . . . . . 97, EC 130 . . . . . . . . 63, EC 130-B4 . . . . . 152,, EC 135 P2i . . . . . 134, 152,

The Global Aircraft Market Online

Visit our website at www.amjetaviation.com

2008 Hawker 850XP

1986 Beechjet 400

S/N 184

S/N 258977

S/N RJ-09

400 Hours Since New EASA / EU-Ops Certified Like New Condition

990 Hours Since New One Owner, MSP-Gold Like New Condition

5400 Total Time Since New 1670 SMOH Engines New Paint / Excellent Interior

Amjet Aviation Company® is an industry leading provider of professional business jet brokerage and business aviation advisory service for domestic and international businesses, corporations and high net-worth individuals.

Telephone +1- 770 - 458 - 9600 Worldwide Sales / Email sales@amjetaviation.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

5


Project1_Layout 1 27/02/2013 16:06 Page 1

This Is Your Aircraft “On The Market�

There is more than one way to go about selling a valuable asset. Once you’ve made the important decision to sell your aircraft, it’s how you go about it that’s crucial. ,QWRGD\¾VKLJKO\FRPSHWLWLYHPDUNHWSODFHLWLVLPSHUDWLYHWRSURPRWH\RXUDLUFUDIWLQVXFKDZD\WRDWWUDFWWKHPRVWTXDOLžHGSURVSHFWLYH                      buyers. Average brokers typically adhere to a marketing scheme that has existed for decades. This archaic approach consists primarily of ad placements in a few magazines and websites, and mass emails containing the same information. Unfortunately, most aircraft are marketed this way, and the result is a vast expanse of publicly advertised jets – all competing for the same buyer(s). Consequently, placing your aircraft on the open market can have negative results. If it doesn’t sell right away, you will eventually attract WKHDWWHQWLRQRI´YXOWXUHV¾WKDWDUHRQO\ORRNLQJIRUDEDUJDLQ7KLVFDQOHDGWRDVLJQLžFDQWDPRXQWRIZDVWHGWLPHDQGHIIRUWRUZRUVH\RX                           may be distracted long enough to miss a real opportunity with a serious buyer.

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Project1_Layout 1 27/02/2013 16:08 Page 1

This Is Your Aircraft “On IntelliJet�

At IntelliJet, we believe our way is better. What makes your aircraft shine in the eyes of prospective buyers? Exclusivity! :HGLVFUHWHO\PDUNHW\RXUDLUFUDIWWRDVHOHFWJURXSRISUHTXDOLžHGFOLHQWVDQGWKURXJKRXUJOREDO                 network of aviation professionals. We limit its exposure by utilizing “quiet marketing techniquesâ€? and thus, we create a demand for your aircraft. Most buyers get more excited about acquiring a jet that not just anyone has access to. Our process also helps to maintain your privacy. ,QWHOOL-HW,QWHUQDWLRQDO°ZHKDYHDÂżDLUIRUSUHVHQWLQJ\RXUDLUFUDIWLQDSRVLWLYHOLJKW               Call us today and let us uncover a buyer for your most valuable asset.

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Panel March13 20/02/2013 15:55 Page 1

World Aircraft Sales DIGITAL EDITION

PRINT EDITION

AVBUYER.COM WEBSITE

GLOBAL TRADE SHOWS

EMAIL ALERTS

EDITORIAL Deputy Editor (London Office) Matthew Harris 1- 800 620 8801 editorial@avbuyer.com

Advertising in World Aircraft Sales is part of a smart, full-spectrum approach to marketing your company. It’s simple. It’s powerful. And it’s the industry’s only total marketing solution.

Editor - Boardroom Guide J.W. (Jack) Olcott 1- 973 734 9994 Jack@avbuyer.com

BRAND YOUR BUSINESS WITHIN THE RETROFIT MARKET

Editorial Contributor (USA Office) Dave Higdon Dave@avbuyer.com

THROUGH THIS HIGHLY VISIBLE SERIES,

Consulting Editor Sean O’Farrell +44 (0)20 8255 4409 Sean@avbuyer.com

PLANE SENSE. ensets S e n Pla rbishmen efu onRARDES

UPG FITS TS O RETR BISHMEN R REFU RAFT O C R IR M ESS A BUSIN r ye s/AvBu ft Sale act: Aircra nt World rtising co ve For ad buyer.com ks@av

ADVERTISING Karen Price 1- 800 620 8801 Karen@avbuyer.com

nse e S e Plan pit Avionics ock on C

ADES UPGR FITS O RETR NTS E M RBISH MRO REFU T CRAF IR A ESS Buyer BUSIN les/Av

ft Sa ntact: Aircra ng co World r advertisi buyer.com Fo ks@av

Karen Schaefer (USA Office) 1-386 767 8460 ks@avbuyer.com

Plansee Senngines on E

t 2012 Augus

STUDIO/PRODUCTION Helen Cavalli/ Mark Williams 1- 800 620 8801 Helen@avbuyer.com Mark@avbuyer.com

ADES UPGR FITS O RETR NTS ME RBISH MRO REFU FT IRCRA ESS A BUSIN

2012 mber Septe

yer s/AvBu ft Sale contact: Aircra ng World r advertisi buyer.com Fo @av Carla

CIRCULATION Lynne Jones 1- 800 620 8801 Lynne@avbuyer.com

March 2012

Three articles focused on Cabin Avionics

Emma Davey Emma@avbuyer.com

■ Balancing Acts: IFE versus Office capabilities ■ Global Tracking and Communicating ■ Wi-Fi Advances in Cabin and Cockpit For advertising in Plane Sense features please contact: Karen Schaefer ks@avbuyer.com +1-386-767-8460 Copy required by 13th March

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

8

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

AVBUYER.COM Nick Barron Nick@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

PUBLISHER John Brennan 1- 800 620 8801 John@avbuyer.com USA OFFICE 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 EUROPEAN OFFICE Cowleaze House, 39 Cowleaze Rd, Kingston, Surrey, KT2 6DZ, UK +44 (0)20 8255 4000 PRINTED BY Fry Communications, Inc. 800 West Church Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055


Panel March13 20/02/2013 15:58 Page 2

Contents

Volume 17, Issue 3 – March 2013

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 22

Quality Decisions: How confident are you that the right call is consistently made on behalf of your shareholders? Are quality decisions reflected in your attitude to Business Aviation?

26

Responding to Challenges: Business Aviation puts a modern perspective

26

on the old adage “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.” Here’s how…

30

A Saga of Success (1 of 3): Featuring a company at a crossroads, this trilogy begins with the initial thought process to embrace Business Aviation.

36

Planning For a Recovery: Cycles contain information that Board Members can use in their oversight of corporate involvement with Business Aviation.

42

Business Aviation Options: You can access the advantages of Business Aviation in several ways. Know the differences and similarities of each option.

50

Can Two Pilots Be One Too Many?: If your aircraft is approved for

42

single-pilot operations and your company is using a co-pilot, beware…

56

Aircraft Depreciation & The Board: When and how a corporation depreciates an asset has a significant impact on whether to purchase, lease or charter business aircraft. What should a Board consider in this matter?

62

Entry Level & Light Jets: A look at the benefits of the Entry Level & Light Jets, and a listing of values for models built over the last 20 years.

Main Features 70

56

Aircraft Comparative Analysis – AS-350B-2: How does the performance of Eurocopter’s AS-350B-2 stand up against the MD 600N and Bell 206 L1?

Plane Sense On Engines: 76

Powerplant Retrofits: Is it time for your jet to have a ‘heart transplant’? Before deciding, here are some considerations...

82

Recognizing Aircraft Engine Value: It’s not in the eye of the beholder. When buying an aircraft, look deeper to ensure the jet is worth the asking price.

86

APUs - The Little Engines That Do: Roaring along out of sight in the space near the airplane’s tail, what do APUs do and why are they so crucial?

90

GAMA 4Q 2012 Shipment Analysis & Report: Mike Potts analyses the numbers, and places them in context to expose the embedded messages about the new aircraft market of 2012.

100

Straightening Up, Flying Right: A call to shake off passivity! Aircraft equipped with systems that do much of the flying work has heightened the need for pilots to get back to the basics of practicing hand-flying skills regularly.

Regular Features 16 74 106 122 126

Viewpoint Aviation Leadership Roundtable Aircraft Performance & Specifications Market Indicators BizAv Round-Up

112

Developing Markets – Russia: Once-upon-a-time in a far-away land, Avkom-D responded to perceived demand for aircraft maintenance opening the first MRO center in Siberia. Now it plans for more…

114

Dealer Broker Market Update: Dave Higdon gets the thoughts of the Dealers

Plane Sense on Cabin Avionics

and Brokers to offer a picture of the used aircraft market.

Business Aviation & The Boardroom

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Next Month’s Issue WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

9


Freestream 1 March 21/02/2013 09:46 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Boeing BBJ Serial Number: 29273 Registration: VP-BBJ • 18 Passenger

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• One Owner Since New • Pats 9 Tank Configuration • CVR/FDR • SATCOM • Heads Up Display (HUD) • Airshow Network • SFAR88 modification requirements c/w

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

3/12

• Basic Operating Weight: 95,096 lbs • US$31,950,000

Boeing BBJ

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 36714 Registration: VP-BFT • 18 Passenger - Andrew Winch Interior Design • Full Factory Warranties • Very low hours • Pats Gulfstream 6 tank Configuration G450 2Q 2012 (5 aft 1 fwd)

Gulfstream GV/512

• Aft state room with private lavatory and shower • Airshow Network • Five external cameras • Make Offer Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 1 March 21/02/2013 09:46 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Boeing BBJ Serial Number: 28579 Registration: N920DS • 17 Passenger

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• 2008 Paint & Interior • Both aft stateroom's have private lavatory & shower • Six fuel tanks installed (one in storage) • SFAR 88 tank mod c/w 4/09 • Flight Dynamics Heads Up Display (HUD)

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• CMC EFB's with XM Weather • High Speed wireless internet access • Engines on GE MCPH • Fresh 36 Month/2000 Hour Inspections • US$36,950,000

Boeing BBJ

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 30076 Registration: VP-BBW • 19 Passenger • Interior Refurbishment 2010 • Pats 8 Tank Configuration • Recent A1, B1, C1 Checks and SFR88 Mod G450 2Q 2012 Gulfstream

Gulfstream GV/512

• Airshow Network • Basic Operating Weight: 95,096 lbs • Make Offer

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 2 March 21/02/2013 09:48 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Challenger 850ER Serial Number: 8051 Registration: VP-BSD Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • 1260 Hours Total Time

• APU: Time Since New 1861 Hours • Engines enrolled in JSSI/VEST Complete Plus Engine Maintenance Program • Airshow 410 • Two fuel tanks (PATS System) • AERO-H SATCOM Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• 15 Passenger • US$15,950,000

Challenger 605 Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number 5704 Registration: M-FBVZ • Total Time: 1616 Hours • Total Cycles: 993 • Proline 21 • Collins SRT 2100 Inmarsat SATCOM Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012

• Airshow 410

Gulfstream GV/512

• 10 passenger • Make Offer

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 2 March 21/02/2013 09:48 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Global XRS Serial Number: 9195 Registration: N4T Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • Total Time: 3119.4 hrs

• Landings: 1023 • Aircraft Maintenance Tracking Program: CAMP SYSTEMS • Engines are on Condition • Second GPS (Honeywell GPS550) • Cabin Humidification System • FDR Upgrade – Crew Force Boeing BBJ/36714 Measuring System • High Speed Data • 13 Passenger Interior • In Service May 31, 2007 • US$ 33,950,000

Boeing BBJ/30076

Falcon 2000 Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1 Registration: G-YUMN • Total Time: 6289.27 hrs • Landings: 5614 • Engines and APU on Honeywell MSP Gold • B-RNAV/RVSM/RNP10/RNP5 Compliant Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012 • CVR/FDR • Honeywell Mark V EGPWS • Collins TTR 920 TCAS II • Aero M SCM1000 Honeywell SATCOM • Airshow Genesys 400 • Elegant 10 Passenger Fireblocked Interior • New Paint in April 2007 Hawker 850XP/258812 • US$5,950,000

Gulfstream GV/512

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

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Freestream 3 March 21/02/2013 09:49 Page 1

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Freestream 3 March 21/02/2013 09:49 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

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Gil WolinMarch 2013_Gil WolinNov06 18/02/2013 16:49 Page 1

VIEWPOINT

Charge ! by Gil Wolin he heading of this month’s column seems to be the current mantra for many FBOs – at least, when it comes to handling fees, according to various aviation manager email threads. Fees range from $700 to $1,200 per FBO arrival, depending upon the airport location, aircraft size – and whether or not there is FBO competition on the airfield. With the decline in business aircraft flight activity (still down anywhere from 2% to 7% below last year’s activity across the board, according to Argus’ TRAQPak numbers) it’s likely that many FBOs are scrambling to make their numbers, just as flight departments are fighting to control operating costs. And with Jet A retail prices at $5 per gallon, and as high as $8 per gallon in monopoly locations, these squawks are no surprise, echoing complaints heard since the dawn of the Jet Age. Unconscionable charges? Perhaps. But a quick history review might help to understand why FBOs charge as they do (or can), as well as provide some thoughts on how best to work with those FBOs based at regular destinations. FBO, or Fixed Base Operation, is a curious term for a building firmly planted in concrete adjacent to several thousand feet of hard-surface runway. But it’s a term with roots in the earliest days of aviation, and worthy of discussion. Long before the development of today’s support infrastructure, the open grass field nearest the final destination was many a town’s unofficial “airport”. Upon the aircraft’s landing, a local fuel supplier – perhaps a truck from a local gas station – would meet it for refueling, and would turn the occasional wrench as required. Not until 1927 was the first airline “passenger terminal” built at Ford Airport in Dearborn, Michigan, home of the Ford Trimotor factory. Scheduled service to Chicago and Cleveland had begun a year earlier, and the grass runways were paved in 1928. Other cities began emulating the new

T

Ford facility, with paved runways and passenger terminals for scheduled service. And the heretofore journeyman mechanics began building “fixed” locations, providing both fuel and technical support, often co-located with a flight school. In keeping with the sometimes-obscure language with which aviators cloaked their conversation, the term “Fixed Base Operation” became the accepted descriptor for such facilities. Early FBOs were pretty rudimentary, not much more than a lean-to built onto a Quonset-hut-styled hangar, with a service counter and a Spartan waiting area equipped with some second-hand couches and coffee tables. By the mid-1940s, many single location FBOs like Showalter Aviation in Orlando, FL improved on that model with better facilities and amenities for pilots and passengers, as well as a focus on “service with a smile”. Industrialist Paul Butler created the first FBO chain in the mid-1940s, beginning with Butler Aviation at Chicago’s Midway Airport. Butler, an avid aviator himself, made sure his FBOs provided an efficient and comfortable transition point between ground and air transportation for both pilot and passenger. That model changed dramatically in the 1960s, as the skies began to fill with turbojets burning 300 gallons per hour. New ownership at Butler recognized that the real value of an FBO was in its real estate, its lease with the airport. The right airport (e.g. one with access to commercial airline connections), with a single FBO location, could become a license to print money – early business jets had to buy fuel nearly every time they landed. Those FBOs had their customers in a virtual hammerlock, and could charge above-average fuel prices. But they had to – the lease payments at those monopoly locations were invariably higher than at other airports. Combs Aviation (later Combs Gates) challenged that model. Harry Combs founded his Denver FBO in the 1930s on an airport with multiple FBOs, and recognized that to secure market share, his FBO had to do more

than deliver “clean and bright” fuel: he needed superior service. By the 1970s Combs Gates had grown to five locations, using the model for the modern FBO – a dedicated Executive Terminal with separate pilot and passenger lounges, and personnel trained to deliver safe, high-quality service. Combs’ customers bought fuel because they wanted to, not because they had to. That last point was critical with the arrival of the fuel-efficient turbofan engine. Now business jets could tanker between airports, and reward the FBOs which provided good service at reasonable prices with increased uploads. That left FBOs with higher lease payments with a choice – invest in better service, and gamble that they could earn larger customer fuel uplifts, or charge a “facilities” fee to cover the FBO’s variable costs to meet and greet each aircraft, as well as a portion of the lease payment. It appears that the latter option is the current preference among larger FBO chains. Aviation rumors and comments used to speed among jet pilots as they traveled from FBO to FBO and shared data in the privacy of the pilots’ lounge. The Internet has changed all that – and FBOs had best pay attention – to history, as well as to the future. ❯ Gil Wolin draws on forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. ❯ Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net

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www.AvBuyer.com 16

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 1 Jack_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 15:36 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Quality Decisions: Using the tools that best serve your shareholders. Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

The measure of the Directors’ value to shareholders is the quality of their decisions, opines Jack Olcott. How confident are you that the right call is consistently made on behalf of your shareholders?

S

hareholders have a variety of reasons for selecting individuals for a position on a corporate Board. Perhaps it is the candidate’s industry knowledge, or connections with important leaders within markets being served by the corporation. The number of shares held by the contender for a Board position is an obvious factor, as is the relationship between the candidate and major shareholders. It is not unusual for Boards to be packed with friends of the company’s leadership, particularly among smaller, more closely-held corporations. These attributes, and possibly others, surface when a vote is taken to replace, add or remove a Director. At the end of the day, however, a person’s appropriateness to be a Director is measured by the quality of his or her decisions. What counts is the person’s ability to objectively address the challenges facing the Board, ask the tough questions, analyze relevant data and make the right call. Making the right call regarding Business Aviation may seem obvious to those Board Members who have experience using business aircraft to reach new markets and to serve existing customers, or who know companies where this form of transportation has been particularly effective. For Directors unfamiliar with Business Aviation as a tool for expansion, however, decisions may be less obvious.

FACTORS TO CONSIDER Corporations may attribute success to a variety of factors such as holding a dominant market share, achieving near oligopoly status, or offering unique products or services. People are fundamental to lasting success, however. When a company is able to employ people with applicable knowledge and skill, and deploy them in a manner that uses their talents and time effectively, success is likely. People and time are a corporation’s most valuable assets. When those assets are used efficiently, opportunities will

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BG 1 Jack_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 15:37 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation be found, business will be nurtured and shareholders will be served. The contrary position also holds true. When people are ineffective and their time is used inefficiently, market advantage can erode quite quickly. Boards that are reluctant to empower a corporation’s people with tools for mobility and growth are doing shareholders a disservice. Directors who are blinded by populous rhetoric that discounts—at times even demonizes—Business Aviation are failing to exhibit good judgment by not exploring the advantages that business aircraft provide. Business Aviation is a multi-dimensional tool for maximizing the value of people and time. This form of transportation is available as charter, air travel cards, fractional ownership, time sharing with another company, and whole-aircraft ownership. Thus it is prudent for Boards to evaluate the many capabilities of Business Aviation as they decide the

SEEKING QUALITY DECISIONS Business Aviation is a unique segment of air transportation that may be outside the sphere of expertize for some—possibly many—Board Members. Unfamiliarity with the subject or succumbing to populous jawboning is not the path to making quality decisions, however. Nor is it appropriate to dodge the issue. Experts are available to assist Directors with objective studies. The subject demands careful analysis. That business aircraft provide value to a corporation is a matter of fact. The decision before Directors is how best to apply the attributes of business aircraft to serve shareholders. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 26

FACT: COMPANIES UTILIZING BUSINESS AVIATION OUT-PERFORM NON-USERS IN SEVERAL KEY METRICS

“When people are ineffective and their time is used inefficiently, market advantage can erode quite quickly.” optimum way to leverage the company’s people assets and available time to serve shareholders. Perhaps the decision may be not to employ some aspect of Business Aviation, but the issues need to be vetted fully and objectively.

IN GOOD COMPANY Many studies reveal that corporations using some form of Business Aviation are more successful than non-users. Public companies that employ business aircraft have a history of providing shareholders with greater growth in stock price and dividends than non-users. When accepted metrics such as revenue growth, net income growth, average return of equity, return on assets and employee growth are considered, companies employing Business Aviation outperform non-users. Companies that investors want to own are users of Business Aviation. Corporations utilizing Business Aviation also score high in qualitative measures, such as Fortune magazine’s “Most Admired” list and its “100 Best Places to Work” designation. A recent study by Nexa Advisors entitled Business Aviation—Maintaining Shareholder Value Through Turbulent Times—is particularly compelling. Published a few months ago and distributed by the National Business Aviation Association, the report concluded that among the public corporations listed within the S&P 500, those that used Business Aviation “…mitigated revenue losses and recovered more quickly than non-users…” during the Great Recession that besieged the USA between 2007 and 2012. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

23


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BG 2March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 15:57 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Responding to Challenges Business Aviation puts a modern perspective on the old adage that “When the going gets tough, the tough get going,” notes Jack Olcott.

”...companies that use Business Aviation outperform their competitors in key financial and non-financial metrics.”

I

n his study of Business Aviation entitled Face to Face, author David Almy related the tale of two bank holding companies in Alabama, each with a corporate aircraft, that were coping with a recessionary period several decades ago. The larger of the two responded by curtailing its use of Business Aviation to reduce operating costs while the other took the opposite approach and expanded its flight operations. The latter’s management argued that there was business to be won in the challenged economy and the company aircraft was an effective tool for finding customers and expanding market share. When the dust settled and the economy recovered, the bank holding company that elected to use its aviation resources aggressively emerged as Alabama’s largest. A contemporary study conducted by Nexa Advisors, a consulting firm based in Washington, DC, presents a more comprehensive analysis of recovery during a period of economic difficulty.

During the years from 2007 through 2012, a period generally referred to as “The Great Recession”, share prices for companies within the S&P 500 on average dropped in value to about half of pre-recession levels. Examining the difference in financial performance between users and non-users of Business Aviation within the S&P 500 as the U.S economy struggled to recover, Nexa concluded “…companies that use Business Aviation outperform their competitors in key financial and non-financial metrics. Those same companies are leading the nation’s economic growth in profits and creating jobs.” For availability of the Nexa Advisors report, Business Aviation: Maintaining Shareholder Value Through Turbulent Times, contact the National Business Aviation Association, 1200 18th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 30

Performance Metrics Weighted by 2011 Market Capitalization

Annual Revenue S&P 500 Indexed to 2007 1.2 1

Employee Growth

0.8

Average Return on Equity

0.6

User

0.4

Non User

0.2

Non-User

Net Income Growth

User

Revenue Growth

0 0

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

1

2

3

4 SOURCE: NEXA ADVISORS

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Mente March_Guardian Jet Chall 1076 oct 20/02/2013 10:46 Page 1

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BG 3 March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 15:24 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

A Saga Of Success: A Company at a Crossroads and its use of Business Aviation. Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

Pete Agur begins a three-part series that tracks a company’s use of Business Aviation from launch, 18 years ago, to today.

T

he topics covered in the coming trilogy will include the company’s decision to embrace Business Aviation, its early activities as it started to use business aircraft, and the results achieved over its many years of involvement with this form of transportation.

THE DECISION In 1995, the Board of Directors of a mid-tier financial services company was faced with the retirement of their long-tenured Chief Executive Officer. The company was in good shape. Revenues and profits were fine. Growth had been organic; slow and steady. Even so, before the search

committee was to begin their task, the Board made a bold decision: To use the change in leadership as a waypoint to a new corporate direction - dramatic growth. They believed the market was ripe for significant change. They could, with the right leader, take their company from the middle of the pack to more than double revenues and increased profit margin. The leading candidate, David, was everything they wanted. He was the brilliant 48-year-old Chief Operating Officer of another financial services company. His vision, experience, energy and drive were exactly what they were looking for. Following a thorough process, they made him an offer. He accepted on one condition: the company must buy a small business jet. David’s point was uncomplicated: If they were to achieve the growth goals the Board had set, his leadership team would need greater mobility than could be achieved on commercial Airlines or by car alone. He explained that he knew the greatest constraint on success was his people’s time and mobility. They could not lead or create change from the ivory tower. They had to see what was happening in the field. They had to make their case face-to-face. The Board sought a consultant to conduct a Business Aviation Strategic Planning Study. Through referrals they found, interviewed and engaged my firm. Our client was the Chairman of the Board, not David. The Chairman’s charge to us was clear: conduct a thorough analysis and let the chips fall where they may. For us, that was easy because that is our tenet. The Study’s Charge and Objectives were as follows (quoted from the final report, with names extracted): Study Charge: Determine appropriate public and business air travel resource and service options that maximize the travel services value for the Company and its travelers. U

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 3 March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 15:25 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

Study Objectives: • Determine the historic air travel patterns for the most recent 12 month period for which accurate data are available. • Gain insights and feedback from key travelers and executives about their air travel needs and the travel-related needs of the Company. • Compare the full and direct costs of public and business aircraft travel. • Provide Observations, Options and Suggestions that may enhance future air travel service performance for the Company and its travelers.

• •

• We conducted the Study, and I was asked to present its findings to a scheduled meeting of the Board. The following, paraphrased to avoid confidential specifics, is what was presented: Observations: • Based on the Study’s findings, the Company has high strategic and operational needs for Business Aviation services. This is underscored by the competitive and operating environment; the specific needs of key travelers; the limitations of commercial air travel and telecommunications services; and strong needs for time-place mobility of key people to assure the achievement of the Company’s strategic and operational goals. • The Company’s shift from a Cost Driven strategy to one of Value Driven is consistent with other companies that report substantial benefits from the use of Business Aviation. The rate and effectiveness of the implementation of the Company’s new strategy will be a direct result of Top Executive face-to-face visits in the field. Business Aviation services can play an important role in accelerating the success of the change process.

The Study determined the average door-to-door time savings of Business Aviation, on legs of less than 1,000 miles, was 80 minutes per leg. [Note: That was in 1995. Today, due to changes in Airline services, security procedures, etc. the average time savings using Business Aviation has more than doubled to nearly three hours.] 98% of the Fortune 50 companies either own, or routinely use Business Aircraft. The Company’s most successful peers and competitors use Business Aviation services aggressively. Despite the intent to use Business Aviation as a Value-Added service, the average company aircraft load of 3.5 passengers per trip would incur 91% of the full costs of travel via the Airlines (including time and tickets but not including estimated savings for overnight stays). [Note: There is usually a premium associated with using Business Aviation (except in cases of shuttle operations). That is why we normally find the most successful applications associated with strategic, revenue growth and value-added goals.]

SUMMARY STATEMENT

At this point in the meeting David excused himself to “get a cup of coffee”. Actually, he was allowing the Board to hear and question the data, observations and recommendations without his presence.

The Company has many of the attributes and business challenges typical of other companies that have achieved substantial benefits from investing in Business Aviation services. We know of no reason why the Company should not experience similar positive results. There followed a series of questions confirming our data and findings. The ensuing thoughtful dialogue among the Board members was followed by a request that David rejoin the meeting. As David puts it, he left for a cup of coffee and came back to find he had access to a business jet. And that was the beginning. The decision was made. Now it had to be implemented. And the results had to be achieved. Those stories, again based in the facts of this company, will be told over the next two months.

Key Service and Data Points: • The Airlines make their best impact on longrange non-stop travel for one or two people.

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 36

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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“...the average company aircraft load of 3.5 passengers per trip would incur 91% of the full costs of travel via the Airlines (including time and tickets but not including estimated savings for overnight stays).”

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Eagle February 23/01/2013 11:07 Page 1

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2005 SOVEREIGN, S/N 680-0019

1998 CITATION ULTRA, S/N 560-0463

2007 CITATION CJ3, S/N 525B-0162

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1982 CITATION I/SP, S/N 501-0242

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The Jet Collection March_Layout 1 18/02/2013 15:01 Page 1


The Jet Collection March_Layout 1 18/02/2013 15:06 Page 2


BG4 March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 17:00 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Planning For A Recovery: Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Additionally, Jay is a Member of the Board of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the Chairman of the Associate Member Advisory Council (AMAC). He also sits on the Jet Aviation Customer and the Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards. Mr. Mesinger can be contacted at jay@jetsales.com

36

Using past cycles to measure the present one. Cycles contain information that Board Members can use in their oversight of corporate involvement with Business Aviation, asserts Jay Mesinger. Here’s how…

B

oards, and other parties considering allocation of corporate resources for Business Aviation, look for changes in the marketplace that can influence decisions. Knowledgeable observers sense when a recovery is emerging and when it is the time to respond to such change. Thus, I thought it would be interesting to recall past cycles in the business aircraft market that I experienced and observed in my previous contributions to this publication. Of particular relevance were

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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several articles from 2003 and 2005. I chose those years because they memorialized the beginning of the last recovery as well as the fully recovered market we experienced before the turndown post-2008. Prior to the economic challenges that our nation confronted over the past four years, we had our last major downturn in 1999, precipitated by the DotCom bubble as well as the Asian financial crisis. Recovery of our industry from that low started during the first quarter of 2003, and it was raging by the first quarter of 2004. The first signs of the 2003/2004 recovery were easily identified in an increase in transactions. What was less obvious was the fact the best aircraft were getting sold and what remained were the less than perfect aircraft. During a market downturn there is typically no difference in the price of a great aircraft versus a less-than-great aircraft. They are all cheap. It is only when a market begins to get more balanced that there emerges a differentiation between aircraft based on real attributes like airframe time, cosmetics, damage and extra equipment. This is not to say that, even in a down-market, glaring differences were not singled out by price. Major damage will still be criteria for price considerations. What subtly begins to happen, however, is that the cream gets sold first. Prices are still down but choice gets dramatically reduced. Then as new aircraft begin to come on the market and that market becomes more active, you start to see the price of the better airplanes firm and U then inch up. Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG4 March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 17:01 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

ADDITIONAL CHANGES The next phenomenon that occurs in a recovering market is a reduction in the number of aircraft within each segment, so there is less choice in addition to clear delineation in price between the great ones and the mediocre ones. As the recovery rages, prices begin to move up discernibly. Depending on the segment of aircraft, they might skyrocket. Days on the market for aircraft shorten and choice becomes slim. The designation of the market shifts from a Buyer’s market, next, to a more balanced market, and then a Seller’s market as we witnessed in the case of the period between 2004 and 2008.

CAPITALIZING ON CHANGE Planning for a cyclical shift in the market requires focusing on a plan that is built around transition, and timing for that transition. The window of opportunity to buy can shift to a window of opportunity to sell higher. While such a shift may not mitigate the ability to maintain the desired spread between the relinquished aircraft and your replacement aircraft, it may mean that several options emerge. I would also emphasize that there is no need to fear that this shift will occur overnight. If a dedicated focus is maintained on the market, there should be no surprises. Let’s look at the current recovery that appears to be surfacing and compare it with others that I have seen. I have never experienced a recovery that did not have a very robust lending component. The desire

and appetite of lenders has been one of the most important factors in our industry’s past recoveries. The lending situation is different this time. Some of my best industry friendships are in the lending community, and every time I make a statement about the lack of lending one of my friends will say, “Jay, we are open for business!” The difference is not between the lending appetite of past recoveries and now. Rather, now there are considerably fewer lenders, and those that are lending are mostly doing it on a relationship basis. Another not-so-subtle difference is that lenders are taking a dim view (if not an absolute dislike) of the aging aircraft—those aircraft that will be 15 years or older during the term of their loan. The present Business Aviation fleet is mostly made up of that very age group. In no way will this recovery be as robust as past recoveries unless that situation changes quickly. This phenomenon means decision makers will have even more time to position themselves, and to plan for a recovery mode. So there you have it: My tips for identifying an impending recovery. Save these for a later date. I do not see signs of a near-term recovery. I think that for all of 2013 we will see what may even be a continued decline in prices, and a continued wide-open window of opportunity for the airplane buyer.

