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WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

June 2013

Read more on pages 30 - 31

Business Aviation & The Boardroom: pages 32 - 71


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Project1_Layout 1 28/05/2013 11:28 Page 1


AC Index June13 23/05/2013 15:03 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRBUS A318 Elite. . . . . . 156, A318-112 Elite. . 38, A319 . . . . . . . . . . 69, A310-304 . . . . . . 156,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 11, 29, 39, 61, BBJ 3 . . . . . . . . . . 61, CRJ 200 . . . . . . . 156, Super 27-200 . . 87, 727-100REW . . . 141, 737-500 VIP . . . . 150, 747-8 . . . . . . . . . . 61, 757-200 Exec . . . 87, 767-200 . . . . . . . . 61,

BOMBARDIER Global 5000 . . . . 24, 41, 47, 61, 156, Global 6000 . . . . 156, Global Express . 19, 35, 39, 41, 52, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 59, 67, 69, 144, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, Global Express XRS.. 13, 19, 29, 35, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 156,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

601-3R . . . . . . . . 21, 52, 140, 601-3A ER . . . . . 21, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 27, 31, 47, 52, 55, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 155, 156, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 12, 29, 47, 52, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152, 156, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 145, 850ER. . . . . . . . . 12, 156,

Learjet 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 45, 49, 67, 113, 31ER . . . . . . . . . . 31, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 115, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 45, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 31, 57, 55 . . . . . . . . . . . . 115, 150, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 53, 57, 137, 148, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 45, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 23, 67, 136,

BRITISH AEROSPACE BAe-125 . . . . . . . 112,

Challenger

CESSNA

300 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 21, 47, 47, 113, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150, 155, 156, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 48, 67, 150, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 27, 52, 156,

ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 43, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 48, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 44,

4

Citation

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 48, 77, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 44, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 52, 67, 156, XL . . . . . . . . . . . . 97, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 16, 29, 48, 51, 85, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 147, 156, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 22, 48, 51, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 69, CJ1+ . . . . . . . . . . 22, 27, 51, 52, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 43, 44, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 26, 31, 43, 61, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, CJ4. . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 156, Encore . . . . . . . . 23, 69, Encore+ . . . . . . . 26, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 155, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 45, 67, Mustang . . . . . . . 21, 22, 49, Super SII . . . . . . 67, Sovereign. . . . . . 22, 25, 29, 43, 44, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 61, 73, 77, 85, 97, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 23, 48, 146,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

Legacy 650 . . . . 13, Lineage 1000. . . 39, Phenom 100 . . . 85,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 7, 57, 154, 156, 20-5BR-2C . . . . . 115, 20F . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 20F-5. . . . . . . . . . 27, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 26, 44, 52, 55, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 149, 154, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 20, 25, 154, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 154, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 61, 69, 97, 134, 135, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 155, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 20, 154, 155, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 5, 20, 24, 31, 85, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87, 154, 900EX EASy . . . 7, 139, 154, 155, 900LX . . . . . . . . . 20, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 16, 24, 25, 44, 61, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 2000EX EASy . . 3, 156, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 3, 156,

Conquest

GULFSTREAM

II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49,

IIB . . . . . . . . . . . . 150, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 149, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 31, 39, 61, 67, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 156, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 14, 15, 20, 24, 25,

EMBRAER 500 . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 156, Legacy 600 . . . . 7, 19, 39, 44, 61, 69,


AC Index June13 23/05/2013 15:00 Page 2

- IN THIS ISSUE

06.13

• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 14, 15, 20, 24, 25, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34, 41, 61, 67, 113, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138, 156, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 34, 53, 67, 155, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 39, 85, 97, 111, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 20, 24, 26, 31, 35, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 55, 67, 76, 113, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 142, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 15, 19, 39, 41, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55, 67, 97, 500 . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 34, 35, 53, 61, 67, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT Beechcraft 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 41, 44, 57, Premier 1A. . . . . 17, 27, 51, 97, 151,

PAGE

IAI Astra . . . . . . . . . . 44, Astra SP . . . . . . . 155, Astra 1125 . . . . . 55, 59, 67, Astra SPX. . . . . . 5, 41, 55,

PAGE

SABRELINER 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 44,

SOCATA

PC12-47 . . . . . . . 29, PC12-45 . . . . . . . 152,

Hawker

PIPER

400XP . . . . . . . . . 67, 97, 750 . . . . . . . . . . . 115, 156,

Cheyenne IIXL . 44, Seneca . . . . . . . . 43,

SIKORSKY

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS

HELICOPTERS A109 Power . . . . 47, AW 109E. . . . . . . 152, AW139 . . . . . . . . 24, Koala. . . . . . . . . . 97,

PILATUS

MD 600N . . . . . . 97,

S-76+ . . . . . . . . . 26, S-92 . . . . . . . . . . 23,

Jetstar II . . . . . . . 155,

Avanti II . . . . . . . 113, Avanti P180 . . . . 47, 57,

PAGE

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS

TBM 700A . . . . . 111, TBM 700B . . . . . 44, 111, 143, TBM 700C2 . . . . 111, TBM 850. . . . . . . 111,

AGUSTAWESTLAND

PIAGGIO

AIRCRAFT

AS 350 B3 . . . . . 69, AS 355 N . . . . . . 69, EC 135 P2+ . . . . 97, EC 135T2 . . . . . . 23, EC135T2i . . . . . . 69,

Seneca V . . . . . . 69, Meridian . . . . . . . 49,

LOCKHEED

King Air 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 45, 49, 67, 97, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 49, 73, 97, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 45, 69, 97,

AIRCRAFT

800A . . . . . . . . . . 151, 800B . . . . . . . . . . 47, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 31, 45, 47, 55, 73, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 147, 156, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 1, 17, 31, 53, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 97, 141, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 45, 53, 69, 97, 156, 1000B . . . . . . . . . 47, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 21,

Aircraft Engine /Support . 81, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 117, 123, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 79, 121, Avionics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102,103, Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 153, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 117,

BELL 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 151, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 151, 230 . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 407GX. . . . . . . . . 119, 412EMS . . . . . . . 151,

EUROCOPTER

The Global Aircraft Market Online

AS 350 B . . . . . . 152,

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PHONE FAX

HOUSTON: 1 . 713 . 681 . 0075 1 . 713 . 681 . 0035

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Years as

CITATION 650 | S/N 0059 AVAILABLE FOR LEASE 5573 TSN, -3C, MSP GOLD HONEYWELL EFIS (4-TUBE), DUAL GNS-XLS W/ GPS TCAS II, EGPWS, SATPHONE, FREON NINE PASSENGER INTERIOR INCLUDING BELTED LAV

1997 FALCON 900EX | S/N 008 6016 TSN, MSP HUD, TAILWIND 500, WIFI SATCOM, SATPHONE, SATAFIS, FULLY WIRED FOR FANS 2C/GEAR OVH c/w NOV/2008, DRY BAY MOD c/w

1997 FALCON 900EX | S/N 012 13 1997 - 20

8105 TSN, 2814 TL MSP GOLD, HUD, SATCOM, SATPHONE, FDR EASA/EU OPS 1 APPROVED, 14 PAX FWD/AFT LAV, 2C/GEAR OVH c/w SEPT/2009

COMING SOON: EASA CJ3, FALCON 50EX

AV I AT I O N C O N S U LTA N T S T O T H E W O R L D WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

5


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Panel June13 21/05/2013 10:04 Page 1

World Aircraft Sales EDITORIAL

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The global marketplace for business aviation News - Aircraft listings - Editorial WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

8

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Panel June13 22/05/2013 16:10 Page 2

Contents

Volume 17, Issue 6 – June 2013

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 32

Control: Business aircraft offer many benefits, but none is as significant as an operator’s ability to influence the safety and effectiveness of air transportation…

36

Trends Favoring Business Aviation: As Airlines seek to increase passenger load factors (reducing capacity and focusing on hub airports), the need for Business Aviation is highlighted.

42

BizAv Services Use Policies: Boards set Business Aviation travel policy.

32

Here, we explore how that policy should reflect the unique needs of the corporation.

56

Block Charter & Jet Cards: Continuing our series on methods for accessing Business Aviation, we consider the pros and cons of Block Charter and Jet Cards.

60

Buying Wisely in an Unstable Market: Noting instability in today’s BizAv market, we consider the benefits of acquiring the right product to serve today’s business opportunities.

64

Non-Owned Aircraft Insurance: If you utilize a non-owned aircraft to transport company personnel you’ll need a true understanding of the additional insurance needs.

66

Medium Jet Value: A look at the benefits of the Medium-sized jet, and a listing of values for models built over the last 20 years.

Main Features 72

Aircraft Comparative Analysis – Gulfstream G200: How does the

56

66

performance of the G200 stand up against Bombardier’s Challenger 300 and Dassault’s Falcon 2000?

80

GAMA 1Q 2013 Shipment Analysis & Report: Mike Potts looks at the delivery numbers and discusses the intricacies of what seems to be a slightly prettier picture than before…

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits 88

Electronic Flight Bag Classification: Ken Elliott walks us through the different classifications and capabilities for EFB hardware and software.

94

EFBs and the Pre-Owned Aircraft Purchase: EFB systems may be certified on the aircraft you’re looking to buy, but what are the FAA requirements for transferring use?

98

Tablet’s Cockpit Invasion: They’re useful additions to any cockpit, but there’s also a danger that the various devices that can be used in the paperless cockpit could provide a distraction if their use isn’t regulated.

Regular Features 18 28 104 114 124 128

Viewpoint Aviation Leadership Roundtable Aircraft Performance & Specifications JETNET >>KNOW MORE Market Indicators BizAv Round-Up

108

Downsizing Your Aircraft: A look at the advantages to downsizing your aircraft as opposed to stepping away from the market altogether…

Next Month’s Issue Business Aviation & The Boardroom

118

Global Systems Tracking: Dave Higdon looks at the way global systems have

Turboprops: Single or Twin? Aircraft Comparative Analysis: Hawker 800A

evolved to connect business aircraft everywhere today. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

9


Freestream 1 June 22/05/2013 15:29 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Boeing BBJ Serial Number: 29273 Registration: VP-BBJ • 18 Passenger

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• One Owner Since New • Pats 9 Tank Configuration • CVR/FDR • SATCOM • Heads Up Display (HUD) • Airshow Network • SFAR88 modification requirements c/w

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

3/12

• Basic Operating Weight: 95,096 lbs • US$31,950,000

Boeing BBJ

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 36714 Registration: VP-BFT • 18 Passenger - Andrew Winch Interior Design • Full Factory Warranties • Very low hours • Pats Gulfstream 6 tank Configuration G450 2Q 2012 (5 aft 1 fwd)

Gulfstream GV/512

• Aft state room with private lavatory and shower • Airshow Network • Five external cameras • Make Offer Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 1 June 22/05/2013 15:29 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Boeing BBJ Serial Number: 28579 Registration: N920DS • 17 Passenger

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• 2008 Paint & Interior • Both aft stateroom's have private lavatory & shower • Six fuel tanks installed (one in storage) • SFAR 88 tank mod c/w 4/09 • Flight Dynamics Heads Up Display (HUD)

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• CMC EFB's with XM Weather • High Speed wireless internet access • Engines on GE MCPH • Fresh 36 Month/2000 Hour Inspections • Make Offer

Boeing BBJ

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 30076 Registration: VP-BBW • 19 Passenger • Interior Refurbishment 2010 • Pats 8 Tank Configuration • Recent A1, B1, C1 Checks and SFR88 Mod G450 2Q 2012 Gulfstream

Gulfstream GV/512

• Airshow Network • Basic Operating Weight: 95,096 lbs • Make Offer

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 2 June 22/05/2013 15:31 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Challenger 850ER Serial Number: 8051 Registration: VP-BSD Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • 1260 Hours Total Time

• APU: Time Since New 1861 Hours • Engines enrolled in JSSI/VEST Complete Plus Engine Maintenance Program • Airshow 410 • Two fuel tanks (PATS System) • AERO-H SATCOM Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• 15 Passenger • US$15,950,000

Challenger 605 Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number 5704 Registration: M-FBVZ • Total Time: 1616 Hours • Total Cycles: 993 • Proline 21 • Collins SRT 2100 Inmarsat SATCOM Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012

• Airshow 410

Gulfstream GV/512

• 10 passenger • Make Offer

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 2 June 22/05/2013 15:31 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Global XRS Serial Number: 9195 Registration: N4T Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • Total Time: 3119.4 hrs

• Landings: 1023 • Aircraft Maintenance Tracking Program: CAMP SYSTEMS • Engines are on Condition • Second GPS (Honeywell GPS550) • Cabin Humidification System • FDR Upgrade – Crew Force Boeing BBJ/36714 Measuring System • High Speed Data • 13 Passenger Interior • In Service May 31, 2007 • US$30,950,000

Boeing BBJ/30076

Legacy 650

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 14501136 Registration: VP-CPL • Total Time: 633.18 • Total Cycle: 248 • Airframe is on Embraer Executive Care Agreement Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012 • Engines are enrolled on RRCC • Long-Range Fuel System • Electronic Flight Bag • Solid State Cockpit Voice Recorder – SSCVR • Solid State Flight Data Recorder – SSFDR • Airshow 4000 • 13 Passengers Interior Hawker 850XP/258812 • US$22,950,000

Gulfstream GV/512

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 3 June 22/05/2013 15:32 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Gulfstream 450 • Year of Manufacturer: 2007 • TTAF: 2480 Boeing BBJ/28579

• Landings: 881

Boeing BBJ/29273

• On JSSI Tip to Tail Maintenance Program • Airshow 4000 System • Honeywell AIS-2000 Direct TV • Honeywell High-speed data system • Securaplane 500 Aircraft security system • Forward Galley

Boeing BBJ/30076

Gulfstream IVSP Global XRS/9195

• 14 Passenger Interior

Boeing BBJ/36714

• Make Offer

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1385 Registration: N4818C • TTAF: 4266 • Landings: 2701 • APU on MSP • Honeywell MCS-6000 SATCOM Gulfstream500 G450 2Q 2012system • Securaplane security

Gulfstream GV/512

• CVR/FDR • Honeywell TCAS 2000 • Aft galley • 14 Passenger • US$10,995,000 Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 3 June 22/05/2013 15:32 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Gulfstream G450 Serial Number: 4148 Registration: VQ-BCE Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • In Service 2009

• Total Time: 976 • Landings: 410 • Airshow 4000 System • Honeywell PRIMUS EPIC II • External Camera System • Forward Galley • 14 Passenger Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• Available for Showings • US$26,950,000

Gulfstream IVSP Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1468 Registration: N700NY • TTAF: 4827 • Landings: 2692 • Engines on RRCC • CMP MSG-3 Maintenance Tracking Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012 • Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7

Gulfstream GV/512

• EGPWS • 13 Passenger • RVSM Compliant • US$13,950,000

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 4 June 22/05/2013 15:33 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Citation XLS Serial Number: 5763 Registration: OE-GSZ Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • Total Time: 2919.50 Hours

• Total Cycle: 2206 Landings • RVSM Capable • Thrust Reversers • Precision RNAV Capability, B-RNAV/RNP5 • U.S. Steep Approach including England Option • On Cessna ProParts Program Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• On ProAdvantage+ Program • On AuxParts Program • US$6,495,000

Falcon 2000 Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1 Registration: G-YUMN • Total Time: 6289.27 hrs • Landings: 5614 • Engines and APU on Honeywell MSP Gold • B-RNAV/RVSM/RNP10/RNP5 Compliant Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012 • CVR/FDR • Honeywell Mark V EGPWS • Collins TTR 920 TCAS II • Aero M SCM1000 Honeywell SATCOM • Airshow Genesys 400 • Elegant 10 Passenger Fireblocked Interior • New Paint in April 2007 Hawker 850XP/258812 • US$5,300,000

Gulfstream GV/512

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 4 June 22/05/2013 15:34 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Hawker 850XP Serial Number: 258812 Registration: D-CLBH Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • TTAF: 1552

• Landings: 1078 • Engines on MSP Gold • Collins Pro Line 21 system • Airshow 410 • 2nd 15’’ LCD monitor • Belted Lavatory Boeing BBJ/30076

• AFM Supplement for JAR OPS Boeing BBJ/36714 • Additional stowage drawers under four forward seats • Long Range Oxygen • US$5,750,000

Premier 1A

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: RB-172 Registration: G-EVRD • 1450 Hours TTAF • UK Based • Engines on JSSI • Executive Package

Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012

• Moving Maps

Gulfstream GV/512

• Electronic Charts • US$2,250,000

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Gil WolinJune2013_Gil WolinNov06 22/05/2013 09:39 Page 1

VIEWPOINT

Don’t Worry, Be Crappy by Gil Wolin ne of the most famous aviation movie quotes, from Top Gun, a film that helped inspire countless mid-1980s teen to pursue flying as a career, was “I feel the need … the need for speed.” After all, flying is all about speed…isn’t it? Perhaps – but perhaps not in all aspects. Business Aviation certainly has been about speed; about saving time; getting to customers, to vendors, to partners, in the most time-efficient manner possible; and staying ahead of the competition. And this year marks the golden anniversary of a couple of wellknown aviation “speed demons” – not a bad time to reflect on that “need for speed” – in aviation, as well as in business. Those ‘speed demons’ are Dassault and Learjet, two business jet manufacturers that now have been in continual production for 50 years. The former is marking the 50th anniversary of the Fan Jet Falcon, forerunner of today’s family of Falcon business jets. And the Learjet celebrates the 50th birthday of the granddaddy of all light jets, the Lear Jet Model 23. Now, while both were among the first business jets in production, neither can claim to be the first. That honor belongs to the Lockheed JetStar (first flight 1957) followed by the North American Sabre 40 (first flight 1958). Certification for both aircraft took four years, with first customer delivers occurring in 1961 and 1962 respectively. The Fan Jet Falcon (later branded the Falcon 20) moved a bit more quickly, with first flight occurring in May 1963 followed two years later with the first customer delivery in June 1965. But it was Bill Lear who put “jet performance” into the “jet development” process – and he did so by restricting the Lear Jet Model 23’s maximum take-off weight to 12,499 pounds, enabling him to certify the Lear Jet 23 to the less-stringent Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 23 standard, usually reserved for piston aircraft, in just one year. The entrance of other mid-size and light jets into the market– like the DH/HS 125 and

O

Jet Commander – dictated that Falcon and Learjet immediately look to the next iteration of their product line. And in short order came the Falcon D in 1968, and Models E and F in 1970. Learjet moved into the more-demanding FAR Part 25 realm in 1966 with the Model 24, followed by the 24B in 1968, and the 24D and eight-passenger Model 25 in 1970. Dassault and Learjet have not been alone in the relatively rapid introduction of new models over the years. The development of the high-bypass turbofan engine in the early 1970s spurred the development of new business jets by all manufacturers. Some were upgrades of existing models – like the Lear 35 from the Lear 25, and the HS125-700 from the -600 – and others were completely new aircraft, like the first business tri-jet, the Falcon 50, and the mid-size Learjet 55. Cessna followed its 1969 Citation 500 with the Citation I and an extended-cabin Citation II, quickly followed by the mid-size Citation III. And so the OEM game of numbers and letters has played out for the last 50 years, as the II becomes the III, the IV the IV-SP, the 604 becomes the 605, and the Global Express the Global 7000.