“ Planning for a cyclical shift in the market requires focusing on a plan that is built around transition, and timing for that transition.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 42

Compare aircraft performance using our

Aircraft Performance Guide at www.AvBuyer.com And select from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 38

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAP March 21/02/2013 12:59 Page 1

Citation Sovereign. Impeccably maintained and excellent pedigree. One owner aircraft. Engines on ESP Gold, APU on AUX Advantage and on Pro Parts. Owner will consider trades. 3,188 Hours Total Time. Call for Specifications and additional information

Challenger 601-1A. Impeccably maintained and excellent pedigree. Two owner aircraft. Will be delivered with a fresh 60 month inspection completed by Bombardier Dallas. 12,725 Hours Total Time. Call for specifications and additional information

Business Aircraft Transaction Specialists William J. Quinn, Managing Director Charleston Aviation Partners LLC, 103 Palm Boulevard, Suite 2-B, Isle of Palms, SC 29451 +1 843 886-3313 (office) +1 843 743-6500 (mobile) +1 843 410-5698 (Fax) billquinn@charlestonaviation.com

About Us...

Charleston Aviation Partners was established to promote a better understanding of the overall needs and requirements of aircraft owners. The services we offer go well beyond the basic concepts of marketing and selling your aircraft or helicopter


O'Gara March 18/02/2013 15:52 Page 1


O'Gara March 18/02/2013 15:53 Page 2


BG 5 March13_FinanceSept 20/02/2013 09:39 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Business Aviation Options: David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

Choices to Borrow, Share or Buy your Business Jet. Companies can access the advantages of Business Aviation in a multitude of ways, ranging from occasional charter to whole-aircraft ownership. David Wyndham discusses the differences and similarities.

U

sing Business Aviation once was seemingly an all-or-nothing proposition. Either you owned a business aircraft or you accessed on-demand charter. Today, many options offer differing prices.

AIRCRAFT CHARTER

• • • •

Charter is the “easy-on, easy-off” Business Aviation solution. Typically, you book the aircraft for your desired departure time and itinerary. One difficulty may be finding the aircraft type that you want within a reasonable distance of your home airport. (When you charter, you pay for 100% of the hours flown, whether you are on board or not. If the closest suitable charter aircraft is 200 miles away, you must pay for the aircraft to fly to your location, fly your trip, and return to its home base. Charter works best when you can meet most of the following situations:

• •

Live near a major Business Aviation airport (more vendor/aircraft options) Use the aircraft for out-and-back trips (paying for hours flown aboard) Have a relatively stable schedule (e.g. one-day trip unlikely to develop into a three-day trip) Have frequent requirements for different size aircraft (three passengers one day, a dozen the next; vastly different trip lengths) Fly infrequently Fly no more than 25-50 annual hours.

With charter, costs are a la carte. Waiting time is billed, as are landing fees, overnight fees, Federal Excise Taxes, and other charges as incurred. A midsize jet might cost $3,100 to $3,400 per hour, but fees and taxes could add 15% to that cost. Overnight trips would cost more to cover expenses.

JET CARD If your flying needs increase beyond approximately 25 annual hours, and if many of your trips are oneway, you may wish to consider the use of a jet card. In its simplest form, such an arrangement is an advance purchase of charter hours with a guaranteed cost. U continued on page 46

42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


A I R C R A F T SA L E S & ACQ U I S I T I O N S 2 0 0 8 G u l f st re a m 2 0 0 s /n 1 8 2

Low Total Time. Excellently Equipped. Beautiful Interior Cosmetics. Meticulous Care. Iridium SATCOM Phone. Airshow 4000. Two 17-inch Monitors. Two DVD Players. Espresso Maker. Microwave Oven.

2008 Gulfstream G450

s/n 4116

1,406 Total Time. 675 Landings. Honeywell Primus Epic Avionics Suite. HUD/EVS.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 145

9,225 Total Time. MSP. 3D Engines. Collins EFIS 86. Dual UNS-1K.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 153

13,196 Total Time. Two U.S. Corporate Owners Since New. JSSI Engine Program.

1996 Challenger 604

s/n 5307

7,500 Total Time. 3,400 Landings. Excellent Paint and Interior by Duncan Aviation.

2002 Citation Encore

s/n 593

2,344 Total Time. Honeywell Primus 1000 EFIS System. Paint by Duncan Aviation 2011.

2001 Astra SPX

s/n 135

4,356 Total Time. TFE731-40R-200G Engines on MSP. Collins FCC 4000 Dual Flight Director, 4 Display EFIS.

+1 402.475.2611 路 www.DuncanAviation.aero/aircraftsales 路 800.228.4277 World Aircraft Sales Ad 2_13_13.indd 2

2/13/2013 12:32:58 PM


JetBrokers March 07/03/2013 11:00 Page 1

1998 Falcon 50EX, S/N 268, 4078TT, MSP, Dual UNS-1C’s, EU Ops, 2C and Gear c/w 4/10, Dual Laserefs, TCAS 2, TAWS-A, Make Offer

1999 Challenger 604, S/N 5422, 5612 TT, GE Onpoint, EU-Ops Ready, Heads-up Display, 48 Month c/w 3/12, Excellent Paint and Interior, Make Offer

1992 Falcon 50, S/N 227, 7072.6 TT, Engines on MSP, C Check c/w 9/10, Gear O/Hed 12/03, Aft Lav, TCAS 2, Nice Paint and Interior, Asking $2,995,000.00

2008 Learjet 40XR, S/N 2102, 2358 TT, Smart Parts, Airshow, Iridium Phone, Steep Approach, Belted Lav, Dual UNS-1E’s, Asking $3,995,000.00

1980 Falcon 50, S/N 010, 8179 TT, JSSI, Collins FDS-2000 EFIS, TCAS II, Dual UNS-1F w/ WAAS, C&CPCP c/w 3/09, Gear O/H in 2/12, Asking $1,995,000.00

2005 Learjet 60SE, S/N 289, 2203 TT, ESP Gold, 8.33/FM Immunity, UNS-1E, Enh Mode S, On CAMP, Asking $4,400,000.00

1995 Falcon 2000, S/N 008, 6608TT, Dual FMS6100’s, Airshow 4000, 9 Pax, Thales EIED, SATCOM, Asking $6,400,000.00

1993 Learjet 31A, S/N 65, 6967 TT, Engines on JSSI Plus, TCAS 2, UNS-1C, TRs, Big Door, Single Point Refueling, 12 Yr due 5/17, , Make Offer

Also Available Astra S/N 030 Beechjet 400, S/N RJ-47 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Citation Jet, S/N 552-0016 Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039

Citation II, S/N 550-0326 Citation II, S/N 550-0216 Citation II, S/N 550-0127 Citation II, S/N 550-0082 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016

Citation Stallion, S/N 501-0317 Falcon 20F-5BR, S/N 430 Gulfstream GIISP, S/N 206 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411 King Air C90, S/N LJ-869


JetBrokers March 19/02/2013 11:47 Page 2

2010 King Air 350i, S/N FL-689, 450 TT, Venue Cabin Mgmt – Aircell Axxess II, TCAS 2, Hi-def Video Displays, L3 ESIS, Asking $5,900,000.00

2009 Citation Sovereign, S/N 680-0276, 604 TT, Pro Parts, Aircell Axxess II, JAR Ops, Airshow 4000, Ten Passenger Interior, Make Offer!

2008 King Air C90GTi, S/N LJ-1902, 1356 TT, Pro-line 21 w/ IFIS, One Owner, Engine Fire Ext., Skywatch, Price Reduced to $2,200,000.00

2007 Citation CJ2+, S/N 525A-0365, 774 TT, Dual FMS-3000, TAWSA, XM Wx, IFIS, Bravo Steps, ESIS, 8.33/FM Immunity, Asking $4,250,000.00

1977 King Air 200XPR Blackhawk, S/N BB-226, 7678 TT, 1193 TSN on -61 Engines!, Dual Garmin 430W, Skywatch, Raisbeck Performance, Asking $1,295,000.00

1999 Citation Jet, S/N 525-0301, 4361 TT, On TAP Elite, XM Wx, Iridium Phone, UNS-1K, TCAS 1, Doc 10 c/w 1/13, Make Offer

1980 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-45, 10229 TT, MSP Gold, RVSM, Freon Air, Garmin 530/430’s, Honeywell KMD850, Asking $625,000.00

1981 Citation II, S/N 550-0295, 8441 TT, 1891/2146 SMOH, 87/361 TSHS, TR’s, Freon, Garmin GNS-530/430’s, Skywatch, Phase 5 c/w 12/12, Asking $575,000.00

AUSTIN +1-512-530-6900 Phone

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

CHICAGO +1-630-377-6900 Phone

DETROIT +1-248-666-9800 Phone

DENVER +1-303-494-6900 Phone

FARNBOROUGH +44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

Web: www.jetbrokers.com


BG 5 March13_FinanceSept 20/02/2013 14:24 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

Typical cards offer prepaid time flying in a certain category of aircraft, and there is a single contact number for booking the trip. Pricing for cards can vary. Current prices range from $155,000 to $250,000 for a 25-hour card, which calculates to be $6,200 to $10,000 per hour according to aircraft size. But these are occupied hours. There are no positioning fees and no overnight fees. Most cards offer some level of coverage for miscellaneous fees. Many card programs also offer concierge-level services such as ground transport, hotels, etc., and include guaranteed availability within a certain booking window. The charter aircraft that you want might be unavailable because it is already booked. Jet card pricing generally is valid for one year. If you do not use the allotted hours, cash remains in your account but the cost per hour could rise. Provisions for a refund are stipulated within the contract. With charter and jet cards, there are no long-term contracts. The costs for each trip can be calculated, and allocation of cost between different business units is straightforward.

FRACTIONAL OWNERSHIP Similar to renting a car, at some point ownership begins to make sense. In aviation, Fractional Ownership provides an intermediate step. Through agreements with a management company, aircraft are owned and shared by a certain number of users (usually no more than 16). Fractional ownership is typically based on occupied hours, with a “full share” being equivalent to 800 annual hours use. Share sizes start at one-sixteenth (50 hours) and can rise in 25 or 50-hour increments. Standard contract lengths are for five years with as little as two-years being offered in restricted circumstances. Like jet cards, fractional programs also offer concierge-level services and have guaranteed aircraft availability within a certain booking window. The major US fractional programs also offer jet cards as an entry into their systems. Costing the flying of the fractional share is more difficult because three costs are involved—ownership cost and two operating costs. Some fractional programs offer different plans that may include a

46

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

fixed monthly fee for all costs, no hourly fees, and a limited number of annual hours flown. The initial acquisition cost varies with the share size, and size of the aircraft. A one-eighth share of a $16 million aircraft would be $2 million. If used for business, this can be written down to zero as a tax deduction. If/when you sell your share, there is a fair market value sale of the share, so the total ownership cost and tax-advantages are far less than the initial acquisition price. Both leasing and financing are available for fractional shares. Fractional contracts have both a monthly management fee and an occupied hourly fee. The management fee is relative to share size, while the hourly fee is based on the aircraft model. For the one-eighth share of a mid-size business jet, the monthly management fees are about $250,000 per year. The hourly cost may be $2,500 per hour plus an added fuel cost adjustment of another $1,500 per hour (based on the mid-size Hawker 900XP or Learjet 60). These hourly costs are only for the hours you use the aircraft, however. Once in a fractional program, the “cost” for the next trip is the just the hourly cost. You can also pro-rate the management fees into allocating the cost of the trip to the business unit using the aircraft. Assigning the ownership costs (loss of fair market value over time) is difficult. Depending on the program, you can trade hours in your category of aircraft for larger or smaller when needed (e.g. 1.5 hours of your mid-size business jet for 1.0 hour use of a large jet). Fractional ownership can be a bridge to fullownership, or a means for providing additional lift when your owned aircraft is unavailable, thereby increasing flexibility and utility of Business Aviation to your company. While full-ownership tends to make financial sense at somewhere around 250 to 300 annual hours usage, there are many variables involved, and many different reasons beyond just cost that can justify owning a business aircraft.

“...there are many variables involved, and many different reasons beyond just cost that can justify owning a business aircraft.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 50

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Charlie Bravo March 18/02/2013 15:13 Page 1

2007 Legacy 600

2001 Citation CJ2

S/N 14500998, 2600TT Hours

S/N 525A-0039, 1757TT

2005 Citation CJ1+

1999 Beechjet 400A

S/N 525-0510, 3000TT

S/N RK-238, 3854TT

ALSO AVAILABLE FROM CHARLIE BRAVO 2010 PHENOM 100 2003 CITATION CJ1 1998 CITATION JET 1990 KING AIR B200

1984 KING AIR 300 1983 GULFSTREAM III 1974 CITATION 500 EAGLE


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BG 6 March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 15:41 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Two’s A Crowd...? Can Two Pilots Be One Too Many? Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

50

If your aircraft is approved for single-pilot operations and your insurance carrier is unaware that your company is using a co-pilot, Stuart Hope advises extreme caution.

S

econd in Command (SIC) pilots flying aircraft certified for single-pilot operations present a situation that warrants special consideration regarding insurance coverage of your flight department. Since most business turboprops and several light jets fall into this category, Board Members should determine that the corporation they govern is not at risk. Assume your company owns a King Air or single pilot Citation model that is flown by a well-qualified aviator who completes simulator-based training appropriate to the aircraft every year. The pilot is listed on the insurance policy as approved to operate the aircraft. For certain trips (e.g. flights into high-density traffic areas, or where adverse weather is forecast),

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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your director of flight operations elects to utilize a co-pilot. This is certainly sound risk management strategy. In aircraft that require two pilots, the insurance policy will stipulate the aircraft must be operated by a two-pilot crew consisting of an approved Pilot-inCommand (PIC) and Second In Command (SIC). In general, the insurer’s policy states that both of these primary pilots engage in recurrent training appropriate to their flight duties at an approved ground and flight school for this aircraft every 12 months. It is not unusual for the PIC and SIC to switch seats and alternate serving as the pilot handing the flight controls on alternate legs. Thus it makes sense that both pilots receive recurrent training. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


General Aviation Services March_Layout 1 18/02/2013 15:17 Page 1


BG 6 March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 15:42 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation READ THE POLICY Let’s look at how an insurance policy for an aircraft certified for single-pilot operation might be worded. Typically the phraseology states: “It is a condition of this insurance that when in flight, the aircraft will be operated only by pilot(s) specified below: • •

Named pilot: John Smith, or Any pilot who holds a Commercial Pilot Certificate or higher certification with MultiEngine and Instrument Ratings, is type rated in the make and model aircraft operated and has a minimum of the following hours of flight as recorded in his/her logbook. 5,000 Total Logged Flying Hours 2,500 Hours in Multi-Engine aircraft 500 Hours in Turboprop or Turbofan powered aircraft 100 Hours in the Make and Model aircraft operated It is further required that such pilot(s) must have successfully completed a motion-based simulator training course specifically designed for the make and model aircraft operated within the preceding 12 months of policy inception and annually thereafter.”

You can quickly see that an owner of a single-pilot certified aircraft using a SIC can get out of bounds on coverage if the specific terms of the policy are not properly addressed. In the event of an accident, the insurer will try to determine who actually was operating the controls of the aircraft at the time of the accident. Then the insurer will examine the terms of the policy to determine if that pilot was approved. If not, a claim denial is a real possibility.

POSSIBLE SCENARIO Let’s now imagine that the owner of an aircraft certified for single-pilot operation uses a SIC even though a second pilot is not required. The approved PIC allows the SIC to operate the aircraft from the left seat, while the approved PIC occupies the right seat. (Note: The PIC’s cockpit location is specified during certification as the left seat.) The aircraft is landing in a rain shower and the aircraft hydroplanes, skidding off the runway, causing substantial damage. During the adjusters investigation, one of the passengers comments the last thing he remembers is the SIC in the left seat landing the aircraft. If this piloting arrangement has not been approved by the insurer PRIOR to the loss, the owner (your company) may be facing this claim on its own. The situation of pilots swapping seats seems to go on all the time, often for what can seem like good reasons. Often clients are under the impression that the scenario described here is perfectly acceptable

because, in the event of a loss, their primary pilot listed on the policy will always be considered the PIC regardless of who was actually operating the aircraft. This might be how the FAA treats the situation, but it is not the definition the insurance company uses, and their definition is the one that counts when it comes to your coverage.

REQUIRED ACTION Even though the insured aircraft is certified for singlepilot operation, you are jeopardizing coverage unless the additional pilot has been added to the policy as an approved SIC. Call your broker, and be sure the insurance company agrees to the proposed crew arrangement. There are various strategies for seeking approval to use an SIC when one is not required, largely depending upon the pilot’s credentials, and his or her role in the cockpit. It is fairly easy to obtain approval for the SIC simply to sit in the right seat and handle the charts and radios. Seeking approval for the SIC to operate the aircraft from the left or right seat may be more difficult if the pilot is not well qualified. There may be a requirement for the pilot to complete a ground and flight school prior to assuming his or her cockpit duties. Some insurance companies are more flexible than others, and of course your aviation insurance broker can help you navigate this situation. If you weren’t already one of the informed, you are now aware of the issues involved. There is simply too much at stake to simply assume coverage in the event of a loss.

“You can quickly see that an owner of a single-pilot certified aircraft using a SIC can get out of bounds on coverage if the specific terms of the policy are not properly addressed.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 56

THE WORLD’S FINEST BUSINESS JETS, TURBOPROPS & HELICOPTERS FOR SALE AT 52

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Corporate Concepts March 19/02/2013 11:48 Page 1

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Project1_Layout 1 27/02/2013 16:28 Page 1

LYNN BEAUDRY | +1 912 965 4000 | lynn.beaudry@gulfstream.com

GULFSTREAM GIV SP S/N 1330 7683 TT, Fifteen (15) Passenger Configuration $9,500,000

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GULFSTREAM GV S/N 518 7365 TT, Forward Galley, Forward Crew Rest, Fourteen (14) Passenger Configuration. For sale or lease. $22,500,000

GULFSTREAM GIV SP S/N 1453 3552 TT, Sixteen (16) Passenger Configuration $15,950,000

GULFSTREAM G450 S/N 4030

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BG 7 March12_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 15:59 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Depreciation of Business Aircraft: Chris Younger is a partner at GKG Law, P.C. practicing in the firm’s Business Aircraft Group. He focuses his legal practice on business aircraft transactions as well as issues relating to federal and state taxation and regulation of business aircraft ownership and operations. Mr. Younger can be contacted at cyounger@gkglaw.com

The Issues Board Members Should Consider When and how a corporation depreciates an asset has a significant impact on whether to purchase, lease or charter business aircraft, notes Chris Younger. he accounting phenomenon known as depreciation has many dimensions that impact a Board’s decisions involving Business Aviation. For example, policies such as bonus and accelerated depreciation beg questions of when and if that feature of the tax code should be applied to optimize a company’s tax liability. But there are many other considerations, as we outline below to illustrate the point that depreciation is indeed a sophisticated subject that deserves careful consideration by Directors. To make the point that the subject has many moving parts, depreciation involves the following common issues that should be considered in Board deliberations involving acquisition and use of a business aircraft.

T

• •

o

o

o

o

o

The availability of bonus depreciation when purchasing a new aircraft and whether a company can utilize the full benefit of such depreciation; The effect of a tax deferred ”like-kind-exchange” on the availability of depreciation and depreciation schedules, as well as the utility of engaging in an exchange in lieu of a taxable disposition of a relinquished aircraft; Whether to elect to use straight-line depreciation instead of accelerated depreciation under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS), and the potential ramifications of such a decision; The effect on the aircraft’s depreciation schedule due to its use in charter operations; and The potential effect of certain statutory limitations on the company’s ability to deduct tax depreciation including: Whether the IRS may disallow depreciation deductions because an aircraft ownership activity is not engaged in the furtherance of a “for profit” business under Code Section 183; Whether the amounts to be deducted are limited under the “at-risk” loss limitation rules of Code Section 465; Whether depreciation deductions will be limited due to the application of the passive activity loss limitation rules of Code Section 469; Whether personal entertainment use of a company aircraft will result in disallowance of a portion of the depreciation under Code Section 274; Whether, due to the ownership of the aircraft, the listed property rules of Code Section 280F will act to limit the availability of bonus or accelerated depreciation deductions.

OTHER USES FOR DEPRECIATION If any of the foregoing limitations would apply to reduce or eliminate the amount of depreciation that a company can deduct, the Board should consider whether it is preferable for the company to enter into U

56

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


BOMBARDIER BUSINESS AIRCRAFT & SIKORSKY REPRESENTATIVE

GULFSTREAM G-200

s/n 150

Engines on Pratt & Whitney Eagle Service Plan Gold - EASA, RVSM, 8.33 COM, EU OPS1, MNPS, FM IMM

2004 FALCON 2000

s/n 217

2008 HAWKER 900XP

s/n HA-56

ASE H C PUR ED E R P PLET M O C Engines & APU on JSSI+ No damage history

2006 LEARJET 40

Engines enrolled on MSP EU OPS Certified

2002 LEARJET 45

s/n 2053

2001 CHALLENGER 604

s/n 226

1999 LEARJET 45

s/n 5487

Airframe on SmartParts Int. / Ext. redone in ‘09

AirframeT.T - 3553 hrs Landings - 3400

Engines & APU on MSP RVSM Certified

Engines & APU MSP Gold Airframe: 965 hrs (01/12)

APU on MSP Gold prog. Engines on GE on Point

AirframeT.T - 2400 hrs Fresh MPI

Fresh 4800 hr inspection EU OPS Certified

Collins Pro Line 21 EFIS EU OPS Compliant

EU OPS Compliant CAMP since new

s/n 036

Engines enrolles in MSP Gold EU OPS Certified

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PRE- OWNED

CHARTER

For the full inventory, please contact: +377 97 70 10 20 - sales@newjet.com - www.newjet.com NEWJET INTERNATIONAL IS A CERTIFIED CARBON FREE COMPANY

EC february 2012.indd 1

12/02/2013 16:32:31


BG 7 March12_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 16:00 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

an operating lease of the aircraft with a financial institution that can utilize such tax depreciation. An operating lease may be an attractive alternative to the outright purchase, particularly if the company cannot utilize depreciation deductions attributable to the aircraft. The financial institution might be able to utilize those deductions and therefore offer the aircraft for lease at a competitive rent rate when compared with the company’s cost of acquiring the aircraft without the benefit of depreciation deductions. If the Board is considering the purchase of a new aircraft, and the aircraft is eligible for 50% bonus depreciation, Directors should determine whether or not the company can utilize that excess depreciation in the year in which it becomes available. If so, the decision to purchase an aircraft that is eligible for bonus depreciation could turn on the tax savings resulting from the company’s deduction. Conversely, if the company cannot utilize bonus depreciation, the company may be better off purchasing a pre-owned aircraft with a lower acquisition cost and utilizing normal accelerated depreciation.

IMPACT ON BOARD DECISIONS The Board’s consideration of all of these factors will allow it to determine whether to acquire an aircraft at all; whether to acquire a new or used aircraft; whether to engage in a tax deferred like-kindexchange of an existing aircraft for a newly acquired

aircraft; whether a newly acquired aircraft should be operated in charter service; whether an aircraft should be made available to executives of the company in connection with personal entertainment transportation; and whether the company should purchase the aircraft itself or enter into an operating lease of the aircraft with a financial institution. Obviously, the issues involved are many and complex. Additionally, a company should analyze all of the foregoing considerations in the context of assuring that what may be an optimal aircraft ownership and operating structure from an income tax standpoint also complies with state sales and use tax rules; the requirements of the Federal Aviation Regulations (which can often be counterintuitive; liability protection planning objectives; public company reporting requirements, if applicable; and Federal air transportation excise tax rules. Due to the complexity inherent in the application of tax laws to aircraft acquisitions and operations, it is advisable for a Board to consult with knowledgeable aviation counsel to acquire the knowledge necessary to make an informed decision. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

“If the Board is considering the purchase of a new aircraft, and the aircraft is eligible for 50% bonus depreciation, Directors should determine whether or not the company can utilize that excess depreciation in the year in which it becomes available.”

Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 62

THE WORLD’S LEADING

AIRCRAFT DEALERS & BROKERS find one today 58

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jeteffect Inventory March 18/02/2013 15:24 Page 1

Listed. Sold. and Every SMART MOVE in Between. Astra 1125-015* Astra 1125-018* Astra 1125-024 Astra 1125-032 Astra 1125-034* Astra 1125-041 Astra SP 1125-052 Astra SP 1125-056 Astra SP 1125-067 Astra SPX 1125-082 Astra SPX 1125-083 Astra SPX 1125-102 Astra SPX 1125-124 Astra SPX 1125-125 Astra SPX 1125-128 Astra SPX 1125-132* Astra SPX 1125-136* Beechjet 400A RK-152 Beechjet 400A RK-174 Beechjet 400A RK-281 Beechjet 400A RK-287 Beechcraft Premier I RB-008 Beechcraft Premier I RB-046 Beechcraft Premier I RB-100 Beechcraft Premier I A RB-157 Challenger 300 20028* Challenger 300 20184 Challenger 600 1020 Challenger 601-1A 3007 Challenger 601-1A 3044 Challenger 601-1A 3050* Challenger 601-3A 5076 Challenger 601-3A/ER 5100 Challenger 601-3A/ER 5108* Challenger 601-3A/ER 5126 Challenger 601-3R 5169 Challenger 604 5360 Challenger 604 5451 Challenger 604 5547 Challenger 604 5635 Citation 500 SP 500-0259 Citation Bravo 550-0809* Citation Bravo 550-0823 Citation Bravo 550-0858 Citation Bravo 550-0991 Citation Bravo 550-1000 Citation Bravo 550-1087 Citation CJ 525-0019 Citation CJ 525-0023 Citation CJ 525-0026 Citation CJ 525-0027 Citation CJ 525-0028 Citation CJ 525-0047 Citation CJ 525-0048 Citation CJ 525-0049 Citation CJ 525-0075* Citation CJ 525-0076 Citation CJ 525-0087 Citation CJ 525-0092 Citation CJ 525-0099* Citation CJ 525-0107 Citation CJ 525-0111 Citation CJ 525-0116 Citation CJ 525-0122* Citation CJ 525-0137 Citation CJ 525-0159 Citation CJ 525-0169 Citation CJ 525-0190 Citation CJ 525-0230 Citation CJ 525-0275 Citation CJ 525-0276 Citation CJ 525-0306* Citation CJ 525-0385 Citation CJ1 525-0364 Citation CJ1 525-0365 Citation CJ1 525-0367 Citation CJ1 525-0372 Citation CJ1 525-0385* Citation CJ1 525-0489 Citation CJ1 525-0513

Long Beach 562.989.8800

Citation CJ1+ Citation CJ1+ Citation CJ1+ Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2+ Citation CJ2+ Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation Encore Citation Encore Citation Encore Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation XLS Citation XLS Citation I/SP Citation I/SP Citation II/SP Citation II Citation II Citation II Citation II Citation II Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation Mustang Citation Mustang Citation Mustang Citation Mustang Citation Sovereign Citation Sovereign Citation Sovereign Citation Sovereign Citation Ultra Citation Ultra Citation V Citation V Citation V Citation V Citation V Citation VI Citation VI Citation VII Citation VII Citation VII Citation VII Citation VII Citation VII Citation X Citation X

525-0617* 525-0635 525-0678 525A-0006* 525A-0047 525A-0065 525A-0099 525A-0101 525A-0120 525A-0149* 525A-0177 525A-0314* 525A-0325 525B-0009 525B-0013* 525B-0023 525B-0170 525B-0250 525B-0251 560-0541 560-0593* 560-0639 560-5021 560-5023 560-5062 560-5077* 560-5080 560-5095 560-5114 560-5180 560-5186 560-5235 560-5325 560-5560 560-5570 501-0076 501-0225 550-0555 550-0205 550-0364 550-0407 550-0646* 550-0719 650-0017 650-0058 650-0076 650-0077 650-0084 650-0088 650-0116* 650-0119* 650-0139 650-0168* 650-0175 650-0184 510-0103 510-0226 510-0233 510-TBD* 680-0009 680-0015 680-0017 680-0076 560-0285 560-0492 560-0032* 560-0036 560-0057* 560-0168 560-0206 650-0211* 650-0232 650-7014 650-7031* 650-7034* 650-7036* 650-7056 650-7101 750-0021 750-0025

Dallas 214.451.6953

Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation XLS+ Citation XLS+ Eclipse 500 Eclipse 500 Falcon 10 Falcon 10 Falcon 10 Falcon 20F Falcon 20E-5 Falcon 20F-5 Falcon 20F-5 Falcon 20F-5 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 900 Falcon 900B Falcon 900B Falcon 900B Falcon 900EX EASy Falcon 2000 Falcon 2000 Falcon 2000 Falcon 2000 Falcon 2000EX EASy Falcon 2000EX EASy Falcon 2000EX EASy Global Express Gulfstream G100 Gulfstream G100 Gulfstream G150 Gulfstream G150 Gulfstream G150 Gulfstream G150 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G300 Gulfstream G300 Gulfstream G400 Gulfstream G450 Gulfstream G450 Gulfstream G450 Gulfstream G-IITT Gulfstream GIV Gulfstream GIV Gulfstream GIV Gulfstream GIV Gulfstream GIV

Savannah 912.330.8797

750-0094 750-0097 750-0104 750-0121 750-0185 750-0246 750-0248 TBD TBD EA500-00111 EA500-00174 049 090 144 404 267* 281 324 357 046 079 081 093 139 170 196 205 236 254 276 308 309 331 348 349 010 012 046* 088 167 044 052 075 163 045 053 101 9085 145 146* 205* 214 227* TBD 010* 014 024 029 043 044 054 067* 084 094 110 173* 186 190 1508 1510* 1516 4034 4147 TBD* 238 1007* 1018 1034 1050 1104

Gulfstream GIV 1171 Gulfstream GIV 1192 Gulfstream GIV 1204 Gulfstream GIV/SP 1259 Gulfstream GIV/SP 1279 Gulfstream GIV/SP 1337 Gulfstream GIVSP 1354 Gulfstream GIVSP 1387 Gulfstream GIVSP 1442 Gulfstream GIVSP 1473 Gulfstream GIVSP 1475 Gulfstream G550 5085 Gulfstream GV 660 Gulfstream GV 692 Hawker 400XP RK-363 Hawker 400XP RK-409 Hawker 700A NA0336 Hawker 800A NA0419 Hawker 800A 258238 Hawker 800XP 258283* Hawker 800XP 258293 Hawker 800XP 258313 Hawker 800XP 258327 Hawker 800XP 258336* Hawker 800XP 258369 Hawker 800XP 258386 Hawker 800XP 258414 Hawker 800XP 258531 Hawker 800XP 258591* Hawker 850XP 258861 King Air C90B LJ-1641 King Air 350 FL-393 Learjet 25D 280 Learjet 25D 291 Learjet 31 33D Learjet 31A 105 Learjet 31A 106 Learjet 31A 131 Learjet 31A 143 Learjet 31A 149* Learjet 31A 228 Learjet 31A 229 Learjet 35A 395 Learjet 35A 670 Learjet 40XR 2057 Learjet 45 015 Learjet 45 052 Learjet 45 087 Learjet 45 094* Learjet 45 137 Learjet 45 150 Learjet 45 203 Learjet 45 211 Learjet 45 216 Learjet 45 227 Learjet 55 021 Learjet 55 055 Learjet 55 106 Learjet 60 014 Learjet 60 015 Learjet 60 017 Learjet 60 208 Learjet 60 226 Learjet 60 271 Learjet 60SE 314 Legacy 145-699 Legacy 600 14500965 MD-500E 0180E Phenom 100 50000165 Westwind 1 1124-0416* Westwind 2 1124A-0351 *Multiple Transactions

the power to produce results jeteffect.com

Palm Beach 561.747.2223


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 aircraft@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Citation 111

Challenger

1985 Challenger 601-1A | 3044

Citation XLS+

1985 Citation III | 650-0080

Citation XLS

2009 Citation XLS+ | 560-6050

2006 Citation XLS | 560-5631

Citation Ultra / V

Citation Excel

2002 Citation Excel | 560-5288

Citation 11

1993 Citation V | 560-0208 Also Available: 560-0366 (Ultra)

Citation CJ3

1981 Citation II | 550-0286

Citation Mustang

2006 Citation CJ3 | 525B-0073

Citation 1SP

2009 Citation Mustang | 510-0204

1982 Citation ISP | 501-0255

For full specs & additional photos, please visit our website at www.BellAviation.com


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 aircraft@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Beechjet

Learjet

1992 Learjet 31A | 31A-051

Beech 1900D

King Air 350

1992 Beech 1900D | UE-5

King Air B200 / 200

1983 King Air B200 | BB-1140

Conquest

1992 Beechjet 400A | RK-36

Also Available: BB-545 (200)

1980 Conquest II | 441-0116

Navajo CR

Also Available: RK-107

1998 King Air 350 | FL-199

King Air C90

1991 King Air C90A | LJ-1274

Conquest

1983 Conquest I | 425-0133

Columbia 300

1979 Navajo CR | 31-7912049

2003 Columbia 300 | 40064

For full specs & additional photos, please visit our website at www.BellAviation.com


BG 8 MARCH13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 12:52 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Entry Level & Light Jets: Flexibility at Lower Cost Levels. Light Jets only in name, ultimately where performance and value reign as dominant factors it is worth remembering there’s nothing lightweight about the value and flexibility of this category of corporate aircraft.

“Does that make bigger better? Not where value and flexibility are important.”

62

A

s business jets increase in size from Entry Level and Light jets to the low-end of the Large Cabin, purpose-built models the stated seating capacity tends to vary only slightly; six to eight seats dominates the standard configurations of many of the offerings across size-category lines. It is true that as aircraft increase in size, headroom and leg-room similarly increase, even if available seating does not. It is also true that for many models, full-fuel payload doesn’t seem to grow proportionally, although a model here and there does defy this typically true generality. Additionally, stillair range also seems to increase as you move up the categories. But ultimately, steps up in size and range also tend to reduce flexibility in an important, notto-be-overlooked way; airport access. As jets get big-

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

ger and heavier their runway needs increase, often dramatically, with no appreciable gain in how many people can fly or how much equipment the jet can carry. Does that make bigger better? Not where value and flexibility are important.

THE VALUE QUOTIENT We know many feel an emotional aversion to aircraft too small for their sensibilities; people want to equate ‘bigger’ with ‘safer’ in a way that the physics belie. The realities of the physics aside, however, the next step up in size seldom results in a major improvement in seating capacity, let alone in fullfuel cabin load. In reality, the larger jets need more power, which means more fuel to cover the same ground at about the same speed, so cabin capacity changes minimally where maximum-range trips are concerned. And that returns us to that maximumrange leg fixation… Why do we so covet range capabilities seldom needed? A light jet fully-fueled and flying a typical Business Aviation mission departs with fuel for the mission, including reserves, in some cases sufficient fuel to return home without adding more. And that maximum-fuel jet can often barely carry the typical passenger load of three persons making the trip, unless one or two of them also doubles as a crew member. With the average mission length under 750 miles and the nominal maximum-range of light jets around 1,200 miles, the crew enjoys the option of flying lighter, saving fuel. (Note: The lower the total weight of the aircraft, the less fuel it consumes on the mission, all other factors being equal). Fueling for the mission, with NBAA reserves, allows a larger cabin load, making three or four, plus crew, possible. In most cases where a fuel stop is not required, the speed difference between a light, a mid-cabin and a large-cabin jet results in a leg taking only slightly longer to fly, but at the trade-off of U higher direct operating costs of the larger jets. Any Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aradian January 19/12/2012 14:33 Page 1

2008 Hawker 900XP

2007 Beech Premier 1A

1175TT. Beige leather interior. MSP Gold. Support Plus. Satcom

2007. 1200TT. Support Plus 2008. 540TT. TAP Elite. Support Plus

2007 Hawker 850XP

2013 Gulfstream 450

1290TT. MSP. Tan leather interior. Satcom

1st Quarter delivery position

Gulfstream 550

1992 Falcon 900B

Several aircraft available including 2013 delivery positions

9800TT 12 pax interior in Beige. Satcom. EU Ops compliant. MSP Gold

McDonnell Douglas MD 600N

2002 Eurocopter EC130

Three MD600N available

2060TT Custom paint and interior. Pearlescent white with white and grey leather seats

ALSO OFFERING: Beech King Air C90GT/C90/B200/350, Hawker 400XP, Citation XL/XLS/Sovereign, Agusta Koala, Gulfstream G100/G150, Hawker 800XP/850XP/900XP. Call/Email For Details

www.aradian.com UK office Tel. +44 1481 233001 Fax.+44 1481 233002 steverogers@aradian.com

US office: Mesa Tel. +1 480 396 9086 Fax. +1 480 393 7008 rick@aradian.com

US office: Atlanta Tel. +1 770 331 1416 davidb@aradian.com

Also in: South America, South Africa, Russia, Spain, Germany, India & UAE


BG 8 MARCH13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 12:54 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation time gained in a bigger jet - we’re talking a few minutes in most cases - is certainly insufficient to offset operating costs running 50-100 percent higher, or more. So for most people, the question comes down to this: Is a bit of headroom for a 100-minute typical mission really cost-justifiable? That brings us to the aspect of light jets in which they not only excel but cannot be beaten on, namely accomplishing the needed mission at the lowest overall cost.

SIZE COSTS Five hundred to 750 miles at a maximum cruise speed of around 400 knots while carrying four passengers will generally cost less in a Light Jet than making the same trip in a Medium Jet at a 480-knot maximum cruise; even more so than a Large Cabin jet. The time difference between heavy and light business jets on a typical mission is small, about 10 to 12 minutes, overall, and is not a large time saving for costs that may be considerably higher for the larger aircraft. Further, beyond these speed-rangepayload operational basics, airport fees tend to be larger for heavier aircraft. With airports and FBOs increasingly turning to weight-based ramp fees for revenue, a larger jet incurs a higher ramp fee, and even if a large-enough fuel purchase can bring a waiver of the fee, you’re still buying far more fuel. Additionally, the Light Jet crew will have the option of far more airports, often closer, more convenient and less expensive than what’s needed for the Medium and Large Cabin jets. It’s hard to escape the heavyweight value edge of Light Jets. It should be noted, however, that ride qualities are impacted by the aircraft’s wing loading (the aircraft’s weight per square foot of wing area). The higher the wing loading, the smoother the ride in turbulence, all other factors such as the aircraft’s inherent stability being equal. Light Jets achieve their lower take-off and landing distances, compared with heavier jets, by virtue of their lower wing loading. Workspace while traveling is another consideration. Decisions related to aircraft size are impacted by the needs of passengers to use their travel time productively.

represented the bottom rung of the business jet ladder… that was before the Entry Level Jets entered the market, differentiated by weights below almost everything ever built at less than 10,000 pounds. Ultimately, where performance and value reign as dominant factors, remember this: there’s nothing lightweight about the value and flexibility of these Light Jets.

ENTRY-LEVEL AND LIGHT JET PRICE GUIDE

WHAT MAKES A “LIGHT” JET?

The following Entry-Level and Light Jets Retail Price Guide (overleaf) represents current average values published in The Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1993 through Winter 2012. Values reported are in US$ millions, with each reporting point representing the current average retail value published in the Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, the Citation CJ3 values reported in the Winter 2012 edition of Bluebook show $4.4 million for a 2004 model, $4.6 million for a 2005 model and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. Aircraft specifications for the following models can be found in the Specifications and Performance section in this issue ( page 106 ).

Today we consider a jet “light” when it’s Maximum Take-off Weight falls between 10,000 and 20,000 pounds. About a decade ago the Light segment

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to Jack@avbuyer.com

U

THE WORLD’S FINEST

Business Jets, Turboprops and Helicopters

for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com and lots more...

64

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


J Hopkinson March 18/02/2013 15:29 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

Citation Sovereign SN 680-0157, Great Corporate Pedigree, One Owner Since New, Power Advantage +, Aux Advantage, Pro Parts, Over $1M accrued in programs, Motivated Owner, Replacement Aircraft has Arrived

Aero Commander 681, “Super 1” Q-Tip Props, Garmin G600, GDL69A XM Weather, GNS 530W, Long Range Fuel, Known Ice Certified

Astra SPX SN 117, 2908 TTAF, Collins Proline IV, Color weather Radar, TCAS II/w change 7, Airshow 400

Citation Bravo 4191 AFTT, Zero Time Engines, TCAS-1, GNS-XLS FMS, ProParts

Citation S/II SN S550-0036, 8576 TTAF, 6755 Cycles, 1304 SMOH, Cosmetics Refreshed & Perma-guarded (08/2011), GNS-XLS, GPWS, New Windows 2007, RVSM Bring all offers John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


Retail Price Guide Feb13_PerfspecDecember06 19/02/2013 17:16 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

ENTRY LEVEL & LIGHT JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL BEECHCRAFT PREMIER 1A

2012 US$M 6.7

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

5.0

3.9

3.1

2008 US$M 2.65

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

2.25

2.0

BEECHCRAFT PREMIER 1 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45XR

13.2

11.0

8.7

7.5

6.7

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40XR

10.83

8.8

6.9

5.350

4.850

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40

WINTER 2012 2005 US$M

2004 US$M

1.7

1.6

1.5

6.2

5.5

5.3

4.8

4.2

5.2

4.7

4.4

4.1

3.7

4.250

3.9

3.5

3.8

3.5

3.1

2.8

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 31A CESSNA CITATION XLS+ 560

2003 US$M

2.0 12.7

11.0

9.9

9.1

CESSNA CITATION XLS 560 CESSNA CITATION ENCORE+ 560

6.0

8.1 7.175

6.375

5.2

4.5

CESSNA CITATION V ENCORE 560

5.750

5.550

5.150

4.2

3.9

3.7

3.5

4.3

4.1

2.5

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560-XL CESSNA CITATION V ULTRA 560 CESSNA CITATION V 560 CESSNA CITATION BRAVO 550

3.1

2.9

2.7

4.4

CESSNA CITATION 11550 CESSNA CITATION CJ4 525C

8.923

7.9

7.4

CESSNA CITATION CJ3 525B

8.174

7.0

6.2

5.8

5.2

5.0

4.8

4.6

CESSNA CITATION CJ2+ 525A

7.040

6.2

5.6

4.9

4.6

4.3

3.9

3.5

3.2

3.1

2.7

2.5

CESSNA CITATION CJ2 525A CESSNA CITATION CJ1+ 525

4.7

4.1

3.5

3.1

2.9

CESSNA CITATION CJ1 525

2.9

2.8

2.1

2.0

1.9

1.7

1.5

CESSNA CITATIONJET 525 CESSNA CITATION MUSTANG 510

3.202

2.7

2.3

2.1

ECLIPSE 500

2.0

1.9

1.8

0.800

0.775

0.700

2.1

1.9

EMBRAER PHENOM 300

8.920

8.0

7.5

7.2

EMBRAER PHENOM 100

4.055

3.6

3.1

2.7

2.5

4.3

3.3

2.6

HAWKER 400XP HAWKER BEECHJET 400A NEXTANT 400XT

1.4 4.154

4.0

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

66

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Retail Price Guide Feb13_PerfspecDecember06 19/02/2013 14:11 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

What your money buys today 2002 US$M

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

1993 US$M

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL BEECHCRAFT PREMIER 1A

1.4

1.3

BEECHCRAFT PREMIER 1 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45XR

3.3

3.1

3.0

2.9

2.8

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40XR BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40

1.9

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.5

1.4

1.350

1.3

1.250

1.150

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 31A CESSNA CITATION XLS+ 560 CESSNA CITATION XLS 560 CESSNA CITATION ENCORE+ 560

3.2

3.0

2.9

3.9

3.6

3.3

CESSNA CITATION V ENCORE 560 3.0

2.7

2.1

2.0

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560-XL 1.9

1.8

1.7

1.6 1.5

2.3

2.1

2.0

1.8

1.7

CESSNA CITATION V ULTRA 560 1.4

1.6

CESSNA CITATION V 560 CESSNA CITATION BRAVO 550

1.4

1.3

CESSNA CITATION 11 550 CESSNA CITATION CJ4 525C CESSNA CITATION CJ3 525B CESSNA CITATION CJ2+ 525A

2.7

2.6

2.5

CESSNA CITATION CJ2 525A CESSNA CITATION CJ1+ 525

1.8

1.7

1.6

CESSNA CITATION CJ1 525 1.450

1.350

1.300

1.250

1.200

1.100

1.000

CESSNA CITATIONJET 525 CESSNA CITATION MUSTANG 510 ECLIPSE 500 EMBRAER PHENOM 300 EMBRAER PHENOM 100 HAWKER 400XP

1.3

1.2

1.1

1.050

1.0

0.950

0.900

0.850

0.800

0.750

HAWKER BEECHJET 400A NEXTANT 400XT

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

67


Project1_Layout 1 27/02/2013 16:17 Page 1

F FEATURED EATURED INVENTORY IN NVENTORY

A plane for

EVERY MISSION.

2008 CITATION XLS+ - SN 560-6006 Pristine Condition Aircraft All Serious Offers Considered

When you come to Jetcraft to acquire an aircraft, we’ll start with a question:

What’s your mission? Are you looking for an office

in the sky, a luxury getaway jet or a helicopter? With our large inventory of new and pre-owned models, our broad

2003 CHALLENGER 850 - SN 7755

customer base and unmatched global network, we can fit your

New VIP Completion - Numerous Upgrades New PATS Extended Range Fuel Allows up to 3,000 nm Range

needs perfectly. And with over 50 years’ experience, we’ll do it quickly. Talk to us and see. Our mission is fulfilling yours. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

2008 FALCON 2000DX EASy - SN 601 Available for Short Term Lease - Extremely Attractive Rates Honeywell “EASy” Flightdeck - Desirable 10 Passenger Interior

1989 CHALLENGER 601-3A - SN 5049

2004 FALCON 2000EX EASy - SN 0029

Immediately Available and Priced to Sell 8,305 Hours Total Time - Dual FMS, FDR/CVR, Satcom

Engines Enrolled on ESP Gold - APU Enrolled on MSP JAR-OPS Capable - Fresh ARCS & Inspections at Gulfstream

1998 CHALLENGER 604 - SN 5368

1987 FALCON 50 - SN 181

Engines Enrolled on GE OnPoint - Honeywell Direct TV 36-150 APU Upgrade - Triple DCU’s, IRS’s & Comm’s

9,255 Hours Total Time - New Paint June 2011 JSSI Engine Program - EFIS 4000 4 Tube Upgrade

2013 CHALLENGER 605 - SN 5895

2007 GLOBAL 5000 - SN 9214

JAA Requirements Package 1 - RVSP Certification Preferred 12 Pax Configuration

13 Passenger Attractively Completed Interior Airframe Enrolled in Bombardier SmartParts


Project1_Layout 1 27/02/2013 16:15 Page 1

2001 GLOBAL EXPRESS - SN 9076

2006 HAWKER 850XP - SN 258787

Available for Immediate Sale and Delivery RSVM Compliant - EASA/ JAR-OPS 1 Certified

Honeywell MSP on Engines and APU - IFIS-5000 Integrated Flight Information System - One US Operator Since New

2006 GLOBAL XRS - SN 9181

2006 LEAR 60 - SN 305

Increased Max Take-Off Weight to 99,500 Operations at Airports with Max Weight Restrictions

New to Market - Certification Date June 24, 2006 Low Time - Only 1,588 Hours/807 Cycles Since New

EFVS E FVS S for Challenger 605 HUD Vision Access Program — OPPORTUNITY TO BE LAUNCH CUSTOMER 2003 GULFSTREAM 550 - SN 5004 14 Passenger Forward Galley with Forward Crew Rest Configuration

2002 GULFSTREAM V - SN 674 Airframe on PlaneParts; APU on MSP - Engine On Condition 16 Passenger Fwd Galley Configuration - Previously Part 135 Compliant

A unique aftermarket enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) program, HUD Vision Access will improve the performance, safety and flexibility of the Bombardier Challenger 605 in all phases of flight and weather conditions. Previously unavailable for the Challenger 605, our enhanced vision system camera is the only infrared detection system approved for use in 1000-foot (RVR) runway visual range operations. It is standard fit on the FedEx wide body fleet and most Gulfstream business jets. Jetcraft’s HUD Vision Access program is currently undergoing certification on the Bombardier Challenger 604. Manufactured by Elbit Systems of America-Kollsman using its EVS-II and new AT-HUD technology, Jetcraft is pleased to offer the opportunity to become the launch and first Challenger 605 customer for this program. For more information on this exclusive upgrade program, please contact:

Ken Elliott, VP Avionics Systems, Jetcraft kenelliott@jetcraft.com I Office 706-650-2140 I Cell 706-631-4715

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AirCompAnalysisMarch13_ACAn 19/02/2013 17:26 Page 1

AS-350B-2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS EUROCOPTER AS-350B-2

MD 600N

Eurocopter AS-350B-2 Ecureuil by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, we provide information on a selection of new and pre-owned SingleEngine Turbine helicopters in the $0.54-$2.4 million price range with the purpose of valuing the pre-owned Eurocopter AS-350B-2 helicopter. We’ll consider the usual productivity parameters (payload/range, speed and cabin size), and cover current market values. The field in this study includes the MD 600N and Bell 206L1.

I

BRIEF HISTORY Table A (right) shows the history of the AS350B single turbine series helicopter, starting in 1977. The Eurocopter AS-350B-2 has been produced since 1989. There are currently 1,148 AS-350B-2 helicopters in operation. The AS-350B-2 Ecureuil featured a more powerful engine than the AS-350B-1 Ecureuil and was equipped with main and tail rotor blades

70

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

originally developed for the AS-355F Ecureuil II. Also shown, the AS-350 series makes up 40% of the 9,367 Eurocopter helicopters produced. Overall, Eurocopter has produced 39% of all the Commercial Civil Western manufactured helicopters (which totals 23,923 units, per JETNET records, as of

January 2013). In North America, this model is commonly known as the AS-350B-2 ‘AStar’. The AS350B-2 is now also being manufactured in the American Eurocopters plant at Golden Triangle Airport in Lowndes County near Columbus, Mississippi. ❯

TABLE A - AS-350 HISTORY In Operation Aircraft Make

Model

EUROCOPTER AS -350B ECUREUIL EUROCOPTER AS -350D ASTAR EUROCOPTER AS -350B -1 ECUREUIL EUROCOPTER AS -350B -2 ECUREUIL EUROCOPTER AS -350BA ECUREUIL EUROCOPTER AS -350B -3 ECUREUIL EUROCOPTER AS -350B -3E ECUREUIL ALL AS -350 Series - Single Turbine ALL EUROCOPTER ALL HELICOPTER TURBINES

Years of Manufacture

Number Built

1977 - 1992 1978 - 1984 1986 - 1992 1989 - UP 1991 - 1999 1997 - 2012 2011 - UP 1977 - UP

468 132 73 1,263 595 1,110 140 3,781 9,367 23,923

Total

Number

Percent

Aircraft

For Sale

For Sale

318 62 52 1,148 518 1,039 111 3,248 7,933 19,029

25 3 1 53 41 63 4 190 459 1,160

7.9% 4.8% 1.9% 4.6% 7.9% 6.1% 3.6% 5.8% 5.8% 6.1%

Source: JETNET

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Leading Edge March_LEAS 19/02/2013 11:51 Page 1

Priced to sell at $7,895,000

2006 Citation Sovereign s/n 680-0105 • Engines on ESP Gold • APU on MSP • Avionics on ProParts • Aircell Axxess II Satcom System • XMR 100-01 Weather / Radio • Cessna Technical Survey Nov. 2012 • Current on maintenance incl. Document Letters 6,14, 20, 21, 39 & 40 • 8 passenger w/ extended refreshment center option • 8 wall mounted video monitors • Airshow 400 w/ cabin briefing

Specifications subject to verification upon inspection, aircraft subject to withdrawal from the market.

Leading Edge Aviation Solutions

Te l i n U S : 2 0 1 - 8 9 1 - 0 8 8 1

aircraftsales@leas.com

w w w. l e a s . c o m


AirCompAnalysisMarch13_ACAn 19/02/2013 10:04 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS EUROCOPTER AS-350B-2

PAYLOAD AND RANGE

cubic feet, is larger than the MD 600N helicopter (92 cubic feet), as shown in Chart A (below). The Bell 206L1 - offering 100 cubic feet - has the largest cabin volume in the field of comparison.

As we mentioned in past articles, a potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. The data contained in Table B (below) is sourced from Conklin & de Decker. The AS-350B-2 ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 878 pounds is the highest payload capability in this field of study.

POWERPLANT DETAILS The AS-350B-2 is powered by a single Turbomeca Ariel 1D1 engine, whereas both the MD 600N and the Bell 206L1 utilize a single Rolls-Royce 250 powerplant. The AS350B-2 powerplant offers a power rating with a 732 SHD transmission rating [trans-

CABIN VOLUME According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Eurocopter AS-350-B2, at 95

TABLE B - PAYLOAD & RANGE

MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel IFR Range (nm)

Eurocopter AS-350B-2

4,960

942

1,820

878

312

312

MD 600N

4,100

771

1,402

631

255

235

Bell 206L1

4,150

657

1,282

625

253

245

Model

100

95

MD 600N

92

50

0

1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The long range cruise speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities. 150

100 Cubic Feet

CHART B - VARIABLE COST

$789

MD 600N

$746

Bell 206L1 Eurocopter AS-360B-2 $0

$726

$200

$400

$600

$800

$1,000

US $ per hour

72

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

The ‘Total Variable Cost’, illustrated in Chart B (left), is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense and Miscellaneous trip expense. The total variable cost for the AS-350B-2 at $726 is the lowest in this field of study.

The points in Chart C (right) center on the same group of helicopters. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors:

CHART A - CABIN VOLUME

Eurocopter AS350 B2

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, M.A. USA: JETNET; B&CA May and Aug. 2012 Operations Planning Guide

Bell 206L1

mission rating is a limiting factor in the total rated and usable engine power output]. The MD 600N engine offers a transmission rating of 808 SHD, while the Bell 206L1 engine transmission rating - at 650 SHD - is the lowest in this field of study. Using data sourced from Conklin & de Decker and Vref we will compare our helicopters. The nationwide average Jet-A fuel cost used from the August 2012 edition of B&CA Operations Planning Guide was $6.04 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: The fuel price used from this source does not represent an average fuel price for the year.

www.AvBuyer.com

The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the helicopters in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all turbine helicopters are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious helicopter buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size, we can conclude that the AS-350B-2 helicopter, as shown in the productivity index is productive compared with the other helicopters represented. The Long Range Cruise speed, Cabin Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisMarch13_ACAn 19/02/2013 17:07 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS EUROCOPTER AS-350B-2

BUSINESS TYPE Table D (right) shows the ‘Top Five’ usages by business type of the AS-350B-2 helicopter. The ‘Top Five’ business types account for 91% of the most common uses for the AS350B-2 helicopter. End-User owned, Charter, Leasing and Air Ambulance account for 35 out of the 53 (total) AS-350B-2 helicopters that are currently ‘For Sale’. The remaining percentage of usages comprise Air Tours, Aviation Related Business, Dealer Broker, Flight Schools, Search & Rescue, and more.

LOCATION Chart D (right) shows the location by continent for the Eurocopter AS-350B-2 helicopter. North America has the majority with 55% of the AS-350B-2 helicopters, followed by South America (15%) and Europe (14%). Combined these three locations account for nearly 84% of the fleet.

SUMMARY Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that helicopter operators value. However, there are often other qualities such as service and support that factor into a buying decision, and are beyond the scope of this article. The Eurocopter AS-350B-2 helicopter fares well against its competition - so those operators in the market should find the preceding comparison of value. Our expectations are that the Eurocopter AS-350B-2 helicopter will continue to do very well in the pre-owned market.

CHART C - PRODUCTIVITY $3.0 $2.5

Price (Millions)

Volume and Average Payload values from Conklin and de Decker are shown in Table C (right) for all the helicopters in this field of comparison. Also shown in Table C is the Vref price for new and used helicopter prices. The last three columns of information show the number of helicopters in-operation and the percentage “For Sale”along with the average monthly number of sales transactions in the past 12 months. The AS-350B-2 has the lowest percentage for sale and the highest average monthly full retail sale transactions at 11. That’s the most sold, based on a monthly average compared to the rest of the field in this study.

AS-350B-2

$2.0

MD 600N

$1.5 $1.0

Bell 206L1

$0.5 $0.0 0.0020

0.0025

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE Long Range Cruise Speed

Cabin Volume (Cu Ft)

Avail Payload w/max Fuel (lb)

Eurocopter AS-350B-2

122

95

878

MD 600N

125

92

Bell 206L1

108

100

Model

In Operation

% For Sale

Avg Monthly Sold*

$2.3m New $925k ‘90 Used

1,148

4.6%

11

631

$1.9m New $800k ‘97 Used

65

13.9%

1

625

$590k ‘83 Used

422

8.1%

3

New Used Vref Prices $m

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, MA, USA; JETNET; Vref: 2012 Operations Planning Guide B&CA Aug. 2012.

TABLE D - AS-350B-2 TOP FIVE USEAGE Business Type End-User Owned Charter Company Leasing Companies Unidentified Air Ambulance

Active Fleet # 438 419 87 57 45

Overall Fleet %

# For Sale

% For Sale

38% 37% 8% 5% 4%

15 14 5 0 1

3.4% 3.3% 5.7% 2.2%

Source: JETNET STAR reports

CHART D - LOCATION BY CONTINENT 1,148 In-service January 2013 3% Africa

5% 15% Asia 8% South Australia America

For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at: 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Email: Mike@avbuyer.com Web: www.mdchase.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

0.0045

0.0035

0.0030

14 % Europe 55% North America

SOURCE: JETNET STAR REPORTS

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

73


JMesingerFeb13_JMesingerNov06 20/02/2013 09:34 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

Crazy About Our Industry any might say the aviation industry makes them ‘Crazy!’ I have certainly had days like that. In fact in the early days of my career, before the days of good contacts and real exclusive agreements for buyers and sellers; before the days of such a mature culture of legal and tax aviation representation, I said many times that if I could try another profession then maybe I would. It was not unlike the Wild West in the early days! Don’t get me wrong, though. I did many deals on a handshake - and I shook some really wonderful peoples’ hands. We have seen a lot of change in our industry in the last four years. There has been enormous economic uncertainty that has rocked our value proposition; there’s been a huge global expansion, followed by a contraction; and the composition of lending within our industry has changed dramatically. These are all factors and circumstances designed to weed out the faint at heart. I am Crazy about this industry! I respect the fellow professionals that share it with me, including those associates who manufacture the aircraft, engines and avionics, and those gifted and skilled people who maintain and keep our fleet operating safely. And I very much admire the buyers and sellers who participate and believe in the value of Business Aviation. Thank you all. [It is an added bonus for me that I get to come to work each day and celebrate my passion with my family who are integral parts of my business. I know for a fact that for many of my trusted friends, that joy is shared. Our businesses are heavily weighted with family ties and family involvement. I have many friends who I started in the industry with who now have second and even third generations involved.] I have always felt I could never bring family into a business if I did not genuinely trust the industry and those people working along-

M

side me day after day. This may be beginning to sound like a love story – and it is. All of you reading this column must have some involvement with the industry, either making your living day-to-day from it, or flying in business aircraft. I am sure you can sense the passion in aviation all around you. I always tell people this is ultimately “not an aircraft business, but a people business”. It is people selling people aircraft; people servicing aircraft for people. It’s the people, and the collective technology they are bringing to our industry that make it so dynamic. It is the people who make me crazy about this industry! So for all of the very difficult circumstances we have seen ourselves in over the last several years, I still see beyond that. I can still see the enthusiasm the people involved in aviation bring to their work every day. I am so excited that I can call this industry mine. I watch with amazing pride when my sons interact with prospects and clients. I am sure for those involved in our industry and especially those of you who get to share your days like I do with a son or daughter or spouse, you can also appreciate the industry like our family does. I know that our economic challenges are not over. It might still be premature to label our current market as being in a state of recovery, but it is not too soon to recognize that the industry we are all sharing is worth the challenges. It is worth the effort. I am sure that if we collectively continue down the path that lies in front of us we will have years and years of opportunity ahead. So as we get stuck in to 2013, we should all stop from the craziness of the day-to-day activities and remember why we are all in this industry: For increasingly more of us, I believe we’re here because no other industry could bring us as close to as many fascinating, bright and hardworking people. What other industry can put us on the cutting edge

of technology? How many other people can come to work each day and have a chance to solve problems that mean so much? With regards to developing new ways to communicate, new ways to navigate, new and more efficient ways to launch a craft into the air and deliver with unparralled safety a method of transportation that is shrinking our very world, I am not sure anything compares. So when your phone rings next, or when you are walking into a new prospect’s office, remember you are about to get a chance to relay to that person that you are crazy about what you do and the people you do business with. I know based on my 39 years of involvement that I am not alone in this passion. Who knows? Perhaps you will make that next call to me and we can compare our enthusiasm. I look forward to talking and seeing many of you during 2013. Here’s wishing much success to you all! ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He served on the Duncan Aviation Customer Advisory Board for two terms and is now on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Advisory Boards. Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. More information visit www.jetsales.com Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

COMPARE AIRCRAFT FOR SALE USING OUR

Aircraft Comparative Facility at www.AvBuyer.com Whilst selecting from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 74

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wentworth January 19/12/2012 16:18 Page 1

B B

ETTER THAN A

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B O E I N G 7 5 7 -200 Exec s/n 24923

12% larger than a BBJ3, with 30+% more range potential. 25% faster climb to a 5000-ft. higher ceiling. Save $75M or so and consider this BBJ alternative: the lowest timed 757 in the world! Recent C, 7220H/ 2554 C, Rolls Royce Engines, Winglets, Forward Airstair, 40-Passenger Interior, Exceptional Flight Department, Prestigious pedigree

OEING

S27-200 S/N 22825

O UTRIGHT SALE, L EASE,

OR

L EASE/ P URCHASE.

Super 27 Valsan –217 modification. Only 5500 Hours / 3300 Cycles since new, Winglets, Recent C Inspection and Landing Gear Overhaul, MSG-3 maintenance upgrade, Boeing Aux Tanks, VIP SNEW. Beautiful new exterior and interior designed by prominent South African Designer in 2008. T RADES CONSIDERED.

C

ITATION

ENCORE S/N 579

R EPLACEMENT AIRCRAFT W ANTS IT SOLD!

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Millions of dollars spent at Duncan Aviation in 2012 on avionic and cosmetic upgrades including full new designer interior, beautiful new paint scheme, Primus Elite Upgrade with EVS 1500, Winglets, Aviator Swift Broadband, and Much, Much More.


Plane Sense March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:03 Page 1

Plane Sense on Engines

76

82

86

Powerplant Retrofits: Heart Transplants for BizJets.

Recognizing Aircraft Engine Value: It’s not in the eye of the beholder!

APUs: The little engines that do...