But “failing fast” just isn’t an option for us. It’s not unlike what we’ve seen in Silicon Valley during the past 40 years – only there, the product upgrade introductions come so fast, they’re measured not in whole numbers, but in tenths. 1.0 may beget 2.0. But you’re likely to see 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3 in short order long before version 3.0 comes to market. And that’s because the mantra in Silicon Valley is not just to move fast, to stay ahead of the curve, to be first. It’s also “fail fast,” and learn from your mistakes – but make certain that you are first to market with Version 1.0

before anyone else. If you wait, someone else will seize the initiative, and establish a potentially unassailable market share. You don’t have to be perfect right out of the box – you waste a valuable “first to market” advantage if you try. Frankly, you can fix it with those successive versions 1.1, 1.2, 2.0 – and sometimes increase your ROI on the original sale by charging for the upgrades. Just be first to market with new technology. In the words of computer guru Guy Kawasaki (channeling Bobby McFerrin), “Don’t Worry, Be Crappy.” As he says in his blog: “An innovator doesn’t worry about shipping an innovative product with elements of crappiness if it’s truly innovative… If a company waits – for example, the engineers convince management to add more features – until everything is perfect, it will never ship, and the market will pass it by.” But “failing fast” just isn’t an option for us. In aviation, being just “good”, isn’t good enough. Coming to market too quickly, just to be first with a new product or service, with the intent to “fail fast” and follow with Version 2.0, can cost lives. After all, this isn’t “Flight Simulator”. This is Real Flight we’re dealing with here! ❯ Gil Wolin draws on forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. ❯ Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net

The world’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops & Helicopters for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com 18

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Avpro 4 page June 20/05/2013 15:18 Page 1


Avpro 4 page June 20/05/2013 15:18 Page 2


Avpro 4 page June 20/05/2013 15:19 Page 3


Avpro 4 page June 20/05/2013 15:19 Page 4


Avpro 4 page June 20/05/2013 15:19 Page 5


Guardian Jet 4 page June 21/05/2013 10:53 Page 1

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2009 Global 5000 SN 9222 Airframe TT - 1566.3 $32,995,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* APU enrolled on Honeywell MSP * Engines enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care Program * Honeywell Primus 2000 XP integrated Avionics System * Triple Honeywell Laseref III HG-2001GD03 IRUs * Additional Refuel/Defuel Panel in cabin * Securaplane Security System

2002 Falcon 900EX SN 110 Airframe TT - 6271.1 $15,250,000 * Honeywell Primus 2000 * Pilot & Co-Pilot EVAS Systems * Aircell ATG4000 High Speed Internet Broadband System * New carpet installed July 2012 * One Fortune Owner Since New Photos by FGL & Associates

2006 Gulfstream G200 SN 151 Airframe TT - 1953 $9,250,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* Engines enrolled in P&W ESP * APU enrolled in Honeywell’s MSP * Collins Pro Line IV, Version 6.1 Avionics System * Auto Power Auto Throttle System * Airshow 410 * XM Satellite Radio System

2004 Falcon 2000 SN 218 Airframe TT - 1638.4 $10,950,000 * Enrolled in CAMP Maintenance Tracking Program * One Owner Since New * Collins Proline IV (4 tube) Avioncs Suite with 6.1 Software Upgrade * Third Flightdeck Seat * Airshow Genesys

Photos by FGL & Associates

1996 Gulfstream GIVSP SN 1283 Airframe TT - 9777.4 $9,995,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* MSG-3 192 Month Inspection Accomplished September 2012 * Forward Crew Lav * Collins SAT-906 SATCOM * 88 Parameter FDR * EVAS * Honeywell SPZ-8400 Six Tube EFIS Avionics System

2006 Agusta AW139 SN 31061 Airframe TT - 517.4 $8,495,000 * Honeywell Primus Epic System/FMS * XM Weather System * Emergency Flotation System with Rigid Covers * One Owner since New * Engines enrolled in MSP Gold Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 4 page June 21/05/2013 10:54 Page 2

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

1999 Falcon 2000 SN 86 Airframe TT - 6659.8 $8,000,000 * Engines enrolled in CSP * Collins EFIS-4000/ Pro Line 4/ Version 6.1 * Collins TWR-850 Weather Radar System * HUD * Wireless Broadband (GoGo Biz) – ATG-4000 Photos by FGL & Associates

1996 Gulfstream G-IVSP SN 1301 Airframe TT - 7974.5 $9,400,000 * Honeywell SPZ-8400 system * Engines enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care * Securaplane 450 Security System * Magnastar C2000 * Single Fortune 100 Owner Since New Photos by FGL & Associates

2004 Dassault Falcon 50EX SN 333 Airframe TT - 3989.6 $7,895,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* APU is enrolled in MSP Gold * Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics System w/4-tube EFIS * Honeywell SAT AFIS * Airshow 400 * New Paint in 2010 * Maintenance Tracking by CAMP

2005 Citation Sovereign SN 680-0054 Airframe TT - 3623.6 $7,295,000 * Aircell Axxess II * GoGo Biz ATG-4000 High Speed Data * Engines enrolled in P&W ESP Gold * Honeywell WU-880 radar receiver/transmitter * Dual Honeywell GPS modules for Epic System * One Fortune Owner Since New

Photos by FGL & Associates

2005 Citation Sovereign SN 680-0046 Airframe TT - 3618 $7,295,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* One Fortune Owner Since New * Airshow 400 & XM Radio 400 * GoGo Biz ATG-4000 High Speed Data * Engines enrolled in P&W ESP Gold * Honeywell WU-880 radar receiver/transmitter * Dual Honeywell GPS modules for Epic System

2011 King Air 350i SN FL-778 Airframe TT - 228.6 $6,400,000 * 3.5 years remaining on warranty * Part 135 equipped and capable * Jeppesen Electronic charts * Collins Pro Line 21 System * Maintenance Tracking by CAMP * Aircell Axxess ST4200 Dual Channel Iridium Satellite Phone System

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

Photos by FGL & Associates

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 4 page June 21/05/2013 10:56 Page 3

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2001 Gulfstream G-200 SN 020 Airframe TT - 4664.6 $6,195,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* One Owner Since New * Engines enrolled in P&W ESP Gold Program * Collins ProLine IV Avionics System * Dual Universal UNS-1C+ with GPS * Airshow by Rosenview * Aircell Axxess Iridium SAT Phone

2010 Citation Encore+ SN 815 Airframe TT - 899 $5,995,000 * One Fortune 500 Owner Since New * Engines enrolled in Williams TAP Elite * Collins ProLine 21 Avionics System w/3-Tube EFIS * Collins IFIS 5000 * ATG-5000 Aircell High Speed Data for Gogo Biz * Aircell ST-3100 Iridium Phone

Photos by FGL & Associates

2008 Cessna Citation CJ3 Airframe TT - 850.7 $5,600,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* One owner since new * Engines enrolled on Williams TAP ELITE program * Aircell ST-3100 Iridium Satellite Phone System * Precise Flight Pulse Light System with TCAS II Interface * Enrolled in CAMP/CESCOM * Collins RTA-800 Weather Radar System

1999 Sikorsky S76C+ SN 760499 Airframe TT - 2865 $3,495,000 * Honeywell SPZ 7600 System * Aircell ST3100 Iridium SATCOM * Enrolled in CALM Maintenance Tracking * Moving Map – ARGUS 7000/CE * Single Honeywell Primus 800 Weather Radar Photos by FGL & Associates

1982 Dassault Falcon 50 SN 127 Airframe TT - 9823.4 $3,250,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* ProLine 21 Avionics System w/4-Tube EFIS * IFIS: Dual File Servers * XM Weather Radar * Aircell ST-3100 SatCom * Maintenance Tracking by AVTRAK * Aircraft is operated under OCIP

1983 Dassault Falcon 50 SN 50-141 Airframe TT - 11,349 $3,195,000 * Engines & APU enrolled in Honeywell MSP Gold * Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics System w/4-tube EFIS * XM Weather * Collins Pro Line 21 Avionics System w/ 4 tube EFIS * Rockwell Collins WMXR-1000 weather receiver * Airshow 410

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Photos by FGL & Associates

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 4 page June 21/05/2013 10:58 Page 4

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2006 Cessna CJ1+ SN 0610 Airframe TT - 682 $2,850,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* Collins Pro Line 21 Avionics System * Engines enrolled in Williams TAP Elite * WX-1000E Lightning Detection * Mode S Diversity Transponders with Enhanced Surveillance capability * One Owner Since New

1999 Lear 45 SN 45-056 Airframe TT - 7023 $2,790,000 * One Fortune Owner Since New * Engines enrolled on MSP * Honeywell Primus 1000 Avionics System * Honeywell Primus WU-650 Color Weather Radar * Thrust Reversers * Magnastar C-2000 Flight Phone

Photos by FGL & Associates

2006 Beechcraft Premier IA SN RB-142 Airframe TT - 587 $2,350,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* Collins Pro Line 21 Integrated Avionics System with 3 tube EFIS * Collins XM Satellite Graphical Weather * Collins Pro Line IV, Version 6.1 Avionics System * Auto Power Auto Throttle System * Airshow 410 * XM Satellite Radio System

1991 Challenger 601 3A SN 5084 Airframe TT - 8158.4 $2,295,000 * Honeywell SPZ-800 five-tube Avionics Suite * Satellite AFIS * Additional Refueling Panel * Pulselight System * APU Enrolled on MSP * Honeywell Primus-880 Weather Radar with 18 inch dish

Photos by FGL & Associates

1983 Dassault Falcon 20F-5 SN 485 Airframe TT - 8190.6 $1,995,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* Engines enrolled in Honeywell MSP * Collins EFIS-86 System * Artex 110-406 ELT with nav interface * Dee Howard TR50-20 Thrust Reversers * Airshow 400 * Major Corrosion Inspection (MCI) accomplished March 2013

2001 Challenger 604 SN 5488 Airframe TT - 3760.5 $7,995,000 * APU is enrolled MSP * Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics System with Precision Plus * Dual EVAS * High Speed Data: Thrane & Thrane Swift Broadband * Aircell Axxess II Iridium SATCOM Phone System * Aircraft enrolled on SmartParts Plus

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Photos by FGL & Associates

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


JMesingerJune13_JMesingerNov06 20/05/2013 14:18 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

The People In Our Industry realized I had been spending so much time talking about the values and the trends of aircraft that I have not focused on a wonderful topic for discussion the great men and women who make up our industry globally. Believe me it is not because I am taking them for granted or forgetting they are here every day. Sometimes we just get busy and do not acknowledge this powerful group. Two weeks ago I had the privilege to be included in a manufacturer’s special informational event at an off-site location. This was a two-day gathering that was both a social as well as a business update session. It was attended by at least fifty people from all over the United States and abroad. These were not exclusively dealers and brokers but other key players of our industry including aircraft attorneys, 1031 Exchange specialists, lenders and consultants. These people are exceptional examples of who makes up our industry. Early in my career I was very skeptical of the role of the aviation attorney as I was inclined to believe they would find ways to confuse a deal and prevent it from proceeding smoothly. I was so wrong and as I matured and became more aware of the exceptional service they provide, I also became aware of how important they are to the success of the deal. I might also add that in the transactions that our office is a part of each year, probably ninety-five percent of them have brokers on the other side. So the participation of a skilled aviation sales professional and aviation attorney is critical to the success of a transaction. It is important that neither side creates what I call manufactured tension. There is no reason to push or pull in a transaction. Just guide. This is about the partner not an accidental occurrence. The manufacturer’s event reminded me of

I

the treasures we all get to work with daily: The people who attended are many of the people that I get to talk to and shape successful transactions with daily. It was like a family reunion! We were all sincerely glad to be together. We shared stories of the more difficult transactions we helped our respective clients navigate successfully, and those stories of the one that got away. We each questioned, ‘why did the client choose you and not me?’ It was such a great exchange of war stories. In keeping with this theme, I am reminded of an old friend who has shared this industry with me for the entire 39 years I have been involved. One day a few months ago the phone rang and it was him - the owner of a family brokerage business just like ours. He just wanted to say ‘hello’ and catch up, and told me he had made a pledge to call three old friends a day for the next two weeks. So often we forget to just say hello to friends and see how they are doing. That conversation allowed us to discuss the kids of course, and how they were progressing in the business as well as talk a little about old times - but more importantly we looked together at what might be in store for us going forward. There was no competitive banter, simply two old friends who have shared an industry for decades talking about our future - after all, we have many collective years and have withstood the test of time. We have shared many downturns and many recoveries and now was a chance to discuss how our businesses are changing. For example, when we first started out as young men we really only had three time zones to manage. Today we must manage an entire world of cultures and time-zones. As we hung up, we promised each other to talk far more often and reach out to each other to find more ways to work together. I think this exercise is a

great one. We do not always think about our friends within the industry enough. The message of this article is a simple one: Remember how wonderfully populated this industry is. Don’t just sit back and have the thought. Reach out and say hello to your partners more often. With respect to the aviation attorneys, the lenders, or the other fine specialists that this industry employs a quick call with some regularity might even bring you a few extra transactions each year. At the very least it might just be a nice way to begin or end a day in the office. So today, I am going to make those three calls to say hello and remind old friends that I am here and anxious to rekindle those powerful friendships. To all those industry friends who I saw at the manufacturer’s event recently, what a treat it was for me. See you all again soon, I hope! ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He now serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards (BAAB). Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. For more information visit www.jetsales.com. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

COMPARE AIRCRAFT PERFORMANCE USING OUR

Aircraft Performance Guide at www.AvBuyer.com And select from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 28

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jet Collection June_Layout 1 20/05/2013 15:24 Page 1

thejetcollection.com

2014 Q4 EMB 500

2007 Citation XLS

2014 Q2 BBJ

2007 PC PC-12/47 C-12/47

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2007 Ce Cessna essna Citation Sovereign Sovereign

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CHICAGO O 312.226.8541 41 312.226.854

DALLAS 214.415.3725 2 14.415.3725

PARIS P ARIS A 33.4.72.81.15.15 33.4.72.81.15.15

MUNICH/STRAUBING M UNICH/STRAUBING 49.151.466.47553 49.151.466.47553

IISTANBUL ST TAN A BUL 90.212.283.02.42 90.2 12.283.02.42

SAN FRANCISO O 707.592.6960 707 .592.696 60

TAMPA T AMP A PA 727.420.1607 7 27.420.1607

LYON LY YON 33.6.28.75.69.30 33.6.28.7 5.69.30

VIENNA VIENNA 43.676.780.0147 43.676.780.0147

BEIJING 86.10.65330620

SpeciďŹ cations and/or desc descriptions criptions are are provided provided as introductory introductory informatio information. on. They do not constitute representations representations or warranties w of The Jet Collection. Y You ou should rrely elyy on your own inspection of the air aircraft. craft.


O'Gara June 21/05/2013 17:35 Page 1

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FOSTERING CONFIDENCE IN AIRCRAFT TRANSACTIONS


O'Gara June 21/05/2013 17:35 Page 2


BG 1 June13_FinanceSept 20/05/2013 16:53 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Control: Business Aviation’s Unique Advantage. Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

Business aircraft offer many benefits, but none is as significant as an operator’s ability to influence the safety and effectiveness of air transportation, contends Jack Olcott.

T

alk to your associates and friends about Business Aviation. Ask them if they are familiar with this form of transportation, and if so what are their opinions? You may be surprised by what you learn. Recently I was introduced to a retired gentleman who had a long and impressive career with a manufacturing company that did business throughout the world. As a marketing expert with the firm, which was founded in 1898, he had been responsible for company activities in various locations in the Americas as well as in Australia. One of his assignments required him to be based for several years in Canada. With no other motivation than facilitating our friendly conversation, I mentioned that I was a Director of a Canadian firm engaged in aerospace. Noting the aviation connection, my new acquaintance said he was a frequent passenger on a Learjet 36 owned by the company and used to reach Canadian customers his firm served in remote locations. Without any prompting on my part, he expanded upon the importance of the business aircraft in reaching areas of Canada where public air transportation was limited or non-existent. “The aircraft was essential to our operation," he volunteered. “Our company made many products including large conveyer belts used in the mining industry. We were able to meet with our Canadian customers at their work sites promptly to address their needs. That Learjet was a great way to travel. Fast, ample for our small team of sales and engineering specialists, and very fast. We were able to use airports that bigger jets didn’t serve.”

PUT FAR-AWAY PLACES IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND WITH BUSINESS AVIATION

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG 1 June13_FinanceSept 22/05/2013 11:50 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

BENEFITS BEYOND ACCESS Being able to reach remote locations is just one of the many benefits of Business Aviation. Placing the right person or sales team at the right place at the right time, ahead of the competition, is simply good business. The duration of a meeting depends on what is being accomplished rather than being constrained by Airline arrival and departure times, sluggish security screening and boarding delays. In addition to being effective, use of business aircraft demonstrates commitment to customers. The mobility provided by Business Aviation reflects the high value a firm places on employees, clients and time. But there is much more to the benefits of this form of transportation. In particular, consider broader issues of control beyond those of scheduling. Individuals deeply engaged in Business Aviation often say that control over the nature and implementation of transportation is the benefit they value most.

ONE USER’S RESPONSE A provocative response to the benefits question was given by an entrepreneur who owned a company with business aircraft. ”One word is my answer,” he said. “‘Control’—pure and simple! “Business Aviation,” he continued, “more so than any other form of transportation, provides our company with the greatest ability to influence factors that impact safety, security and effectiveness. Our Board, working with the experts we hire within the company’s flight department, sets the safety standards of our operation. We establish best practices and monitor the implementation of those policies and procedures. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

“While other providers of air transportation, such as the scheduled Airlines and major charter operators, have excellent safety records, we don’t want to be dependent on someone else—someone who we do not know as well as we know our company’s flight personnel—to be responsible for safe and secure travel. In essence, when we use public transportation we abdicate control over the wellbeing of our most important assets—our employees—to parties over which we have neither control nor detailed knowledge of their behavior.” Re-enforcing his reasoning, he said, “Unlike automobiles and even to some extent trains, business aircraft are rarely involved in collisions with other vehicles. Thus we have a very low risk that our company aircraft will be blindsided by another aircraft, and we can strictly adhere to policies that minimize even the low risk of mid-air collisions. “Other safety issues, such as what weather conditions are acceptable, are stated in our operations procedures and followed with pride by our crews. Because our pilots know our employees and recognize who is the lead passenger on each flight, security is assured. Nothing is more effective in countering terrorism than facial recognition. “Because operating our company aircraft provides us with more control compared with other forms of transportation, we feel more secure—and that is a good feeling,” he concluded.

“ Individuals deeply engaged in Business Aviation often say that control over the nature and implementation of transportation is the benefit they value most.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 36

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Trends Favoring Business Aviation ” ...it is clear that our nation requires the added dimension of transportation that Business Aviation provides.”

Responding to high fuel prices and stockholder demands for greater returns, scheduled Airlines in the USA are adopting strategies that increase passenger load factors by reducing capacity and focusing on hub airports—trends that reflect the need for Business Aviation, notes Jack Olcott.