Powerplant Retrofits

Y

Heart Transplants for BizJets. by Dave Higdon

76

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

ou probably noticed a new option emerging for putting a business jet on the company’s asset sheet (you’ll likely see more of them in the future). The new option: program remanufacturing. World Aircraft Sales Magazine gave readers an inside look at Nextant Aerospace’s 400XT in the December 2012 issue. The foundation of this and other similar remanufacturing programs is built on the existence of a broad inventory of available modifications for business jets, making the full remanufacture www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:04 Page 2

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

aircraft or others within its segment. Just as these options help define the aircraft’s potential, so they also allow operators control over what they choose to implement and how they go about it to schedule and finance the upgrades they need. Powerplants, of course, serve as the heartbeat of any aircraft. Understandably they often hold the promise of the greatest financial and operational gains available from systems upgrades - so this month we look at the benefits that drive powerplant retrofit programs. www.AvBuyer.com

THE ‘GO’ TO GET THERE Once-upon-a-time, aircraft engines fulfilled their single defining role: Thrust provision. Whether spinning main rotors for lift or driving forward a fixed lifting surface, spinning propellers and hot exhaust perform the same job. As engines moved beyond the level of barely being powerful enough to deliver excess power, engines acquired roles beyond providing thrust alone. With the addition of generators and alternators, powerplants could provide electrical power - the motive force

option financially viable. Today’s available upgrades provide business aircraft owners and operators with options not all other airframe owners enjoy. Somewhat more than targeted systems refurbishments, these whole-airplane makeovers couple airframe renewal with upgraded engines, an approved avionics upgrade, new interior and new paint and windows. There are packaged with nothing but zero-time systems, and priced as a package to compete with a brand-new aircraft – whether unmodified versions of the same

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

77


Plane Sense March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:05 Page 3

“ Many upgrades deliver fuel-flow reductions in the 20-40 percent range.”

necessary for avionics and lights, flight-management systems, environmental control of temperature, air pressure and airflow. Powerplants also literally provide the air we breathe in pressurized aircraft cabins. Some do so directly from air bled off the engine compressor, while others work indirectly by powering a separate compressor to pressurize the cabin air. Advances in power production, efficiency and durability began immediately after the success of the first Whittle engines of the 1930s; those efforts span the turbine-engine era and continue today. As a result, the engines of today work more efficiently and more reliably than ever – producing more pounds of thrust at lighter weights, consuming less fuel per pound of thrust, too. They bring flexibility enough to be fitted onto today’s newest jet airframes – and many qualify to replace original-equipment powerplants in many older airframes. It’s a long-running idea that shows no sign of losing favor: frugal operators who know they’re fine with their existing aircraft can stick with the jet they have, and improve their operating costs with a powerplant transplant.

POWERPLANT TRANSPLANTS

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

You may be surprised at how often numbers as basic as one element can tip the tables toward a powerplant transplant.

FUELING FRUGALITY When you see overhaul costs that approach the hull value of the airplane it is not difficult to get a knot in the pit of your checkbook. Even when the million-dollar overhaul is invested in an aircraft worth $2-2.5 million, it won’t buy you lower fuel bills – not with the same old engines powering the jet afterwards. When the cost of an overhaul comes to within 80 percent of the cost of an upgrade, the upgrade becomes worth consideration. Many upgrades deliver fuel-flow reductions in the 20-40 percent range. As a case in point, the highly successful JT15D turbofan powers the Beechjet 400A and its predecessor, the Mitsubishi Diamond and the early Cessna Citations. While they were superior in size, weight and efficiency when they first arrived on the scene in 1971, during the 42 years since the JT15Ds have been surpassed by other options offering equal power at lower weights, complexity levels, maintenance costs and fuel efficiency. Both Beech Aircraft Services and Nextant rightly point to significant reductions in fuel consumption and other costs from upgrading to Williams International FJ44 engines. The Nextant 400XT gains about 50 percent in still-air range over the 400A; the Beech

Have you checked the cost of Jet A lately? Did it nudge you into reassessing the costs of operating at 2008 levels at 2013 fuel prices?

Maybe you miss the days when per-hour costs of on-condition maintenance needs left you with enough change to go a little beyond the minimally-required maintenance work in a bid to head off potential, unexpected problems at future annual inspections. Perhaps the knowledge of the impending hot-section is adding to your flying-finance frustrations, or your aircraft faces an onerous airworthiness directive that you can terminate, or at least reduce the cost of with an engine change. It may make sense for you to spend money now that you would rather not pay out later… with interest, if fuel charges continue to rise! If your engines are getting expensive, consider asking two respected colleagues for some input on the prospect of a powerplant transplant; namely your CFO and your chief pilot. What you want to know is: • First: What, if any, tax breaks or incentives still exist for capital expenditures, investments in new equipment and/or upgrading current systems? • Second: What options exist, if any, for giving the company aircraft a ‘heart transplant’? (Some airframes may qualify under more than one retrofit program. Checking both would seem optimal.) • Third: What are the net costs, wholly amortized and leveraged, for any upgrade options?

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Rolls Royce October 20/08/2012 17:54 Page 1

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Delivering the highest quality engine care and service is our

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business, and has made CorporateCare® the world leader of business

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jet engine maintenance programs. A fact recognised in more than

Friedrich, Vice President – Sales & Marketing, at +1 (703) 834-1700,

just words. Aircraft enrolled in CorporateCare have higher asset

corporate.care@rolls-royce.com.

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Trusted to deliver excellence


Plane Sense March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:06 Page 4

NEXTANT HAWKER 400XT CONVERSION

conversion is nearly the same. That means the aggregate fuel consumption plummets about 35 to 40 percent with the rest of the gain coming from airframe improvements. Now consider a pre-powerplant-transplant jet that typically flies 350 hours per year, burning 160 gallons per hour, with fuel costing approximately $7.00 per gallon. The annual fuel budget would come in at $392,000. Imagine the same jet underwent an engine upgrade, and recalculate the cost at the new fuel burn-rate of 120 gallons per hour (a mere 25 percent reduction). Your new annual fuel tab would be $294,000: That’s $98,000 dollars less that you paid the previous year, before you had the engines upgraded. Longer hot-cycle inspection and overhaul cycles would naturally contribute to further cost reductions. The breaker is finding a program that fits your airplane, your needs, and your budget. But with overhauling an engine pair in the $900,000-$1 million range, and conversions within striking distance, the long-term, fulllife costs of the conversion may actually pay – particularly when compared to keeping older engines with their higher fuel use.

The flip side of greater fuel efficiency is the ability to tanker fuel when cabin demands allow for the carriage of more fuel than needed. Avoiding fuel stops saves money, since you’ll avoid paying more than you do at home, or at other specific FBOs. Every little bit helps.

PROGRAM PROSPECTS If you own a Falcon 20 you’ve got options; a Falcon 20 Retrofit with Honeywell engines. The same can be said for the Falcon 50; the 50Dash-4 program Honeywell supports (www.50dash4.com), along with its several approved installation sites. Cessna Citations can be upgraded with Williams engines, and likewise for older Beechjet options. There are plenty of older Citations and Beechjets yet to benefit from the upgrades developed by Sierra Industries. For example, the Sierra Stallion conversions of older Citations (www.sijet.com) remain available, as does the 400A conversion Sierra Industries developed for Beech. For fans of the once-plentiful Learjet 25, Spirit Wing Aviation developed its SpiritJet that converts to FJ44 engines from the original GE 610 turbofans.

NON-DIRECT SAVINGS A jet that uses significantly less fuel missionto-mission also offers greater flexibility in planning and executing trips. For example, by working a flight plan based on fuel needed (plus NBAA reserves), an operator of an upgraded airplane will naturally be dealing with smaller fuel loads – and, along with that, the ability to carry more in the cabin.

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

TIMING IS EVERYTHING Whether you are looking at one of these programs or other, newer ones that are likely to arrive. Yet undertaking a ‘heart’ transplant is not a spur-of-the-moment project – not in Business Aviation, anyhow. Central to exercising the best option will be the research you undertook to find and qualify an option as www.AvBuyer.com

being suitable for your operation. Beyond that, timing and financing will rule the decision-making process. Timing-wise, conversion shops consistently recommend the operator plan on the conversion, retrofit or upgrade to coincide with other major projects, so if an upgrade can be worked out to match the overhaul cycle of the powerplants, so much the better. Timing to coincide with a long-term periodic airframe inspection is an equally good approach – particularly when it means skipping a second down-cycle by tackling the engine earlier than is absolutely necessary. There’s no sense in having the expense of two hangar stints if the objective can be accomplished in one visit – even if it means doing some work early. How will the cost of the upgrade be financed? The disciplined operators who diligently deposits funds into an overhaul equity account, won’t find the check-writing so painful. Timing to take best advantage of any special tax treatments is worth consideration. While it may mean moving ahead with the project a little earlier than engine health requires, it can also mean spending far less with the exercise of available tax breaks. Such benefits don’t last long. The option of an engine upgrade – or of broader programs covering avionics and more – can also be a solid reason for considering some used airframes. Given their low residual value, it just may be smarter financially to find an eligible airframe for a full treatment – giving your operations all the benefits of new, with fewer of the costs. You have the power! ■ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Plane Sense 2 March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:20 Page 1

Plane Sense on Engines

Recognizing Aircraft Engine Value It’s not in the eye of the beholder! by Steve Watkins

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

little puffs of blue smoke that came out of the tail pipes, and the engine roar was music to my ears. I had found my dream car and instantly plopped down the $1,700 asking price and drove off the lot wearing a big smile. That was the last time I smiled when thinking about that car. Within a week, the car had developed a clicking sound, and those little puffs of blue smoke were becoming less little by the mile. Within the year, I had torn down the engine (due to the massive amount of 19 cent quart bulk oil that the Aircraft Index see Page 4

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ne of my first cars was a 1964 Impala SS with the 327 hi-performance small block engine. When I went onto the car lot, I saw this black beauty – complete with black interior and fell in love. I walked around the outside of the car admiring my reflection in the flawless paintwork. Being a diligent aircraft mechanic, I naturally had to pop the hood to see the hidden powerhouse. It opened to uncover the big chrome air filter cover and the engine looked factory-new. I started it, ignoring the


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Plane Sense 2 March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:22 Page 2

GARMIN’S G1000 PANEL IN A KING AIR

OVERHAULS & INSPECTIONS

327 engine was going through), and when I had the engine stripped down it became apparent that someone had filled the crankcase with oil treatment. There was a three-inch layer of sludge on the bottom of the oil pan. The sludge explained my original false opinion of the engine along with its rapid decline that eventually saw me driving around in a haze of blue smoke. Had I known about the real condition of the engine, my ego would have still forced me to buy the car, but I am sure I would not have paid the full $1,700 for it.

IT’S THE INSIDE THAT COUNTS I admit to this impulse purchase to illustrate a point: You cannot tell the condition of any engine, car or aircraft, by its outside appearance. Hiding the actual condition is rather harder to do with an aircraft, but it can be

done. Research and examination of past maintenance documentation will help determine the value of the aircraft engines, which are major factors to consider when placing a value on the aircraft. Overhauls, Mid-Point Inspections (MPI), Life Limited Component (LLC) replacements, and scheduled inspections are the most important aircraft records to review when determining engine value.

“You cannot tell the condition of any engine, car or aircraft, by its outside appearance.“

First, check the Overhauls and MPI over the life of the engine. Is the history of the intervals changing? Many engines have their overhaul interval requirements extended over the years, so check to see if the latest overhaul coming due has been determined using the latest interval specified in the maintenance manual. Review the Service Bulletins or other maintenance options that can be performed prior to, or during the next Overhaul or MPI that will extend the Overhaul interval. If extensions are available, then the value of the engines could be increased. It is also important to look for reductions of interval or additional inspections that may be required. Some engine manufacturers have calendar interval inspections that are determined by the number of years since the last Overhaul or MPI, regardless of the hours or cycles flown. If you are looking at an aircraft with a history of low hours and cycle usage, it may sound good but could have a calendar engine Overhaul coming due that could reduce the value of the engines. There could also be inspections required due to the low utilization of the aircraft. These inspections can be required if the aircraft has not flown a certain amount of hours over a specified length of time. If this kind of inspection is required, then the engine value could be reduced. Borescope inspections can also reduce the value of an engine… A borescope inspection is usually hourly specified and requires a look inside the engine to determine the condition. If I could have only done a borescope inspection on that Impala, I would have seen all of the wear and sludge in the engine, so my purchase price would not have been the dealer’s asking price. This is why it is always a good idea to comply with the recommended borescope inspection during a pre-buy inspection.

LIFE LIMITED COMPONENTS If, at the last Overhaul, the owner was looking at obtaining an Overhaul or MPI at a lower cost, the components could have been reinstalled. Maintenance and Overhaul manuals do not require replacement of these components until they have reached an hourly or cyclic limit, even when an Overhaul is being accomplished. It is possible to have an LLC reach its maximum life prior to the Overhaul or MPI. This allows for two options; the LLC being replaced without the inspection, or the Overhaul and MPI happening at the same time. Either way, the additional cost will effect the value of the engine.

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES (AD) & SERVICE BULLETINS (SB) ADs and SBs can require the replacement or inspection of components inside the engine. These can be calendar, hourly or cyclic requirements or they can be Part Number- or Serial-Number specific. The ADs and SBs are not always related to the Overhaul or Life Limit currently required by the Maintenance

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Manual. The requirement may be at a specific interval or require it to be accomplished at the “Next Access”. Airworthiness Directives are created from Manufacturer Service Bulletins, therefore assuring that the latest and greatest Mandatory Service Bulletins are complied with as the best way to prevent unexpected major maintenance costs and reduction of the value of the aircraft engines. Above, I have referred generally to the engines, but you should also review all of the accessories on the engines for each of the previously mentioned maintenance

requirements. One of the most reliable ways to assess the value of an aircraft engine is to look for a maintenance program that provides coverage for all the previously-mentioned requirements as they occur. These programs provide peace of mind and assurance that the engines have been properly maintained, so the protection is reflected in the engines’ and ultimately the aircraft’s value. So when you are looking at buying that shiny, newly painted aircraft with upgraded avionics and a fresh interior, you may have to look deeper under the hood (or cowling) to assure that the value is worth the asking price.

“Maintenance and Overhaul manuals do not require replacement of these components until they have reached an hourly or cyclic limit, even when an Overhaul is being accomplished.“

 Steve Watkins is Technical Services Manager, Western Region for Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI). Steve has been an A&P mechanic, IA and Private Pilot for over 35 years and was a Designated Mechanics Examiner in Wichita, KS and Long Beach, CA. He has also spent time as Director of Maintenance and Chief Inspector for various FAR 135 and FAR 145 operations, owned his own maintenance shop as well as instructed at an A&P technical school and is an active member of the AMT Society.  Contact Steve at: SWatkins@jetsupport.com ■

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Plane Sense 3 March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:43 Page 1

Plane Sense on Engines

APUs: The Little Engines That Do...

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many other reasons, operators with the option will choose to equip their business aircraft with an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Think of this as the little jet engine that could (and does), roaring along out of sight from the un-pressurized space near the airplane’s tail.

APU BASICS The Auxiliary Power Unit is that jet engine you often hear while crossing a ramp; with no aircraft propulsion powerplants running they stand out for their decibel output – often in excess of idling jet engines. In reality the noise you hear is a combination of airsuction noise from the APU’s inlet passage, combined with the sound of hot, fast-rushing exhaust air making the short trip through a two-stage turbojet engine. Instead of providing motive thrust, however, the jet exhaust turns a turbine wheel from which all other power flows. Consider the following itemized list of APU Aircraft Index see Page 4

usiness aircraft do not work by powerplants alone. Beyond propulsive power, modern business-turbine aircraft need other forms of motive force: electricity – usually in multiple forms; fresh air flow to keep cool; air pressure to start main powerplants, and stand-by power at altitude (should something befall the main sources of electrical power). Much of the time powerplants fulfill all these needs simultaneous to propelling the airplane forward. Sometimes, however, the powerplants need help – or an alternative of lower costs – in fulfilling those non-propulsive roles. Batteries can make up some of the electrical needs (both aloft and grounded) as well as power fans to circulate air. But batteries are finite power sources - without concomitant replenishing they run out of juice; no engine generator or alternator, no replenishing. For engines with air-starting, ground sources do not always exist. For these and


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Plane Sense 3 March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:45 Page 2

HAMILTON SUNDSTRAND’S APS3200 - WHICH HAS TODAY ACCUMULATED MORE THAN 13 MILLION HOURS OF SERVICE.

capabilities for packages produced by Honeywell and United Technologies’ Hamilton Sundstrand division, the two major APU suppliers: • • • • •

Starting power for main engines Pneumatic power for environmental control systems Drive power for other pneumatic and hydraulic systems Back-up electrical and pneumatic power for in-flight needs Independent electrical and pneumatic power for on-the-ground needs.

So how does the little APU accomplish such heavy lifting? In essence it is packed with the hardware to produce power: the two-turbine jet-power section that, at one end, drives an electrical generator and elsewhere, off the same shaft drives a singlestage high-pressure air compressor for utility air that’s separate from the second air compressor. That second compressor is also a singlestage design, equipped for high-volume airflow to feed the combustion process. One air inlet feeds both the load compressor and the larger combustion compressor while a series of high-pressure nozzles inject fuel into the combustion chamber. It’s downstream in the combustion can that the blue flame burns creating the hot gases that drive the turbine wheels. The load compressor supplies the air pressure; an electrical generating system to fulfill the aircraft’s needs for current flow. In the absence of main-engine electricity the APU’s generator should be sufficient to power avionics, lights, galley equipment, even electrical air compressors like those used on Boeing’s ground-breaking 787 Dreamliner. Delivering electrical power and

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HAMILTON SUNDSTRAND’S APS5000

air flow via APU serves many roles – without the higher expenses of running a main engine for those needs. Even when running hours on end, the fuel impact of an APU is seldom more than two percent of the fuel consumed by the main engines.

ETOPS ENABLERS The ability of twin-engine aircraft to fly extended-range operations (known as ETOPS) that get no closer than within two, even three hours of a diversion point, stands as another one of the reasons APUs support our in-flight independence – and is among the more-routine applications of the APU. Airbus and Boeing airliners alike enjoy their ETOPS abilities because they employ highly capable APUs. By running throughout the trip – or, at the least, those legs out in the ETOPS-approved range, APUs provide assurances that even the very low prospect of a failed electrical system or engine should not result in even a tiny hiccup in electrical power or air for other needs. Aircraft makers design their products to work with APUs specific to the power needs of the aircraft – minimizing the prospects of a catastrophic outcome from an engine failure. Beyond their value as a system of independence in normal operations, it’s their value in emergency operations that nudge many operators into making them a choice wherever APUs are available. The APU performance on Flight 1549, by all measures an everyday flight before its encounter with geese, erased doubts of the worth of the APU for many a pilot.

DON’T FORGET REDUNDANCY The APU can also play a role for aircraft inflight. For example, in the unlikely event of a failure of engine-powered electrical-generation capabilities, the electricity-generating www.AvBuyer.com

APU can back up alternators, batteries and starter-generators. Some can provide compressed-airflow for air-start needs beyond their ability to cool the cabin – whether by direct airflow production or by allowing the powering of on-board air-conditioning systems independent of the main engines. These stand-by roles depend on the rapid availability of the resources output by the FBO. Consider the plight of USAirways Flight 1549 (mentioned above). The cockpit crew consisted of Capt. Chesley Burnett Sullenberger, III and First Officer Jeffrey Skiles. Moments after leaving the airspace above La Guardia Airport, New York, the Airbus A319 collided with a flock of Canada geese that knocked out both turbofans. Capt. Sullenberger fell back on his training, almost instantly calling for the start of the APU – which, thankfully, came almost instantly. The electrical power from the APU gave the crew electrical power to keep PFDs and MFDs alive and power flowing to the fly-by-wire, electrically actuated flight controls. Having the APU working kept the Airbus responsive all the way to a smooth, minimum-speed touchdown on the Hudson River west of Manhattan. The APU contributed to a casualty-free outcome that day. Had the crew needed to focus on deploying other emergency power options, the captain’s focus on his textbook-perfect touchdown would have been challenged by the likelihood of needing to fly on the standby instruments instead of the main displays.

SELF-CONTAINED OR GROUND-DEPENDENT? The arena in which the humble APU is most known for earning its keep is on the ground. On the ground is a less-hospitable environment than at altitude. And it is the inherent hostilities of ramps and runways that most Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense 3 March_FinanceNov 19/02/2013 12:47 Page 3

HONEYWELL 131-9A APU

challenge the APU’s reliability and longevity. Down-low atmospheric pollutants, corrosives, salt air, atmospheric moisture and particulates challenge the durability of every part of the APU that sees airflow. Dirty air impinges on both the engine compressors and power compressors, as well as challenging the durability of surfaces exposed to the airflow – from the screened inlets to the compressors through the exposed edges of combustion chambers and continuing through the hot, white-hot, highvelocity, high-pressure airflow through the power-turbine wheels. Beyond erosive and corrosive impact of the atmosphere the solid and chemical contaminants attack APU materials at levels micro- and macroscopic, alike – anywhere corrosion can get a molecular grip. Yet sitting idle at altitude for hours on end could create difficulties pressing the APU into service aloft, too. After cold soaking in the thin, frigid air of the flight levels the temperature swing upon start-up adds its own stresses to all the rotating parts, compressors, power turbines, all the metal alloys subjected to sudden application of high-pressure air heated to white-hot temperatures. At least up high it is clean air, though…

HONEYWELL Offering 20 basic APU models and 41 variations, Honeywell may be the most-familiar APU provider in the market. Honeywell APUs are installed on the majority of aircraft worldwide because the company has delivered more than 64,800 units for more than 150 applications over the past 60 years. 85 Series: The 85 series APU revolutionized commercial air travel as the first APU to be installed in an aircraft. Previously, commercial air crews used a ground-based source to provide electrical power and comAdvertising Enquiries see Page 8

THE LEGENDARY HONEYWELL 85 SERIES APU

pressed air for engine starting. The 85’s first installation was in a Boeing 727 back in 1963. An aerospace industry landmark, the 30,000th production unit was delivered in 1996 (of course many product improvements had been made over the years since the first). The 85 series APU was inducted into the Smithsonian Institution for being the world’s most widely used aircraft APU, and today it is currently being used to test advanced materials that increase engine life. Additionally, Honeywell created its original 131-9D APU specifically for the Boeing MD-90 airplane, and the 131-9A arrived in January 1998 designed for installation in Airbus A320 series jets. Meanwhile, the RE220 demonstrates Honeywell’s advances in aircraft system integration by being the first General Aviation APU to communicate with the aircraft’s maintenance data acquisition unit (MDAU). Linking the MDAU to the APU gives pilots and maintenance technicians a window through which they can monitor APU performance and troubleshoot faults from the aircraft flight deck. Honeywell’s largest commercial aircraft APU is the 660, designed specifically to start the massive engines used on the Boeing 747 airplane. In addition, this workhorse drives two electrical generators that provide power to the aircraft.

HAMILTON SUNDSTRAND More than 825 Hamilton Sundstrand APS2300 APUs have been delivered to more than 70 operators of Embraer 170/190 series aircraft, while more than 1,800 APS3200 APUs were delivered to more than 155 operators for their fleet of Airbus A320 aircraft. The company’s APS5000 APU, meanwhile, works aboard the new Boeing 787 Dreamliner, producing an enormous 1,100 www.AvBuyer.com

shaft horsepower for its various air and electrical functions – the Dreamliner is predominantly electrical in operation.

THE CHALLENGES OF TOMORROW The world is on a collective drive to living greener, to reducing our “carbon footprints” while improving the operating environment for those working around noisy processes, and both APU makers have been in business to meet those challenges and implement improvements to their products’ performance. Noise has long been a leading source of disconcertion. Between the standards imposed by regulators and the pressures of customer demands, the sound output of APUs has been on a steady decline. Operating economics present another front – one being met by Honeywell and Hamilton Sundstrand on their own terms. Today’s generation of APUs enjoy a higher level of fuel efficiency than models that were new only a few years ago. The efficiencies of the newer APUs also accompanies reduced pollutants from the engine’s exhaust – a product of improvements in induction, mixing and burning the fuel used. Smaller and lighter can only take you so far as you move down the chain to the level where on-board batteries can meet all but the most-demanding needs. But continual improvement will remain a hallmark for a product family that already enjoys overhaul times in the 12,000-hour-plus range. Operators even enjoy the formidable advantage of by-the-hour maintenance and warranty programs for APUs, underwritten by companies including the OEMs as well as independents such as JSSI. Given the mushroom-like life APUs lead it is impressive how well they perform, and the importance of the roles they fulfill. ■ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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GAMA March13_GAMA DEC05 19/02/2013 16:41 Page 1

GAMA FOURTH QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS

GAMA 2012 Fourth Quarter Shipment Analysis by Mike Potts ny hope that an unusually strong year-end sales surge would salvage the disappointing business aircraft delivery performance of 2012 was quickly scuttled as the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) presented its annual state of the industry news conference in February. While GAMA presented the happiest face it could, the news was grim for an audience hoping for signs of market recovery. Instead, the signs said the slump is continuing, with jet deliveries down 3.4 percent from 2011, piston sales off 1.9 percent, but turboprop numbers up 10.3 percent, based on how GAMA counts them now (the increase was entirely in agricultural aircraft). Based on traditional business turboprop deliveries, the category almost – but not quite – broke even. Evidence of an upturn was nowhere to be found. In raw numbers, jet deliveries totaled 672 units in 2012, compared with 696 the year before, making 2012 the weakest year for jet deliveries since the recession began in 2009. Turboprops (including agricultural) totaled 580 units, up from 526 - but traditional turboprops units (sans agricultural) totaled 359, down from 361. GAMA reported 881 piston deliveries, but this number is probably a little low, as American Champion did not report its fourth quarter results in time to be included in the report. Total shipments equaled 2,133 (including agricultural aircraft), up 0.6 percent from the 2,120 reported in 2011 (including agricultural units). Annual billings were off slightly, at $18.9 billion, compared with $19 billion in 2011. This reduction directly reflects the con-

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tinued softness in the jet market, which represents the vast majority of GAMA’s total billings. The shortfall between 2012 and 2011 was concentrated in the jet market and came in the second half of the year. It was particularly pronounced in the fourth quarter when the remarkable sales surge that lifted 2011 out of the category of ‘absolute disaster’ was not replicated in 2012. At the end of the third quarter in 2011 it had seemed possible that the jet market might actually fall below 600 units. Then came the big surge, and a finish just short of 700. Optimism grew as 2012 got off to a good start. At the mid-year point in 2012 jet sales stood at 295 units, fully 13.45 percent ahead of the 260 delivered in the same period in 2011. The market was beginning to look like the long-anticipated recovery was finally underway. By the end of the third quarter, however, 2012 sales had started to lag, and results for the two years were suddenly looking very similar: 430 for 2012 compared with 427 for the prior year. It isn’t clear what market forces drove the year-end surge in the jet market in 2011, but the result was that nearly 39 percent of the business jet deliveries that year came in the fourth quarter. Whatever market forces combined to produce that 2011 surge didn’t come together in quite the same way in 2012. There was a fourth quarter surge in 2012, but it was a more normal surge of about 36 percent, or a total of 242 units. That’s not bad, but it’s not enough to prevent this year from being a new low point in the recession that began in 2009. While the jet market didn’t experience an ultra-surge in 2012, the business turboprop www.AvBuyer.com

segment did. During the last three months of 2012 a total of 137 turboprops were delivered – slightly more than 38 percent of the year’s total. A similar surge occurred last year, but it wasn’t as evident because when GAMA issued its 2011 year-end report, Hawker Beechcraft hadn’t release its numbers. Last year, when GAMA issued its report, the group’s leadership strongly implied that recovery appeared imminent. This year’s official pronouncement was more guarded. Brad Mottier, GAMA’s chairman for 2013, characterized the shipment and billing data as “mixed,” and said the numbers “don’t reflect the amount of development work in progress in General Aviation,” adding that General Aviation “is poised for resurgence in the next few years as these new technologies certify and enter the market.” This reinforces a theme introduced late last year when Honeywell outlined in its forecast that new developments in technology will provide the catalyst necessary to lift our industry out of the sales slump suffered over the past four years. Until then, Honeywell added, increases in deliveries are likely to be modest. This latest GAMA shipment report contains a number of changes that we will not factor within these pages. Helicopter sales data from four manufacturers including Bell ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GAMA March13_GAMA DEC05 19/02/2013 16:43 Page 2

GAMA FOURTH QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS 12 units, making it the other jet builder reporting improved results over a year ago when it had eight deliveries. Boeing’s total included four deliveries in the fourth quarter, up from three a year ago. Airbus reported nine deliveries for the year, equal to its prior year performance. The company’s fourth quarter was down by a single unit, at three, compared with the four it recorded in the last three months of 2011.

TURBOPROP SEGMENT SUMMARY

Helicopter; Enstrom Helicopter Corp.; Eurocopter; and Robinson Helicopter Company. Our column will continue to focus only on the fixed-wing business aircraft segment of the GAMA report.

JET SEGMENT SUMMARY Turning to the specifics of the jet market, we see that half of the eight business jet manufacturers, including the two largest in terms of unit volume, had lower sales than last year. Two were even with last year’s results and two had improved sales. The leading seller of jets, by a narrow margin, was Cessna with 181 units, down slightly from 2011 when it delivered 183. In second place was Bombardier with 179, down from 182 in 2011. Both Cessna and Bombardier also had lower sales in the fourth quarter of 2012 than the year before, Cessna reporting 53 deliveries in 4Q 2012 and Bombardier, 60. Both had reported 67 units in 4Q 2011. Cessna continued to benefit from sustained strength at the light end of its product line, which last year accounted for 67 percent of its total sales (122 units in its Mustang and CJ series, combined). Embraer, which has been steadily moving upward in the total deliveries race, finished in third place in 2012 with 99 units, edging out Gulfstream which had 94. Both companies are listed as having delivered 99 the year before, although in last year’s report Gulfstream was initially credited with 107. The difference is related to how Gulfstream defines a delivery, which was altered to occur when the aircraft is completed, rather than when it is delivered “green” from the factory. GAMA has recast its prior reports to

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reflect the change. Bombardier continues to lead the jet market in billings, with a total above $5.8 billion. The company benefitted from strong demand for its high-end products. Its largest-selling model was its Global 5000/6000 series, with 54 units, which accounted for almost 56 percent of its sales by unit volume. Gulfstream was second with just over $4.1 billion. Between them, Bombardier and Gulfstream account for more than half of GAMA’s Business Aviation billings. Like Bombardier, Gulfstream’s higher-end models sold better than the less expensive models, with its large series aircraft actually having better results (83 units, up from 78) than a year ago. Dassault occupied third place in billings with $2.9 billion, and was one of two jet makers with improved sales over 2011 (66 deliveries compared with 63 the year before). The company’s positive result came in spite of having fewer sales in the fourth quarter of 2012 - 23 units - than the 28 it reported a year ago. The jet maker with the biggest decrease in sales in 2012 was Hawker Beechcraft, with a reported 32 units in the past year compared with 52 in 2011. The company appears to have experienced only a minimal fourthquarter surge, with just nine units reported in the last three months of the year compared with 22 in the same period a year ago. Hawker Beechcraft entered Chapter 11 bankruptcy during 2012 and said it would exit jet manufacturing eventually, which likely contributed to its reduced delivery performance. Once again the airliner-based business jets seemed unaffected by the recession or other factors affecting the traditional business jet manufacturers. Boeing led the category with www.AvBuyer.com

In the turboprop segment, market performance was uneven. Of the eight traditional business turboprop manufacturers, two had improved results, three were down for the year and the other three had identical sales with a year ago. The market leader was Cessna, which had been slowly gaining in this segment for several years and in 2011 edged out traditional market leader Hawker Beechcraft by a single unit (93 to 92). This year Cessna captured the lead by a wide margin with 107 deliveries, including 42 in the fourth quarter. Hawker Beechcraft was a somewhat distant second with 85, down seven units from the year before. The Hawker Beechcraft total included 30 in the fourth quarter, down seven units from the fourth quarter of 2011. In its press conference at the NBAA Convention last fall, Hawker Beechcraft announced plans to reinvent itself when it emerges from bankruptcy as a turboprop and piston manufacturer. It will be interesting to see if it can reclaim its historical premier position in the turboprop segment. Third in turboprop sales in 2012 was Pilatus with 67 units, down from 69 the year before. Pilatus had 30 deliveries in the fourth quarter, compared with 24 in 4Q 2011. Socata (with 38) and Piper (with 32) both equaled their deliveries from the year before. Socata’s fourth quarter sales (15 units) was down from 16 in 2011, while Piper’s fourth quarter sales totaled nine units in both years. Next were Quest with 15, up from 13 in the prior year; Pacific Aerospace with 10 in both of the past two years, and Piaggio with five, down significantly from 14 in 2011. GAMA listed a new entrant in the turboprop segment for 2012: Extra Aircraft of Germany reported two deliveries of its EA500 high-wing, cabin-class single engine business turboprop, one in each of the third and fourth quarters. The turboprop listings in the GAMA report also included 169 single-engine aircraft from Air Tractor and 51 from Thrush. The 2011 GAMA year-end report was amended recently to include historical results from these two companies. Unlike for business turboprops, demand for agricultural Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GAMA FOURTH QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS aircraft increased sharply in 2012, up 33 percent from 2011 when Air Tractor had 130 deliveries, and Thrush 35.

PISTON SEGMENT SUMMARY The piston segment completed its third year of flat performance in 2012. Based on the most recently amended GAMA reports, piston deliveries totaled 889 in 2010, 886 in 2011 and 881 in 2012. The margin between the three years is actually even tighter, because GAMA closed its 2012 year-end report lacking fourth quarter results from American Champion. Expect a few units higher than 881, eventually.

THE SINGLES Oddly, from a segment with such flat results, seven of the 12 piston manufacturers reporting single-engine deliveries to GAMA in 2012 had improved results over the previous year. If you didn’t otherwise know the numbers, you might conclude this is the most vibrant segment of Business Aviation manufacturing, compared with the jet segment where only two out of eight manufacturers had improved results from a year ago, and the turboprop segment where two of nine had gains. In fact, the single-engine piston segment in 2012 was slightly ahead of the

2011 total, with 790 units compared with 781 the year before. This gain, however, was offset by weaker performance in the piston twin market. Cessna and Cirrus continue to battle closely for the top spot in piston manufacturing, with Cessna achieving top position in 2012 - 264 units compared with Cirrus’ total of 253. That represented a reversal from a year ago when Cirrus led 255 to 245. Cessna’s victory this year came only after a 99-unit surge in the fourth quarter lifted them above Cirrus, which delivered just 84 units in that period. Diamond is third in piston production with 125 singles delivered, up from 112 an increase that came in spite of a weak fourth quarter surge that totaled just 29 units, compared with 40 in 4Q 2011. Piper was next with a strong performance at 87 single engine units, up almost 30 percent from the previous year. None of the other single-engine piston manufacturers had sales above 20 units for the year. These included: American Champion (18, plus missing results from the fourth quarter); Gippsland (14); Hawker Beechcraft (12), and Maule (nine). New entrant WACO reported six deliveries.

PISTON TWIN SEGMENT Total piston deliveries were held back by the piston twin market, which was off 33 percent from a year ago. This year the category was led by Piper, which delivered 39 units, up from 37 the year before, followed by Diamond which has led the segment in recent years but had only 28 deliveries in 2012, down from 70 the year before. Also in negative numbers for piston twins was Hawker Beechcraft with 24, down from 30 last year.

MARKET SUMMARY Overall, the market for new Business Aviation aircraft is very flat right now. The elements for recovery seem to be in place. Corporate profits are at record highs and the corporate world is supposedly awash in excess cash. Airline travel is an increasingly difficult and unpleasant experience. Perhaps Honeywell is correct in believing it will take the introduction of new technology to spur a market recovery. From the standpoint of this industry, it can’t come soon enough.

View GAMA’s 4Q 2012 Shipment Report (excluding Helicopters) overleaf. ❯

Airplane shipments 1, 2, 6 Manufactured Worldwide Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON

168

180

209

246

790

MULTI-ENGINE PISTON

17

19

17

38

91

TOTAL PISTON

185

199

226

284

881

TURBOPROPS

107

136

126

211

580

BUSINESS JETS

124

171

135

242

672

TOTAL TURBINE

231

307

261

453

1,252

GRAND TOTAL

416

506

487

737

2,133

Airplane shipments

1, 2, 6

YTD

Manufactured US Only 3

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

YTD

SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON

133

153

152

206

645

MULTI-ENGINE PISTON

9

14

11

29

63

TOTAL PISTON

142

167

163

235

708

TURBOPROPS

94

104

99

161

459

BUSINESS JETS

68

87

76

116

347

TOTAL TURBINE

162

191

175

277

806

GRAND TOTAL

304

358

338

512

1,514

NOTES: 1. A shipment occurs when a general aviation airplane is shipped from its production facility to a customer located anywhere in the world. 2. Shipments may include deliveries to a fractional operator owned by the company or to an aircraft dealer. 3. An airplane is considered to be manufactured in the United States when produced under an FAA production certificate. 4.Military airplane shipments are not included in shipment table totals. 5. Company billings are not reported. Where available, GAMA estimates total billings using public information including B&CA Purchase Planning Handbook 2012. 6. Cessna Aircraft Company C162 SkyCatcher (SLSA), CubCrafters CC11 and Diamond Aircraft HK36 Motor Glider models are included in civil make-model shipment total, but not summary tables. This change is intended to properly capture all deliveries by the companies listed while maintaining a consistent baseline of shipments from previous years' reports. GAMA will further integrate CS-VLA and S-LSA aircraft into future shipment reports. 7. Airbus and Boeing twin aisle shipments will be identified in the report as opposed to in the footnotes going forward. GAMA, however, is not including the value of twin aisle airplane shipments in the calculation of billings. 8. Air Tractor is new to the report starting first quarter 2012. Historical data was added to the 2011 report. 9. American Champion Aircraft fourth quarter 2012 data was not available at the time of publication. 10. CubCrafters was added to the report for year end 2012. Historical data was added to the 2011 report. 11. Extra Aircraft was added to the report in third quarter 2012. Historical data is not available for the EA-300 and not used in year-over-year summary table. 12. Gulfstream deliveries will be recognized at the time of completion ("outfitted") starting 2012 to better align with shipment recognition with other OEMs. The 2011 report has been updated and prior years’ data will be amended. 13. Thrush Aircraft is new to the report starting first quarter 2012. Historical data was added to the 2011 report. 14. WACO Aircraft Company was added to the report for year end 2012. Historical data has been added to the 2011 report. ■

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

93


GAMA March13_GAMA DEC05 19/02/2013 16:45 Page 4

GAMA FOURTH QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT REPORT

Fourth Quarter Airplane Shipment Report 2012 MAKE & MODEL

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

GRAND TOTAL CIVIL SHIPMENTS

416

506

487

737

2,133

GRAND TOTAL AIRPLANE BILLINGS

$3,493,417,155

$4,737,932,849

$4,114,003,939

$6,550,175,258

$18,872,514,646

ACJ318

0

1

1

0

2

ACJ319

2

1

0

3

6

ACJ320

0

0

0

0

0

ACJ330

0

0

1

0

1

TOTAL UNITS

2

2

2

3

9

TOTAL BILLINGS

$166,000,000

$145,000,000

$65,000,000

$240,000,000

$616,000,000

AT-401B

0

1

0

0

1

AT-402A

1

0

0

0

1

AT-402B

5

5

4

7

21

AT-502A

0

0

0

1

1

AT-502B

22

21

13

25

81

AT-504

2

1

2

1

6

AT-602

4

2

0

4

10

AT-802

2

8

4

4

18

AT-802A

8

5

7

10

30

TOTAL UNITS

44

43

30

52

169

$18,177,397

$19,170,273

$13,375,374

$22,627,164

$73,350,207

CHAMP 7EC

0

0

0

N/A

0

AURORA 7ECA

0

0

0

N/A

0

ADVENTURER 7GCAA

0

0

0

N/A

0

CITABRIA EXPLORER 7GCBC

1

2

0

N/A

3

SCOUT 8GCBC

2

1

4

N/A

7

SUPER DECATHALON 8KCAB

2

2

4

N/A

8

TOTAL UNITS

5

5

8

N/A

18

TOTAL BILLINGS

$832,500

$802,500

$1,375,200

N/A

$3,010,200

BBJ

0

0

2

0

2

BBJ 2

1

1

0

0

2

BBJ 3

0

0

0

0

0

B747-8

1

3

0

4

8

TOTAL UNITS

2

4

2

4

12

TOTAL BILLINGS

$63,000,000

$63,000,000

$106,000,000

$0

$232,000,000

AIRBUS

YTD

7

AIR TRACTOR

8

TOTAL BILLINGS AMERICAN CHAMPION AIRCRAFT

BOEING BUSINESS JETS

9

7

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40XR/45XR

2

3

8

11

24

LEARJET 60XR

3

3

1

8

15

CHALLENGER 300

11

13

11

13

48

CHALLENGER 605

8

12

7

7

34

GLOBAL 5000/6000

4

14

17

19

54

94

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAI_WAS_MAR13_Layout 1 2/14/13 12:23 PM Page 1

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2006 TBM 850

Only 725 Hours TTSN. Equipped with RVSM, 2-Tube Bendix EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s with WAAS, Garmin GMX-200 MFD with Chartview, TAS/TAWS, WX-500, Garmin GDL-69A Real Time Weather, and Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 Transponders.

2001 TBM 700B

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jp@caijets.com PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

1,250 TTSN, Collins Proline 21 Avionics, Fresh 1,200 Hour Inspection, ECH-5000 Electronic Charts, TCAS II Change 7, Rosenview LX Passenger Information System with 8.4” Slide Mount LCD Display, RVSM Equipped, Paint & Interior in Excellent Condition and NDH.

1991 TBM 700A

2,039 Hours Total Time, 690 SHS, Dual Garmin 530's WAAS, 2-Tube EFIS, GMX-200 MFD, Chartview, GDL 69A w/Passenger Remote Control, Skywatch, WX-1000E, Shimmy Damper Mod, New Interior in 2008 - Excellent Condition, No Damage History, and ALWAYS HANGARED.

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www.caijets.com


GAMA March13_GAMA DEC05 19/02/2013 16:46 Page 5

GAMA FOURTH QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT REPORT MAKE & MODEL

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

YTD 4

BOMBARDIER (CONTINUED)

CL850/870/890

1

1

0

2

TOTAL UNITS

29

46

44

60

179

TOTAL BILLINGS

$818,500,000

$1,556,300,000

$1,553,100,000

$1,904,800,000

$5,832,700,000

162 SKYCATCHER

5

7

2

5

14

172R SKYHAWK

14

5

4

4

27

172S SKYHAWK SP

11

29

23

50

113

182T SKYLANE

9

12

4

23

48

T182T TURBO SKYLANE

8

4

3

4

19

206H STATIONAIR

4

2

6

4

16

T206H TURBO STATIONAIR

3

12

11

14

40

350 CORVALIS

1

0

0

0

1

400 CORVALIS TT

0

0

0

0

0

208 CARAVAN 675

4

3

3

1

11

208B GRAND CARAVAN

12

21

22

41

96

510 CITATION MUSTANG

7

11

6

14

38

525A CITATION CJ2+

5

4

3

7

19

525B CITATION CJ3

6

6

5

4

21

525C CITATION CJ4

10

14

11

9

44

560 CITATION XLS+

3

11

7

10

31

680 CITATION SOVEREIGN

4

3

8

7

22

750 CITATION X

3

0

1

2

6

TOTAL UNITS

109

144

119

199

571

TOTAL BILLINGS

$380,559,427

$454,059,923

$460,066,676

$557,406,415

$1,852,092,441

CIRRUS SR20

19

15

24

26

84

CIRRUS SR22

13

18

15

35

81 88

CESSNA AIRCRAFT COMPANY

6

CIRRUS AIRCRAFT

CIRRUS SR22T

13

27

25

23

TOTAL UNITS

45

60

64

84

253

TOTAL BILLINGS

$23,068,699

$33,299,587

$34,401,690

$47,307,469

$138,077,445

CC11 SPORT CUB S2

0

0

0

0

0

CC11 CARBON CUB SS

14

16

16

11

57

CC18 TOP CUB

1

0

0

0

1

TOTAL UNITS

15

16

16

11

58

$2,989,990

$3,232,000

$3,232,000

$2,255,000

$11,708,990

FALCON 900LX

2

2

1

2

7

FALCON 2000LX

4

6

2

10

22

FALCON 7X

9

11

6

11

37

TOTAL UNITS

15

19

9

23

66

TOTAL BILLINGS

$683,800,000

$852,800,000

$420,200,000

$982,000,000

$2,938,800,000

HK-36

0

3

0

0

3

DV20

1

2

3

3

9

DA20-C1

6

6

6

5

23

DA40 (ALL)

21

15

36

21

93

DA42 (ALL)

8

5

6

9

28

TOTAL UNITS

36

31

51

38

156

TOTAL BILLINGS

$13,057,380

$9,422,870

$17,231,610

$13,832,170

$53,544,030

4

7

5

13

29

CUB CRAFTERS

6, 10

TOTAL BILLINGS DASSAULT FALCON JET

DIAMOND AIRCRAFT

EMBRAER

6

5

PHENOM 100

96

5

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Project4_Layout 1 18/02/2013 15:42 Page 1


GAMA March13_GAMA DEC05 20/02/2013 14:29 Page 6

GAMA FOURTH QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT REPORT MAKE & MODEL

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

YTD

PHENOM 300

8

10

6

24

48

LEGACY 650

1

2

1

13

17

LINEAGE E190 HEAD OF STATE

0

1

0

1

2

SHUTTLES (ERJs AND E-JETS)

0

0

1

2

3

TOTAL UNITS

13

20

13

53

99

TOTAL BILLINGS

$115,160,000

$226,710,000

$141,230,000

$769,560,000

$1,252,660,000

EA300

N/A

N/A

10

9

19

EA500

N/A

N/A

1

1

2

TOTAL UNITS

N/A

N/A

11

10

21

TOTAL BILLINGS

N/A

N/A

$4,300,000

$4,000,000

$8,300,000

GA8 AIRVAN

6

4

2

2

14

TOTAL UNITS

6

4

2

2

14

TOTAL BILLINGS

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

EXTRA AIRCRAFT

11

GIPPSAERO PTY LTD

5

GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE CORP.

5, 12

GULFSTREAM G150/200/280

2

3

0

6

11

G350/450/500/550/650

17

18

17

31

83

TOTAL UNITS

19

21

17

37

94

TOTAL BILLINGS

$900,745,000

$938,080,000

$891,430,000

$1,336,823,871

$4,067,078,871

BEECHCRAFT BONANZA G36

4

2

4

2

12

BEECHCRAFT BARON G58

3

3

2

16

24 25

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORP

BEECHCRAFT KING AIR C90GTx

10

2

5

8

BEECHCRAFT KING AIR 250

2

4

8

8

22

BEECHCRAFT KING AIR 350i

6

8

10

14

38

BEECHCRAFT PREMIER IA

0

1

2

0

3

HAWKER 900XP

3

7

5

2

17

HAWKER 4000

3

2

0

7

12

TOTAL UNITS

31

29

36

57

153

TOTAL BILLINGS

$218,361,100

$261,281,800

$240,782,500

$397,182,900

$1,117,608,300

XL2

0

0

0

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

0

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

MX-7-180B

0

1

0

0

1

MXT-7-180

2

0

0

1

3

M-7-235C

1

0

0

0

1

MT-7-235

0

1

0

0

1

M-7-260C

1

0

2

0

3

TOTAL UNITS

4

2

2

1

9

TOTAL BILLINGS

$760,830

$327,844

$364,640

$162,278

$1,615,592

LIBERTY AEROSPACE

MAULE AIR, INC.

MOONEY AIRCRAFT M20R OVATION

0

0

0

0

0

M20TN ACCLAIM

0

0

0

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

0

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

PAC 750XL

3

5

1

1

10

TOTAL UNITS

3

5

1

1

10

TOTAL BILLINGS

$5,332,446

$9,338,990

$1,950,000

$1,605,575

$18,227,011

0

1

1

3

5

PACIFIC AEROSPACE LTD

PIAGGIO AERO P.180 AVANTI II

98

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


GAMA March13_GAMA DEC05 19/02/2013 16:47 Page 7

GAMA FOURTH QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT REPORT MAKE & MODEL

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

TOTAL UNITS

0

1

1

3

YTD 5

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$7,195,000

$7,195,000

$21,585,000

$35,975,000

PC-6

0

1

0

4

5

PC-12 TOTAL UNITS TOTAL BILLINGS

5 5 $22,325,000

14 15 $64,351,000

17 17 $75,905,000

26 30 $124,123,000

62 67 $286,704,000

PA-28-161 WARRIOR III

8

4

4

4

20

PA-28-181 ARCHER III

2

0

1

1

4

PA-28R-201 ARROW

1

1

0

0

2

PA-34-220T SENECA V

4

3

1

9

17

PA-44-180 SEMINOLE

2

8

8

4

22

PA-46-350P MALIBU MIRAGE

12

10

13

14

49

PA-46R-350T MATRIX

2

4

5

1

12

PA-46-500TP MERIDIAN

6

9

8

9

32

TOTAL UNITS

37

39

40

42

158

TOTAL BILLINGS

$31,578,203

$37,423,010

$37,877,665

$42,070,874

$148,949,752

KODIAK 100

2

4

3

6

15

TOTAL UNITS

2

4

3

6

15

TOTAL BILLINGS

$3,340,000

$7,000,000

$5,250,000

$10,500,000

$26,090,000

TBM 850

5

11

7

15

38

TOTAL UNITS

5

11

7

15

38

$17,200,000

$37,320,000

$23,930,000

$51,230,000

$129,680,000

S2R-T34

7

11

8

13

39

S2RHG-T65

0

0

0

0

0

S2R-T660

0

0

0

0

0

S2R-G10

1

0

2

0

3

S2R-H80

0

0

0

9

9

TOTAL UNITS

8

11

10

22

51

$6,098,797

$9,559,000

$7,976,000

$19,118,000

$42,751,797

YMF-5D

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

6

TOTAL UNITS

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

6

TOTAL BILLINGS

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$3,000,000

$4,737,932,849

$4,114,003,939

$6,550,175,258

$18,872,514,646

PILATUS

PIPER AIRCRAFT, INC

QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY

SOCATA

TOTAL BILLINGS THRUSH AIRCRAFT, INC.

13

TOTAL BILLINGS WACO AIRCRAFT COMPANY

14

GRAND TOTAL AIRPLANE BILLINGS $3,493,417,155

THE WORLD’S FINEST

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

99


Safety Matters March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 09:28 Page 1

SAFETY MATTERS: HAND FLYING SAFELY

Straightening Up, Flying Right: It takes regular practice to do it well.... by Dave Higdon oss of Control: it’s the biggest cause of General Aviation accidents, particularly for turbine aircraft. With more safety systems and automation than ever, what could possibly allow this status to occur? Two words provide the answer: ‘Hand’ and ‘Flying’ (or at least the lack of it amid an increased emphasis on training to work the automated systems that can fly the airplane almost on their own). The proliferation of aircraft equipped with systems has essentially turned cockpit work into a button-pushing, knob-turning position. We repeat: Despite the automation, loss of control dominates accident statistics.

L

IT’S NO FAIRY TALE Once upon a time, smooth, deft, efficient control distinguished the expert aviator. Today, systems management and systems emergencies take precedent in much of the initial, transitional and recurrent training. The problem reaches from the heights of the airline community right down to the grass-roots of flying. That expanse exists because of the proliferation of glass cockpits, cockpit automation, hazard-avoidance-information saturation and push-button travel.

100

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

What once equipped only jet airliners and high-end business jets now pervades aviation from the largest airliner down through the entirety of the propjets and into most piston aircraft (including a large percentage of Light Sport Aircraft). LSA OEMs justify their digital panels partly because of weight and a growing cost advantage – and also the increasing number of professional cockpit-bound students they’re training. Yes: That’s a lack of a hand-flying focus as these students move up the ladder. And as pilots move up in ratings, the focus fades on individual hand-flying skills and shifts more to crisis management, rules and regulations, and managing the increasingly complex systems with a focus on unusual systems situations.

LET’S GIVE OURSELVES A HAND… So how does the above square with the debris of accidents from which investigators found that fundamental skills failed – and that they failed veteran aviators as much as those with far less experience? What can be done to address it? A set of recommendations by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board challenging the www.AvBuyer.com

community’s pilots to turn off their Flight Management Systems, turn down their computer screens and engage in the most-fundamental of all aviating skills - of flying by hand - have been published. The latest recommendations came in early 2013 as a SAFO letter from the FAA, but the issue isn’t new – it’s just more urgent as automation and complexity of cockpit systems continues to grow. View it here: http://www.faa.gov/other_ visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/airline_ safety/safo/all_safos/media/2013/SAFO13002.pdf> Aircraft Index see Page 4


Safety Matters March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 09:29 Page 2

The FAA encourages an integrated approach to training firstly by incorporating emphasis of manual flight operations into both line operations and training – across the board, from initial, to recurrent, to upgrade. The agency urged operators and owners to develop or review operational policies to ensure pilots receive appropriate opportunities to exercise manual flying skills. Such opportunities could be hand-flying in nonRVSM airspace, during low workload conditions, in weather that doesn’t present a risk to the training. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

The FAA also advised operators that they should develop, or review their policies to ensure that pilots understand when to turn to the automated systems – for example, during high workload conditions or airspace procedures that require use of autopilot for precise operations. The operator may want to consider the full-time use of augmented-crew operations because they can, like automation, also limit a pilot’s opportunity to engage in manual-flight operations. Company operational policies should ultimately ensure that all pilots enjoy www.AvBuyer.com

appropriate opportunities to exercise their hand-flying knowledge and skills in flight operations. Part of FAA’s recommendation focuses on skills beyond the basics of hand flying and on recovery from unusual attitudes (which will form the basis for a future article).

THERE’S PRACTICE AND THERE’S PRACTICE The hand-flying practice in piston singles provides as much impact for the pilot as doing ❯ the same maneuvers in a turbine-powered WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

101


Safety Matters March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 09:31 Page 3

SAFETY MATTERS: HAND FLYING SAFELY

aircraft. Naturally, practicing in a turbine airplane has its own value (specifically the relevance to any emergency or unusual procedures, and the pilot’s knowledge and control of the turbine aircraft systems), but in terms of the value to honing hand-flying skills, booking some time with your favorite Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI) in that Beech, Cessna, Piper, or other piston single is a worthwhile approach. Likewise, flying approaches in the piston single, flying under the hood without autopilot assistance, and practicing both common and rarely-used instrument approaches brings its own extra-value benefits. The hand-flying training can be tailored specifically to the corporate pilot flying business-turbine aircraft.

TARGET THE WEAKEST SKILLS All of the above is of no use if all the pilot does is swap from flying automated in a turbine to flying automated in a piston. Several pilots of my acquaintance admit to frequent soirees into hand-flying their business-turbine airplanes. Truth is, these pilots, above-average in general, hand-fly their airplanes via panel inputs more than through control-system interaction. They’re really only putting the FMS in “HEADING” and “ALT” modes, twisting the DG heading bug to what ATC tells them, and dialing in altitude settings for the FMS to capture. Is that hand flying in the classic sense? Hardly… A professional flight instructor and frequent transition tutor/mentor told World Aircraft Sales Magazine that he considers handflying to be ‘no machine’ input. “Hands on

102

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

the yoke, feet on the rudder pedals, the throttles…and working them together with trim and flaps to do manually what the machine does so easily automatically: hit airspeeds, altitudes, headings, just like you were back in instrument training, but in a jet or a turboprop.” He and several other instructor-rated pilots contributed their opinions on the skills to focus on and the routines that help test those skills. Following is our list of top skills for focus in Hand-Flying practice. 1. Stall Recognition & Recovery (all available attitudes) The incidences of stalls close to the ground remains high enough to warrant special focus on recognizing stalls, their onset, their recovery methods, and practicing them at various attitudes. Recovery training should be undertaken as aggressively as possible for the circumstance. Try to sustain a sense of urgency, even when practicing stall onsets while high enough to safely demonstrate the accompanying recovery techniques. Then work to see how quickly you can recover from a fully developed stall (in terms of feet and seconds). Once established, work to improve, and remember – the goal is retaining control. 2. Maneuvering at Minimum Airspeeds As one of the prime contributors to low-altitude loss-of-control incidents, maneuvering at minimum controllable airspeeds should be seen as another skill basic to the flying envelop. Every airplane has an airspeed at which it barely flies but remains maneuverable, www.AvBuyer.com

without stalling, if flown correctly. Early in our flight training we learned to make turns around a point; to fly boxes around a single point on the ground; to fly circles that kept a central point; even through changes in wind direction and relative velocity. The key is to learn to be a pilot familiar, and comfortable with flying aircraft at the slowest it can fly – and still maneuver. 3. Precision Speed Control Every aircraft brings to the runway its own distinct set of numbers, as well as combinations of ways to accomplish the different numbers. Speed is an element as important as any other in controlling a machine that moves through three dimensions. The best aviators possess an innate ability to hit any speed with any one of several different combinations of power and pitch. Absent precision in speed, management of accurate maneuvering can be difficult to achieve. 4. The Tactile Pilot Every airplane comes with its own set of individual numbers for individual performance parameters; it’s possible to make an airplane do what you want by simply achieving the numbers that work and plugging them in ‘check-list’ fashion. But the pilots who truly get the best from their aircraft need not consult a chart to know where the airplane best flies. The best pilots control the airplane like it’s an extension of their minds... 5. Eyeball Aviating One of the devices contributing to the deterioration of hand-flying skills is also one of the ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Safety Matters March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 09:31 Page 4

SAFETY MATTERS: HAND FLYING SAFELY

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[Latin ]

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A division, section of time.

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A space, period, moment of time.

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major safety enhancements of the glass-panel era: the electronic attitude indicator and the combined Primary Flight Display instrument collection. We re-iterate: The time spent learning the avionics has come at the expense of learning to fly by hand, instinctively. Turn off the PFD in that Skyhawk; pop the breaker on the Piper; ban instrument altogether from that Bonanza. 6. Autopilot failures The very piece of automation designed to relieve pilots of hand-flying demands can itself become a source of controlled-flight departure, which is an issue of increasing concern in flight safety. The catalysts may vary, from runaway elevator trim; a roll servo failing into turn mode; or errors in communications between the brains and the brawn. The best hedge against losing a contest with an autopilot is practice: Practicing, with a safety pilot, control of severely out of trim conditions induced by your training partner; disconnecting the autopilot; finding and pulling breakers for autopilot, trim and servos. Recognition is the most critical step – but recognition without the ability to take conditions into your hands will lead to the same outcome.

1*-"564%&"-&34)*1t13&08/&%+&54"-&4 563#013014"-&4

THE IDEAL OUTCOME The old instructors all counseled that to truly experience the simplicity and confidence borne by hand flying, the best practice areas were right in the patterns of the airports near your home. Some will claim otherwise, but it’s even possible at night (although experts advise engaging a safety pilot for this, and the other areas of practice planned). Ultimately, flying something slow and tactile to hone corroded hand-flying skills will feel useful and relevant elsewhere. You’ll probably find that the rust comes off quicker than you expected – and that polishing these skills actually serves to increase your comfort and confidence in the regular airplane that you fly - with all that electronic equipment working. You’ll know you don’t really need it; it’s just there to help you.

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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ACSpecs IntroMarch13_AC Specs Intronov06 19/02/2013 14:33 Page 1

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: LIGHT & ENTRY LEVEL JETS

APRIL ISSUE: Turboprops MAY ISSUE: Large Cabin Jets JUNE ISSUE: Medium Jets

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Description of Cost Elements he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Light & Entry Level Jets – appears opposite, to be followed by Turboprops next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only, but Conklin & de Decker provides details of older airplanes too. If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know.

T

❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

106

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs. VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door. BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.). CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.). WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight. SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alter-

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nate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For single-engine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing distance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


BO MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T3 BO 1A MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T3 1A BO /ER MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T4 BO 0 MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T4 0X BO R MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T4 5 BO MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T4 5X CE SSN R AC ITA TIO NJ ET CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J1

AircraftPer&SpecMarch13_PerfspecDecember06 19/02/2013 14:46 Page 1

LIGHT & ENTRY LEVEL JETS $2,358.03

$2,358.57

$2,171.20

$2,089.91

$2,225.65

$2,137.90

$1,560.11

$1,471.35

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.35

4.35

4.92

4.92

4.92

4.92

4.8

4.75

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.95

4.95

5.12

5.12

5.12

5.12

4.83

4.83

CABIN LENGTH FT.

12.9

12.9

17.67

17.67

19.75

19.75

11

11

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

271

261

368

363

410

410

186

198

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.16

3.75

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.25

4.25

DOOR WIDTH FT.

3

3

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

2

2

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

40

30

15

15

15

15

4

8

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

50

50

50

50

51

51

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

6

6

6

6

8

8

5

5

MTOW LBS

17200

17700

20350

21000

20500

21500

10400

10600

MLW LBS

16000

16000

19200

19200

19200

19200

9700

9800

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

11203

11247

13718

13949

13890

14125

6950

7050

USEABLE FUEL LBS

4124

4653

5375

6062

6062

6062

3220

3220

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1873

2000

1507

1239

798

1563

330

430

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2297

2253

2282

2051

2110

1875

1450

1350

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1211

1480

1573

1778

1423

1685

750

775

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1337

1600

1707

1960

1968

1937

1130

1161

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3800

3800

4330

4680

4350

5040

4010

4220

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4200

4200

4033

4060

4063

4105

4333

4407

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

5110

4890

2820

2820

2800

2630

3311

3230

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1610

1515

710

394

590

589

868

850

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

462

462

465

465

465

465

377

381

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

441

441

436

436

436

436

364

381

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

417

417

428

433

416

436

302

307

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TFE 731-2

TFE 731-2

FJ44-1A

FJ44-1A

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

TFE 731-20AR TFE 731-20BR TFE 731-20AR TFE 731-20BR

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

107


AircraftPer&SpecMarch13_PerfspecDecember06 19/02/2013 14:46 Page 2

CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J1+ CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J2 CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J2+ CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J3 CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J4 CE SSN AC ITA TIO NB RA VO CE SSN AC ITA TIO NE NC OR CE E SSN AC ITA TIO NE NC OR E+

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

LIGHT & ENTRY LEVEL JETS $1,500.07

$1,557.53

$1,653.49

$1,763.49

$2,058.21

$1,783.30

$2,122.50

$2,081.78

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.7

4.75

4.75

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.83

4.83

4.83

4.83

4.83

4.8

4.83

4.83

CABIN LENGTH FT.