R

eport No. ICAT-2013-02 published in May 2013 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s International Center for Transportation describes a recent trend by scheduled Airlines in the USA to reduce the number of flights available for passengers as well as increase concentration of activities at hub airports. As shown in the charts below, since 2007 the number of departures by scheduled air carriers has fallen by over 14 percent at all domestic airports and by over 21 percent at smaller airports, due mainly to major Airlines reducing frequency of service to large hubs and removing direct flights to small and medium-sized communities. Furthermore, the report concludes that the trend toward frequency reduction and hub concentration—a policy it calls “Capacity Discipline”—is likely to be practiced throughout most of the next decade.

CHART A - SCHEDULED DOMESTIC DEPARTURES FROM ALL U.S. AIRPORTS

10

Not Lg Hub

2

Large Hub

0 3.9 5.3

3.75 4.95

3.7 4.9

3.6 4.9

5 4.5 4 3.5 3 Millions of 2.5 Departures 2 1.5 1 0.5 0

Non Hub Sm Hub Med Hub 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Not Lg Hub 4.33 Large Hub 5.4

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 42

CHART B - SCHEDULED DOMESTIC DEPARTURES AT SMALLER U.S. AIRPORTS

12

8 Millions of 6 Departures 4

Coupling this trend with the reality that business aircraft have traditionally provided access to nearly 10 times the number of airports with any scheduled service and about 100 times the locations with schedules that meet the demanding needs of many business travelers, and it is clear that our nation requires the added dimension of transportation that Business Aviation provides. Transportation in its many forms is a necessity for our nation’s economic recovery. Rural America is primed to welcome companies willing to establish a new plant or expand existing facilities, thereby creating jobs. As scheduled Airlines increase their concentration on established hubs, Business Aviation provides access to emerging opportunities.

Non Hub 0.75 0.75 Sm Hub 1.475 1.25 Med Hub 2.15 2

3.43 4.8

0.75 1.1 1.8

0.75 1.15 1.7

0.75 0.75 1.1 1.05 1.65 1.575

SOURCE: MIT SMALL COMMUNITY AIR SERVICE WHITE PAPER NO. 1, MAY 2013

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 3 June13_FinanceSept 20/05/2013 17:23 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

BizAv Services Use Policies. How will you prioritise use of your Company’s airplane? Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

Boards set policy, and Business Aviation must not be an exception to this ethos. But each policy should reflect the unique needs of the corporation, assert Pete Agur and his associate Don Henderson.

W

hen I started my aviation consulting career, one of my first clients told me; “Once you’ve seen one company’s use of Business Aviation, you have seen one company’s use of Business Aviation.” His point was straightforward: The business, organizational and cultural challenge related

to “who can use the company airplane” is unique to each user. The “one-size-fits-all” approach to policies can degrade the benefits that business aircraft create. Before policies can be developed, it is critical to answer three questions: 1. What is your business’ Strategic Intent? 2. What is your corporate Organization and its resulting Culture? 3. How does Business Aviation support each?

STRATEGIC INTENT Is your business growing or maintaining? If you are maintaining (i.e., focusing on holding cash) then cost management is a major part of your strategy, which may be mutually exclusive to the premium costs of Business Aviation. On the other hand, if your goal is growing, you are more focused on revenue development through offering new products or services, reaching underserved markets, or seeking horizontal or vertical acquisitions. The impact of time on the key people making growth happen has a leveraging effect on your business’ success that far outshadows the marginal cost of Business Aviation over the Airlines. The highest and best use of Business Aviation is, therefore, in support of accelerating and assuring the achievement of your enterprise’s Strategic Intent.

CORPORATE ORGANIZATION AND CULTURE The use of Business Aviation is an effective method to support the enterprise’s structure and to communicate its corporate culture. For example, if your company is organized around a small team of key executives, you will liberate them to make the most U continued on page 46

42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 3 June13_FinanceSept 20/05/2013 17:25 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

HOW DOES YOUR BUSINESS AVIATION USE POLICY DEFINE WHO HAS PRIORITY IN YOUR CORPORATION ?

of their time by saving them three hours for every leg when you put them on business aircraft. One Airline trip per week will cost over 300 hours per year (which is the equivalent of five executive work weeks or 10% of their work year, assuming the average hard-driving executive puts in 60 hours per week) of wasted time per executive. Business Aviation puts that time, and much more, back in the plus column for your company for each frequent-traveling key executive. On the other hand if your organizational structure is flat, supported by a culture of collaboration, then egalitarian aircraft use policies that are based on highest and best business purpose, cost vs. benefit, and first-come, first-served, may be appropriate.

evolves, those use polices also may need to be adjusted.

WHAT USE POLICY SERVES YOUR CORPORATION? Regardless of culture, Business Aviation use policies should be thoughtful, clearly defined, and published. They should be endorsed or reviewed by the highest leadership group within the corporation (Board of Directors, owner, etc.). And they should address as a minimum the following: • •

BUSINESS AVIATION SUPPORT

Business Aviation services offer several significant benefits. They:

• • • •

Allow key individuals or teams to participate in multiple meetings at disparate destinations in days instead of weeks; Provide access to communities and business sites that are not served by other forms of transportation; Leverage senior leaders’ and other key individuals’ time; Act as a powerful sales and branding tool; Support a corporate culture committed to providing quality of life for employees; and Recognize that respecting an executive’s wellbeing is an effective and approprtiate incentative.

How you wish to address each of these questions shapes your Business Aviation use policies. As the competitive arena shifts or the corporate culture

46

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

Access—who has the right to request the company aircraft? Authorization—who approves use of the company aircraft? Scheduling—who resolves conflicts for competing use of the company aircraft? Justification—what method evaluates the benefit/cost issues of company aircraft use? Purpose—a clear and concise statement of why Business Aviation serves shareholders.

There are a number of other important policies that should be addressed overtly, including: •

Operational Standards – What standards will be expected of Business Aviation services? How will those be determined and measured? Will they emulate Airline standards? Will they be just regulatory compliant or Best Practices? How do we align the Business Aviation operational standards with our other corporate quali ty initiatives, strategic intent and Business Aviation Use Statements? Policy Exceptions – Policies cannot be written for every situation. It is important to declare if U www.AvBuyer.com

“Regardless of culture, Business Aviation use policies should be thoughtful, clearly defined, and published. They should be endorsed or reviewed by the highest leadership group within the corporation (Board of Directors, owner, etc.).”

continued on page 50 Aircraft Index see Page 4


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CHALLENGER 605 SN: 5865; Year: 2011; Total Time: 330 Hrs; Cycles: 159; Programs: CAMP, SmartParts, MSP; Location: Paris, France Price: Make Offer

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CHALLENGER 604 SN: 5318; Year: 1996; Total Time: 7,632 Hrs; Cycles: 3,273; Programs: CAMP, JSSI; Location: South Africa Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 300 SN: 20295; Year: 2010; Total Time: 2,109 Hrs; Cycles: 1,048; Programs: SmartParts; Honeywell MSP; Location: Poland Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 300 SN: TBA; Year: 2007; Total Time: 1,031 Hrs; Cycles: 836; Programs: CAMP, Jet Care Program; Location: Europe Price: $14,750,000

HAWKER 1000B SN: 259004; Year: 1991; Total Time: 3,988 Hrs; Cycles: 2,353; Programs: Pratt & Whitney ESP Silver; Location: Biggin Hill Price: Make Offer

HAWKER 800XP SN: 258439; Year: 1999; Total Time: 7,617 Hrs; Cycles: 5,074; Programs: Honeywell MSP Gold; Location: Moscow, Russia Price: Make Offer

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PIAGGIO AVANTI P-180 SN: TBA; Year: 2002; Total Time: 2,923 Hrs; Programs: CAMP, ESP Gold; Location: Switzerland Price: Make Offer

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BG 3 June13_FinanceSept 20/05/2013 17:26 Page 3

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

exceptions are allowed, and if so, under what circumstances, with whose authority and with what mitigating controls? Passenger Pairing or Co-Rider Issues – Are there passengers who should not ride together in the interest of business continuity? Tactically, passenger-pairing policies may be perceived as unnecessarily restrictive and not cost effective. Strategically, business continuity is a factor in passenger pairing policies and brand protection. Furthermore, the highly remote possibility of a mishap may have an impact on market capitalization for publically traded companies. Even an aircraft incident without injuries can disrupt investor confidence if too many leaders are on the same aircraft. Co-rider policy exceptions may be allowed in predetermined circumstances where risks are deliberately mitigated. Routine exceptions, or variances, indicate the policy is either being ignored or needs to be reviewed.

There are additional supporting Business Aviation policies that deserve top leadership review and approval to assure the effective support of the enterprise: •

Business Aviation service limitations and distribution can be accomplished by a number of methods – o Constrain the number of aircraft available: Ideally this leads to a negotiation for highest and best use, especially challenging for companies with only one or two aircraft and little or no supplemental support from fractional/charter aircraft services. User negotiations for access requires open and adult dialogue and is least effective in organizations with substantial internal politics or an informal power structure. o Elevate the point of trip authorization: The higher the executive to whom trip requests go, the greater the political visibility (and liability) there is. This situation acts as an effective constraint on use in most organizations, and it usually is in place because one or more top executive feels a high need to control Business Aviation services for all potential users. o Use an internal transfer fee for the aircraft use (typically called a chargeback): Internal chargebacks can meter the use of the aircraft, depending upon their costs versus commercial alternatives as well as the latitude the requestors have within their budgets. This method may have a high administrative costs, but it can reduce the need for senior executives being burdened with managing aircraft use. Tacticly, it may allow the company to subsidize the expense of the aircraft for lines of business that are under time and performance pressures. Internal charge rates range from artificially nominal to full cost recovery.

WHO HAS THE AUTHORITY TO APPROVE/ DENY ACCESS TO YOUR COMPANY AIRPLANE ?

o

• •

Personal Use: Is personal use allowed? How is it documented? How will imputed income be calculated, and who is responsible for reporting that income to the IRS? Is the impact of personal use on the company’s tax treatment of aircraft depreciation considered? Public Officials – What is the policy for the transportation of public officials? Charter Aircraft Use – Are all on-demand forms of transportation subject to the same procedures and standards as the corporate aircraft? What are the the corporation’s quality assurance standards, processes and practices for charter aircraft services? Charitable Use – Is charitable use allowed? Is the business expense risk (loss of depreciation expense) considered? How are requests handled? Empty Seats – Are the unused seats available to other traveling employees? Does the user of the aircraft have the authority to not allow others on the aircraft? Is the expense shared, or do the “add-ons” ride for free?

“Your use of Business Aviation is unique because your business is unique. That requires you to develop your own policies.”

Your use of Business Aviation is unique because your business is unique. That requires you to develop your own policies. Even so, a dialog with other owners and operators as well as with outside experts can ensure the development of a robust, yet efficient policy structure. The graphics overleaf present a framework for aligning corporate U characteristics with Business Aviation benefits. continued on page 54

50

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 3 June13_FinanceSept 20/05/2013 17:27 Page 4

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation ACCESS POLICY Who has the right to request the use of the aircraft? Is there a specific role (i.e, the CEO) or group (the Senior Leadership Team) who should always have access? Are specific individuals or lines of businesses excluded from Business Aircraft use? Are specific types of trips or individuals provided preferred or denied access?

APPROVAL POLICY Will aircraft access be controlled by a specific individual or will multiple layers of approval be required to use the aircraft? Will any individual or position have the authority to use the aircraft without any additional approval (self-approval)?

SCHEDULING CONFLICT If there are competing requests to use the aircraft, who will get priority? Will individuals or teams have the authority to “bump” others off the aircraft? If someone is bumped from the aircraft, will their needs be satisfied by another form of ondemand air travel (e.g., charter aircraft service, fractional aircraft service), and who will be responsible for the incremental expense?

ACCESS POLICY E galitarian, Flat, Team Oriented I ndividualistic, Hierarchical, C ulture C ompetitive Culture • Access is defined by very • Access is limited to a select large groups or may not be few individuals. restricted. • Titles or specific individuals • The use of the aircraft is are named in the policy promoted. identifying access to the • Existence of the aircraft is aircraft. • Existence or use of the known across most of the organization. aircraft may be confidential.

AUTHORISATION POLICY E galitarian, Flat, Team Oriented I ndividualistic, Hierarchical, C ulture C ompetitive Culture • May have multiple layers of • Simplified, possibly only one approval. or two approvals required. • May have predefined • Approved only at senior “approved” uses. leadership level. • Multiple individuals (line of • May have a few individuals business leaders) may have with “self-approval” authority. final approval on aircraft use.

JUSTIFICATION Justification and documentation should be part of any policy, regardless of the traveler’s position on a cultural spectrum. It is imperative to be able to substantiate to the IRS the business purpose of each passenger on each leg. Otherwise the company’s ability to deduct the aircraft as a business expense could be jeopordized. Why the aircraft was used in comparison to another form of transportation is not an issue to the IRS, but it is relevant to the company’s internal culture. Value of time for key individuals or accelerating the business cycle can easily outweigh a clinical analysis of business aircraft vs. other transportation expense.

SCHEDULING CONFLICT E galitarian, Flat, Team Oriented I ndividualistic, Hierarchical, C ulture C ompetitive Culture • First-come, first-served. • Simplified, possibly only one • No “bumping”. or two approvals required. • Approved only at senior leadership level. • May have a few individuals with “self-approval” authority.

PURPOSE POLICY A Business Use Statement that declares the alignment of the Business Aviation services with the corporate strategic intent reduces uncertainty about the purpose and value of the use of business aircraft. In the absence of specificity in policy, a broad statement may provide sufficient guidance. Examples of a Business Use Statement might be as simple as: ‘The use of Business Aviation services will be a primary tool to maximize the Senior Leadership Team’s time and impact for the enterpise’, or ‘Business Aviation is our primary method of reaching our customers. It helps us sell trust and demonstrate our uncompromised commitment to excellence’. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

JUSTIFICATION POLICY E galitarian, Flat, Team Oriented I ndividualistic, Hierarchical, C ulture C ompetitive Culture • May be based on a • May be very simple and comparison against the based on senior leadership expense of other forms of request only. transportation. • May be based on the value of • May have an additive factor business related to the for the value of time. specific trip. • May be used to help multiple • May be based on Line of approvers weigh appropriate Business (requestor). use. • May be different based on • May be based on corporate requestor. quality of life issues. • May be based on information security.

Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 56

54

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


A I R C R A F T SA L E S & ACQ U I S I T I O N S Duncan Aviation has been assisting companies around the world with the sales and acquisition of aircraft for over 50 years.

2008 Gulfstream 200

s/n 182

Low Total Time. Excellently Equipped. Beautiful Interior Cosmetics. Meticulous Care.

1996 Challenger 604

s/n 5307

7,500 Total Time. 3,400 Landings. Excellent Paint and Interior by Duncan Aviation.

1989 Astra 1125

s/n 31

Collins ProLine 21 EFIS 3 Displays. Astra SP Modifications. Dual Universal UNS-1D +FMS. Custom 100 Interior.

2001 Astra SPX

s/n 135

4,356 Total Time. TFE731-40R-200G Engines on MSP. Collins FCC 4000 Dual Flight Director, 4 Display EFIS.

2006 Gulfstream G450

s/n 4039

2,575 Total Time. 1,330 Landings. BBML and Direct TV. Excellent Maintenance and Care.

1999 Hawker 800XP

s/n 258396

2,448 Total Time. MSP Gold. Dual FMZ-2000. King KHF-950. Honeywell TCAS-2000. RSVM Certified.

1993 Citation VI

s/n 232

6,430 Total Time. Honeywell EDZ-605 (5) Tube EFIS. Dual Universal UNS-1Es FMS/GPS.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 145

9,225 Total Time. MSP. 3D Engines. Collins EFIS 86. Dual UNS-1K.

+1 402.475.2611 路 www.DuncanAviation.aero/aircraftsales 路 800.228.4277 World Aircraft Sales Ad 5_15_13.indd 1

5/14/2013 9:32:40 AM


BG 4 June13_FinanceSept 21/05/2013 09:05 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Block Charter & Jet Cards: What are they, and when are they right for you. David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

Continuing his series on methods for accessing Business Aviation, David Wyndham addresses Block Charter and Jet Cards...

T

raditionally, you charter a business aircraft on an “as-needed” basis with no commitment beyond the current scheduled flight. If you consistently make use of charter, however, you may be able to purchase hours in blocks of time for a set price. Block Charter and Jet Cards are both pre-paid arrangements to receive a specific number of charter hours. The Jet Card commonly refers to a formalized program whereby you purchase a “card” that entitles the holder to a prescribed number of charter hours. The idea probably came from the gift cards that are available from credit card companies and merchants. Essentially Block Charter achieves the same purpose, sans the card image and branding. With both, you agree to purchase a set amount of charter from a single provider. From here on, therefore, I will use the term Jet Card to apply to all methods of pre-purchasing a block of charter. The provider of Jet Cards may be a single company (such as Marquis NetJets), or a broker (such as Air Partner) that deals with several charter providers. So, what are the advantages and disadvantages of this form of charter? First, let us look at what Jet Cards offer. While program specifics vary from provider to provider, a typical Jet Card plan has the following features: U

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


General Aviation June_Layout 1 20/05/2013 16:01 Page 1


BG 4 June13_FinanceSept 21/05/2013 09:08 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

• A block of 25-hours is purchased for a set price (e.g., 25-hours for $150,000). • The type of aircraft is specified (e.g. light jet), along with a specific service provider or category of provider. • There is a single point of contact for scheduling. • The price guarantee and length of contract has a time limit of a year; most programs will allow the use of unused amounts after contract end, but at a different price. • Availability may be guaranteed if booked in advance. You may get an aircraft with as little as 24-hours advanced notice for example. • The provider guarantees the level of service. • Some programs also offer concierge services by booking ground transportation, hotels and even obtaining tickets to special events or restaurant reservations.

ADVANTAGES Cost Savings: Purchasing charter in advance secures a guaranteed price that does not increase during the length of the contract. Many programs do stipulate a variable fuel cost surcharge to account for the volatility of fuel prices. Availability: With traditional charter, you do not have a guaranteed aircraft when you call. If the aircraft you require is not available, you may have to book a larger, more costly aircraft, or look elsewhere. With a Jet Card, if your aircraft category is not available, the provider will supply the equivalent or superior aircraft. So if the Hawker 900XP is not available, for example, you may get a larger, Gulfstream G200 at the same price. Service Consistency: Using a single provider should enable you to enjoy the same level of service each time you fly. Service levels may even improve as the provider learns your needs and preferences (Diet Coke, no ice. Cashews, not peanuts).

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

DISADVANTAGES (i.e., CAVEAT EMPTOR) You need to be confident that you will use the allotted hours during the contract time. If you purchase a Jet Card and find the service is no longer needed, you may not be able to get a refund for the unused hours. If you do not use the allotted hours during the contract length, you may not be able to extend the contract without paying additional fees. Read carefully the terms of the contract: • Does the company provide for a refund of unused funds? Can you apply the unused funds to a new card? • Does the service provider have different sizes/capability aircraft? A client of ours flies a mix of short trips with few passengers and longer trips with many passengers. For them, a light jet and a mid-size jet are needed. • Be sure your special needs are specified in advance and are met by the terms of your Jet Card agreement. • Does the card have a pre-defined service area? If you travel internationally, does the provider offer the opportunity for charter in those regions? One client of ours is evaluating charter travel from the US to China. If the card provider also has the ability to offer charter within China, that would make the logistics of the trip planning much simpler. • What if the company providing the card goes out of business? This may be more of a risk with a smaller charter company, but even large companies are not immune to market forces. If traditional charter works for you, but you need 25 to 50 hours per year, the Jet Card can be a cost effective means of accessing Business Aviation.

“ If traditional charter works for you, but you need 25 to 50 hours per year, the Jet Card can be a cost effective means of accessing Business Aviation.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 60

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Exceptional Pre-Owned Aircraft For Sale 2000 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: 9002

FEATURES INCLUDE: • Capacity: 13 Passengers

• High Speed Internet

• Range: 6,150 NM

• Airshow Genesys

• Sleeps: 7

• DVD / CD Player

• Leather Seating

• Forward Galley

• Wi-Fi / Datalink

• Two Enclosed Lavatories

• Worldwide, Broadband

• Three 21’’ Monitors

1989 Astra 1125 Serial Number: 035

FEATURES INCLUDE: • Capacity: 7 Passengers

• RVSM Compliant

• Range: 2,643 NM

• Fully Berthable 3-place

• Leather Seating

divan or 2-single seats

• Engines on Honeywell MSP

• L/H Extended Range Galley

• Airframe on Gulfstream CMP

Contact: Brian Panning

Office: +1 303.799.9999 Mobile: +1 949.636.3678

bpanning@tempusaircraft.com www.tempusaircraft.com


BG5 June13_FinanceSept 21/05/2013 09:10 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Buying Wisely In An Unstable Market. Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He now serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards and is a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association. Contact him via Jay@jetsales.com.

“The challenge for the buyer, therefore, is deciding what parameters apply when evaluating the purchase of a business aircraft...”

60

‘To buy or not to buy?’, that is the question. Noting instability in today’s market for business aircraft, Jay Mesinger reflects on the benefits of acquiring the right product now to serve today’s business opportunities and to move boldly into the future. ome sales professionals say we are in the midst of a buyer’s market for business aircraft. Others look at prices trending down and ask if there might be a better deal tomorrow. With prices lower than ever in the recorded history of our industry, there is little doubt that the market favors buyers. We cannot say with confidence, however, that prices have bottomed or that clear signs of a rebound are present. Rather, I believe that our present market

S

for business aircraft is best described as unstable. The challenge for the buyer, therefore, is deciding what parameters apply when evaluating the purchase of a business aircraft in today’s unstable and unpredictable market.

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITIES Resale prices of business aircraft are not the only factors that are attractive. The price of borrowing has never been lower, and many buyers can U

WHICH DIRECTION IS RIGHT IN THIS UNSTABLE MARKET ?

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Corporate Concepts June 22/05/2013 15:54 Page 1

Corporate Concepts International, Inc. 1988 Falcon 900B - S/N: 058

• New paint in January 2013 • EASA qualified – Currently operating under a EASA commercial certificate • Thirteen passenger configuration with forward and aft lavatories • Iridium satellite phone system • Engines and APU on MSP - Upgraded -150 APU (Lower MSP rate and increased reliability) • Fresh C/2C inspection and landing gear overhaul • Immediately available – For Sale or Lease – Some trades considered 1996 Falcon 2000 - S/N: 030

• Highly desired ten passenger configuration • Upgraded entertainment system with six individual monitors • Ultra Mid-Class cabin with over 3,000 mile range • EASA qualified – Currently operating under a EASA commercial certificate • Engines and APU on MSP • Provisions for HUD • Immediately available – For Sale or Lease – Some trades considered

ALSO AVAILABLE ■ New Gulfstream G-550 ■ Global 5000 ■ Citation Jet 3 ■ Boeing BBJ3 ■ NEW Boeing 747-8 ■ Boeing 767-200 ■ Citation Sovereign ■ Green BBJ ■ Gulfstream G-IV SP ■ Legacy 600 ■ Gulfstream G-IV – Lease

SEE www.flycci.com or contact us for details. Dennis Blackburn +1 832 647 7581

Fernando Garcia Latin & S. America +52 55 54077686

Chris Zarnik +1 919 264 6212

Larry Wright +1 704 906 3755

Austin • Charlotte • New York • Mexico City • Middle East-Northern Africa

Corporate Concepts International, Inc.

Member NBAA, NAFA, ISTAT, AOPA


BG5 June13_FinanceSept 21/05/2013 09:11 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation self-fund an acquisition. Many corporations have either the borrowing ability or the ready cash to purchase. Buyers, however, are sensitive to the impact of price instability on the acquired aircraft’s residual value; they want to retain as much resale potential in the asset as possible. Such thinking may be the result of times gone by and thus be misleading in today’s dynamic business environment. In past markets it was possible to buy a business aircraft, fly it for a few years and then sell it at - or near - its purchase price. (In fact, there were unique situations in the mid-2000s when an aircraft garnered a higher resale price from buyers that wanted the advantages of Business Aviation without delay.) At the very least you might suffer what had been in the past a traditional depreciation factor of one to three percentage points a year. Any of those three scenarios (retention of purchase price, windfall, or nominal depreciation) would be acceptable to the buyer. Today, though, no one can say with certainty what will happen to residual values.

SIGNS OF INSTABILITY The financial crisis that erupted in 2008 had a profound effect on the market for business aircraft. One would have thought that an aircraft purchased in 2010 might increase in resale value over its depressed purchase price, or at the very least might be an even ride. In fact prices continued a slide in every category of aircraft, and in many cases lost as much as 28-35% of value since the false 2010 bottom. Furthermore, following 2008 the lending community changed drastically. Borrowed money either was not available or was rather cumbersome to obtain, especially for some older aircraft. In the recent past, if you wanted a pre-owned aircraft that would retain its value based on historical markers you needed to buy a model currently in production but not over 10 years old. In some situations, the better option was purchasing an aircraft that was manufactured within the last five to seven years, and considering resale before it was 10 years old. No longer could you consider the older mainstays of the Business Aviation fleet as safe bets for retaining high resale valuations. In the words of songwriter Bob Dylan, “Times they are a-changing.” Today stock indices are at record highs. Business seems to be recovering. Airlines are curtailing service to smaller markets where growth appears to be emerging—routes where business aircraft really shine. Globalization continues to encourage increased travel internationally—another good arena for Business Aviation. Yet the US economy still has unresolved

issues, such as how business will be affected by sequestration. Considering the countering forces buffeting business, it is understandable that the market for business aircraft is best described as unstable. Within such instability, however, there lies unique opportunity. You may choose to buy an attractively priced aircraft knowing that the residual value component is somewhat uncertain but you have committed less capital. More significantly, you will have access to excellent transportation that enhances the ability of your company to grow even in a challenging economy.

PURCHASING FOR THE RIGHT REASONS Business aircraft are good investments because they enable the best use of employee talent and time. Companies that embrace Business Aviation in one or more of its delivery forms—charter, fractional use, timesharing, or outright ownership— grow faster, reward shareholders with higher returns in dividends and stock appreciation, and garner more accolades for being well-managed than do their counterparts that do not use business aircraft. A timely purchase of an attractively-priced business aircraft is a corporation’s best strategy for dealing with market instability.

“ Airlines are curtailing service to smaller markets where growth appears to be emerging— routes where business aircraft really shine.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 64

Compare aircraft performance using our

Aircraft Performance Guide at www.AvBuyer.com And select from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 62

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


World Aircraft Sales | Second Chance Ad | Full page bleed 276mm H x 211mm W | Trims to 270mm H x 205mm W

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BG 6 June13_FinanceSept 21/05/2013 09:24 Page 1

W

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Non-Owned Aircraft: Insurance options for companies that use them. Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

64

Many companies that own an aircraft also use what aviation cognoscenti call ‘supplemental lift’ (i.e., utilize a non-owned aircraft to transport company personnel when their own is not available). A Board must have a true understanding of the risk exposure they take on when they select such an option, cautions Stuart Hope. on-owned aircraft can take the form of a charter aircraft, an aircraft accessed through a dry lease or time-share agreement, or possibly a rental aircraft. You might think there is coverage for such flights under your Commercial General Liability policy or somewhere in your Business Insurance program, but you would be wrong. Such policies almost universally exclude the aviation peril. Insurance coverage IS available under a Corporate Non-Owned Aircraft Liability policy, however, which can cover nonowned fixedwing or

N

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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rotor-wing aircraft, piston or turbine powered. Such a policy may stipulate the total seating capacity, what the approved use is, and who the approved pilots are in order to be valid. If your company owns an aircraft, you may already have this coverage under your policy – you can certainly add it for an additional premium if you don’t. Perhaps your company never charters aircraft so you don’t feel you needed to purchase this coverage. Imagine, however, that you have an employee who happens to be a licensed pilot and who (with or without your knowledge) decides to rent an aircraft (maybe he/she even owns an aircraft) and fly it on company business. Alternatively, an emergency could surface at any time that requires you or another executive of your company to suddenly charter an aircraft. Corporate Non-

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG 6 June13_FinanceSept 22/05/2013 14:06 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

Owned Aircraft Liability coverage would automatically extend to protect the company in the event one of these employees is involved in an accident.

RISK MANAGEMENT TOOLS In addition to carrying Non-Owned Aircraft liability insurance, there are other offensive measures you can take to mitigate this risk. You could practice risk avoidance by having a clearly-stated and communicated policy prohibiting the use of any mode of air travel other than Airlines when the company aircraft was not available. Keep in mind, however, that this will not relieve you of liability. If you have a rogue employee who either ignores the policy or “didn’t get the memo”, you still have the exposure. In any case, in today’s super competitive business arena, companies are using private aircraft as tools to gain an advantage over their competitors. Why handicap your company with policy or procedure that limits use of Business Aviation? If your company decides it will allow employees to operate employee-owned aircraft on company business, you should have a two-pronged insurance approach: 1) Have a written policy in force detailing exactly what coverage the employee-owner must carry. The firm’s policy for employee-owned or provided aircraft should prescribe a minimum acceptable liability limit, mandate the employer’s company be named as an additional insured, and specify that the insurance contract of the employee be primary, without right of contribution from any insurance the employer may carry. 2) Coordinate this information with the insurance underwriter (and agent) that provides your company’s Non-Owned Aircraft Liability policy. If your company owns an aircraft, you will already have some form of coverage for use of nonowned aircraft. Whether you purchase a standalone Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

policy or already have coverage under your owned aircraft insurance policy, the important point is that the structure of the non-owned coverage must match the exposure. Consult with your aviation insurance broker throughout this process. Be sure to purchase as high a liability limit as you can reasonably afford. Like all liability policies, you only find out if you bought an adequate limit after the loss has been settled. The average aviation wrongful death claim per person is now somewhere north of $5m USD.

CHARTER CONSIDERATIONS If you charter aircraft, inquire about the charter operator’s insurance limits to ensure the coverage is adequate. Many prospective jet charter clients look for a minimum of $50 million combined single limit, bodily injury to passengers and property damage liability. However, you might require more insurance coverage or, depending on your situation and the operator’s needs, less insurance might be appropriate. Have the charter operator list your company, and any other appropriate parties, as an additional insured with waiver of subrogation status on their aviation insurance policy. In addition, have the charter operator endorse their policy to state it is primary without any right of contribution from any insurance your company may carry. Last, request 30 days’ notice of cancellation or material change and obtain a certificate of insurance/endorsement verifying compliance with these insurance requirements before riding in the aircraft. By doing all of the above, you should be well protected to fly non-owned aircraft on company business.

“...the important point is that the structure of the non-owned coverage must match the exposure.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 66

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

65


BG 7 Jun13_FinanceSept 21/05/2013 09:29 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

The Medium Jet Value Among the many advantageous aspects of Business Aviation, the broad spectrum of solution options suggests Medium Jets can be just the right fit for many operators.

F

“Using the latter approach makes it possible for a Medium Jet to cover multiple stops and get home at the day’s end, without buying fuel along the way.”

66

rom Entry Level Jets, through Light Jets and on to the heady realm of the VIPconfigured airliners, an airplane exists that will accommodate your requirement for speed, range and capacity. Of all the business jet categories, however, none does more to balance capability with utility than the Medium Jet segment (loosely defined by aircraft with a maximum take-off weight between 20,001-40,000 lbs); and no segment provides more options, either. Medium Jets, as their label indicates, fall between the Light Jet and Large-Cabin Jet segments in numerous ways, while leaning closer to the LargeCabin segment in several specific areas. This category of jets will tend to be not too big, not too small, and not too expensive.

CABIN VALUE A smaller Medium Jet can only improve incrementally on the cabin space of the largest Light Jets, while the largest Medium Jet could dwarf the volume of that same Light Jet model. Medium Jets,

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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however, tend to cruise at the upper-end of the private jet speed range – between Mach 0.78 and Mach 0.85. If there’s a contest to identify a specific give-back element to the Medium Jet segment, most would opt for runway flexibility. Runway requirements for Medium Jets are generally longer than the average length needed by a Light Jet. But Medium Jets typically can use a significant percentage of the secondary airports serving most of the 150 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. In general the average Medium Jet can reach most of the U.S. non-stop from almost anywhere in the U.S. as Medium Jets typically can fly from several hundred miles to more than 1,000 miles farther than the Light Jet average. That range capability also gives the crew the flexibility to string together a sequence of stops that total the same distance. Using the latter approach makes it possible for a Medium Jet to cover multiple stops and get home at the day’s end, without buying fuel along the way. This capability to avoid refueling on a multi-leg U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jeteffect Inventory June 21/05/2013 10:34 Page 1

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Year

Model

Serial No.

1988

Astra 1125

012

1983

Challenger 601-1A

3010

1999

Challenger 604

5421

2005

Challenger 604

5587

1997

Citation Jet

525-0198

1998

Citation Jet

525-0243

1985

Citation Super SII

S550-0046

1997

Citation X

750-0016

2001

Global Express

9029

2003

Global Express

9085

2001

Gulfstream G200

015

1988

Gulfstream GIV

1057

1989

Gulfstream GIV

1107

2000

Gulfstream GIV/SP

1433

2007

Gulfstream G450

4071

1998

Gulfstream GV

545

2004

Gulfstream G550

5029

2003

Hawker 400XP

RK-358

2005

Hawker 400XP

RK-407

2000

King Air 350

FL-268

1997

Learjet 31A

147

2002

Learjet 31A

239

2007

Learjet 60XR

320


BG 7 Jun13_FinanceSept 22/05/2013 14:09 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation trip is called “tankering”, and it makes the Medium Jet a more-suitable solution than a Light Jet for the operator who regularly needs to fly 2,000 nautical miles or more on a leg – or who may cover that much in a day or two flying multiple legs.

CONSIDER A MEDIUM JET IF… While on average faster than the Light Jet, a Medium Jet’s superior speed generally provides only a few minutes of gain on the typical Business Aviation trip of 350 to 500 miles, but the difference will be noticeable on legs as long as the average Light Jet’s typical maximum range. There’s no disputing the advantages of space in the comfort equation, particularly when applied to longer trips. That is ultimately where the Medium Jet’s basic advantage comes into play. Medium Jets deliver plenty of added space and comfort over the typical Light Jet, but at costs still significantly below those of the Large Cabin segment. Indeed, Medium Jets generally can match their Large Cabin kin in terms of speed and, to a point, range while providing reasonable office amenities that are competitive with most larger aircraft.

All things considered, it is little wonder that the Medium Jet segment is the biggest selling, deepest segment across the business aircraft market.

MEDIUM JET PRICE GUIDE The following Medium Jets Retail Price Guide represents current values published in the Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1994 through Spring 2013 (20 year period). Values reported are in USD millions, with each reporting point representing the current average retail value as published in the Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, Bombardier’s Learjet 45XR values reported in the Spring 2013 edition of Bluebook shows $4.7 million for a 2005 model, $5.0 million for a 2006 model and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. Aircraft specifications for many of the following models can be found in the Specifications and Performance section in this issue (page 104). Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to Jack@avbuyer.com

U

“Medium Jets deliver plenty of added space and comfort over the typical Light Jet, but at costs still significantly below those of the Large Cabin segment.”

THE WORLD’S FINEST

Business Jets, Turboprops and Helicopters

for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com and lots more...

68

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Boutsen June_Layout 1 20/05/2013 16:07 Page 1


Retail Price Guide June13_PerfspecDecember06 21/05/2013 09:35 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

MEDIUM JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE 2013 US$M

SPRING 2013

2012 US$M

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300

22.0

18.2

17.2

15.5

14.65

13.75

12.75

11.75

11.25

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 60XR

12.0

8.8

7.6

6.8

6.0

5.5 5.5

4.5

4.0

3.6

5.7

5.0

4.7

4.5

4.8

4.4

4.1

3.9

4.0

3.7

3.3

3.6

3.3

3.0

2.7

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 60SE BOMBARDIER LEARJET 60 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45XR

12.0

9.5

8.1

6.9

6.2

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40XR

9.9

8.1

6.4

4.9

4.5

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40 CITATION X 750

20.0

16.7

15.2

13.5

11.5

10.5

9.6

8.5

7.6

CESSNA CITATION SOVEREIGN 680

16.5

14.5

12.8

11.3

9.8

9.4

8.7

8.2

7.7

CESSNA CITATION XLS+ 560

11.8

10.0

9.2

8.5

7.8 6.1

5.5

5.3

4.9

CESSNA CITATION V1 650 CESSNA CITATION V11 650

CESSNA CITATION XLS 560

6.9

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560

4.1

DASSAULT FALCON 50EX

9.3

8.9

8.4

7.9

8.0

7.5

4.3

4.0

DASSAULT FALCON 50 GULFSTREAM G280

24.0

GULFSTREAM G200 GULFSTREAM G150

14.0

14.0

13.0

10.3

9.5

9.0

8.5

11.0

10.0

8.8

7.8

7.3

7.0

GULFSTREAM G100

4.6

GULFSTREAM/ ASTRA 1125 SPX GULFSTREAM /ASTRA 1125 SP HAWKER 4000

12.0

11.0

10.0

9.0

8.0

15.0

10.5

8.5

8.0

7.0

6.9

6.5

HAWKER 1000 HAWKER 900XP HAWKER 850XP PRO LINE

5.6

HAWKER 800XP PRO LINE

4.9 4.2

HAWKER 800XP

4.0

HAWKER 800 HAWKER 750

9.0

7.5

6.5

5.9

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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Retail Price Guide June13_PerfspecDecember06 21/05/2013 09:37 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

What your money buys today 2003 US$M

2002 US$M

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

11.0

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 60XR BOMBARDIER LEARJET 60SE

3.4

3.2

3.0

2.9

2.7

2.5

2.4

2.3

2.2

2.0

4.0

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 60 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45XR

3.5

3.2

3.0

2.9

2.8

2.7

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40XR BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40

7.0

6.6

6.1

5.6

3.1

5.1

2.8

4.7

2.7

4.5

2.6

4.3

2.4

CITATION X 750 1.8

1.7

CESSNA CITATION V1 650

2.2

2.1

CESSNA CITATION V11 650 CESSNA CITATION SOVEREIGN 680 CESSNA CITATION XLS+ 560 CESSNA CITATION XLS 560

3.9

3.7

3.4

3.1

2.8

2.5

7.5

7.0

6.7

6.3

6.0

5.7

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560 5.5

DASSAULT FALCON 50EX 3.8

3.7

3.6

DASSAULT FALCON 50 GULFSTREAM G280

7.0

6.5

6.0

5.6

5.2

GULFSTREAM G200 GULFSTREAM G150

3.9

3.6

3.4 3.4

GULFSTREAM G100 3.0

2.9

2.8

2.7

2.6

GULFSTREAM/ ASTRA 1125 SPX 2.0

1.9

GULFSTREAM /ASTRA 1125 SP HAWKER 4000

3.2

3.1

3.0

HAWKER 1000 HAWKER 900XP HAWKER 850XP PRO LINE HAWKER 800XP PRO LINE

3.6

3.1

2.9

2.7

2.5

2.4

2.3

2.2

2.0 1.9

HAWKER 800XP 1.8

HAWKER 800 HAWKER 750

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

71


AirCompAnalysisJune13_ACAn 20/05/2013 16:43 Page 1

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS GULFSTREAM G200

CHALLENGER 300

Gulfstream G200 by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, we provide information on a selection of pre-owned business jets in the $11.5-16m price range for the purpose of valuing the pre-owned Gulfstream G200. We’ll consider the usual productivity parameters (payload, range, speed and cabin size), and cover current and future market values. The field in this study also includes Bombardier’s Challenger 300 and Dassault’s Falcon 2000. For the purpose of this comparison, prices are based on 2011 models for the G200 and Challenger 300, while the Falcon 2000 is based on the 2006 model.