11

13.58

13.58

15.67

17.3

15.75

17.33

17.33

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

198

248

248

283

311

278

307

307

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4

4.25

4.25

4.25

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

-

4

-

-

6

28

28

28

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

45

70

65

65

71

46

43

43

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

5

6

6

6

7

7

7

7

MTOW LBS

10700

12375

12500

13870

17110

14800

16630

16830

MLW LBS

9900

11500

11525

12750

15660

13500

15200

15200

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

7035

7900

7980

8585

10350

9375

10525

10460

USEABLE FUEL LBS

3220

3932

3930

4710

5828

4824

5400

5400

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

545

668

715

775

1052

801

905

1170

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

1365

1400

1720

1925

2150

1925

2075

2390

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

895

1075

1194

1374

1667

1290

1410

1494

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1245

1530

1626

1891

1991

1720

1736

1792

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3990

3820

3810

3440

3500

4160

3920

3920

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4135

4628

4645

4203

3978

4295

4195

4182

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3290

3870

4120

4478

3858

3190

4740

4620

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

906

1160

1004

1090

1248

845

1440

1400

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

389

413

413

417

454

405

430

430

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

389

413

413

417

454

405

430

430

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

307

344

351

348

380

335

372

372

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

FJ44-1AP

FJ44-2C

FJ44-3A-24

FJ44-3A

FJ44-4A

PW530A

PW535A

PW535B

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

108

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


CE SSN AC ITA TIO NM US TA CE NG SSN AC ITA TIO NU LTR A CE SSN AC ITA TIO NV CE SSN AC ITA TIO NX LS CE SSN AC ITA TIO NX LS+ EC LIP SE AE RO SPA CE EC LIP SE EC LIP 50 0 SE AE RO SPA CE EC LIP EM SE BR 55 AE 0 RP HE NO M 10 0

AircraftPer&SpecMarch13_PerfspecDecember06 19/02/2013 14:47 Page 3

LIGHT & ENTRY LEVEL JETS $1,034.42

$2,353.60

$2,331.27

$2,407.84

$2,377.03

$932.13

$899.84

$1,179.97

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.5

4.8

4.8

5.7

5.7

4.16

4.16

4.92

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.58

4.83

4.83

5.5

5.5

4.66

4.66

5.08

CABIN LENGTH FT.

9.8

17.33

17.33

18.5

18.5

7.6

7.6

11

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

144

292

292

461

461

160

160

208

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

3.8

4.25

4.25

4.5

4.5

3.9

3.9

4.86

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2

2

2

2

1.96

1.96

2.04

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

6

26

26

10

10

16

16

11

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

57

41

41

80

80

-

-

60

CREW #

1

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

4

7

7

8

8

3

3

5

MTOW LBS

8645

16300

15900

20200

20200

6000

6000

10472

MLW LBS

8000

15200

15200

18700

18700

5600

5600

9766

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

5550

9950

9400

12800

12800

3834

3834

7132

USEABLE FUEL LBS

2580

5771

5770

6740

6740

1698

1698

2804

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

600

779

930

860

860

502

502

580

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

1200

2250

1800

2300

2300

1088

1088

1312

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

718

1259

1220

1539

1528

574

574

926

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1070

1651

1644

1989

1976

964

964

1124

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3380

3510

3740

3910

3910

2898

2898

4376

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3683

3833

3750

4738

4738

5173

5173

4122

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3010

4230

3684

3500

3500

2575

2575

3061

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

870

728

1139

800

800

780

780

852

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

340

400

397

433

440

371

371

390

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

340

400

397

433

440

369

369

390

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

319

372

350

373

373

330

330

333

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

PW615F

JT15D-5D

JT15D-5A

PW545B

PW545C

PW610F-A

PW610F-A

PW617F-E

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

109


EM BR AE R

PH EN OM

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

30 0 HA WK ER BEE CH CR AFT BEE HA CH WK JET ER 40 BEE 0A CH CR AFT HA HA WK WK ER ER 40 0X BE P EC HC RA FT HA HA WK WK ER ER 40 BEE 0X CH PR CR AFT PRE MI HA ER WK I ER BE EC HC RA FT PR NE EM XTA IER NT IA AE RO SPA CE 40 HO 0X ND T AH A42 0H ON DA JET

AircraftPer&SpecMarch13_PerfspecDecember06 19/02/2013 14:48 Page 4

LIGHT & ENTRY LEVEL JETS $1,825.12

$2,364.94

$2,249.17

$1,860.67

$1,684.81

$1,660.34

$1,787.71

$1,173.69

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.92

4.8

4.8

4.8

5.4

5.4

4.8

4.94

CABIN WIDTH FT.

5.08

4.9

4.9

4.9

5.5

5.5

4.9

5

CABIN LENGTH FT.

17.17

15.6

15.6

15.6

13.6

13.6

15.6

12

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

325

305

305

305

315

315

305

-

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.86

4.16

4.2

4.2

4.16

4.167

4.2

-

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.38

2.41

2.4

2.4

2.125

2.125

2.4

-

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

11

31

31

31

23

23

31

-

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

74

25

25

25

55

55

25

66

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

7

7

8

8

6

6

7

5

MTOW LBS

17968

16100

16300

16300

12500

12500

16300

9963

MLW LBS

16865

15700

15700

15700

11600

11600

15700

-

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

11783

10915

10985

10900

8565

8600

10531

-

USEABLE FUEL LBS

5353

4912

4912

4912

3611

3670

4912

-

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

942

473

603

688

414

320

1057

-

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2216

2085

2015

2100

1435

1400

2469

-

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1692

1180

1180

1243

850

850

1852

1035

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1937

1519

1519

1974

1340

1340

2108

1304

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3474

4600

4600

4030

4650

4650

4600

-

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3741

5083

5025

5237

5208

5208

4045

-

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4050

4020

4020

5000

4000

4000

5000

3990

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1026

560

560

620

948

948

995

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

453

458

450

450

461

454

471

420

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

453

449

450

450

426

426

460

420

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

383

410

410

425

370

370

405

-

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

PW535E

JT15D-5

JT15D-5R

FJ44-4A-32

FJ44-2A

FJ44-2A

FJ44-3AP

HF120

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

I

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

110

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Developing Markets_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 14:12 Page 1

DEVELOPING MARKETS - RUSSIA

A Look On The Inside: The Maintenance Market in Russia. by Anna Nazarova ver the course of 2012 within the service sector of Russian Business Aviation a long awaited trend began to emerge: Fixed Base Operations away from Moscow. Midway through 2012, Avkom-D opened its first MRO facility in Irkutsk (Siberia), and now has its sights firmly set on Omsk (southwestern Siberia) and Khabarovsk (just 30 kilometers from the Chinese border). As exciting as the trend is, however, a large part of the money spent on MRO by Russia’s Business Aviation operators still passes by the local service providers.

O

THE LOST $300 MILLION… The Business Aviation fleet in Russia has been growing steadily over recent years, and according to market participants, over 150 to 380 business airplanes are operated

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

by Russian owners. For various reasons, however, most of the fleet of business jets operated by Russian owners are on foreign registers. According to Eugene Bakhtin, chairman of the board at Avkom-D, only 48 business jets were on the Russian register (as of the end of 2012), and a large proportion of the foreign-registered, Russian-operated aircraft head to foreign service centers for their maintenance. Bakhtin (and others) outline that the market for business aircraft maintenance in Russia has impressive prospects. He especially values the potential of the technical support market which, factoring Russian-owned aircraft that are on the Russian and Foreign registers, turns over no less than $350 million annually. Remove the Foreign-registered aircraft from the equation, however, and the small portion www.AvBuyer.com

of business aircraft flying on the Russian register accounts for just $75-100 million. An inadequate infrastructure of domestic companies offering MRO often does not allow for a full range of maintenance and repairs, which in practice reduces their share to just $45-50 million a year of the potential $350 million. The remaining crumbs of the maintenance ‘pie’ are divided between local and Foreign Service providers operating within the Russian market. In the Moscow aviation hub which accounts for most of the flights of business aircraft, maintenance services are provided by Avkom-D (Domodedovo); Jet Aviation (Vnukovo-3); Air Group - in conjunction with Finnish outfit Airfix Aviation (Sheremetyevo); and a subsidiary of Gazprom (Ostafievo). Avkom-D, located at Domodedovo, was Russia's first business jet technical service Aircraft Index see Page 4


Developing Markets_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 14:14 Page 2

THE FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY CREATES A NEED FOR BUSINESS AVIATION IN SIBERIA.

BIZAV IS OFTEN THE ONLY ADEQUATE MODE OF TRANSPORTATION FOR THE UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INDUSTRIES OF SIBERIA.

center with the Aviation Engineering service of the company receiving its operator’s certificate in 1993 when Russian Business Aviation was in its infancy, and was almost exclusively the domain of foreign businessmen arriving in Russia.

PIONEERING INTO SIBERIA Before 2012, such MRO bases were kept to within the European part of Russia. Now, as outlined above, the business of on-site aircraft maintenance has begun forming in other parts of the country - particularly in Siberia and the Far East, pioneered by Avkom-D with the opening of its Irkutsk facility. "The expansion of the aircraft fleets of our partners, and the urgent requirements of customers for on-site services (eliminating the unnecessary cost of moving their aircraft for maintenance to Europe and the Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

U.S.) are the main reasons for expansion of our services in Siberia and the Far East," explains Eugene Bakhtin. According to Bakhtin, the main customers of the base in Irkutsk are companies operating in the upstream and downstream industries, whose representatives often hold meetings and inspections in the various cities around Siberia. Here, business jets are often used by medium-sized enterprises, and since Business Aviation is almost the only way to efficiently operate for such enterprises, the need for on-site maintenance is a priority. Further, the line maintenance station in Siberia can significantly save money as well as time for such regional operators, who often find that the airfare to Moscow for a maintenance service equals the cost of the work itself! As of January 2013, more than twelve maintenance inspections had already been www.AvBuyer.com

undertaken by Avkom-D, and demand was proving so high that the cost of developing a base in Siberia was already paying off. The base provides engine replacement services along with routine maintenance work. Meanwhile, Avkom-D has acted to eliminate the costly delays that can be associated with parts deliveries to remote regions, and the company takes advantage of a logistics service that has been implemented to provide express delivery of spare parts to anywhere in Russia and the CIS. Eventually, Avkom-D plans to open maintenance stations in Khabarovsk and Omsk, again pointing to a growing consumer demand within these areas. Expert opinions agree, and add that the removal of high custom duties and a more robust approach from the government towards establishing transparent business practices will provide the incentive needed to bring about the import of more jets to Russia, and the subsequent placement of more aircraft on the Russian register. According to inside knowledge, in the last two years Russia imported ten times more business jets than it did for the previous 20 years. The growth of the fleet will inevitably lead to more development in the aircraft maintenance infrastructure; after all, there’s a $300 million market share still up for grabs…

❯ Anna Nazarova is a freelance aviation journalist specializing in the areas of Business and General Aviation in Russia. She can be contacted at anna.a.nazarova@gmail.com ❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered /published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

113


Dealer Broker Mkt Update March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 16:06 Page 1

DEALER BROKER MARKET UPDATE

Business Aviation & 2013: The Year of the Rebound? by Dave Higdon

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

he following topped the pitch from an investment service that recently crossed my desk: “Significant Signs Signal Growth...Slow Growth.” The essence of the pitch? The time is right to ‘get back in’. Business growth is trending well, profits continue apace, and stock markets close in record territory (again); thus the invitation to let said investment service help me to prosper. Among the background art pieces adorning the invitation, a typical scene of happy people lounging in tropical splendor. A second image portrayed them enjoying a beverage aboard their floating palace, anchored

T

www.AvBuyer.com

in a bay of topaz blue and emerald green waters - white sand beach in the background. A third image portrayed these hard-working souls emerging from a limousine almost as long as the light jet that was parked up in the background, the captain and a flight attendant awaiting their arrival by the cabin hatch. Pushing unwelcome stereotypes aside, somewhere, some people are deploying their business aircraft for just such travel. Meanwhile, the majority of the fleet sees far-less exotic travel, and far more utilitarian trips. The passengers on those more utilitarian trips include middle managers overseeing ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIC March_Layout 1 18/02/2013 16:12 Page 1


Dealer Broker Mkt Update March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 16:09 Page 2

DEALER BROKER MARKET UPDATE

remote facilities; marketing and sales executives on demonstration trips or some such show-and-tell opportunity; product-support engineers working out customers’ issues; and development staff, engaged in all the different elements of research, design, prototyping and production – all to give sales and marketing new products to sell and market so that product support staff can spend time installing and maintaining, enabling R&D to continue throughout, cycle after cycle… Along with the rest of the economy Business Aviation appears to be on the initial rise of a tide that has been a long time coming; a tide that brings signs of continued, moderate economic growth that’s finally trickling back into pre-owned aircraft repurposing, and business aircraft use generally. It couldn’t have come at a better time.

FLYING ACTIVITY Last year brought some incrementally good news to the economy on many fronts: strong profits continued for most mainline industries - among them, Detroit sold more cars, again, and looks on track to sell yet more in 2013. Passengers boarding on the Airlines increased but cargo shipments declined. The forecasts for passenger growth this year suggests it will rise, with capacity flat or slightly down. Either way, expect fuller airplanes with less margin for hiccups in the system. Last year, various entities reported that private flying in business-turbine aircraft actually declined as regards Part 91 flying. Conversely, Part 135 on-demand Charter

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

Brokers, dealers and analysts have largely expressed expectations of modest growth starting to build.

closed out the year on a growth curve and was up for the year. But aggregated, business flying still slipped, slightly, by a couple of points by most analyses. That didn’t seem to dissuade some gains, however. According to a variety of sources, sales of pre-owned business jets gained solidly last year, setting a record for completed transactions. In addition, prices gained almost 2 points over the period. The percentage of the fleet for sale continued its slow drop toward nominal, ending the year at less than 14 percent. New jet sales, according to the forecasts, should be increasing by about five or six percent this year. After a flat 2012, the industry shipped about 700 business jets (see the full GAMA Report on page 94 of this edition). www.AvBuyer.com

Expected to help moving forwards is an extension of the 50 percent bonus depreciation opportunity through the end of 2013. Congress extended the program with legislation passed to avoid the tax increases that were set to kick in on January 2, 2013. For those operators with the income to offset, the extra 50 percent in first-year depreciation can, in some cases, make the opportunity cost effective.

WE’VE WAITED LONG ENOUGH! Brokers, dealers and analysts have largely expressed expectations of modest growth starting to build. “Those are all good observations,” said industry analyst Brian Foley. “When so many indicators point up for so long, no matter that it is weak growth – there’s a cumulative effect. I expect to see more of that in the coming year.” He believes that the Light Jet segment has been so far down for so long that pentup demand should start to drive some better sales growth than the past three years. Foley also expects “some good growth in mediums – but they’ll still be small numbers because of how far down the market has gone.” Meanwhile, he expects Large Cabin jets to see continued, small, growth percentages, reflecting the segment’s continued expansion. Improving sales of pre-owned jets has impacted supply – but demand hasn’t forced up prices – indeed, some continue to decay. “If your turbine aircraft is older than age 10 to 15 years, its value will not recover,” predicts Conklin & de Decker’s David Wyndham, adding that this is STILL a buyer’s market. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Dealer Broker Mkt Update March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/02/2013 16:10 Page 3

DEALER BROKER MARKET UPDATE

“We’ve been talking to several prospects for three, maybe four years,” explained one West Coast broker previously. “We’ve been regularly in touch, and continued to offer the occasional better-than-average opportunity - but the answer hasn’t wavered: the prospects are not going to be ready to even look until they’re ready to move – which comes when they’re confident in their situation.” As this story was being researched, however, the broker revealed that one longterm ‘on-hold’ prospect called. “They’re coming through the area…to look over some changes in what we’ve been pursuing. It seems they are ready and confident. They have lined up financing – and we will line up a buyer for their older airplane. They’re ready!” The West Coast broker was not alone: dealers, brokers and researchers from across the country pin the change in large part on the failure of worst expectations to materialize. “For years we’ve been hearing about peoples’ lack of confidence in the economy, their ‘uncertainty’ about regulations and taxes,” explained a dealer from the Southeast U.S. What he was seeing was a lot of small and medium business people focused on making the best of their existing situation and trying to hold on and grow –

or at least “not go backward.” “Our customers just weren’t buying replacements for what still worked – until there were compelling reasons to make that change, anyhow.” Accelerated depreciation, he believed, attracted some interest and helped sell some airplanes. “But some of the clients we courted could not absorb the entire depreciation and preferred spreading it out for whatever reasons.” While counting the pennies to make dollars stack up, many of these operators discovered that ‘making do’ for another year or two cost them little to nothing. “We are hearing from some operators that record fuel prices are finally nudging them into something new, or newer and refurbished,” related a broker from the Midwest. “Two years ago a couple of clients stopped looking when they had to cut back on flying because of how fuel costs escalated; that worked… for a few months.” As the year wore on, the pressure, the need, to put people out in the field, to market and to support customers proved too great. The Airlines were the last resort, and they weren’t working well. “The flying hours went up and they called us,” the Midwest broker continued. “We showed them how, with a slight adjustment in their use habits, they could go

down in size, way down in age, and how after tax breaks and 20 percent lower fuel costs they’d be spending a few points less per hour.” Thankfully, examples in the range this client desires remain relatively plentiful. “We don’t have the choices we had in 2009, 2010 or even 2011, but those we do have are still good and we’re not really going to be paying more than we would have done two years ago. For this client, it’s working out,” the Midwest broker concluded.

REBOUND IN PROGRESS “This whole down-cycle is finally passing, and the economy is poised for a significant rebound,” observed Foley. “It’s not one indicator or another, but taking into account the whole of all these positive indicators. Together they point toward growth, recovery, and in time more stability. “It’s going to ignite this year, and not just from the OEMs,” he added. “For me, more business activity is more indicative of a recovery. The used jets inventory going down are because used buyers are feeling better.”

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine.

COMPARE AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE USING OUR

Aircraft Performance Guide at www.AvBuyer.com And select from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

117


HAI March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 14:16 Page 1

HAI HELI-EXPO

HELI-EXPO 2013 he Business Aviation world has the National Business Aviation Association’s recently renamed Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition (BACE); Personal and Sport Aviation have the Experimental Aircraft Association’s AirVenture Fly-In; Balloonists have Albuquerque. And so it is for the helicopter community that Heli-Expo is staged each year. As a focus on the helicopter segment of the aviation business, the Helicopter Association International’s (HAI) annual Heli-Expo excels. When you look at HAI, its make-up, its membership base and its level of involvement, no other aviation association is, at one time, as narrow or as broad. Heli-

T

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

Expo directly reflects the base on which it is built. And the 2013 edition of Heli-Expo (March 4-7) in Las Vegas is shaping up as a possible record-setter as participants look beyond forecasts of tepid growth for ideas to help keep their businesses moving.

A DYNAMIC LANDSCAPE Economic pressures have worked their damage on much of General and Business Aviation; the helicopter community wasn’t immune - and from the perspective of some aviation industry analysts, improvements are not imminent. Analyst Brian Foley was among those to recently note his pessimism for a quick end to the negative influences on the helicopter community. www.AvBuyer.com

For government – Search and Rescue, Law Enforcement and Military – recent tight budgets and pressures to spend less remain; demand meanwhile for offshore flights supporting oil and gas platforms and the apparent success and profitability of operators reflects a very frugal, cost-driven attitude toward new equipment and upgrades. That’s why the ADS-B upgrade of two years ago went down easier than overtures to buy new ships. Neither commercial nor corporate operations have shown signs of rebounding past pre-recession levels yet. “It’s going to be another slow, moribund year for the helicopter community, I’m afraid,” Foley predicted. Foley’s perspective closely reflects that of Aircraft Index see Page 4


HAI March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 14:17 Page 2

HAI HELI-EXPO

David Wyndham - co-owner of Conklin & de Decker, which has its own sources on the helicopter business. “The helicopter industry is one that is (partly joking) dependent on disaster. High oil prices mean more oil and gas exploration,” he observed. But in a world market with declining prices? “That isn't likely this year,” he observed. “Who knows what the fire-fighting season will hold - but government agencies won't be wanting to support big price increases unless justified. Health care costs are too high and insurance companies are fighting every aspirin and hip replacement. Don't expect a willingness for insurers to pay more for EMS services.” The sum of Wyndham’s 2013 helicopter Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

analysis: “I do not see a strong year for the commercial helicopter industry. There is hope as developing nations start to expand their infrastructure for helicopters, but that is still years away.” Nevertheless, manufacturers continue to advance and innovate – and find sufficient business to support their cases for new development, and it’s to Heli-Expo 2013 much of the community will flock to stay abreast of these latest developments, as well as to press on the human element of the community.

THE IMPORTANCE OF FACE-TO-FACE In interviews HAI president Matt Zuccaro has never shied away from pointing out the www.AvBuyer.com

many important elements of the international helicopter association’s annual gathering. This most-diverse, most-focused aviation organization gathers annually for what Zuccaro rightly describes as “the largest trade event for helicopters in the world.” Indeed, as he’s noted before, HAI is an international organization with an international membership. And in terms of business, market changes are continuing, in China, in India, and in established markets like Europe and North America. Heli-Expo this year expects an attendance to offer networking opportunities for around 20,000 industry professionals from the international helicopter community – by any standards a strong showing, and up from last year. ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

119


HAI March13_FinanceSept 19/02/2013 14:18 Page 3

HAI HELI-EXPO

It’s HAI that works to keep the helicopter and its contributions in perspective for a society that doesn’t always see behind the curtain. While in Las Vegas many of them will gather to participate in the dozens of forums and scores of workshops to share in the industry’s latest trends. There will also be the chance to examine more than 60 helicopters expected on the exhibit hall floor, and to sample the latest in helicopter-oriented products and services that are offered by more than 600 exhibitors (that number was as of late January). The number typically continues to grow right up to the opening of the exhibit floor (on March 5 this year), and the continued strength and growth of the exhibitors’ list serves as graphic testimony to Heli-Expo’s importance and market penetration. It is also among the most global a market of an aerospace industry that is ever-more international in its consistency. Helicopter OEMs in Europe have established both markets and facilities in North America; American companies have partnerships and stand-alone facilities in overseas markets also.

brings it into the entire spectrum of operations, and the wide array of conflicts that can come their way. For example, in early February, a Texas City Council voted to bar helicopter opera-

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

STRENGTH BORNE OF RELEVANCE It is hardly a surprise that tensions sometimes exist between elements of an association with a membership as diversely engaged as the helicopter community. Yet you’d never know it from the stances, statements or actions of HAI, Zuccaro, or the rest of the HAI staff. The face the non-helicopter public sees reflects the faces of all its different operators in all their incarnations. And HAI, under Zuccaro’s leadership, has helped improve its image and interaction with other elements of aviation over the past three years. It was under Zuccaro’s leadership that HAI increased both its presence and participation in the broader range of aviation events that today it does – both as an exhibitor as well as a program presenter. Indeed, Zuccaro has involved himself in presentations on helicopters and helicopter safety at these events. Ultimately, though, you need to go to a Heli-Expo to appreciate the full depth of HAI’s involvement, the expanse of its member-oriented programs, and the breadth of its penetration as a worldwide influence in the rotorcraft community.

❯ More from: www.rotor.com ❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above

SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW With operating members in literally every aspect of helicopter use, HAI’s representation

tions within 300 feet of a residence, and to require potential home-owner helicopter operators to have six acres from which to fly. The ordinance was an alternative to a proposal to ban all helicopter operations except emergency flight – and the move was spurred by a local doctor who wanted the option of using his own helicopter to speed him back to a Dallas hospital when called on for an emergency. HAI engages for its members on noise issues, on safety concerns, airspace and airport issues, as well as on the oft-challenged right to operate a helicopter from one’s own property when no restriction or regulations already prohibit. Helicopter use in wilderness settings can often bring benefits – but also frequently become a point of contention by visitors expecting total quiet on their get-aways. “Nobody likes a helicopter landing near their office or home… until it comes to take them or a loved on out of harm’s way from a flood or fire, or takes them to life-saving medical care,” explained a commercial helicopter pilot who flies part-time for a medical-emergency operator. It’s HAI that works to keep the helicopter and its contributions in perspective for a society that doesn’t always see behind the curtain.

topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com ■

MATT ZUCCARO, PRESIDENT, HAI

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


MarketIndicators Feb13_Layout 1 19/02/2013 16:04 Page 1

Market Indicators JETNET View JETNET released the December 2012 monthly and year-to-date (YTD) results for the pre-owned business jet, business turboprop and helicopter markets. Highlighted in the Table are key worldwide trends across all pre-owned aircraft market sectors, comparing December 2012 to December 2011, as well as YTD. The Fleet for sale percentages for all market sectors, except for piston helicopters (no change), were down in the December comparisons, with the largest drop in business turboprops, to 8.3% from 9.6% in December 2011. For Sale inventories continue to decline: • Business jets for sale were at 13.4% (down -0.4 from 13.8%); • Business turboprops for sale were at 8.3% (down -1.3 from 9.6%); • Turbine helicopters for sale were at 6.1% (down -0.5 from 6.6%); • Piston helicopters for sale were at 6.1% (no change). Full Sale Transactions had mixed results, with only business jets showing growth: • Business jets were up (7.2%); • Business turboprops were down (-5.7%); • Both turbine (-1.2%) and piston (-6.1%) helicopters were down. Average Days on Market are all at very high levels: • All market sectors have shown increases in average days on market YTD through December 2012, except business jets, which took 10 fewer days. • Piston helicopters took more than a month (37 days) longer to sell than a year ago.

Average Asking Prices had mixed results: • Business turboprops (+2.6%) and turbine helicopters (+7.3%) increased; • Business jets (-0.3%) and piston helicopters (-0.9%) decreased.

WORLDWIDE TRENDS DECEMBER For Sale

Business Aircraft

Helicopters

Jets

Turbos

Turbine

2,539

1,142

1,145

Piston

571

Fleet % For Sale 2012

13.4%

8.3%

6.1%

6.1%

Fleet % For Sale 2011

13.8%

9.6%

6.6%

6.1%

% Change For Sale

(-0.4)pt

(-1.3)pt

(-0.5)pt

n.c.

. .

January to December 2012 Full Sale Transactions

2,240

1,351

1,287

931

Pre-owned Business Jet 350 344 433 370 Avg. Days on Market “For Sale” Market $226 Avg. Asking Price - $USD M $4.560 $1.343 $1.411 Several significant events have occurred since 2005 in YTD January to December 2012 vs 2011 the Business Jet “For Sale” -6.1% -5.7% -1.2% 7.2% Change - Transactions inventory: 37 11 23 -10 Change Days on Market • In the past eight years -0.9% 2.6% 7.3% -0.3% Change Asking Price the market has remained a buyer’s market, based on 10% or greater fleet percentage of the in-operation business jets for sale. 2012 has set a new record for the number • After several years of record sales and of pre-owned full retail sale transactions. rising aircraft values, the bubble finally There were 2,240 transactions in 2012, beatburst in 2008 amid a world economic ing the previous record peak of 2,181 in collapse and banking crisis of historic 2007. This record follows three years of inproportion. From 2007, there was a large creases from the low of 1,539 transactions increase of 973 (or 60%) in 2008 and recorded in 2009. 1,147 (or 70%) in 2009 of business jets in 2012 was a success for our industry in the “For Sale” inventory. This increase many ways, and the pre-owned market conpeaked in 2009. tinues to be very active. Now that 2013 is • The year-end “For Sale” inventory here, and there is renewed optimism, it is decline starting in 2010 has remained hoped this trend for the pre-owned market, relatively unchanged over the past three along with improvements in the world years. The percentage for sale has economy, will continue to push more new declined more as a result of the growth aircraft purchases during this year. For now, of the in operation fleet numbers, it continues to be a buyer’s market, with increasing from 17,118 in 2009 to 18,897 pre-owned ‘for sale’ inventories running in 2012. The year-ending 2012 “for sale” around 13%. inventory level is 2,539, or 13.4%.

Market Indicators - March 2013

/ More from www.jetnet.com

GAMA View solely in the lower-end, non-pressurized turboprop segment as overall billings decreased by nearly one percent from $19 billion to $18.9 billion year-over-year. For the business jet segment, the 672 aircraft deliv-

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

ered in 2012 represented 24 fewer than 2011 and was the lowest total since 2004. See the delivery analysis, beginning on page 90 of this issue.

/ More from www.gama.aero

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

According to full-year 2012 aircraft delivery numbers released by the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), 2012 saw a modest increase in overall new turbine aircraft shipments. The gains were


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Market Indicators

CONKLIN & de DECKER View By David Wyndham Globally, the economic recovery is expected to continue, slowly. The high income nations such as the US and most of Western Europe are expected to see around 2% growth in Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Corporate profits and the stock market are generally improving. The high growth in Asia, primarily China and India, has slowed. But developing nations globally are still expected to grow GDP at 4% to 5% with China closer to 7%. So the global economy is expected to limp along with spots of higher growth. No inflation fears, yet. One bright spot continues to be oil prices. Crude is back down around $100 a barrel with prices expected to stay stable into 2014. This should be a help to most aircraft operators as they manage their 2013 fuel budgets. Airline travel globally is expected to grow at 5%. Most Airlines are not placing large numbers of aircraft into service this year, so do not look for falling airfares or more empty seats. There is no evidence that Airline travel service levels will improve. This should continue to support the case for General Aviation and make it easier to cost-justify the use of aircraft for business. Five people on a Hawker 800 charter can be cheaper than on the Airlines. For aviation employment, things will improve slowly this year. It looks like the Regional Airline hiring might pick up. Corporate flying seems to be rising slowly. You can only put off certain maintenance and I think the maintenance facilities have become as lean as they can. Any increase in flying should have a corresponding demand for pilots and mechanics. Boeing's long-term

forecast predicts aviation will need 1 million more pilots and mechanics by 2031, many of them in Asia. Regarding aircraft sales, I sound like a broken record: it is a buyers' market - still. Here in the U.S, 2013 will have the 50% Bonus Depreciation available for new aircraft and capital upgrades. This will be a help for selling new aircraft to profitable companies who are in need of some short-term tax write-offs. New aircraft sales will have an increasingly adverse effect on used prices. None of the new aircraft manufacturers want to inventory many used aircraft. So if they do take one in on a trade, they will be very anxious to resell it. According to Vref, the jet market still has falling prices across most of the jet market. Even the Large-Cabin jets. Turboprop prices are flat and piston prices are still sluggish. Buyers continue to be very price sensitive. As always, aircraft in excellent condition will still sell first, but most important is price. If you are selling, don't think prices will creep up anytime soon (as in the next two years). If your turbine aircraft is older than age 10 to 15 years, its value will not recover. Don't plan on buying an older turbine aircraft thinking its retail value will improve enough to earn a profit. However, if the older turbine aircraft meets your needs, then now is a good time to buy. If you are upgrading to a newer, or larger aircraft, the loss you take on your current aircraft will be offset by the saving on the more expensive upgrade. While I'd like to say ‘buy now’, unless you need the 50% Bonus Depreciation on a new aircraft, you have time to

shop around. The helicopter industry is one that is partly joking dependent on disaster! High oil prices mean more oil and gas exploration. That isn't likely this year. Who knows what the fire-fighting season will hold, but government agencies won't be wanting to support big price increases unless justified. Health care: costs are too high and insurance companies are fighting every aspirin and hip replacement. Don't expect a willingness for insurers to pay more for EMS services. I do not see a strong year for the commercial helicopter industry. There is hope as developing nations start to expand their infrastructure for helicopters but that is still years away. Overall, flying will increase this year. Corporations in general have had a profitable 2012 (and 2011 for many). They will need to get the deals done, find new customers, and continue to support the ones they have. This means they need to fly. The helicopter industry is dependent of factors far less connected to corporate profits and I see a low year. I see weak growth in aviation for at least the next two years, but growth nonetheless. Now is the time to prepare for that growth, stay lean and to invest in improvements in your business.