I

BRIEF HISTORY The Galaxy 1126 first flew on Christmas day 1997 and is a supermidsize, medium-range twin-turbofan corporate jet. By December 1998 it had received certification from the US and the Israeli aviation authorities. Deliveries began in 1999. Powered by a pair of 5,700 lbst Pratt & Whitney Canada PW306 powerplants, this Galaxy model was designed with a new, wider

72

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

fuselage with seating configurations for 8 to 10 passengers and a stand-up cabin. Attached to the fuselage were strengthened Astra SPX wings with integrated winglets that imposed a limit on maximum size, but allowed for the larger fuselage. On May 1, 2001 General Dynamics (GD) announced the acquisition of Galaxy Aerospace Company from Israel Aerospace Company Ltd. (IAI) which included the type certificates for the entire family of aircraft. When the deal closed, GD placed the entire family of aircraft with Gulfstream, which it had acquired in 1999. General Dynamics chose to rename the Astra and Galaxy models the Gulfstream G100 and G200 respectively. Under the arrangement, IAI would continue to manufacturer the G100 and G200 aircraft in Israel and fly the aircraft for interior completion to Gulfstream in the US. The final production G200 rolled off the production line on December 19, 2011 and a total 250 units have been built over the years. In 2005, Gulfstream began designing a follow-on aircraft. The new model, known as the G250 was launched in 2008. It was ❯ later renamed the Gulfstream G280 and began delivery in 2012.

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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1998 Falcon 2000 s/n 66 • • • • •

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AirCompAnalysisJune13_ACAn 20/05/2013 16:46 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS GULFSTREAM G200

MARKET SHARE

CHART A - MARKET SHARE

Chart A (top left) represents the in-operation aircraft market share as of April 2013 for the Gulfstream G200 (28%), the Challenger 300 (45%), and the Falcon 2000 (27%). There are currently 867 total aircraft in operation for these three models.

PAYLOAD AND RANGE The data contained in Table A (left) is published in B&CA (May 2013 issue) and is also sourced from Conklin & de Decker. As mentioned in previous articles, a key area for a potential operator to focus on is payload capability. The Gulfstream G200 ‘Available Payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 650 pounds is significantly less than the competitors in this field of study.

TABLE A - PAYLOAD & RANGE

CABIN VOLUME

MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel IFR Range (nm)

Gulfstream G200

35,450

15,000

4,050

650

3,530

2,371

Challenger 300

38,850

14,045

3,350

1,105

3,340

2,581

Falcon F2000

35,800

12,155

5,910

1,095

3,130

1,411

Model

According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Gulfstream G200 (868 cubic feet) is marginally larger than the Challenger 300 (860 cubic feet), see Chart B (left). Both of these aircraft offer less cabin volume than the Dassault Falcon 2000 at 1,024 cubic feet.

POWERPLANT DETAILS Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, M.A. USA: JETNET; B&CA May 2013 and Aug. 2012 Operations Planning Guide

CHART B - CABIN VOLUME 1,024

F2000 868

G200

860

CL300 750

800

900

850

950

1000

1050

Cubic Feet

TABLE B - FUEL USAGE Model

Fuel Usage (GPH)

Gulfstream G200

235

Challenger 300

275

Dassault Falcon 2000

265

COST PER MILE COMPARISONS Chart C (top, right) details ‘Cost per Mile’ and compares the Gulfstream G200 to its competition, factoring direct costs and with all aircraft flying a 1,000nm mission with an 800 pound (four passengers) payload. The Gulfstream G200 cost per mile at $4.91 is

Source: Aircraft Cost Calculator (www.aircraftcostcalculator.com)

74

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

The Gulfstream G200 aircraft has two PW306A engines each offering 6,040 pounds of thrust. Meanwhile, the Challenger 300 utilizes a pair of Honeywell HTF7000 engines offering more thrust at 6,826 pounds each. The Dassault Falcon 2000 has two CFE 738-1-1B engines with less thrust at 5,918 than either of the other two models. Using data published in the May 2013 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2012 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet-A fuel cost in the August 2012 edition was $6.30 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: Fuel price used from this source does not represent an average price for the year. Table B (left), sourced from the Aircraft Cost Calculator, shows the fuel usage of each aircraft in our field of study. The Gulfstream G200 - at 235 gallons per hour (GPH) has a lower fuel usage in this field of study.

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisJune13_ACAn 20/05/2013 16:47 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS GULFSTREAM G200

only slightly more per mile compared to the Challenger 300 ($4.87). The Dassault Falcon 2000 cost per mile is significantly higher at $6.58 per nautical mile.

CHART C - COST PER MILE* F2000

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS The ‘Total Variable Cost’ illustrated in Chart D (right) is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense, and Miscellaneous Trip Expense. The total variable cost for operating the Gulfstream G200 at $2,056 per hour is less than the Challenger 300 at $2,206 and the Falcon 2000 at $2,819.

The points in Chart E (right) center on the same group of aircraft. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in the B&CA 2013 Purchase Planning Handbook and Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors. 1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The long range cruise speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities. The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the aircraft in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all business jets are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious business aircraft buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. Also included in Chart E is the Gulfstream G280 business jet which has replaced the G200 as Gulfstream latest super mid-cabin aircraft. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size, we can conclude that while the Gulfstream G200 model has a slightly larger cabin volume, the Challenger 300 shows a slightly better productivity value. However, beyond the parameters set within Chart E, the G200 has a lower operating cost than its competition, and a 2011 model can be purchased for less than a 2011 model Challenger 300. Table C (right) contains the relative retail prices from Vref for each aircraft. The number of aircraft in-operation, percentage “For ❯ Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

G200

$4.91

CL300

$4.87

$0.00

$2.00

$4.00

$6.00

$10.00

$8.00

US $ per nautical mile * 1,000 NM TRIP, 800LBS PAYLOAD

CHART D - VARIABLE COST F2000

$2,819 $2,206

CL300

$2,056

G200 $0

$1,000

$2,000

$3,000

$4,000

US $ per hour

CHART E - PRODUCTIVITY $30.0

Price (Millions)

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS

$6.58

Gulfstream G280 (2013)

$25.0 $20.0 $15.0

Gulfstream G200 (2011)

Challenger 300 (2011)

$10.0

Falcon 2000 (2006)

$5.0 0.9

1.5

1.2

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE Avg. Speed

Cabin Volume (cu.ft.)

Max Payload w/avail fuel range(nm)

Vref Retail Prices $m (Model Year)

G200

459

868

2,371

$15m (2011)

CL300

459

860

2,581

F2000

459

1,024

1,411

Model

In Operation

% For Sale

Avg. Sold Monthly*

246

11.8%

3.4

$16.5m (2011)

391

5.4%

6.8

$11.5m (2006)

230

10%

2.2

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker; JETNET; Vref; 2012 Operations Planning Guide B&CA Aug. 2012. * Past 12 months

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

75


AirCompAnalysisJune13_ACAn 22/05/2013 15:20 Page 4

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS GULFSTREAM G200

Sale” and the number “Sold” over the past 12 months are from JETNET. As shown, the Gulfstream G200 has 11.8% of the fleet on the market (buyer’s market) with a monthly average of 3.4 aircraft sold currently.

LOCATION BY CONTINENT The majority of the Gulfstream G200 fleet is based in the United States (62%), followed by Asia (16%) and Europe (14%) – see Table D (right). This information is compiled by JETNET STAR reporting system. The data can be valuable information for dealer/broker repeat business where the majority of Gulfstream G200 aircraft are located by continent.

SUMMARY Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that business aircraft operators value. There are other qualities such as airport performance,

TABLE D - FLEET LOCATION Location of Aircraft By Continent Make/Model Gulfstream G200 Fleet Percentage

Asia

1

34 16%

0.0%

Australia/ Oceania 0 0.0%

Europe

North America

28 14.0%

129 62.0%

South America 16 8.0%

Total 208 100%

• Three aircraft are in shared ownership arrangements and 28 are in a fractional program. This information is compiled by JETNET STAR reporting system. This data can be valuable information for dealer/broker repeat business where the majority of Gulfstream G200 aircraft are located by continent.

terminal area performance, and time to climb performance that might factor in a buying decision, too, however. The Gulfstream G200 aircraft holds its own among its competition, so those operators in the market should find the preceding comparison of value. Our expectations are that the Gulfstream G200 aircraft will continue to do very well in the pre-owned market.

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2008 Gulfstream G200

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For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at: 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Email: Mike@avbuyer.com, Web: www.mdchase.com

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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www.AvBuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 20/05/2013 15:27 Page 1

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS

GAMA First Quarter 2013 Shipment Analysis Every category up, so what are the driving forces? by Mike Potts here was good news when the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) issued its report on business aircraft deliveries for the first quarter of 2013. Every category that GAMA reports was up – and in some cases up sharply from a year ago. Perhaps this marks the beginning of the recovery we’ve all been hoping to see. In spite of the positive numbers, however, there are still signs that the market has not left all of its troubles behind. Nonetheless, the strong numbers are very encouraging. Total aircraft shipments numbered 458 units, up 9.6 percent from 418 a year ago. Billings were up by a startling 31.7 percent at $4.6 billion. That’s an increase of more than $1 billion from last year’s first quarter of $3.5 billion. Clearly the strongest portion of the recovery is coming in the higher-end of the jet market. The jet segment itself was up 4.0 percent at 129 units (compared with 124 last year). Turboprops were up 29.2 percent from 108 to 136, but in a departure from previous practice, GAMA didn’t report them that way. Instead, turboprop deliveries were segmented into single- and multi-engine categories, with the singleengine turboprops up 14.8 percent at 102 units, from 89 last year, and the multiengine turboprops up an enormous 78.9 percent, with 34 units compared with 19 last year.

T

The piston category had the smallest increase at 3.8 percent with 193 piston deliveries in the quarter compared with 186 last year. In announcing the first quarter delivery results, GAMA President and CEO Pete Bunce said he was “very pleased to see a shift to the positive for GA airplanes, which extends across all airplane segments,” but he noted that “performance was mixed within the segments” – something of an understatement… Weakness in the market was signaled three weeks before the GAMA results were announced when Textron, parent company of Cessna, said in its first-quarter earnings report that jet sales were below expectations. Textron forecast that Cessna’s jet sales this year would not match 2012 levels and said it was cutting production accordingly. This has been a difficult market for Cessna. Traditionally, the company has been a contender for the lead in all three categories – jets, turboprops and pistons. This quarter the company is not close to contending for first place in any of these categories. Preloaded with this disappointing news from Textron, the positive GAMA numbers therefore came as something of a pleasant surprise.

THE BUSINESS JET MARKET A detailed look at the GAMA results paints a less positive picture than the overall results suggest. Of eight business jet

manufacturers, four had weaker delivery results than a year ago. Two were even, and just two had improved results, although the companies that did have better sales had disproportionately large increases compared to the rest of the market. Bombardier led the jet manufacturers in the first quarter with 39 deliveries, up from 29 last year - an increase of nearly 35 percent. The company’s deliveries were distributed heavily in the middle- and upperparts of its product line, with its Challenger 300 super mid-size and Global 5000/6000 models accounting for 31 of its 39 units reported. The lower end Learjet 40/45 and 60-series models accounted for just three deliveries. While encouraging, Bombardier’s results in the past quarter were still below its 2011 and 2010 first quarters (42 and 47 respectively) so the company’s deliveries are not yet close to approaching pre-recession levels. Cessna came in at a somewhat distant second with 32 units, down from 38 this time last year - a drop of nearly 15.8 percent, with the reduction coming entirely in

THE WORLD’S LEADING

AIRCRAFT DEALERS & BROKERS find one today 80

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www.AvBuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 20/05/2013 15:28 Page 2

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS the light end of Cessna’s production range. Collectively, deliveries of the company’s Mustang, CJ2+ and CJ3 models were off 44.4 percent, from 18 units to 10. Its CJ4 model matched the performance of 1Q 2012 with 10 deliveries while its mid-sized XLS+ and Sovereign models were both up over last year with a combined total of 12 units (versus seven last year) for a collective gain of 30.77 percent. This continues a trend we have seen throughout the recession since 2008, with the sales reductions in the jet segment coming mostly in the lower end of the product lines of the various manufacturers, and culminating in the decision of Hawker Beechcraft (now known simply as Beechcraft), to announce late last year that it is exiting the jet market. Gulfstream was in third place for jet deliveries for the first quarter with 29 units, up 10 from a year ago when it recorded 19. That’s an increase of more than 52.6 percent, marking the company’s best first quarter delivery results since 2009 when the recession was just beginning and it delivered 31 units. It’s also the best quarter Gulfstream has reported since the first quarter of 2009 with the exception of last year’s fourth quarter when it made 37 deliveries, suggesting that it could be approaching pre-recession delivery levels this year. For the other jet companies, prerecession totals are still some distance away. In the billings category, Bombardier narrowly led Gulfstream, with $1.516 billion for the Canadian manufacturer compared with $1.468 billion for the American firm. Third place in billings was far behind where Dassault reported $358 million. Collectively, Bombardier, Cessna and Gulfstream represented 77.52 percent of the business jet market in the first quarter of 2013, with 100 of the 129 business jets delivered. Accounting for the remaining deliveries were Embraer (12 units), Dassault (eight) and Beechcraft (six). Airbus made two and Boeing one delivery in the top end businessliner category. Airbus and Beechcraft matched their totals from last year’s first quarter. Everyone else endured reduced sales from a year ago. Embraer’s reduction was small at just one unit, down from 13 last year, while Dassault’s shortfall was comparatively large at 7 units, down 46.6 percent from 2012. Beechcraft listed six deliveries of its topof-the-line Hawker 4000, which it is reportedly selling at a substantial discount below its approximately $23 million list price (as approved in a bankruptcy court filing late last year). Textron cited plunging values of Beech-built jets as having an impact on

82

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

GULFSTREAM ENJOYED ITS BEST FIRST QUARTER SINCE 2009

Cessna sales. Beechcraft will cease to be among the GAMA jet manufactures when its inventory is exhausted. On balance, the jet market is still roiled but showing some positive signs of recovery. Of the seven continuing manufacturers, Gulfstream could reach pre-recession delivery levels this year or next, and Boeing and Airbus never really experienced much of a downturn. Things are clearly picking up at Bombardier, and Embraer is only slightly off last year’s pace. Only Cessna and Dassault have yet to exhibit recovery signs. When Beechcraft fully exits the market, the others should experience a lift.

THE TURBOPROP MARKET The turboprop market is clearly healthier than the jet market with only one of nine traditional manufacturers trailing last year’s results. Four of the nine are ahead of last year, and one posted gains that could be fairly described as ‘astonishing’. For more than three decades beginning in the 1960s, Beech Aircraft was the unchallenged king of the turboprop market, at times capturing more than 50-percent of a field that included five other credible contenders. In recent years, however, the company’s command of the turboprop market has faded, and for the past several years Cessna has sold more turboprops than anyone else. Last fall Beech announced it was www.AvBuyer.com

exiting the jet market to return to its turboprop roots. Based on this quarter’s results, the company clearly meant it, reporting delivery of 34 turboprops, or 45.95 percent of the traditional business turboprop market, which totaled 74 units in the first quarter. That’s an increase of nearly 79 percent over the 19 units Beechcraft delivered in last year’s first quarter. A distant second was Cessna, with 18 deliveries - up two units over the 16 it delivered a year ago. Third place was narrowly won by Pilatus, which delivered seven units, followed by Piper with six. Pilatus was up two units over last year while Piper matched its 1Q 2012 total. Following in deliveries were Socata with five (matching its 1Q 2012 total), Quest with two (equal to last year), and Extra and Pacific Aerospace with one each. Only Pacific Aerospace was behind its last year’s total, when it delivered three units. Both the total turboprop and the twinengine turboprop categories are probably understated, because Piaggio – at the moment the only other builder of twinengine turboprops besides Beechcraft – elects to report to GAMA every six months instead of quarterly. GAMA’s totals also include agricultural turboprop aircraft from Air Tractor (55 units, up from 44 last year) and Thrush (seven, down from eight last year). The Aircraft Index see Page 4


GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 20/05/2013 15:29 Page 3

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS

agricultural segment has been growing strongly over the past two years while the business turboprops have remained fairly static. In this past quarter the business turboprops also saw significant gains.