/ More from www.conklindd.com

Market Indicators - March 2013

ZENITH JET View As reported in the Wichita Business Journal, aviation analysis and advisory firm Zenith Jet is forecasting some better days ahead for business jet manufacturers. According to the firm’s 2013-2022 industry outlook, it expects 757 business jet deliveries in 2013, followed by 911 in 2014, 1,055 in 2015, and

1,214 in 2016. From there, it projects a slowdown in the industry with deliveries falling to 898 in 2016 and bottoming out at 707 in 2019. The industry will then again cycle back up, reaching up to 1,114 deliveries by 2022. The report notes that while deliveries

/ More from www.zenithjet.com

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

will pick up in the coming years, none of them will top the industry’s delivery high of 1,313 in 2008. The total 10-year deliveries are predicted to be worth about $253 billion at current aircraft prices.

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BUSINESS AVIATION ON FULL DISPLAY IN SHANGHAI — MAKE PLANS TO BE THERE ■

MORE THAN 150 EXHIBITORS ■

OVER 6,500 ATTENDEES

OVER 30 AIRCRAFT ON STATIC DISPLAY

REPRESENTATION BY ALL MAJOR AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURERS EDUCATION SESSIONS FOCUSING ON SAFETY AND OWNING, OPERATING AND MAINTAINING BUSINESS AIRCRAFT

PARTICIPATION BY HIGH-LEVEL GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS FROM FROM CHINA AND THE U.S.

Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport at Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Service Centre In Partnership With Shanghai Airport Authority (SAA) and Co-hosted by NBAA, the Asian Business Aviation Association (AsBAA) and the Shanghai Exhibition Centre (SEC)

WWW.ABACE.AERO


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BizAv Round-Up

03.13

NEWS IN BRIEF

(ACJ) in Australia for the first time recently. The aircraft, an Airbus ACJ319 operated by VVIP charter company Comlux, was shown at the recent Australian International Airshow. Its cabin incorporates workspaces, lounge areas, bedrooms and bathrooms that capitalize on the unequalled comfort and space that Airbus corporate jets typically offer. “When it comes to business jets it’s the cabin that counts,” Airbus chief operating officer, Customers, John Leahy outlined. “The more you fly, the more important comfort becomes…” ACJs have now won more than 170 sales, and are flying on every continent, including Antarctica. Australian company Skytraders flies an Airbus ACJ319 on charter flights, including the ferrying of scientists and their equipment to and from Antarctica. / More from www.airbus.com

Airware,

AMANDA KRAFT, CO-FOUNDER,

AIRWARE the aviation food service packaging company, has celebrated its successful first year of business since it launched operations in December 2011. The Atlanta, Georgia-based company provides high quality aviation packaging for on board food provision and serves the Business Aviation and Commercial Airline charter sectors. In the last twelve months, Airware has grown from a small

126

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

G280 PUSHING AHEAD GULFSTREAM NOTCHES CERTIFICATIONS AND SPEED RECORDS ALIKE.  Gulfstream’s G280 received Type Certification from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), demonstrating that the super mid-sized aircraft demonstrates compliance with EASA airworthiness and environmental requirements. It is one of the final steps required for the G280 to be registered in a European Union country. The G280 earned its Type Certification from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Civil Aviation Authority of Israel on August 30, 2012 and entered service on November 13, 2012. The aircraft’s range is 3,600 nautical miles at

Mach 0.80, and its maximum operating speed is Mach 0.85, which is clearly being put to good use after it recently set 15 new city-pair speed records as part of the company’s reliability demonstration program. The 250-hour internal testing program, among the most extensive voluntary reliability programs ever implemented by Gulfstream, served to enhance fleet reliability, enrich pilot training and improve customer readiness. Of the 15 new city-pair speed records set as part of the program, the most notable were a flight from Aspen, Colorado, to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and

initial client-base to a current customer portfolio of over 50 active accounts, including several Fortune 50 companies. Founded by experienced Business Aviation catering professionals Amanda Kraft and Eric Posey, Airware essentially seeks to meet the needs of small in-flight caterers that require attractive catering products for their clientele that work well in the niche General Aviation market.

one from Honolulu to Savannah, Georgia. The super mid-sized aircraft has established 22 speed records since setting its first in May 2012. “Two of these new speed records are particularly significant because they demonstrate the G280’s capability to reach the East Coast from Aspen and to travel an exceptional distance,” said Scott Neal, senior vice president, Sales and Marketing. “The G280 continues to prove its tremendous reliability, range, speed and performance for our customers.” / More information from www.gulfstream.com

Conklin & de Decker’s latest release

/ More from www.myairware.com

of its innovative LIFE CYCLE COST 2013 Volume I aircraft budgeting and financial analysis tool is now available. Providing aircraft owners, operators, flight department managers, and aircraft consultants with extensive ownership and operating cost data for more than 400 aircraft, The LIFE CYCLE COST budgeting software is part of a family of aircraft operating and acquisition products, and places all cost aspects of owning

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Airbus exhibited an Airbus Corporate Jet


DEDICATED TO HELPING BUSINESS ACHIEVE ITS HIGHEST GOALS.

2013

business aviation regional forums

Thursday, February 28 AirFlite Long Beach, CA Thursday, June 6 Panorama Flying Service White Plains, NY Thursday, July 11 TAC Air Denver, CO Thursday, September 12 Landmark Aviation Chicago/Waukegan, IL

Static Display, Exhibits and Education Sessions – One Day Only, In Your Backyard! www.nbaa.org/forums NBAA FORUMS/WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES.indd 1

12/18/12 12:34 PM


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BizAv Round-Up and operating an aircraft into one easy-to-use program. Aircraft acquisition costs, operating costs, taxes, final residual values and revenues; if the user’s aircraft is used in commercial operations, are all pre-loaded into this Business Aviation budgeting tool. / More from www.conklindd.com

Embraer & AgustaWestland signed a

/ More from www.embraerexecutivejets.com

ExecuJet Aviation sourced, secured and delivered a pre-owned Boeing Business Jet (BBJ) recently in what it claims to be a record: less than six weeks. Approached by the client in December, ExecuJet was tasked with ensuring the aircraft was delivered by the end of January. The company delivered the aircraft on January 28 and the BBJ flew from Europe to the owner’s base in South Africa on January 31. ExecuJet Europe will manage the BBJ on the owner’s behalf. Meanwhile, ExecuJet Africa has partnered with international risk management company MS Risk to offer emergency response plans for clients with staff based at remote locations in Africa. Under the new Urgent Response Plan (URP) service, ExecuJet and MS Risk will work with clients’ human resources and safety managers to develop evacuation plans for those companies that do not currently have one in place or integrate services into an existing program. The URP will also include intelligence reporting, remote site visits, ground and air service options and logistics coordination. / More from www.execujet.net

Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI) has introduced Embraer Legacy 650 Airframe Program and Platinum level coverage for the Honeywell HTF7000 series of engines. The Embraer Legacy 650 Airframe Program covers virtually every part, component, assembly and system on the aircraft, excluding the engines and APU, for a limited contract term. Airframe pricing for this program is based on data obtained during JSSI’s 20 years of realworld experience and it is customized by aircraft serial number, taking into account the unique customer flight profile. Legacy 650 128

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

TBM 700 & 850 GOES A MILLION + With more than 620 Daher-Socata's TBM turboprop business aircraft produced to date, the overall fleet usage now averages in excess of 120,000 flight hours annually. “Surpassing this milestone confirms the TBM 850 as the keystone of Daher-Socata’s strategy,” remarked Stephane Mayer, Chairman and CEO. “The extensive experience accumulated during 20 years of operations has proven the TBM’s airframe design and validated its reliability,” added Nicolas

Chabbert, Senior Vice President of the DaherSocata Airplane Division. According to Chabbert, the TBM in-service experience provided the confidence for Daher-Socata to offer extended warranties and its Exclusive Maintenance Program, which lowers scheduled maintenance costs for five years or 1,000 hours. The 2012 deliveries bring the total number of aircraft received by customers to 622 units, of which 298 are TBM 850s. The majority of TBM 850s purchased in 2012 were

clients can also opt to include Engines and APU to get JSSI’s Tip-To-Tail coverage. HFT7000 Engine Program enrollments allow for the option of adding coverage for scheduled repair and replacement of Life Limited Components, as well as routine inspections. JSSI’s distinctive Platinum Programs are designed specifically for owners and operators of large cabin aircraft. / More from www.jetsupport.com

acquired by U.S. customers (66 percent). With a cruising speed of 320 KTAS at Flight Level 260 (in ISA conditions), the TBM 850 is claimed to be the world’s fastest single turboprop aircraft. As an 850-shp version of the TBM 700, the TBM 850 combines cruise speeds and the trip times of a light jet with the economical direct operating costs, range and eco-friendly environmental signature of a turboprop-powered aircraft. / More information from www.tbm850.com

of activity for almost half of the workforce.” / More from www.lufthansa-technik.com

Satcom Direct announced its new Satcom Direct Router (SDR), a NextGen aircraft network router which will enable Business Aviation customers to manage all cabin communications onboard their aircraft and simultaneously use multiple satellite connections. / More from www.satcomdirect.com

Lufthansa Technik Switzerland (Basel) has been unable to sustain its operations and will be closing its two Line Maintenance and Logistics Services businesses on 30 April. Rainer Lindau, CEO of Lufthansa Technik Switzerland explained, “Due to the fall in demand and the associated decline in our customer base, closing the facility was sadly unavoidable…thanks to our agreement with SWISS we have succeeded in finding alternative direct employment in the same field www.AvBuyer.com

The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) has renamed its largest annual U.S. event “Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition” (BACE). President and CEO Ed Bolen noted that, given the global nature of Business Aviation, the new name for NBAA’s largest event brings it into alignment with the other shows, ABACE, EBACE and LABACE. / More from www.nbaa.org

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), to facilitate a joint-venture which could lead to the production of AgustaWestland helicopters in Brazil to be marketed for both commercial and military use throughout Latin America. Preliminary research by both companies shows strong market potential for twin-engine, medium lift helicopters, especially to meet the requirements of the offshore oil and gas market. Other key market sectors, such as executive transport and military, show promising potential as well. The partners aim at establishing the joint-venture within a few months once a final agreement has been reached and the relevant approvals have been obtained.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BUSINESS AVIATION –– MAKING THE DIFFERENCE IN EUROPE Nearly 500 Exhibits • 60 Aircraft on Static Display • Over 12,000 Attendees

TUESDAY, MAY 21; WEDNESDAY, MAY 22; & THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 Palexpo and Geneva International Airport Geneva, Switzerland

www.ebace.aero


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BizAv Arrivals & Events

Siddharth Bhardwaj

Ted Farid

David Gee

Preston Henne

Siddharth Bhardwaj – has been appointed by Rizon Jet as its new director of Flight Operations. Captain Bhardwaj has worked in aviation for more than 14 years and during this period logged more than 8,600 hours of flying experience.

Peg Billson – is appointed president and CEO of the BBA Aviation Aftermarket Services division. This division comprises, all of BBA Aviation’s market leading aftermarket services companies including Ontic, Dallas Airmotive, Premier Turbines, H+S Aviation, International Turbine Service, W.H. Barrett Turbine Engine Company, International Governor Services and APPH. Ted Farid – was appointed to head of sales, Asia-Pacific region at Hawker Beechcraft. Farid joined the company in 1996 and most recently served as senior vice president for international sales and new business development. David Gee – becomes the new vice president of Engineering at Blackhawk Modifications. Formerly he worked at Hawker Beechcraft, Raisbeck Engineering, Piper Aircraft and Fairchild Aircraft.

Rogerio Muller

Dan Nale

Lada Ouhrabkova

Kandi Spangler

Lada Ouhrabkova – was appointed the new chief operating officer for Prague-based Grossmann Jet Service. Ouhrabkova, currently holds the position of Flight Operations and Training manager with GJS, and will be responsible for maintaining the safe and efficient operation of the current fleet there.

James D. Raisbeck – founder and CEO of Raisbeck Engineering is to be honored as an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Fellow at a gala in Washington, D.C., in May. David Rushton – joined FlightSafety International as commercial marketing manager, Visual Simulation Systems. Kandi M. Spangler – becomes vice president sales, at JetBrokers, Inc., based at the company's ninth, and newest location in Denver, Colorado. She has more than 20-years’ experience in aviation operations, maintenance, sales and marketing.

Bradley Stewart – gained promoted to company CEO at XOJet. He had been president of the fixed-price aircraft charter firm since 2010.

Preston Henne – senior vice president of programs, engineering and test at Gulfstream will retire, effective March 31. He turned 65 last year. Henne joined Gulfstream in 1994, and will be replaced by Dan Nale, Gulfstream’s vice president of advanced aircraft programs. Nale is a 10-year Gulfstream veteran who has overseen development of various next-generation aircraft.

Joseph J. Trotti – joined American International Group (AIG) as president and CEO of its Aerospace division, part of AIG’s Global Specialty business. Trotti was executive vice president of AIG’s Aerospace business, prior to leaving the company in 2002.

Rogerio Muller – is the new Jet Support Services (JSSI) direc-

Asia, has joined Hongkong Jet as director of technical services. He will lead the AOG Go-Team.

tor of business development for South America.

Richard Wolfskeil – a pioneer in developing AOG services in

BizAv Events 2013 OPPORTUNITIES IN BUSINESS JETS HAI HELI-EXPO NBAA: INTERNATIONAL OPERATORS CONF ABU DHABI AIR EXPO INT’L GENERAL AVIATION INDIA BBGA ANNUAL CONFERENCE CYGNUS AVIATION EXPO WOMEN IN AVIATION CONFERENCE BUSINESS AIRPORT WORLD EXPO BUSINESS JET INTERIORS ASIAN BUSINESS AVIATION AEA (AIRCRAFT ELECTRONICS ASSOCIATION CONVENTION) NARA SPRING MEETING AIRCRAFT INTERIORS EXPO SUN ‘N FUN FLY-IN Events in RED indicate Business Aviation related.

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Mar 4 Mar 4 - 7 Mar 4 – 7 Mar 5 - 7 Mar 7 - 10 Mar 12 Mar 12 - 14 Mar 14 – 16 Mar 19 –21 Mar 19 – 21 Mar 19 – 21 Mar 25 – 28 Apr 3 - 5 Apr 9 – 11 Apr 9 – 14

Malta Las Vegas, NV, USA San Diego, CA, USA Abu Dhabi, UAE Ahmedabad, India

/ www.quaynote.com / www.rotor.com/heliexpo / www.nbaa.org / www.adairexpo.com / www.biztradeshows.com / www.bbga.aero

St. Albans, Herts, UK Las Vegas, NV, USA

/ www.cygnusaviationexpo.com

Nashville,TN, USA

/ www.wai.org

Farnborough, UK Farnborough, UK

/ www.businessjetinteriors.com

Hong Kong Las Vegas, NV, USA Amelia Island, FL, USA Hamburg, Germany Lakeland, FL, USA

/ www.businessairportworldexpo.com / www.reedexpo.co.uk / www.aea.net / www.nara-dealers.com / www.reedexpo.co.uk / www.sun-n-fun.org

If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AvBuyer 205x270_Mise en page 1 18/01/13 08:56 Page1

Hosted by

Abu Dhabi Air Expo

BROKERAGE MARKET AREA Sell your aircraft on the only General Aviation Exhibition in the Middle East

5 to 7 March 2013 Al Bateen Executive Airport, Abu Dhabi, UAE During the 3 days of the exhibition, the Brokerage Market Area for private owners welcomes many single-engine, twin-engine, jets and helicopters. This area for private owners is a great opportunity to exhibit a second hand aircraft on the only General Aviation Exhibition in the Middle East. Private owners, if you want to exhibit a second hand aircraft on the show, download the booking form online at the Brokerage Market page at :

www.adairexpo.com A unique opportunity to showcase your aircraft to more than 10.000 visitors from the GCC. Brokerage Market Area, exhibiting cost for the 3 days : Single Engine / Helicopter (pistons) : Twin engine / Turbo prop / Helicopter (turbine) : Jet :

250 USD 450 USD 600 USD

Be a part of the only General Aviation Exhibition in the Middle East !


D e d i c a t e d t o h e l p i n g b u s i n e s s a c h i e v e i t s h i g h e s t g o a l s.

While you’re following your own unique course in the air, having a business partner on the ground you can rely on is essential. Membership in the National Business Aviation Association gives you access to powerful business management tools and tax information that will save you money and help maximize your airplane investment. So you can concentrate on what’s most important—reaching even greater opportunities. Learn more at www.flyforbusiness.org.

Flying solo doesn’t mean you fly alone.


THE WORLD IS COMING

17-21 NOVEMBER 2013 The Dubai Airshow moves to Dubai World Central www.dubaiairshow.aero

#DXB13


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Dassault 7X March 19/02/2013 12:06 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2010 Falcon 7X Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

98 N407KT 475 210

• Enrolled on FalconCare • Available for customer delivery July 1, 2013

Engine Type Pratt & Whitney Canada PW307A (on ESP) APU s/n P-209: Honeywell GTCP36-150(FN) (on MSP) Exterior Overall Matterhorn White gloss with Las Vegas Gold metallic underbelly, horizontal stabilizer, upper and lower wing surfaces. Cashmere Gold and Shadow Gray metallic accent stripes Interior Beige leather seats, Swiss Café Ostrich pattern ultra-leather lower sidewall, Cream color upper and lower valance panels/window panels and shade assemblies, Tan pattern designer carpet with Cream and Olive color accents, Karelian Birch Burl veneer, polished Champagne Gold Seating 14 passengers: 4-place forward club, 4-place mid-cabin dining group with opposing credenza, two aft 3-place divans, forward galley, forward and aft lavatories, third crewmember seat Avionics Honeywell Primus Epic System Flight Management Systems triple Honeywell EASY Central Maintenance Computer Honeywell EASY VHF Communications (VHF Data Radio –

“VDR”) triple Honeywell TR-866B VOR/ILS/Marker Navigation Systems/GPS dual Honeywell NV-875X DME Systems dual Honeywell DM-855 ADF Systems dual Honeywell DF-855 Mode S Transponder Systems dual Honeywell XS-857A Color Weather Radar System Honeywell Primus 880 TCAS II System ACSS TCAS 3000 (w/ Change 7) Radio Altimeter System dual Honeywell KRA-405B Enhanced GPWS with Windshear Honeywell EASY Head-Up Guidance System (HGS) Rockwell Collins HGS-5860 Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) Rockwell Collins EFVS-5860 High Frequency Communication Systems dual Honeywell KHF-1050 SATCOM Aero H+ / Swift Broadband Honeywell MCS-7120 Micro Inertial Reference Systems triple Honeywell Laseref V Voice and Flight Data Combined Recorder dual Honyewell AR-Combi ELT System with NAV Interface Honeywell Rescu 406AF Additional Equipment Honeywell: Data Loader, triple AV-900 Flightdeck Audio Systems, SELCAL, Attitude Heading Reference System, Standby Instrument Display. Honeywell EASy: Flight Deck Video Interface, Modular Avionics Unit (MAU), Communications Management Function (CMF), Electronic Jeppesen Charts.

www.falconjet.com/preowned

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Rockwell Collins FCMS: Airshow 4000, 17 and 21 inch LCD monitor, dual DVD player. Goodrich Air Data Smartprobes, Goodrich Ice Detectors

Mark Verdesco: Director, Pre-owned Aircraft Sales USA Tel: + (1) (201) 541-4556 Tel: + (1) (201)-541-4620 E-mail: preowned@falconjet.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

135


Florida Jet Falcon 50-3D March 19/02/2013 15:23 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Falcon 50-3D Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

196 N56CL 6758.6 6157

Engines & APU 3D ENGINES: TFE 731-3D-1C W/DEEC ENGINES ENROLLED ON MSP GOLD Avionics • COLLINS APS 85 AUTOPILOT • COLLINS EFIS 86 SYSTEM 5 TUBE • DUAL UNS 1K PLUS • COLLINS TCAS II W/ CHANGE 7 W/ FLT EH ID • DUAL COLLINS RTU 4200 SERIES RADIO TUNING UNITS • HONEYWELL MK V EHGPWS • XM WEATHER PROVISIONS FOR COCKPIT • DUAL HONEYWELL KHF950 SYSTEMS • COLLINS TWR 850 WEATHER RADAR WITH DUAL CONTROL • DUAL COLLINS VHF 22 COMMS 8.33 SPACING • DUAL VIR 32 NAVS FM IMMUNITY • DUAL ADF 60A ADF • DUAL COLLINS DME 42 • DUAL AHC 85 AHRS • GLOBAL AFIS SYSTEM WITH SATCOM UNIT • HONEYWELL LASERTRAK INS WITH CDI • COLLINS ALT 55B RADAR ALTIMETER • ARTEX 406 ELT W/ NAV INTERFACE • FREDRICKSON SELCAL UNIT • FAIRCHILD A100A CVR • FAIRCHILD F1000FDR • RVSM COMPLIANT Exterior BY STANDARD AERO, SPRINGFIELD, IL.

OVERALL – MATTERHORN WHITE TRIM – RED BARON, BLACK DEVORE RECOGNITION LIGHTS (UPPER & LOWER) Interior BY STANDARD AERO, SPRINGFIELD, IL. THIS ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS AND METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED FALCON 50 SN 196 HAS A DESIGNER INSPIRED INTERIOR IN EARTH TONE COLORS AND A CUSTOM PAINT SCHEME. CUSTOM FABRICS, SUPPLE BEIGE LEATHER UPHOLSTERED CHAIRS, AND DARK HIGH GLOSS CABINETRY COMPLIMENT THE 9 PASSENGER EXECUTIVE INTERIOR WITH THE FOLLOWING FEATURES: • EMS WI-FI WIRELESS NETWORK SYSTEM • iPOD DOCKING STATION • AIRSHOW 4000 PASSENGER INFORMATION SYSTEM • HONEYWELL CABIN MANAGEMENT AND ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM • ONE 15” MONITOR AND FOUR 8.4” MONITORS • TWO DVD PLAYERS • ONE 10 DISC CD PLAYER • HONEYWELL PRONTO CABIN ENTERTAINMENT REMOTE • EMS HIGH SPEED DATA 4 CHANNEL SATCOM SYSTEM • AIRCELL AXXESS IRIDIUM PHONE SYSTEM W/2 HANDSETS • LED READING AND WASH LIGHTING SYSTEM Ownership History SONY CORPORATION. SHELL OIL CORPORATION. SEM GROUP. JET SALES OF FLORIDA, INC. AIH II, LLC.

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Florida Jet Falcon 900B March 19/02/2013 15:26 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1995 Falcon 900B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

140 N140FJ 6628.7 3078

Engines & APU Garrett TFE 731-5BR-1C Engines enrolled on MSP Gold with DEEC’s Engine 1: Engine 2: Engine 3: S/N: P101218 P101222 P101220 Hours: 6508 5938 6508 Cycles 2998 2736 2998 APU Garrett GTCP 36-150F S/N: P257 Hours: 3370 TT Avionics Autopilot Dual Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS Comm Triple Collins VHF22C with 8.33 spacing Navs Dual Collins VIR 32 with FM immunity ADF Dual Collins ADF 60 DME Dual Collins DME 42 Transponder Dual Collins TDR 94D w/mode S & Enhanced Flight ID HF Dual King KHF 953 with SELCAL EFIS Honeywell EDZ 820 5 tube IRS Triple Honeywell LASEREF II RAD ALT Honeywell RT-300 WX Radar Collins WXR 870 w/2 RCU’s TAWS Allied Signal MK V w/Windshear & Terrain Display Phone Dual Line Aircell Access Iridium Satphone TCAS Collins TTR-920 w/Change 7 FDR Fairchild F-800

CVR FMS

Universal CVR-30A Dual Honeywell NZ 2000 with 5.0 software Data Loader DL-950 ELT Airtex C406-1 GPS Dual 12 Channel WiFi GoGo High Speed Internet Interior/Exterior Interior refurbished – Completion Date: April 2013 A 14 passenger interior features a forward four place club, mid cabin four place conference group with Hi/Lo table w/extension opposite the credenza with a kibitzer, and aft dual three place berthable divans with a privacy bulkhead. Forward galley with bulkhead pocket door, a forward and aft lavatory. The interior was refurbished with new soft goods, wood veneer, and plating, as well as a new single cup coffee maker. In addition, new MCCI switch panels. A state-of-the-art entertainment system includes a 17” HD monitor in the aft cabin and 17” HD monitor in the forward cabin, with a Blue Ray DVD/CD player for each monitor, new speakers and amplifiers, iPod docking station, and audio switches, Airshow 400 Moving Map System. New up wash, down wash, lav indirect, and galley LED Lighting. The iCABIN in-flight entertainment and cabin management system allows you to simultaneously stream movies to up to 16 iPads. A new dual line Aircell Access Iridium satellite phone system with GoGo high speed internet installed to help you get more done in the sky. Exterior paint is in like new condition, repainted by Standard Aero SPI

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Chuck Collins Gulfstream G400 March 20/02/2013 10:23 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2003 Gulfstream G 400 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1504 N902L 3,220.4 1,381

Engines Eng #1: 3.220.4 since New. 18 since Midlife-Jan. 2013 Eng #2: 3,220.4 since New. 18 since Midlife-Jan. 2013 Avionics Collins Pro Line IV Avionics Suite with Honeywell SPZ 8400 Flight Control System w/6-Tube EFIS system, Altitude Alert and Preselect, Dual Honeywell AZ-810 Digital Air Data Computer Triple Collins Pro Line IV VHF 422 Communication Transceivers with 8.33 MHz Dual Collins Pro Line IV VIR 432 VOR/LOC/GLS/MKR Receivers w/FM immunity Triple Honeywell FMZ-2000 FMS w/dual GPS and triple LaserRef II IRU Dual Collins Pro Line IV TDR 94D Xpdr Dual Collins Pro Line IV ADF 462 Dual Collins Pro Line IV DME-442 Dual Honeywell HF-9000 HF Systems Dual Collins AA-300RadioAltimeters Fairchild A-100 Cockpit Voice Recorder Fairchild 1000 FDR Flight Data Recorder Honeywell Primus 880 Radar w/Turbulence Honeywell MCS 7000 SATCOM Honeywell TCAS 2000 TCAS II Honeywell HUD-2020 Heads Up Display AlliedSignal (AFIS) BF Goodrich ADI-335 Attitude Indicator SATCOM MCS 7000

Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Gold, Orange and Blue with factory horizontal Stripes, Painted in October 2008 by Gulfstream Aerospace, Paint is Excellent Interior Gulfstream Aerospace best selling Executive 14 passenger floor plan. This FAR Part 135 fireblocked interior’s main cabin features forward 4 place club, mid-cabin 4 place divan opposite 2 captain chairs in club and aft 4- place conference group with Hi/Lo table w/extension opposite credenza. All oversized swiveling captain chairs were used in the club arrangements thorough out and are appointed in buckskin glove leather. The 4 – place conference group is appointed with chamois leather chairs. The berthing 4 place divan is finished in a designer walnut fabric. The pilot and copilot seats are gray leather with gray sheepskin. • Forward and aft Lavatories? • Large Aft Cabin Galley • Airshow w/personal monitors a Dual Coffee Makers • Two 17” Video monitors a Microwave Oven • Three 110 V electrical outlets a High Temp Convection Oven • Fax and Printer a Cold Storage Compartment • Jump Seat The interior is exceptionally clean, in excellent condition and shows as new with no defects

CHUCK COLLINS & ASSOCIATES, INC. Premier Jet Complex * McClellan-Palomar Airport, 2100 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 214 Carlsbad, California 92011

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Tel: +1 760-929-0302 Cell: +1 760-420-7400 Email: Chuck@CCAJets.com http://www.chuckcollinsassociates.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Chuck Collins Hawker 700A March 20/02/2013 10:26 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

$549,000 US

Hawker 700A Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1504 N902L 3,220.4 1,381

Garmin 500A GPS/FMS/WAAS, 3D Eng. Upgrades. - 100 upgraded APU, Excellent Paint, NDH, Excellent Logs Engines Honeywell TFE-731-3DR-1H - more power high and hot - “3D” Engine Mods - 2,100 Hr/4,200 Hr MPI/CZI Interval w/N1 DEEC’s Engine #1: - SN: P-84227C - 796 Since MPI - 796 Since CZII Engine #2: - SN: P-84236C - 796 Since MPI - 796 Since CZI * Engines on Honeywell Maintenance Service Plan (MSP) Gold since new, and they have the Digital Engine Computers DEEC´s and the “D” Upgrades APU Honeywell GTCP-92-100 Upgraded APU. 3430.8 TTSN. 77.2 Since Hot Section Avionics Collins APS 80 Automatic Flight Guidance System with Dual Collins FDS 109 Flight Director and HSI’s, Dual RVSM Air Data System with Altitude Alert Dual Sperry C-14 Compass System. No. 1: - Collins Pro Line VHF 20 Digital Communication Transceiver w/Remote CTL Heads - Collins Pro Line VIR 30 VOR/LOC/GLS/MKR Receiver w/HSI and Remote CTL Heads

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

No. 2: - Collins Pro Line VHF 20 Digital Communication Transceiver w/Remote CTL Heads. - Collins Pro Line VIR 30 VOR/LOC/GLS/MKR Receiver w/HSI and w/Remote CTL Heads. LRN #1: - Global GNS-XLS Long Range Navigation/Flight Management System using 12 Chanel G.P.S. certified for IFR approach and en route with CRT display, complete North American Global Vandling database. LRN #2: - Garmin 500A GPS/FMS/WAAS IFR Long Range Navigation System fully Integrated with Garmin GDL 69 WX Weather downlink. - Dual Collins Pro Line TDR-90 Mode C w/CTL Heads - Honeywell Primus 400 Color Radar/data link Interior Eight Place Fireblocked Interior with Five 800 Style Cabin Chairs and a Three-Place Couch, All Done In Scandia Sandstone leather. R/H Aft Galley with Crystal Storage, heated oven/tray storage. Extra cold storage, wood cabin dividers, under couch storage. Rear private flushing lavatory. All Metal throughout gold plated. Custom cabin entertainment system with Airshow 400, Stereo/DVD/CD/ entertainment System with 2 Displays and multi stereo speaker system with headsets Exterior White Top with Deep Green Bottom and Las Vegas Gold Striping in Custom Scheme. - In Excellent Condition. - New paint 09/03

CHUCK COLLINS & ASSOCIATES, INC. Premier Jet Complex * McClellan-Palomar Airport, 2100 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 214 Carlsbad, California 92011

Tel: +1 760-929-0302 Cell: +1 760-420-7400 Email: Chuck@CCAJets.com http://www.chuckcollinsassociates.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

139


Northern Air N959RP February 19/02/2013 12:31 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

40-2100 N959RP 2408 1949

• Extended Range Fuel • Fresh A-D check at Bombardier Wichita Airframe Factory Warranty Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 1907 / Right Engine 1899 MSP Gold Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660

• ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue and Yellow Stripes Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Imbuia gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Almond Crunch leather with Surfside lower sidewalls and finished Imbuia wood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

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Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


DMB Aviation March 20/02/2013 10:21 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Priced to Sell Now - $3,495,000 or make offer

1995 Challenger 601-3R Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5172 N777YG 5150 2965

Engines GE CF34-3AI JSSI Coverage - prorated Engine 1 (S/N: 807221) 5140 TTSN. 2955 Cycles Engine 2 (S/N: 807220) 5140 TTSN. 2955 Cycles APU Garrett GTCP36 - 100E 5570 Hours SNEW 100% JSSI Coverage APU Maintenance Plan Exterior White over light sand with tan, taupe and maroon accent stripes New paint 2007 Shows rating 9 out of 10 Interior High gloss Burlwood accents with Mother of Pearl inserts Gray leather headliners/sidewalls, mirror bulkheads and bright gold fixtures Comfortable seating for ten (10) passengers plus jumpseat in an executive interior featuring: • One (1) four (4) place divan completed in earthtone fabrics • Six (6) single club chairs upholstered in overstuffed light gray leather Divan pulls out into bed

Storage under divan for two (2) life rafts Entertainment system • Airshow 400 • Dual 18” flat screen monitor • Two (2) remote monitors • Stereo • CD / DVD player Forward galley with: • Convection / Microwave oven • China storage • Hot water plus hot cup • Coffee maker Avionics Honeywell SPZ-8000 EFIS Dual Collins VHF 22B Comms (8.33 MHZ spacing) Dual Collins ADF 462 Dual digital air data computers Dual Honeywell 12 channel GPS Honeywell MCS 300 Satcom Honeywell EDZ 5 tube EFIS/MFD Selcal Honeywell TCZ 810/Change 7 TCAS Triple Honeywell Lasertrak III LRNAV’s Honeywell Lasertrak (NDU) Additional Equipment Long range fuel tank Thrust reversers Steer-by-wire Cockpit refuelling panel Increased gross weight mod Remote engine oil Remote nose door activated switching SAT/COM - Triple handset with Fax wiring External logo lights

DMB Aviation Associates, LLC

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 1-702-592-2843 Fax: 1-928-649-0373 Email: Dmarkbrady@aol.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

141


AeroSmith Penny February 19/02/2013 12:36 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Price Reduced

1990 Citation II Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-0636 N50NF 6343 4898

Airframe CESCOM Fresh Phase 1-5 and 10 - July 2011 Engines Pratt & Whitney JT15D-4 Eng. 1: 2659 SMOH 711 SHOT Eng. 2: 2659 SMOH 711 SHOT Avionics Sperry 3 tube EDS-603 3 Tube EFIS Sperry SPZ 500 Autopilot Global GNS XLS w/ GPS KGP 860 MFD Honeywell Primus 650 Color Radar Dual Collins 32A Navs 8.33 Spacing Dual Collins 22A Comms Dual Collins TDR 90 Transponders Dual Collins ADF – 462 Collins ALT-55B Flightphone Honeywell Mark VIII TAWS 406 ELT

Additional Features RVSM Thrust Reverse Fairchild A100 CVR AFT Baggage Freon Air Conditioning No Damage History Gross Take Off Weight Increase Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with blue stripes. New paint in June 1997 Interior Interior has seven passenger center club configuration. Also included is a left hand deluxe refreshment center. Seat belted flushing potty. New leather seats and carpet 2009

AeroSmith Penny II LLC 8031 Airport Blvd., Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061

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Tel: +1 (713) 649-6100 Fax: +1 (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com www.aerosmithpenny.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


New Jet International March 19/02/2013 12:38 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Hawker 900XP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

HA-56 I-BBGR 1120 956

Engines Garrett TFE731-50R Left engine: Right Engine: S/N: P122218 P122217 TSN: 1120 hrs 1120 hrs TBO: O/C O/C APU GTCP36-150(W) S/N: P1050. APU HRS 1143 ENGINES AND APU ARE ON MSP Avionics EFIS Collins Proline 21 Integrated Avionics Suite COMMS Dual Collins VHF-4000 w/8.33 spacing NAVS #1 NAV Collins NAV-4000, NAV #2 Collins NAV- 4500 A/P Dual Collins FGC-3000 HF Dual Collins HF-9000 w/SELCAL TRANSPONDERS Dual Collins TDR 94D ADF Dual Collins ADF-4000 DME Dual Collins DME-4000 AHRS Dual Collins AHC-3000 RADAR Collins TWR 850 Color w/Turbulance TCAS TCAS II Collins TCAS-4000 EGPWS Honeywell Mark V w/windshear detection RAAS Honeywell Runway Awareness and Advisory System GPS Dual Collins WAAS enabled GPS-4000S 12-Channel FMS Dual Collins FMS-6000

ADC Dual Collins ADC-3000 RADALT Collins ALT-4000 CVR Universal CVR-120 FDR Honeywell Solid State Interior Eight-Passenger configuration with five individual seats and one right hand three-place berthing divan. Finished in Gray Leather and Gray carpet. Cabinetry is medium color Rosewood veneer. Belted lavatory seat, Fold Out Table, Center Seat Cushion, Break Over Forward Armrest on Divan. 220 VAC Power, Espresso Machine and Microwave Oven, Pyramid Style . Cabinet, Additional Storage Drawers Under Each Club Chair, Drop Down Inboard Armrests, Sliding Lavatory Door, Vestibule Hinged Door, Dual six-person Life Raft, Aft Closet Additional Equipment • JAR OPS and EASA compliant • High Intensity Radi-ated Field (HIRF) Kit • Universal Power Outlet in Cockpit on Copilots Side • Long Range Oxygen (2 x 750 liter bottles) • Precise Flight PulseLite System with TCAS Interface • Honeywell Runway Awareness & Advisory System (RAAS) • Extended Frequency Range Radios • Paperless Cockpit • Aircell ST 3100 w/Cordless Cabin and Cockpit Handsets • Artex C406-2 ELT Exterior Overall white with black and gold stripes

New Jet International

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +377 97 70 10 20 E-mail: sales@newjet.com www.newjet.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

143


CAI Premier 1A March 20/02/2013 10:19 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Beech Premier IA Airframe TT: Landings:

1,250 819

Airframe RVSM approved (Reduced Vertical Separation Minima) Engines Williams-Rolls FJ44-2A (2300 pounds of thrust each) 3500 hour overhaul/core zone inspection interval (TBO) Left Right 1,250 HSN 1,250 HSN 867 CSN 867 CSN S/N :105391 S/N: 105392 Avionics Collins Pro Line 21 Avionics System Collins Three-Tube AFD-3010 EFIS Electronic Flight Information System Collins FGC-3000 Autopilot/Flight Director System Collins XMWR-1000 Color Weather Radar Dual Collins VHF-4000 Communication Transceivers Dual Collins Nav-4000 / Nav-4500 Navigation Receivers Collins Nav 4000 Automatic Direction Finder Collins DME-4000 Distance Measuring Equipment Dual Collins TDR-94D Transponders Dual Collins ADC-3000 Air Data Computers Dual Collins AHC-3000 AHRS Altitude Heading Reference System Dual Collins DB-438 Audio Panels

Collins ALT-4000 Radar Altimeter Collins GPS-4000A Collins TTR-4000 Traffic Collision Advisory System with Change 7 Collins FMS-3000 Flight Management System with GPS Global Positioning System Interior New in 2008 by Raytheon Seating for two crew members and up to six passengers in a forward Club seating arrangement with two additional forward-facing chairs in the aft cabin. Beige/tan leather upholstery is complemented by beige carpeting and burlwood gloss cabinetry. The forward refreshment centre features coffee service, trash receptacle and storage drawers. Other cabin amenities include two executive writing/dining tables. The aft lavatory features an airline-style flushing toilet. Fire blocked Exterior New in 2008 by the Raytheon Factory! Overall Matterhorn White with Metallic Platinum, Metallic Ming Blue and Umber Stripes Maintenance ON CAMP 1,200 Hour Inspection Complied With

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

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Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jetability March 20/02/2013 12:33 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1995 Citation Jet Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

525-0105 G-EDCJ 3488 2786

Engines Engine Model: FJ44-1A Engine #1 – s/n 1225 / Total Time 3417.3 / FJ44 Check 5 due in 1737.7 hours Engine #2 – s/n 1220 / Total Time 3417.3 / FJ44 Check 5 due in 1737.7 hours Engines enrolled on Williams TAP Elite Equipment / Options RVSM Certified EU-OPS capable Single Pilot

Avionics AP / FD: Sperry SPZ-5000 EGPWS: Sandel ST-3400 Class B TCAS: Ryan TCAD ADC: Shadin ADC-200 ADF: Bendix KR-87 DME: Dual Bendix KN-63 VHF COMM: Dual Bendix KY-196A with 8.33 spacing VHF NAV: Dual Bendix KN-53 with FM immunity GPS: Garmin GNS-430 RAD ALT: Bendix KRA-405B; RMI: Dual Bendix KNI-582; XPDR: Dual Garmin GTX-330D mode S; WXR: Bendix RDR-2000VP colour Moving Map: Argus 7000CE ELT: 3 frequency with NAV interface Northstar CT-1000 flight deck organizer Stormscope: Insight Strike Finder

Interior Non-smoking interior. Five fire blocked seating, 4-place club w/headrests & single forward starboard side-facing seat upholstered in light tone glove leather. Port side belted and flushing lavatory. Sheepskin covered crew seats. Carpet: Entry, cockpit & centre aisle carpet assembly w/vinyl runner. Forward port side deluxe refreshment centre. High-gloss cabinetry throughout, dual executive tables, aft port divider w/mirror on forward side. Brushed aluminium hardware Exterior Overall white with accent stripes Inspections Aircraft enrolled on Cescom Aircraft enrolled on Cessna Pro Parts Inspection Document 10 complied with July 2012 / 3487 hours Inspection Documents 02 & 33 due July 2013

Two Corporate Owners Since New

2008 King Air C90GTi Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

LJ-1890 G-CFBX 715

Engines Engine Model: PT6A-135A L/H S/N: PCE-PZ-0685 R/H S/N: PCE-PZ-0684 L/H TSN: 715.0 R/H TSN: 715.0 Props Prop Model: Hartzell 4-Blade HC-E4N-3N L/H S/N: HH3264 R/H S/N: HH3269 L/H TSN: 715.0 R/H TSN: 715.0 Equipment • Raisbeck Crown Wing Lockers • Aft Cabin Partition with Sliding Doors Separating Baggage/Toilet Area from Cabin • Four Lateral Tracking Cabin Chairs in Club Seating

Arrangement • Aisle Facing Seat with Lap Belt • Private Lav Compartment with Electric • Flushing Toilet and Sidewall Relief Tube; • Cockpit Relief Tube Avionics Collins Pro Line 21 w/3 Displays -2 PFDs & 1 MFD Com 1 & 2: Collins VHF-4000 (8.33 Spacing) Nav 1 & 2: Collins NAV-4000 FMS: Collins FMS-3000 Autopilot: Collins FGC-3000 Radar: Collins WXR-800 ADF: Collins NAV-4000 DME: Single Collins DME-4000 ADC: Dual Collins ADC-3010 ELT: Artex C406-2 AHRS: Dual Collins AHC-3000

Jetability

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Transponder: Dual TDR-94D Enhanced Flt ID ESIS: Meggitt Mark II Radio Altimeter: Single Collins ALT-4000 TCAS: Skywatch HP-TCAS 1 CVR: L3 FA-2100-1020 w/120 minutes IFIS: Collins Integrated Flight Information System EGPWS: ACSS TAWS+ (Class A) Collins ECH-5000 Electronic Charts Software Interior Panel, Sidewall Armrests, Cabin Sidewall, Cockpit Sidewall and Seats; River Sand Marshall Sidewall Rail; Taup[e Premier Velour Floor Covering; Fawn Belts and Harnesses; Dark Anthracite Instrument Panel Exterior Matterhorn White with Blue and Red Stripes

Tel: +44 (0) 1223 399966 info@jetability.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

145


John Hopkinson Ultras July 19/02/2013 12:44 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation Ultras Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell GNS-XLS FMS Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS Interior Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior Exterior Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior Maintenance Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale Zero Engine Option follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

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Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


P147_JMesingerNov06 18/02/2013 15:06 Page 1

Not just a tug.

It’s a

8900 Series

.

800-535-8767 / 503-861-2288 w w w. l e k t r o. co m / s a l e s @ l e k t r o. co m

Need Help Navigating Aircraft Operating Costs? Conklin & de Decker products and consulting services are like having a “GPS” for your aircraft acquisition decision or budgeting process.

Aircraft Cost Evaluator The perfect tool for benchmarking variable & fixed costs, performance and specification data for more than 460 aircraft.

Life Cycle Cost A budgeting and financial analysis tool to understand the true cost of owning and operating an aircraft.

www.was.Conklindd.com

+1- 508-255-5975 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

147


Marketplace March13 20/02/2013 15:39 Page 3

Marketplace Boeing 737 500 VIP

European Skybus Ltd Price:

$4,250,000

Year:

1992

S/N:

24648

Reg:

VPCAJ

TTAF:

35,418

Location: United Kingdom

Boeing 737 500 VIP

40 Passenger corporate interior. This aircraft has recently undergone a passenger to VIP conversion in October 2010 by European Aviation. Refurbished to the highest standards, this 1992 example has been operated by ourselves as a corporate aircraft and is now available for sale or lease. The Cabin area is divided into two sections, the forward section is arranged into a ‘Club 4’ configuration around 4 HI-LO folding tables, which can be converted into 8 sleeping positions.

European Skybus Ltd Price:

Please call

Year:

1995

S/N:

27425

Reg:

N463AC

TTAF:

31,908

Location: United Kingdom

Boeing 737

Please call

Year: S/N:

TBC

Reg:

TBC

TTAF:

TBC

Tel: +44 (0) 1202 581 111 Email: sales@europeanskybus.com

40 Passenger corporate interior. This aircraft has recently undergone a passenger to VIP conversion in October 2011 by European Aviation. Refurbished to the highest standards, this 1995 example is now available for sale or lease. The Cabin area is divided into two sections, the forward section is arranged into a ‘Club 4’ configuration around 4 HI-LO folding tables, which can be converted into 8 sleeping positions. The aft section of the cabin is configured with a further 24 forward facing lie flat business class seats

SCI Asia Limited Price:

Tel: +44 (0) 1202 581 111 Email: sales@europeanskybus.com

Tel: +852 3975 2959 Email: EdenJET@SCIAsiaLimited.com

Boeing 737 Luxury VIP Private Jet. Versatile Interior. 29 pax standard configuration. Superb Entertainment and Communications Facilities: incl. 2 iPod docks & 4 40. Flat TVs. Rockwell-Collins Air Show 4000. 4 Distinct seating areas & one 8-person Conference Table. Spacious cabin & Massive storage. Fwd & Aft Galley. Aft VIP Lav & Fwd Crew Lav. State of the Art Engineering. New Personalized Exterior Paint. Customization Available

Location: Hong Kong

www.EdenJETglobal.com

Bombardier Challenger 605

Evgeny Tikhomirov Price:

Make offer

Year:

2011

S/N:

5838

Reg:

OE-IDV

TTAF:

86

Location: Austria

Dassault Falcon 7X

Jean-Louis Price:

Please call

Year:

2009

S/N:

52

Reg: TTAF:

1200

Location: Switzerland

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +43 (0) 676 887 00845 Email: busjetsale@gmail.com

BOMBARDIER COMPLETION. 86 Hours 48 Cycles. In Service Date – March 2011. AVIONICS: Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21 with four 10” x 12” LCD screens and integrated minu control. EFIS/IECAS with synoptic. Dual FMS 6000 with coupled lateral and vertical nav & performance calculation. Integrated Flight Information System (IFIS). 3D Map and Long Range Cruise. Lightning Detection System (LDS). Enhanced Maps on MFD. 3rd Inertial Reference System. 2nd Radio Altimeter. Datalink with Iridium interface

Tel: +377 (0) 99 99 49 13 Email: jlc@rigmora.com NEW Low Time Falcon 7x for sale - One Owner - Over 3m USD of Options. Go for nothing less than the fighter-likefeel of this Fly-by-Wire Tri Jet! No Damage History, Number of Seats 14, Completed in Little Rock, Custom Rare Wood Elm Burl, Specific Marquetry Inlay in Console Tables, Metal Inlays plated with 24K Polished Gold, Forward Double Club, Mid Cabin Double Club, and 2 Aft electrically operated Three-place Divans, Light Beige Interior

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace March13 20/02/2013 15:40 Page 4

Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,975,000

Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

Reg:

N337WR

TTAF:

6615.3

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,975,000.

Location: USA

BELL 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $1,975,000

Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

Reg: TTAF:

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not

do justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners.

1700

Location: USA

BELL 412EMS

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,875,000

Year:

1981

S/N:

33017

Reg:

N554AL

TTAF:

15265

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’.Fresh annual / Export C of A

Location: USA

BELL 212 (Seven Available)

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Please Call

Year:

Call for details

S/N:

Call for details

Reg:

Call for details

TTAF:

Call for details

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

Location: USA

Socata TBM 700B

Avia Source, Inc Price:

Make Offer

Year:

N/A

S/N:

212

Reg:

LX-JFF

TTAF:

3716

Tel: +1 (626) 584 8170 Email: jason@aviasource.aero VERY LOW ENGINE TSOH: 190hrs, Serial number 212 has been professionally maintained since new and is in very good condition. It is a top value on the TBM 700B market with very low engine time since overhaul and excellent maintenance. Take a close look at this low cost and high value TBM 700B..

Location: Geneva, Switzerland

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

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Marketplace March13 20/02/2013 15:41 Page 5

Marketplace Learjet 31A

James Lovett Price:

1.495 M $ USD

Year:

1996

S/N:

31A-115

Reg:

ZS-NYV

TTAF:

1,937.7

Tel: +44 (0) 7747 011 642 Email: sales@jameslovett.com 1937.7hrs TT, Engine TSO 1937.7/1834.6 RVSM Compliant

Location: South Africa

Beechcraft Beech Jet 400

James Lovett

Tel: +44 (0) 7747 011 642 Email: sales@jameslovett.com

Price:

795,000 $ USD

Year:

1989

S/N:

RJ-59

Rohr thrust reverser system Branson long range tank RVSM compliant Painted 2009

Reg:

ZS-MHN

3997.7hrs TT, Engine TSO 1590.6/512.2

TTAF:

3,997.7

Location: South Africa

Piper PA31-P Navajo Commanchero

James Lovett

Tel: +44 (0) 7747 011 642 Email: sales@jameslovett.com

Price:

925,000 $ USD

Year:

1974

S/N:

31P-7400227

Reg:

N900TB

Pratt and Whitney PT6A-135 750hp engines flat rated to 620hp Standard Airworthiness Certificate in normal category 22nd may 2012 Dual purpose aircraft passenger or aerial survey with dual camera ports

TTAF:

8,499

8,499hrs TT, Engine TSO 877.5/117.7

Location: UK

Cessna Caravan 208B

CAAD Inc. Price:

$1,150,000 USD

Year:

1999

S/N:

208B0781

Reg:

YN-CGS

TTAF:

20,419.65

Tel: +1 (305) 593 9929 Email: info@caadinc.com For delivery in April 2013 with 0 SMOH engine and prop, Total cycles: 19,444, Configuration: PASSENGER, Aircraft status: OPERATIONAL, King IFR, A/P and FD, MFD, APE III, POD, A/C, P&W C. SB 1669 Blades, ADAS +. EGPWS, Rosen Visors, 14 seats, Large Tires

Location: Nicaragua

www.caadinc.com

Cessna Caravan 208B

CAAD Inc. Price:

$1,100,000 USD

Year:

1997

S/N:

208B0607

Reg:

YN-CGU

TTAF:

17,538.03

Tel: +1 (305) 593 9929 Email: info@caadinc.com For delivery in April 2013 with 0 SMOH engine and prop, Cycles: 23,358, Configuration: PASSENGER, Aircraft Status: OPERATIONAL, King IFR, A/P and FD, MFD, APE III, POD, A/C, P&W C. SB 1669 Blades, ADAS +. EGPWS, Rosen Visors, 14 seats, Large Tires

Location: Nicaragua

www.caadinc.com 150

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace March13 20/02/2013 15:42 Page 6

Marketplace Gulfstream G550

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

Please Call

Year:

2004

S/N:

5033

Reg:

VP-BNR

TTAF:

1448

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Only 1448 hours, One owner since new, Certification Foxtrot "Basic" System upgrade, Recent 12,24 & 96 Month Inspections, 72 Month Inspection c/w August 2010, 18 passenger custom designer interior in like new condition

Location: USA

Bombardier/Challenger 601-3A/ER

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

Please Call

Year:

1992

S/N:

5121

Reg:

N328AM

TTAF:

9,025

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

A "no excuses" airplane. With all major inspections just accomplished. Fresh 6/12/24/60 /120 & 240 Month inspection c/w in 2011. Fresh HSI on left engine. Fresh gear overhaul and interior refurbishment

Location: USA

Socata TBM 850

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

Please Call

Year:

2006

S/N:

360

Reg:

N874CA

TTAF:

1,542

Location: USA

King Air C90B

BAS GmbH Price:

US$ 850.000

Year:

1993

S/N:

LJ-1325

Reg:

D-IHMV

TTAF:

3.505

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Jet speeds with single engine turboprop economy. That is what you get with this superbly maintained TBM 850. Climb to 31,000 in 5 minutes and fly 1585 NM in economy cruise. Slip into 2100 foot strips. That is the versatility of this marvelous plane. The panel and maintenance history of this aircraft is proof of exceptional pride of ownership. The panel includes the IHAS 8000 TCAS/TAWS and the WX500 stormscope and RDR Radar displayed on the KMD 850 MFD for utmost safety and comfort. Maintenance has been performed by the book and only by factory authorized technicians.

Tel: +49 (0) 7403 914 04 66 Email: sales@basjets.com AC will be delivered with Engines enrolled on MORE Program (HSI on Cond. TBO Interval 8.000 hrs); no Damage History, only one Owner since new; all times hangared; 6 Yr Inspection of Gear and Propellers performed Dec/2011; FMS Modification (Garmin/Avydine GPS/MFD); Maintenance done at German Beechcraft Service Center

Location: Stuttgart Germany

www.basjets.com

Citation Bravo

BAS GmbH Price:

US$ 2.130.000

Year:

2000

S/N:

550B-0916

Reg:

N555BK

TTAF:

3.951

Tel: +49 (0) 7403 914 04 66 Email: sales@basjets.com Fresh Engine Overhaul (only 1 hr SMOH); Airframe and Engines on Power Advantage Program; No Damage History; only one Owner since new; all times hangared; Bravo Steps; EGPWS Mark VIII; TCAS II; Stormscope; UNS FMS with DTU, sliding Toilet Door, CVR, all maintenance performed in Citation Service Center

Location: Germany

www.basjets.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

151


Marketplace March13 20/02/2013 15:43 Page 7

Marketplace Eurocopter EC 130B4

Tel: +31 (0)499 390 964 Email: peter@vanzutphen.nl

Van Zutphen BV Price:

Please call

Year:

2009

S/N:

4716

Reg:

00-EVL

TTAF:

373

Location: Netherlands

Eurocopter EC 135P2i-Executive

Garmin 430 VHF/VOR/LOC/GS/GPS, Garmin 496 GPS, Garmin 795 GPS, Garmin GTX 330 transponder mode S, Garmin GMA340 audipanel-ICS, Bendix King KX 165A VHF/VOR/LOC/GS, Engine wash kit, Heating & demisting system, Retractable landing light, VFR night and day equipped, Ground power receptacle, Chopper spotter heli mover, High visability main rotor blades, Cargo hook provisions with load indicator, Emergency pop-up floats, 2x artificial horizon, ELT, Radar altimeter.

Tel: +41 (0) 31 310 41 13 Email: gtsilalidis@europavia.ch

Europavia (Suisse) SA Price: EUR 4,900,000 excl VAT Year:

2011

S/N:

0938

Reg:

HB-ZTJ

TTAF:

10

BRAND NEW EC135P2i Executive Only 10FH Ferry Flight, Immediately available by Eurocopter Distribution, First come, first served, Exceptional Fix Price Euro 4,900,000 ex work Switzerland WWW.EUROPAVIA.CH Contact Direct George Tsilalidis gtsilalidis@europavia.ch

Location: Switzerland

Cessna Caravan (C-208)

Tel: +1 (631) 218 2152 Email: malte@thro.com

Thro Aviation, Ltd. Price:

Please call

Year:

2010

S/N:

20800521

Reg:

N720QB

TTAF:

486

This 2010 Executive Cessna Caravan, with only 486 Hours total time since new, is on Wipline 8000 Amphibious floats. The aircraft's stunning interior includes a Taupe executive leather seating with two tables and an exceptional entertainment system with ceiling mounted LCD monitors and more!!!

Location: Islip, NY

Cessna Citation XLS

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Price: Year:

Tel: +49 (0) 821 7003 100/145 Email: info@beechcraft.de

EU Reg, EU-OPS, CVR (2h), HF-1050, TCAS II, CMS400 Checklist, Dual FMS UNS-1 ESP, AvVisor+, Aircell ST-3100, EASA German commerc. certif., CAMO+, fresh HSI 08/2012!

2007

S/N: Reg: TTAF:

2,920

Location:

Par Avion Ltd

Alberth Air Parts

+1 832 934 0055

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011 152

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace March13 20/02/2013 14:33 Page 8

Marketplace

Find an Aircraft Dealer

Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

Business Aviation

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

www.AvBuyer.com/dealers World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), March 2013, Vol 17, Issue No 3 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & DVDs submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 13th March 2013 Advertiser’s Index 21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................154

Corporate Concepts .................................................53

JetBrokers..............................................................44-45

ABACE-Asian Business Aviation ........................125

Dassault Falcon Jet Europe ...........................2-3,135

Jetcraft Corporation.....................................68-69,BC

Abu Dhabi Air Expo.................................................131

DMB Aviation Associates ......................................141

Jeteffect ........................................................................59

AeroSmith/Penny.....................................................142

Dubai Air Show ........................................................133

JETNET ......................................................................123

AIC Title Services ....................................................115

Duncan Aviation....................................................43,83

John Hopkinson & Associates ........................65,146

AMJET .............................................................................5

Eagle Aviation..............................................................33

Leading Edge Aviation Solutions............................71

Aradian Aviation..........................................................63

EBACE-European Business Aviation..................129

Lektro..........................................................................147

Aviation Advisors ........................................................91

EMBRAER Pre-Flown ........................................48-49

Mente Group .......................................................FC,27

Avjet Corporation.................................................24-25

European Helicopter Show ...................................121

NBAA Corporate .....................................................132

Avpro.......................................................................17-21

ExecuJet Aviation........................................................37

NBAA Regional Forums .........................................127

Ist Source Bank ..........................................................87

Florida Jets .......................................................136-137

New Jet International .........................................57,143

Bell Aviation ..........................................................60-61

Freestream Aircraft USA....................................10-15

Northern Air ..............................................................140

Bombardier..................................................................31

General Aviation Services ........................................51

O’Gara Aviation Company.................................40-41

Boutsen Aviation ........................................................97

Gulfstream Pre-Owned ......................................54-55

Par Avion.........................................................................4

Central Business Jets .............................................155

Heliasset.com...........................................................134

Rolls-Royce..................................................................79

Charleston Aviation Partners...................................39

Intellijet International .................................................6-7

Southern Cross Aviation ........................................103

Charlie Bravo Aviation ...............................................47

J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ......................28-29

Tempus Jets .....................................................104-105

Chuck Collins ..................................................138-139

Jet Support Services (JSSI) ....................................85

The Jet Collection ................................................34-35

Conklin & de Decker ...............................................147

JETability ....................................................................145

VREF Aircraft Values...............................................147

Corporate Aircraft Photography ...........................147

JetBlack Aviation ......................................................111

Wentworth & Affiliates...............................................75

Corporate AirSearch Int’l .................................95,144 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................81

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – March 2013

153


21st Century May 24/10/2012 11:01 Page 1

Copyright of Leor Yudelowitz

When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet In the sky; and the Federal Aviation Adminstration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope, and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 Series aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter than the Gulfstream IV and provide a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. Furthermore, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN, with eight passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. Revolutionary and the world’s first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology. FBW enables a MMO of .90 and enhanced low-speed handling, pitch and roll stability characteristics. The 7X can climb directly to FL 410 at ISA + 10° conditions. Two Hundred (200)+ very high speed, ultra long range Falcon 7X business jets have been ordered!

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ March_CBJ November06 18/02/2013 16:50 Page 1

General Offices

Mexico office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Enrique A. Ortega Lapham

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +52.55.5211.1505

FAX: (952) 894-8569

CELL: +52.55.3901.1055

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

E-MAIL: Enrique@CBJets.com

ial g t i In erin f Of

ial g t i In erin f Of

CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5577

CHALLENGER 601w/3A ENGINES SN/3024

Aircraft at Duncan Aviation Now for its 96-Month Inspection and Landing Gear Overhaul, 2000 Hours TT, On Smart Parts Plus and MSP Gold Engine Programs, Spectacular Terence Disdale Designed 10 Place Interior

Less than 12-months Since Wallet Numbing 30-Year Heavy Check; JSSI Engines w/ less than 100 Hours Since Mid-Life, Less than 100 Hours on -150 APU, Landing Gear Overhauled, New Paint, Refurbished 12 Place Interior including Airshow 4000 System, EFIS, LaserRef’s, etc

2009 CHALLENGER 300 S/N 20264

FALCON 900B SN/65

1185 TT, Iridium SAT Phone w/ Swift Broadband, MSP GOLD, 2nd IFIS FSU (Paperless Cockpit), Sliding cabin/galley Pocket Door, Deluxe Galley w/ sink, Maintained to Part 135 Standards

Will be Delivered w/ Fresh 4C and Landing Gear OH, MSP Gold Engine Package, Preferred 13 PAX Configuration w/ FWD & AFT Lav; Impeccable US Ownership History

al De ing nd Pe

al De ing nd Pe

FALCON 900B SN/60

FALCON 50 RETROFITTED TO FALCON 50EX (SB280) S/N 171

Will be Delivered w/ Fresh 4C and Landing Gear OH, JSSI Engine Package, Preferred 13 PAX Configuration w/ FWD & AFT Lav; Impeccable US Ownership History

MSP Gold on -40 Engines, Completely New Proline IV Avionics Package, 4C Heavy Check and Landing Gear OH 09/10

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5248

1125 ASTRA SP S/N 49

Power Advantage Engine Program, w/ Fresh Engine Overhauls, Pro-Parts Airframe Program and on Cescom Since New; Dual Universal UNS-1ESP FMS; Aircraft can be delivered anywhere in the world

3597.9 TT; Fresh C Check, new paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center 08/11, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod


Just because you no longer have connecting flights

you no longer need connections.

The right aircraft can turn up anywhere—which means you need to know the right people everywhere. We’ve been cultivating worldwide connections for over 50 years, from legal and financial resources to the top aviation experts. Today our unmatched global network gives you eyes, ears and business savvy around the planet. A larger inventory of options. And fast, smooth, face-to-face transactions. Want the best value in the business? Just connect the dots. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

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Scan this QR code to download to your Apple or Android device.

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

FEATURED INVENTORY

2005 Challenger 604 - SN 5606

14 Passenger Interior - Fully Programmed Triple IRS and FMS

2000 Global Express - SN 9062

Uncompromising Quality - Immediately Available Max-Vis EVS-1000, WSI AV-300 Weather

WAS_2-26-13_back cover_Connections.indd 1

2008 Hawker 900XP - SN HA-0036

New to Market - 392 Hours Total Time - Lowest Available - One Owner - Exceptional Value 1987 Airbus A310 2007 Challenger 300 1988 Challenger 601-3A 1995 Challenger 601-3R 2006 Challenger 604 2009 Challenger 605 2010 Challenger 605 2011 Challenger 605 1993 Citation VI 2005 Citation X 2009 Falcon 2000LX

2010 Falcon 7X 2005 Global 5000 2013 Global 5000 2002 Global Express 2007 Global XRS 2010 Global XRS 1998 Gulfstream GIVSP 1988 Gulfstream IV 2006 Global 5000 2013 Global 6000 2007 Global XRS

2006 Global xrs - SN 9171

New to Market - 2,060 Hours Total Time Airframe on SmartParts

2001 Citation X - SN 750-0143

4,037 Hours Total Time - 3,491 Landings Engines Enrolled on Rolls-Royce CorporateCare

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

DOESN’T MEAN

2/11/13 3:11 PM


World Aircraft Sales Magazine March 2013