PISTON SUMMARY Results in the piston segment were mixed, with six of the 11 reporting companies showing gains and five showing losses. The single-engine piston leader was Cirrus with

Airplane shipments1,2,6 by type: MANUFACTURED WORLDWIDE

51, followed by Cessna with 37, Diamond 30, Piper 16 and newcomer Cubcrafter with 14. Each of the others had fewer than 10. Somewhat unexpectedly, Beechcraft led piston twins with seven units, followed by Piper with five and former market dominator Diamond with just four. The piston market seems increasingly detached and appears to be becoming somewhat irrelevant to the performance of the turboprop and jet markets. If there is recovery in the jet and turboprop markets – and there seems to be, albeit a painfully slow one - it is not being signaled by activity in the piston markets as has occurred in previous recoveries over the past six decades. In a welcome change of formats, GAMA dropped helicopter results from the airplane report this year, instead issuing rotorcraft results in a separate report. Helicopters were added to the report in 2012. As touched upon above, GAMA added a twin-engine turboprop category this quarter, recognizing perhaps somewhat belatedly that these aircraft are different from the single-engine models in important ways. It might, however, be more meaningful if GAMA were to add an “agricultural turboprop” category to distinguish between airplanes that do and do not have the potential to perform Business Aviation missions. ❯ To view a full reproduction of GAMA’s First Quarter 2013 shipment report, see overleaf. ❯

Airplane shipments1,2,6 by type: MANUFACTURED IN U.S. ONLY 3

Q1

YTD

Q1

YTD

SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON

177

177

SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON

135

135

MULTI-ENGINE PISTON

16

16

MULTI-ENGINE PISTON

12

12

TOTAL PISTON AIRPLANES

193

193

TOTAL PISTON AIRPLANES

147

147

SINGLE-ENGINE TURBOPROPS

102

102

SINGLE-ENGINE TURBOPROPS

88

88

MULTI-ENGINE TURBOPROPS

34

34

MULTI-ENGINE TURBOPROPS

34

34

TOTAL TURBOPROP AIRPLANES

136

136

TOTAL TURBOPROP AIRPLANES

122

122

BUSINESS JETS

129

129

BUSINESS JETS

67

67

TOTAL TURBINE AIRPLANES

265

265

TOTAL TURBINE AIRPLANES

155

155

GRAND TOTAL

458

458

GRAND TOTAL

302

302

NOTES FOR THE ABOVE AND FOLLOWING TABLES: 1. A shipment occurs when a general aviation airplane is shipped from its production facility to a customer located anywhere in the world. 2. Shipments may include deliveries to a fractional operator owned by the company or to an aircraft dealer. 3. An airplane is considered to be manufactured in the United States when produced under an FAA production certificate. 4. Military airplane shipments are not included in shipment table totals. 5. Company billings are not reported. Where available, GAMA estimates total billings using public information including B&CA Purchase Planning Handbook 2012. 6. Cessna Aircraft Company C162 SkyCatcher (SLSA), CubCrafters CC11, Diamond Aircraft HK36 Motor Glider and Flight Design GmbH ASTM CT Series models are included in civil make-model shipment total, but not summary tables. This change is intended to properly capture all deliveries by the companies listed while maintaining a consistent baseline of shipments from previous years' reports. GAMA will further integrate CS-VLA and S-LSA aircraft into future shipment reports. 7. Airbus and Boeing twin aisle shipments will be identified in the report as opposed to in the footnotes going forward. GAMA, however, is not including the value of twin aisle airplane shipments in the calculation of billings. 8. The listing in this report of Beechcraft Corporation for the period ending March 31, 2013 includes Hawker Beechcraft Corporation deliveries through February 15. 9. Gulfstream deliveries will be recognized at the time of completion ("outfitted") starting 2012 to better align with shipment recognition with other OEMs. 10. Piaggio Aero does not provide quarterly data, but reports airplane deliveries on a six-month basis to GAMA, mid-year and end-of-year. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

83


GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 20/05/2013 15:29 Page 4

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT REPORT

First Quarter Airplane Shipment Report 2013 MAKE & MODEL

Q1

YTD

MAKE & MODEL

Q1

YTD

AIRBUS7

BOEING 747-8

0

0

ACJ318

1

1

TOTAL UNITS

1

1

ACJ319

1

1

TOTAL BILLINGS

$55,000,000

$55,000,000

ACJ320

0

0

BOMBARDIER

ACJ330

0

0

LEARJET 40XR/45XR

1

1

TOTAL UNITS

2

2

LEARJET 60XR

2

2

TOTAL BILLINGS

$151,000,000

$151,000,000

CHALLENGER 300

14

14

CHALLENGER 605

5

5

AT-401B

0

0

GLOBAL 5000/6000

17

17

AT-402A

0

0

CL850/870/890

0

0

AT-402B

11

11

TOTAL UNITS

39

39

AT-502A

1

1

TOTAL BILLINGS

$1,516,800,000

$1,516,800,000

AT-502B

21

21

CESSNA AIRCRAFT

AT-504

0

0

172R SKYHAWK

0

0

AT-602

4

4

172S SKYHAWK SP

16

16

AT-802

4

4

182T SKYLANE

4

4

AT-802A

14

14

T182T TURBO SKYLANE

11

11

3

3

AIR TRACTOR

5,6

TOTAL UNITS

55

55

206H STATIONAIR

TOTAL BILLINGS

$24,108,208

$24,108,208

T206H TURBO STATIONAIR

3

3

350 CORVALIS

0

0 0

AMERICAN CHAMPION 7EC CHAMP

0

0

400 CORVALIS TT

0

7ECA AURORA

0

0

208 CARAVAN 675

2

2

7GCAA ADVENTURER

0

0

208B GRAND CARAVAN

16

16

7GCBC CITABRIA EXPLORER

1

1

510 CITATION MUSTANG

2

2

8GCBC SCOUT

1

1

525A CITATION CJ2+

5

5

1

525B CITATION CJ3

3

3

8KCAB SUPER DECATHALON

1

8KCAB EXTREME DECATHLON

1

1

525C CITATION CJ4

10

10

TOTAL UNITS

4

4

560 CITATION XLS+

7

7

$703,600

$703,600

680 CITATION SOVEREIGN

5

5

750 CITATION X

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS BEECHCRAFT CORP

8

BONANZA G36

9

9

TOTAL UNITS

87

87

BARON G58

7

7

TOTAL BILLINGS

$365,750,400

$365,750,400

KING AIR C90GTx

5

5

CIRRUS AIRCRAFT

KING AIR 250

13

13

CIRRUS SR20

11

11

KING AIR 350i/ER

16

16

CIRRUS SR22

14

14

HAWKER 4000

6

6

CIRRUS SR22T

26

26

TOTAL UNITS

56

56

TOTAL UNITS

51

51

TOTAL BILLINGS

$368,336,100

$368,336,100

TOTAL BILLINGS

$31,161,244

$31,161,244 0

CUBCRAFTERS6

BOEING BUSINESS JETS7 BBJ

1

1

CC11 SPORT CUB S2

0

BBJ 2

0

0

CC11 CARBON CUB SS

4

4

0

CC18 TOP CUB

14

14

BBJ 3

84

0

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 2


J Hopkinson June 22/05/2013 14:28 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

Citation Sovereign SN 680-0157, Great Corporate Pedigree, One Owner Since New, Power Advantage +, Aux Advantage, Pro Parts, Over $1M accrued in programs, Motivated Owner, Replacement Aircraft has Arrived

Gulfstream G150 423 AFTT, Long Range Oxygen Bottle, Part 135 Certification, 7 Passenger, New Paint & Interior soft-goods in 2012

Phenom 100 SN 50000035, 565 AFTT, Pratt & Whitney ESP Gold, Embraer Prodigy Flight Deck, HF Radio, XM Satellite Radio & Weather, Air Conditioning, Satcom, Datalink, Embraer Executive Care

Citation XLS SN 560XL-5672, 4089 AFTT, ESP Gold, APU, EGPWS, Cockpit Voice Recorder, 9 Passenger, Air Conditioning

Falcon 900EX 5300 AFTT, MSP Gold, Triple Laseref IV, Airshow 4000, 15 Pax configuration, Interior refurbished August 2010, Painted August 2010. Great Corporate Pedigree.

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 22/05/2013 10:49 Page 5

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2013 SHIPMENT REPORT MAKE & MODEL

Q1

YTD

MAKE & MODEL

CUBCRAFTERS TOTAL UNITS

18

18

MOONEY AIRCRAFT

TOTAL BILLINGS

$3,609,386

$3,609,386

DASSAULT FALCON JET

5

Q1

YTD

M20R OVATION

0

0

M20TN ACCLAIM

0

0

FALCON 900LX

2

2

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

FALCON 2000LX

2

2

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$0

FALCON 7X

4

4

PACIFIC AEROSPACE LTD

TOTAL UNITS

8

8

PAC 750XL

1

1

TOTAL BILLINGS

$358,200,000

$358,200,000

TOTAL UNITS

1

1

$1,940,000

$1,940,000

HK-36

0

0

PIAGGIO AERO

DV20

0

0

P.180 AVANTI II

N/A

N/A

DA20-C1

3

3

TOTAL UNITS

N/A

N/A

DA40 (ALL)

27

27

TOTAL BILLINGS

N/A

N/A

DA42 (ALL)

4

4

PILATUS

TOTAL UNITS

34

34

PC-6

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$11,967,920

$11,967,920

PC-12

7

7

TOTAL UNITS

7

7

$31,255,000

$31,255,000

6

DIAMOND AIRCRAFT

EMBRAER

TOTAL BILLINGS

5

10

PHENOM 100

5

5

TOTAL BILLINGS

PHENOM 300

3

3

PIPER AIRCRAFT, INC

LEGACY 650

4

4

PA-28-161 WARRIOR III

0

0

LINEAGE 1000/E190 HEAD OF STATE

0

0

PA-28-181 ARCHER III

0

0

SHUTTLES (ERJs & E-Jets)

0

0

PA-28R-201 ARROW

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

12

12

PA-34-220T SENECA V

1

1

TOTAL BILLINGS

$161,865,000

$161,865,000

PA-44-180 SEMINOLE

4

4

PA-46-350P MALIBU MIRAGE

12

12 4

EXTRA AIRCRAFT EA300

7

7

PA-46R-350T MATRIX

4

EA500

1

1

PA-46-500TP MERIDIAN

6

6

TOTAL UNITS

8

8

TOTAL UNITS

27

27

$4,420,000

$4,420,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

$29,723,271

TOTAL BILLINGS FLIGHT DESIGN GmbH

6

$29,723,271

QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY

ASTM CT SERIES

25

25

KODIAK 100

2

2

TOTAL UNITS

25

25

TOTAL UNITS

2

2

$1,765,444

$1,765,444

TOTAL BILLINGS

$3,550,000

$3,550,000

TOTAL BILLINGS GIPPSAERO PTY LTD

5

SOCATA

GA8 AIRVAN

5

5

TBM 850

5

5

TOTAL UNITS

5

5

TOTAL UNITS

5

5

N/A

N/A

TOTAL BILLINGS

$17,340,000

$17,340,000

TOTAL BILLINGS GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE

5, 9

THRUSH AIRCRAFT, INC.

GULFSTREAM G150/280

4

4

S2R-T34

5

5

GULFSTREAM G350/450/500/550/650

25

25

S2RHG-T65

1

1

TOTAL UNITS

29

29

S2R-T660

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$1,468,120,000

$1,468,120,000

S2R-G10

0

0

S2R-H80

1

1

XL2

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

7

7

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$6,214,000

$6,214,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$0

WACO AIRCRAFT COMPANY YMF-5D

2

2

M-7-260C

2

2

TOTAL UNITS

2

2

TOTAL UNITS

2

2

TOTAL BILLINGS

$1,124,000

$1,124,000

TOTAL BILLINGS

$381,956

$381,956

487 $4,614,335,529

487 $4,614,335,529

LIBERTY AEROSPACE

MAULE AIR, INC

86

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

6

GRAND TOTAL CIVIL SHIPMENTS GRAND TOTAL AIRPLANE BILLINGS

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wentworth June_Layout 1 20/05/2013 16:15 Page 1

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ANTED:

Global Express Global Express XRS

2003 or later BBJ

Gulfstream V Gulfstream 550


Plane Sense June_FinanceNov 20/05/2013 14:47 Page 1

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

88

94

Electronic Flight Bag Classification: An understanding of what the hardware and software requires.

EFBs and the Pre-Owned Aircraft Purchase: Be Prepared.

Tablets’ Cockpit Invasion: Useful tool, or tempting distraction?

98

Electronic Flight Bag Classification An understanding of what the hardware and software requires. by Ken Elliott

88

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

lectronic Flight Bags (EFBs) represent one of those revolutionary technologies that transform cockpit management. It’s a technology with multiple applications for potentially minimal cost, streamlining aircraft operations while reducing both aircraft weight and environmental impact. One major US Airline estimates that it will save 326,000 gallons of jet fuel a year and 16 million sheets of paper by replacing traditional paper-based flight bags with iPads across its fleet. Unfortunately, as with many emerging and rapidly evolving aircraft technologies, authorization for use is a certification puzzle.

E

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense June_FinanceNov 22/05/2013 10:39 Page 2

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

that will finalize recommendations regarding the use of EFBs sometime in 2013. Many other proactive regulatory agencies such as Australia, China (including HK SAR), UK and Sweden have advanced guidance based on US and EU advisories. Given that most of the guidance material is similar across the world, we will focus on US guidance. This should be a good starting point for anyone trying to grasp a basic understanding of EFBs, their installation, and their use in the cockpit. Some cockpit-based systems have a higher need for understanding human factor implications. Anyone considering upgrading to EFBs should pay careful attention to cockpit resource management. www.AvBuyer.com

Note also that most cockpits will employ dual EFBs. As for classification, EFBs are categorized by their hardware and software. The hardware class focuses on the extent to which the device integrates into the cockpit, while the software type focuses on how the use of the EFB relates to the performance and operation of the aircraft.

EFB HARDWARE CLASSES Class 1 EFBs: These are Portable Electronic Devices (PED), stowed below 10,000ft, that are not normally used during take-off and landing operations, and do not require an administrative process to remove them from WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

89

The operator is not simply approving an installation but also flight bag operations for that specific flight department. New aircraft owners may be spared that effort as production aircraft are delivered with single or dual flight bags standard, or as an option – in which case the aircraft OEM has typically covered the bases and ensured the installation and operation can only be within regulatory requirements. In the US, an Airworthiness Circular AC120-76B issued in 2012 acts as the primary guidance for installation and operations of EFBs. In Canada it is AC700-020, while EASA uses TGL-36 and ICAO - representing many international regions - has an EFB sub-group


Plane Sense June_FinanceNov 20/05/2013 14:50 Page 3

BEFORE

• •

applications can include weight and balance and other performance related data for specific aircraft models. Requires operational approval. Requires regulatory agency evaluation.

AFTER

the aircraft. Connectivity to other aircraft systems should be read-only. They can have quick disconnect aircraft power and limited read-only interconnect. Because they must be stowed for take-off and landing they have limitations as to when they can be used.

Class 3 EFBs: These are fixed, installed equipment and therefore require installation design approval, typically implying that an STC will be necessary. Depending on the model, it may be connected to the GPS or FMS and it may be able to combine GPS position with the locations and speed vectors of other aircraft as well as provide graphic weather information into a single, detailed moving map display. Its detailed database can also provide obstacle and terrain warnings.

Requires operational approval. Examples include: Non-interactive manuals, logs, data sheets, records and operational guidance material.

Type B Applications Provides all Type A information: • can display approach charts, calculate weight and balance, and deliver weather information. Requires operational approval. • Requires regulatory agency • evaluation. Examples include: Aeronautical • charts and maps, interactive performance calculations (such as takeoff, en route, and landing), weight and balance calculations, weather and aeronautical data, etc. Type C Application Provides all Type A and B informa• tion and can display "own-ship" position on approach and airport charts. Uses approved aircraft standard avionics data known as DO178B compliant. Type C

ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATION GUIDANCE Apart from the primary guidance material already mentioned, some of the more useful additional Airworthiness Circular (AC) guidance material and breakout of class and type certification is provided below: AC 91-78 use of Class 1 or Class 2 • EFBs. AC20-159 airport moving map dis• play ‘own ship position’ Class 1 and 2 EFBs for use on the ground only.

Class 2 EFBs: These are Portable Electronic Devices (PED), normally mounted in a position where they are utilized during all phases of flight and require an administrative process to remove or replace them from the aircraft. Fixed equipment used to mount or interface to an aircraft requires design approval. There can be limited connectivity to other aircraft systems and data such as weather. Aircraft mounts include power and interconnect, but for egress the device should still have a quick disconnect capability. The device can be used to compute weight and balance information as well as take-off and landing speeds, and to display flight critical pre-composed data, such as navigation charts. Since it is not necessarily stowed for take-off and landing, pilots can use it to display departure, arrival and approach charts. Class 2 EFBs typically include a separate aircraft interface module.

• •

In summary the more an EFB physically and electronically integrates to an aircraft and its performance, the more certification effort is required to install and operate it. Note also that the regulatory authority will look at the category of aircraft operation when approving EFB use. A commercial airline or charter/fractional operator will incur closer scrutiny, particularly to the EFB operation or its intended use. The goal of the authorization is to ensure risks are mitigated and safety assessments completed. An aircraft crew should be able to operate the EFB in a seamless fashion, dovetailing it into the existing cockpit procedures. In fact it is recommended that a transition period from paper to paperless should include an overlap of several months when both paper and paperless are available to the crew at all times.

CMC’s PILOTVIEW FAMILY OF EFBs

EFB SOFTWARE TYPES: Type A Applications The least complex software provid• ing electronic documentation such as flight manuals but no navigational charts.

90

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Plane Sense June_FinanceNov 20/05/2013 14:50 Page 4

UNIVERSAL AVIONICS’ UCDT III CLASS 3 EFB

• • •

AC20-173 installation of EFBs. AC91-21-1 use of portable electronic devices (PEDs). AC20-64 electronic checklists.

Class 1 EFB: Certification requires an assessment of the physical use of the device in the cockpit, possible risks associated with electromagnetic interference and the use of lithium batteries. The EFB power source must be capable of deactivation at any time. It may even be appropriate to have an alternate power supply available. The EFB may not be connected to any aircraft system but may be connected to non-aircraft systems on the ground only. Class 2 EFB: Certification requires a regulatory approval of the mounting arrangement, its ability to withstand impact when mounted, its data connectivity and its power connection. Also required is an assessment of the physical use of the device in the cockpit, possible risks associated with electromagnetic interference and the use of lithium batteries. The EFB power source must be capable of deactivation at any time. Data connectivity and isolation from other aircraft systems should be validated while ensuring non-interference. Typically data connectivity to aircraft systems involves an STC process. Class 3 EFB: Certification requires a full airworthiness approval (STC) just like any other on-board avionics system. A Class 3 EFB may form part of a network supporting other functions. A human factors and safety assessment will be part of its evaluation. Type A: Can be used for document storage and retrieval. Type B: Can be used for independent performance calculations, the display of charts with no aircraft position and checklists, can use the internet, and display weather and external cameras (one example being heads-down enhanced vision infrared imagery). Type C: Relates to the active control of the aircraft in flight raising significant human factors concerns. This usually requires the EFB system to be Class 3. Part 91 operators in the US and as pilot-incommand, may approve the operation of their own Class 1 and 2 EFBs, but Part 91K, 135 and 121 operators must obtain operational approval though the OpSpec process. Under EASA and other regulatory regions an OpSpec or alternative form of operational approval will be necessary for all users. For those readers who are members of NBAA, you will find a wealth of useful EFB operational data under the Association’s aircraft operations portal.

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

EFB BRANDS BY CLASS There are a plethora of EFB devices available today and in a sense they follow the three hardware classifications discussed. Commercial off the shelf (COTS) devices include the beloved iPad and popular Android devices. COTS devices are found in both Class 1 and 2 applications. Aviation equipment manufacturers, meanwhile, have taken the COTS principle and adapted specific units for aircraft mounting and digital interface. These devices are designed for aircraft and include physical characteristics suitable for aircraft reliability and performance. Several industry leaders have emerged in Class 2 and 3 arenas such as Universal Avionics (the first to market with Class 3 certified), CMC, navAero, Astronautics and Goodrich. And there are an even greater number of application providers supplying a wide array of software for use on all classes of EFBs.

WHY EFBs Some key benefits for using EFBs in the cockpit are: • • • • • •

Reduced pilot workload Efficiency Safety Replacement of paper reference Reduced cost Weight saving.

An example of features that can be gained from a full Class 3 EFB system shows just how beneficial Electronic Flight Bags can be in terms of what they provide: • • • •

Airport Map/Runway Incursion Prevention ADS-B Merging and Spacing Enroute Moving Map with dynamic own ship position Aviation Weather Information www.AvBuyer.com

• • • • • • • • • •

Network Connection CPDLC Communication Management Unit Data Loading Maintenance Charts Manuals Video Surveillance Request Application Information Others.

TRAINING Finally the importance of training cannot be reinforced enough. Incorporating new cockpit tools into the normal flying procedures can be complex and time consuming. Some operators have used their COTS and PEDs to interface with existing X-Plane commerciallyavailable software creating realistic simulation of the cockpit environment. This allows for the new devices to be proven and tested down to simple processes like folder management for the many documents available on the device. This ground based proving exercise can be a very effective way of establishing a flight department-standardized procedure for using EFBs in flight operations. ❯ Ken Elliott is an avionics veteran of 40 years and more recently focused on NextGen. His work within the NextGen Advisory Council sub-committees brings him close to current and intended development effort. Equally, his specialization in low-vision operations provides a deeper insight into one of the pillars of NextGen. Ken has served the aviation industry on three continents from light GA to large corporate aircraft. His current employer Jetcraft is a leading aircraft brokerage company with worldwide presence. More from www.jetcraft.com, email: kenelliott@jetcraft.com ■ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Plane Sense 2 June_FinanceNov 20/05/2013 14:55 Page 1

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

EFBs and the Pre-Owned Aircraft Purchase: Be prepared. by Steve Watkins

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

changing requirements for EFBs is critical. And as usual, it is up to the operators and their technicians to do so. Now that EFBs have been around for a while, it is very likely that if you are looking to purchase a pre-owned aircraft it already has a system installed and FAA-approved for use by the current owner. The pilots may be amazed at all the functions this mobile device offers to make flying the aircraft easier, but be aware that this new little gadget will require additional paperwork, training and maintenance procedures before anyone gets to use it to its full potential. Aircraft Index see Page 4

94

T

he nice thing about old technology is that the FAA doesn’t revise the requirements very often. The bad thing is that old technology comes with limited capabilities. The Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) is one of the most dynamic items in an aircraft today, and it appears the possibilities are endless, especially when it comes to the manufacturers and regulating agencies. In my article in the June 2012 edition of World Aircraft Sales Magazine (p100), I referenced the AC120-76A documentation. That same month, the FAA approved AC120-76B – which illustrates how keeping up with the


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Plane Sense 2 June_FinanceNov 20/05/2013 15:01 Page 2

“ The best way for an

operator to go paperless in a previously-approved aircraft, is to start anew and take everything the previous owner performed and documented to your regulating agency and hope they will accept this as a gift. ”

NON-TRANSFERRABLE APPROVAL The existing installed and approved EFB System may increase the value of the aircraft you are looking to purchase, as well as make the pilot’s life easier. Even though it may have been installed only months ago, there is likely to be much more work to be done to meet the laundry-list of FAA requirements. For example, when you purchase the aircraft the approved EFB is not transferrable. You now become the Operator, and the list of items that the new Operator needs to have documented and approved is substantial, no matter what the Class of System, or Type of Software being used. To review the requirements for the different Classes of Hardware and Types of Software, refer to the FAA AC120-76B. Basically, there are three Classes and three Software Types detailed, as outlined in the preceding article of this edition.

OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS Now that the Class and Types are clear, let’s review some of the requirements that the Operator must perform for Class 2 Type B EFB Systems, as an example. The Operator is referred to as the new aircraft owner/operator that intends to use a previously approved EFB System. They must perform the following: 1. Document EFB non-interference to show operational suitability and compliance with AC91.21-1 and AC 120-76B.

96

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

2. If using Type B software, determine the usage of the hardware and/or software with a failure. 3. Provide evidence that demonstrates EFB meets the appropriate criteria for intended function. 4. If W&B information is used, be sure it is current to the aircraft and perform a valuation test prior to EFB use. 5. Perform within an initial validation period - typically six months - to ensure reliability of the EFB prior to removal of the paper documents. (In other words, if you buy an aircraft with an EFB installed, you still have to get paper documents until your validation has been approved.) 6. Assure that the batteries being used in your Portable Electronic Device (PED) have the proper charging system that is compatible and has a replacement interval. 7. Provide documentation that the PED meets the requirements specified for environmental hazards and non-interference compliance requirements. 8. Assure that the PED, if wireless, doesn’t interfere with other systems. 9. Assure that any PED used meets decompression testing requirements if aircraft can be pressurized.

APPROACHING YOUR LOCAL FAA You should be able to see from the above bullet points that transferring approval for an www.AvBuyer.com

EFB is not as simple as you might have assumed initially. There are more items like procedures and training that will need to be addressed before you can successfully get the EFB System approved by your local FAA. The best way for an operator to go paperless in a previously-approved aircraft, is to start anew and take everything the previous owner performed and documented to your regulating agency and hope they will accept this as a gift. Start with your Operations and Maintenance Regulators and show them what you received. Then, on bended knee, ask them what else they need to approve your EFB documentation, evidence and validations, so you can use this new EFB technology before they decide to change it all again!  Steve Watkins is Technical Services Manager, Western Region for Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI). Steve has been an A&P mechanic, IA and Private Pilot for over 35 years and was a Designated Mechanics Examiner in Wichita, KS and Long Beach, CA. He has also spent time as Director of Maintenance and Chief Inspector for various FAR 135 and FAR 145 operations, owned his own maintenance shop as well as instructed at an A&P technical school and is an active member of the AMT Society.  Contact Steve at: SWatkins@jetsupport.com ■ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Plane Sense 3 June_FinanceNov 20/05/2013 15:14 Page 1

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

Tablets’ Cockpit Invasion: Useful tool, or tempting distraction? by Dave Higdon

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

the gravest examples occurred in the Fall of 2011 when the pilot of an emergency medical airlift helicopter flew his ship into a fourway fatality – while using his cell phone to send and receive text messages, according to the report from the National Transportation Safety Board. Fortunately, considering the volume and growth in incidents, fatal outcomes are relatively rare. However, the low fatality numbers mask the dangers as we see a tidal shift toward iPads and other tablets in the year since the Federal Aviation Administration updated its long-running Advisory Circular outlining the definitions of EFBs and their use and qualifications. It's been about two years since the first approvals for Part 135 use of iPads came about. Aircraft Index see Page 4

98

I

n one instance a pilot's use of a personal computer caused the airplane to fly miles beyond its destination. In another, it took alarmed flight attendants to snap the two pilots back to their cockpit duties after they had flown well beyond their intended airport. Several other instances can be found in which crews lost track of their positions, altitude or approach status as they tried to use new electronic chart software loaded on the company's new iPads or other new Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) software. Potentially, they can all contribute to distracting pilots – just like cell phones, electronic readers or any other consumer product lumped under the broad heading ‘Portable Electronic Device’ (PED). One of


Project1_Layout 1 23/10/2012 11:22 Page 1

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Plane Sense 3 June_FinanceNov 20/05/2013 15:15 Page 2

“ The proliferation of tablet computers and other PEDs in aircraft cockpits is generating blow-back thanks to the unpredictability of one element of the tool… The pilot handling it! ”

Thanks to these and other actions by FAA and vendors, operators across the aviation spectrum – private, business and commercial – continue to embrace new technology for charts and plates and other necessary, required documents. And at every step, signs emerge that show pilots are not entirely immune to their devices' distracting traits. Even as the community absorbed the relative benefits of their newly available tool – lighter weight, better updating and lower costs – aviation's safety gurus knew there would also follow new forms of the old issues of cockpit focus, distraction and the flight safety challenges resulting from the new tools.

FAILURE TO LAUNCH “You knew it had to come,” growled one semi-retired corporate pilot. He flies as a mentor pilot, instructing part-time for a large flight-training organization, and he advises aircraft owner/operators on issues of singlepilot cockpit-resource management. “There's no getting around the benefits these electronic tools bring to us in the cockpit – particularly for single-pilot operators,” he explained. The ease of finding the right chart or plate for the singe pilot who's adept at using whatever EFB tool he or she chooses can't be overstated. But even something this great has its issues. The proliferation of tablet computers and other PEDs in aircraft cockpits is generating blow-back thanks to the

100

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

unpredictability of one element of the tool… The pilot handling it!” It's a dichotomy of significant proportions. The PEDs operate on the basis of their hardware and software; they follow a logic imparted by the program. The most fatal of pilot's flaws meanwhile are their human ability to be easily distracted by the very tool touted to help make flight safer for them, some of which devolve to the point of fixation which can exclude from their awareness any and all input outside of the interface. There's no questioning the appeal of EFBfunctioning devices. It grows with every generation software and hardware advance. Regardless of its brand origins, pilots and operators wholly embrace the functional benefits of the PED that serves as a portable GPS back-up navigator; a plane-smart E6B flight computer; a replacement for pounds worth of paper; and the end of the laborious process of keeping up-to-date charts, plates, airways, and company manuals. But those benefits accompany the tool's peculiar ability to steal focus away from basic flying tasks, and a distracted pilot – even one focused on an ancillary flying task – is at that moment not a safe pilot. Distracted pilots aren’t solely a singlepilot-cockpit or professional-cockpit phenomenon. Distracted pilots work and fly in single- and two-pilot cockpits, meaning that all operators and pilots must focus on avoiding electronic-screen hypnosis. www.AvBuyer.com

HUNDREDS ON RECORD... The database at the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting Service holds almost 400 Part 91 operations reports citing distraction as a factor since 2009. Widen the inquiry to cover all operations and more than 1,000 reports appear citing distraction as a factor since 2009. Bear in mind that this snapshot excludes reportable accidents – by including these, the number is certainly higher. One safety investigator for a major OEM observed, “Guys getting distracted by their cockpit toys is as bad as we know it is on the streets...and you think that pilots would be better, know better. There's a good number of minor incidents that have to be reported because they clear the damage thresholds, but they don't generally rise to the level of an NTSB investigation. The FAA hardly covers some of them.” Common issues cited in the ASRS reports involve the user becoming distracted because of a lack of knowledge and experience in using the new device. There's no standard for how software writers organize access to the documents in their EFB programs. Sometimes the source of the distraction is as basic as not knowing how to power up the device; other times it's down to unexpected issues – such as the iPad shutting down after getting too hot laying on a light-jet glareshield, while the pilot has no paper alternative. These are usually EFB and iPad-as-EFB issues; but those devices aren't the only PEDs brought into cockpits. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense 3 June_FinanceNov 20/05/2013 15:18 Page 3

THE CIRCLE OF DISTRACTION

THE SOLUTION? COMMON SENSE

Pilots have always struggled at times between maintaining focus during the droning monotony of a long flight and handling some of the job's distractions which have grown over the decades. As technology advanced new ways to become distracted emerged. Consequently, three- and four-person cockpits became the norm, with two pilots, a flight engineer to manage power and systems, and a navigator to track progress and serve as the ship's radio operator. The latter two jobs let pilots stay focused on flying by eliminating their responsibilities for those critical tasks. Technology advances started eliminating the need for navigators in the 1960s and then for flight engineers in the 1980s. Now two-pilot cockpits are the norm for all but the Light Jet segment, where single-pilot IFR designs dominate, and in the process of concentrating the work of four into two, or one, the dependence on technologies continually expanded. Only with the ability to substitute a form of computer hardware for pounds and pounds of paper charts, maps and manuals has the cockpit-technology revolution reached full circle. With the reductions in human staff and the proliferation of all these electronic systems the opportunities and incidents of distracted pilots returned – with a growing rate.

Company policies on use of PEDs and EFBs vary, from non-existent to highly detailed. Sanctions for violating these seem rare, however, and somewhat questionable in their effectiveness. The NTSB, in closing its investigation into the crash of the medical helicopter flown by the distracted pilot outlined above, presented seven recommendations to the FAA - three specifically addressing the problem of cockpit distractions:

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Prohibit flight crew flying Part 135 and 91 subpart K (Fractional) operations from using a portable electronic device for non-operational use while at their duty station on the flight deck while the aircraft is being operated. Require all Part 121, 135, and 91 sub part K operators to incorporate into their initial and recurrent pilot training programs information on the detrimendue to the nonoperational use of portable electronic devices can have on performance of safety-critical ground a and flight operations. Require all Part 121, 135, and 91 subpart K operators to review their respective general operations manuals to ensure that procedures are in place that prohibit the non-operational use of Portable Electronic Devices by operational personnel while in flight and www.AvBuyer.com

during safety-critical preparatory and planning activities on the ground in advance of flight. The Board also made two recommendations to the operator of the accident helicopter, one of them specific to the issue of cockpit distractions: “Expand company policy on Portable Electronic Devices to prohibit their non-operational use during safety-critical ground activities, such as flight planning and pre-flight inspection, as well as in flight.” Professional pilots and instructors have their own recommendations that are focused largely on sticking with old tools in the cockpit until a pilot has learned and become adept at using the new electronic replacement for charts and plates – and keeping paper as a spare for the first few weeks of actual flying with the new tool. Our professional pilot and instructor summarized: “Do you think there's a message there? It's as simple as the Boy Scout motto – ‘be prepared’. It's also important for all of us to look at those recommendations and follow them in our own flying, every day, mission notwithstanding, status not relevant. Part-time recreational pilot flying for fun or pro-ATP drawing a check, none of us should be succumbing to the aura of the iPad – or any personal device.” ■ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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ACSpecs IntroJune13_AC Specs Intronov06 21/05/2013 09:39 Page 1

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: MEDIUM JETS

JULY ISSUE: Light Jets AUGUST ISSUE: Turboprops SEPTEMBER ISSUE: Large Cabin

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Description of Cost Elements he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Medium Jets – appears opposite, to be followed by Light Jets next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only, but Conklin & de Decker provides details of older airplanes too. If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know.

T

❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000;

Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs. VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door. BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.). CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.). WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight. SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alter-

104

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

nate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For single-engine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing distance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


BE EC HC RA FT HA WK ER BE 75 EC 0 HC RA FT HA WK ER BE 80 EC 0 HC RA FT HA WK ER BE 80 EC 0X HC P RA FT HA WK ER BE 80 EC 0X HC Pi RA FT HA WK ER BE 80 EC 0X HC PR RA FT HA WK ER 85 BE 0X EC HC P RA FT HA WK ER BO 90 MB 0X AR P DIE RL EA RJE LEA T4 0 RJE T4 0X R

AircraftPer&SpecJune13_PerfspecDecember06 21/05/2013 09:53 Page 1

MEDIUM JETS $3,076.64

$3,112.13

$3,146.85

$3,137.85

$2,853.31

$3,161.31

$2,849.07

$2,319.69

$2,405.09

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

4.92

4.92

CABIN WIDTH FT.

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

5.12

5.12

CABIN LENGTH FT.

21.30

21.30

21.30

21.30

21.30

21.30

21.30

17.67

17.67

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

604

604

604

604

604

604

604

368

363

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.30

4.30

4.30

4.30

4.30

4.30

4.30

4.80

4.80

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.50

2.50

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

47

48

48

49

50

50

50

15

15

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

32

-

-

-

-

-

-

50

50

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

6

6

MTOW LBS

27000

27400

28000

28000

28000

28000

28000

20350

21000

MLW LBS

23350

23350

23350

23350

23350

23350

23350

19200

19200

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

16250

16000

16250

16250

16500

16330

16500

13718

13949

USEABLE FUEL LBS

8500

10000

10000

10000

10000

10000

10000

5375

6062

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

2200

1520

1750

1750

1620

1790

1620

1507

1239

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2200

2000

2050

2050

1950

2120

1950

2282

2051

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

2050

2390

2470

2470

2733

2525

2733

1573

1778

MAX. RANGE N.M.

2200

2570

2620

2620

2929

2710

2929

1707

1960

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4900

6300

5640

5640

5258

5641

5258

4330

4680

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3803

3787

3803

3803

3805

3810

3805

4033

4060

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3500

3500

3415

3415

3415

3415

3415

2820

2820

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

530

532

470

470

570

470

570

710

394

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

447

442

449

449

452

452

452

465

465

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

430

429

430

430

430

430

430

436

436

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

402

389

402

402

402

402

402

428

433

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TFE 731 -20AR

TFE 731 -20BR

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

TFE 731-5BR TFE 731-5R TFE 731-5BR TFE 731-5BR TFE 731-50R TFE 731-5BR TFE 731-50R

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

105


AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

BO MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T4 BO 5 MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T4 BO 5X MB R AR DIE RL EA RJE T6 BO 0 MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T6 BO 0X MB R AR DIE RC HA LLE NG CE ER SSN 30 AC 0 ITA TIO NV I CE SSN AC ITA TIO NV II CE SSN AC ITA TIO NE XC CE EL SSN AC ITA TIO NX LS

AircraftPer&SpecJune13_PerfspecDecember06 21/05/2013 09:55 Page 2

MEDIUM JETS $2,350.12

$2,469.86

$2,698.01

$2,555.50

$3,324.18

$3,353.30

$3,396.94

$2,626.61

$2,541.21

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.92

4.92

5.71

5.71

6.08

5.70

5.70

5.70

5.70

CABIN WIDTH FT.

5.12

5.12

5.92

5.92

7.17

5.50

5.50

5.50

5.50

CABIN LENGTH FT.

19.75

19.75

17.67

17.67

28.60

18.40

18.40

18.50

18.50

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

410

410

453

453

860

438

438

461

461

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.80

4.80

5.30

5.30

6.22

5.00

5.00

4.54

4.50

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.50

2.50

2.00

2.00

2.50

2.00

2.00

2.00

2.00

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

15

15

24

24

106

-

-

10

10

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

50

50

24

24

-

61

54

80

80

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

8

7

7

8

7

7

7

8

MTOW LBS

20500

21500

23500

23500

38850

22000

23000

20000

20200

MLW LBS

19200

19200

19500

19500

33750

20000

20000

18700

18700

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

13890

14125

14772

14896

23850

13800

14250

12500

12800

USEABLE FUEL LBS

6062

6062

7910

7910

14045

7329

7330

6740

6740

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

798

1563

1068

944

1105

1071

1620

960

860

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2110

1875

2228

2104

3350

1600

2250

2500

2300

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1423

1685

2186

2044

3065

1770

1693

1449

1539

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1968

1937

2418

2398

3340

2000

1824

1839

1989

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4350

5040

5450

5450

4810

5630

5170

4060

3910

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4063

4105

5208

5317

3833

4208

4500

4917

4738

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

2800

2630

4500

4500

4240

3699

4315

3790

3500

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

590

589

714

718

474

805

510

699

800

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

465

465

465

465

476

427

452

433

433

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

436

436

436

436

459

427

452

433

433

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

416

436

423

423

459

418

417

373

373

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

PW305A

PW305A

HTF 7000

PW545A

PW545B

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

TFE 731-20AR TFE 731-20BR

TFE 731-3B TFE 731-4R-2

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

106

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


CE SSN AC ITA TIO NX LS+ CE SSN AC ITA TIO NX CE SSN AN EW CIT AT ION CE SSN X AC ITA TIO NS OV ER CE EIG SSN N AN EW CIT AT ION GU LFS SO VE TRE RE AM IGN G1 00 GU LFS TRE AM G1 50 GU LFS TRE AM G2 00 GU LFS TRE AM G2 80

AircraftPer&SpecJune13_PerfspecDecember06 21/05/2013 09:56 Page 3

MEDIUM JETS $2,509.50

$3,995.57

$4,086.29

$3,021.77

$2,915.40

$2,640.92

$2,498.79

$3,316.86

$3,313.64

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

5.70

5.70

5.70

5.70

5.70

5.60

5.75

6.25

6.25

CABIN WIDTH FT.

5.50

5.50

5.50

5.50

5.50

4.75

5.75

7.20

7.20

CABIN LENGTH FT.

18.50

23.92

25.20

25.25

25.25

17.10

17.70

24.50

32.25

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

461

593

620

620

620

375

465

868

935

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.50

4.50

4.50

4.58

4.58

4.30

4.33

6.00

6.00

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.00

2.10

2.10

2.50

2.50

2.08

2.10

2.75

2.75

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

10

-

-

35

35

9

25

25

34

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

80

82

82

100

100

55

55

125

120

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

8

8

9

9

7

7

8

8

MTOW LBS

20200

36100

36600

30300

30755

24650

26100

35450

39600

MLW LBS

18700

31800

32000

27100

27575

20700

21700

30000

32700

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

12800

22025

22464

18150

18400

14365

15100

19950

24150

USEABLE FUEL LBS

6740

12931

12931

11223

11348

9365

10300

15000

14600

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

860

1444

1505

1177

1277

920

850

650

1000

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2300

2375

2514

2650

2600

2635

2400

4050

4050

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1528

2890

3229

2620

2773

2550

2760

3130

3387

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1976

3125

3380

3010

3163

2910

3130

3530

3690

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3910

5480

5320

3810

3820

6000

5640

6600

4750

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4738

4693

4702

3867

3917

4362

4050

4352

5083

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3500

3650

3650

4016

-

3400

3340

3700

5000

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

800

1120

1120

1237

-

493

606

395

844

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

440

525

527

459

459

474

470

470

482

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

440

525

527

459

459

459

459

459

470

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

373

470

470

388

-

430

430

430

459

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

PW545C

AE 3007C1

AE 3007C2

PW306C

PW306D

PW306A

HTF 7250G

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

TFE 731-40R TFE 731-40AR

I

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Downsizing May13_Gil WolinNov06 20/05/2013 14:26 Page 1

DOWNSIZING YOUR AIRCRAFT

Flying Less ? Pressured to Sell ?

lthough some signs point to modest increases in business flying in some areas, other signs show many operators continue to fly less than they were a few years ago. For some, those changes will inevitably spur discussions about the company aircraft: “Is this more than we need today?”, and “Will we need this airplane in the foreseeable future?” So many influences come into play when

A

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

trying to answer such questions. Increased flying can make upgrading viable; ditto for longer average stage lengths – or changes that increase the demand for seats on the company flights. Don’t forget wear-andtear/replacement cycle buying, either… In recent years some have used the recession-depressed market to step up to a larger or faster airplane, discounted to the point that the price seemed competitive with something smaller but newer. www.AvBuyer.com

Of course, when times are good rationalizing an upgrade may require nothing more than a spreadsheet showing the new airplane won’t, alone, land badly on the company balance sheets. But when times are tough as they are now, flight-hours growth and moveup demand generally hasn’t been all that stellar these past five years. Consider the reverse of the step-up proposition: How often, if ever, have you heard flight department staff, owner/pilots Aircraft Index see Page 4


Downsizing May13_Gil WolinNov06 20/05/2013 14:27 Page 2

DOWNSIZING YOUR AIRCRAFT

“ One industry expert suggests there are two basic reasons to replace your current aircraft: The airplane is no longer capable of performing the mission; or the costs of operating the aircraft make it no longer the best economic choice for the mission.“

Perhaps downsizing your airplane could keep you flying... By Dave Higdon

the airplane seem more than the company requires (or wishes to continue paying for). The need for an airplane remains; the question is how much of an airplane is needed? Downsizing can offer many useful benefits. These include lower costs; reduced insurance premiums; reduced maintenance costs; maybe even lower crew costs. Further, the operator retains the on-demand, shortnotice-to-everywhere travel options that only business aircraft provide.

ing in the way of speed and time efficiency since many light jets can cruise to within 50 knots of many medium and large jets. Even if the cruise difference was between 75 to 100 knots though, for the typical business flight the time added will be minimal. Always remember to measure changes in fuel and sundries by the cost-per-mile yardstick. Cost-per-mile, as the consultants and marketing executives note, provides the most direct comparative measure.

STEPPING DOWN VERSUS EXITING

INSURANCE & MAINTENANCE

It’s not as complicated as it seems – at least in the abstract. A company that no longer needs mid-cabin space and range will possibly find it can meet a high percentage of its needs with a light jet. Allowing for the unlikely case of a straight swap with the owner of a smaller jet who is looking to step up to a jet of the size and category that you presently own, finding a buyer for your aircraft has better prospects these days – and supplies of light jets are good, with prices just off buyers’ market levels. Stepping down from medium to light, large to medium, or from ultra-large to anything else, offers many of the same relative savings.

FUEL & SUNDRIES The two general rules about costs in Business Aviation follow: • •

or owner/operators discuss the relative merits of trading down in aircraft. One industry expert suggests there are two basic reasons to replace your current aircraft: The airplane is no longer capable of performing the mission; or the costs of operating the aircraft make it no longer the best economic choice for the mission. A variation on that last reason has hit more than a few operators lately. They’ve seen utilization decline or change in a way that now makes Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

More speed is more expensive. Extra space is also costly.

Naturally, then, owning an airplane that is faster and bigger than you actually need is going to cost more than you need to pay. Logically, a step down should be a step to lower costs on several levels. Lower fuel costs may be the big saving since the track between size and fuel, and speed and fuel is virtually linear. The same fuel budget you spent on the larger airplane will buy more flying hours. As for that speed difference, depending on the smaller jet, you may be giving up nothwww.AvBuyer.com

This one should be relatively easy to compare. Since insurance premiums tend to first reflect the aircraft ‘hull’ value the premium is set by the unit costs and moves accordingly. You may also gain some savings through differences in systems on the aircraft and the amount you fly. Maintenance programs and some maintenance costs should also reflect the lower expense of the aircraft – though not nearly in the direct way of fuel or insurance. The hourly costs of technicians varies little though age, parts and complexity may work in the operator’s favor in the scenario of a step-down.

POTENTIAL OPERATIONAL GAINS More total airport options become available to the owner who finds downsizing their jet to be the way forward. That’s because smaller airplanes equal shorter runways. A light jet may be able to operate from runways of only 3,000 feet in length, while some midcabin jets need a little over 4,000-foot length. Large cabin jets go well into the 5,000-foot territory. Turboprops, meanwhile, can operate from runways most commonly accommodating piston aircraft – 3,000 feet and shorter. More airport options will usually translate into landing at the airport nearest the required business destination – instead of using a larger, less-convenient runway because the airplane needs it. The option to use a smaller airport also gives the flight planner more choices for shopping airports offering more attractive airport fees and hangar costs (a matter of poundage and ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

109


Downsizing May13_Gil WolinNov06 20/05/2013 14:29 Page 3

DOWNSIZING YOUR AIRCRAFT space). And smaller airports often offer lowercost options for fuel, handling and catering to flights. In terms of where to base the aircraft, the smaller field may also be more competitive for hangars and maintenance, even if their front door facilities don’t match up to the luxury trappings of the major FBOs on the larger airports. There are ways around that for operators who regularly fly clients out of their hometowns. One operator we know always uses a major airport with a glittering, upscale FBO to meet passengers for his business travels, but he doesn’t base his jet there. He bases it 18 nautical miles away at an uncontrolled field. By not basing at the larger airfield permanently, however, this operator saves $450 a month which he had to spend to base his larger aircraft at said larger airfield. Other costs may also drop at smaller suitable airports – depending on the field and the services provider. For example, handling fees for moving our example’s airplane to the small field run one-fifth of the cost of that large airport FBO – and also lower than another nearby GA airport. It all adds up. The lower costs reduced his annual spending on hangar, handling and, most of all fuel, by significant five-figure sums, he explained. “The savings are paying much of the cost of changing airplanes.”

SINGLE-PILOT OPTION The option of working with a single pilot works only in a limited area – but it’s an area catching the eye of more than a few operators looking to step down for all the reasons noted above: Lower utilization, less need, costs, etc. Some companies may decide to stick with using two pilots and cite numerous logical reasons for that decision, but other smaller operators will see the single-pilot option as another cost-saving with few downsides. Using a single-pilot brings a boost in useful utility by opening up capacity for another passenger or extra fuel on some trips. Make sure, however, that the airplane you downsize into is certified for single pilot operations.

Finding the ideal replacement may be equally time-consuming, so be prepared. If it’s a model in high demand, the costs may not be buyer’s market-level. Tax benefits for buying qualified aircraft have been unusually generous in recent years but may not be available for the particular unit you’re considering. A tax professional can sort out that concern and put you on the path to the smartest decision.

All things considered, the end game is assessing whether the financials make sense. You may believe it worth incurring some financial loss to step down when the longterm savings will greatly exceed those costs. Be sure your financial advisors or accountant

are engaged from the start of this process. As our new-found light jet owner noted, he incurred costs in stepping down. But looking at a five-year spreadsheet comparing the old medium jet to his pre-owned, butnewer light jet, he concluded that the savings were significant. “It was worth it for us…we’re flying a little more and spending a good bit less – and all the while, the smaller airplane does what we need. Who wouldn’t take that option above exiting Business Aviation ownership altogether?”

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

THE DOWNSIDES OF DOWNSIZING If these items add up to a familiar picture for you, perhaps it’s time to meet with someone to help you assess the costs and savings – and the prospects of selling the old jet and buying something smaller. A couple of cautions should be given, however: •

110

Today’s market is not exactly on fire; depending on what you want to downsize from, clearing it from the company books may take time. Consider working with a broker to carry this load. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAI_WAS_JUNE13_Layout 1 5/16/13 2:51 PM Page 1

CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL, INC.

2013 1983 –

PHONE: +1 (561) 433-3510 | www.caijets.com 2008 GULFSTREAM G150

2005 TBM 700C2

This Gulfstream G150 has only 375 Hours TTSN. Offers a Wide Cabin with Maximum Range of 2,950 nm with 4 Passengers, 2 Crew, NBAA IFR Reserves at 430 KTAS (Mach .75) or Normal Cruise of 459 KTAS (Mach .80). Universal 7 Passenger Interior.

S/N 321

Only two owners and 1,075 hours total time since new. Equipped with 2tube EFIS, Dual Garmin 530's, GMX-200 MFD, Traffic Alert System, Stormscope, Gaseous oxygen system and Freon Air.

2006 TBM 850

2000 TBM 700B

S/N 351

Only 725 Hours TTSN. Equipped with RVSM, 2-Tube Bendix EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s with WAAS, Garmin GMX-200 MFD with Chartview, TAS/TAWS, WX-500, Garmin GDL-69A Real Time Weather, and Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 Transponders.

2001 TBM 700B

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Only Two Owners Since New, 1,625 TTSN, 536 SHS, De-Iced 4-Blade Prop 36 SOH (4/13), RVSM, Always Hangard, Excellent Maintenance, All Records, No Damage History, Always Hangared.

1991 TBM 700A

S/N 200 1,899 Hours TTSN, 1,126 SHS, EFIS, Dual Garmin 530's, KMD-850 MFD, EGPWS, Skywatch TCAD, Landing Gear enrolled on Long Life Program, 10-Year Inspection complied with 2012, Freon Air, and No Damage History. Annual Inspection complied with March 2013. CONTACT J.P. HANLEY

S/N 182

S/N 003 Only Two Owners and 3,500 Hours TTSN, 420 Hours SMOH, Garmin 530/430, Sandel EHSI, Gear on Long Life Program, NEW Windshields and De-ice Boots Fitted March 2012, Gear Actuators Overhauled March 2012, Always Hangared, and No Damage History.

LIST YOUR AIRCRAFT WITH CAI CALL US FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PROVEN SUCCESS RECORD.

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RASF WAS June 2013 21/05/2013 12:08 Page 1

Sale of 2 BAe - 125 Invitation for Tender: The opening date for all envelopes will be on 15 June 2013 This is to include 2% bank garantee of the actual bid value of the tender to be sent in a sealed envelope to the following address:

Registration Number Airframe Hours Engine Type

HZ-105

HZ-109

8957.55

8411.24

TFE731-5/-5AR/-5R

TFE731-5/-5AR/-5R

Mr Bader Abdulrahman

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Tel: 0096614769777 Ext: 49140 Mobile: 00966505326620 Royal Saudi Air Force Headquarters, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Saudi Embassy London Tel: +44 (0) 207 581 7070 Ext: 210 Fax: +44 (0) 020 7581 9782 E-mail: AIR-TSU@MODA.GOV.SA


Southern Cross June 21/05/2013 15:54 Page 1

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JetNet June13_PAMA interview November06 20/05/2013 15:43 Page 1

JETNET >>KNOW MORE

Financed vs. Cash Pre-Owned Business Jet Transactions by Michael Chase & Marj Rose here can be no doubt that changes in the landscape of available used-aircraft financing that characterize today’s market have had an adverse impact on the business and helicopter aviation re-sale markets. As 2013 unfolds there remains a large inventory of business aircraft available at very affordable prices. The percentage of financed versus cash retail transactions for business jets was roughly split 50/50 from 2000 through September 2008. But then in late 2008 came the start of the economic meltdown, at which point securing debt financing for pre-owned business aircraft purchases became a more challenging task for buyers. Thus the pendulum swung in favor of cash as the method of most pre-owned jet transactions. Today the ratio of financed versus cash transactions for used business jets stands at 23% financed to 77% cash. This is based on JETNET’s findings from US-based FAA-filed financial documents. There has been little change in the percentage of financed business jets over the past four years as shown in Chart A (right).

CHART A - BUSINESS JET FULL RETAIL SALE TRANSACTIONS U.S. FAA FINANCIAL DOCUMENTS FINANCED VS CASH*

MORE DETAILED VIEW

TABLE A - FINANCED VS CASH SNAPSHOT

T

Following are just a few of the questions we will seek to answer in this month’s JETNET >>KNOW MORE. • Is financing only available to the higher priced pre-owned business jets today (compared to the period prior to the melt-down)? • Is it more difficult to finance older business jets today? • What are the most popular makes and models of business jets that are financed? Table A (right) provides a snapshot view of the third quarter of 2007 compared to the fourth quarter of 2012. You can see what trends have taken place in the financing of business jet aircraft since the economic ❯ melt-down.

114

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

Start of Economic Melt-down

23%

FINANCED

Data based on the four quarter total moving average

P ERIOD 3 Q 2007 % of Total 4 Q 2012 % of Total C hange % Change

F INANCED 189 50% 92 23% -97 -51%

C ASH 189 50% 308 77% 119 63%

77% CASH *

T OTAL 378 100% 400 100% 22 6%

Source: JETNET; Analysis by Chase & Associates

Source: JETNET; Analysis by Chase & Associates

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Dominion June 21/05/2013 12:13 Page 1

Comprehensive Services 1977 Falcon 20-5BR-2C

S/N: N 366 - Reg: N100AQ MSP - Honeywell 150 APU- 286/281 CZI Aft Baggage Mod - External Lavatory Service Single point refueling - EGPWS VIII - TCAS II "MCI & C & 2C c/w 2/2011" - 15 Year Gear

2008 Gulfstream G-150

S/N: 272 - Reg: N399SC Universal 7 Passenger Interior plus Belted Lavatory - Microwave and Seat Storage Drawers - XM Radio - Wood Veneer Handrails - Honeywell Laseref V IRS - Dual IFIS w/Jepps Maps & DBU 5000 - XM Cockpit Weather Graphics - Collins Electronic Checklist

2008 Hawker 750

S/N: HB-002 - Reg: N787FF 1150 Hours - MSP Engines and APU Provisions for FDR & 2nd HF CAMP External Access & Heated Baggage TCAS II EGPWS - LoPresti Taxi& Landing Lights 48 Month Inspection HBC Indianapolis

1985 Lear 55

1986 Lear 35A

S/N: 121 - Reg: N747AN 3250 Hours - MSP - TR's - Phase I & IA Mods TCAT II - TAWS - WX-1000 Storm Scope - 12 year c/w Feb 2010 - CAMP Only 5 US owners all FAR-91

S/N: 620 - Reg: N500CG MSP - Universal Synthetic Vision 1 4 Tube Universal EFIS - TCAS I - TAWS Dual Universal UNS 1 FMS w/Universal MFD-640 Raisbeck Aft Locker & Raisbeck ZR Lite Avcon Ventral Fins - Honeywell DEEC 3rd VHF-22A Comm - Exec Door Freon AC - Aux Heat Argus 7000 CE Moving Map - WX-500 Storm Scope


JetNet June13_PAMA interview November06 20/05/2013 15:45 Page 2

JETNET >>KNOW MORE During 3Q 2007, there were 378 total preowned business jet transactions completed with 50% (189) financed and 50% purchased with cash. During 4Q 2012 the number of preowned business jets financed had declined to 92 or just 23% of the total of 400 transactions for the quarter, which saw an overall increase of 6% more transactions. The shift towards cash transactions is clear.

TABLE B - PRE-OWNED FINANCED TRANSACTIONS - WEIGHT

WEIGHT CLASS

TABLE C - PRE-OWNED FINANCED TRANSACTIONS - AGE

Table B (top right) delves a little deeper into our snapshot comparison of the same two periods and breaks the Financed transaction numbers down by aircraft weight class. While all weight classes experienced a decline in volume of financed pre-owned business jets, the light/VLJ classes saw an increase from 47% to 59% in its share of financed assets. One conclusion we could draw from this snapshot is that financing continues to be available for all classes of business jets.

W EIGHT H eavy M edium L ight/VLJ T otal

3 Q 2007 35 66 88 189

% 19% 35% 47% 100%

4 Q 2012 15 23 54 92

% 16% 25% 59% 100%

+ /-20 -43 -34 -97

% -57% -65% -39% -51%

Source: JETNET; Analysis by Chase & Associates

A ge (Yrs) 0 -5 6 -10 1 1-15 1 6-20 2 1-25 2 6-30 3 0+ T otal

3 Q 2007 25 41 29 24 21 30 19 189

% 13% 22% 15% 13% 11% 16% 10% 100%

4 Q 2012 20 21 20 12 2 5 12 92

% 22% 23% 22% 13% 2% 5% 13% 100%

B efore

N ow

50% 50%

67% 33%

Source: JETNET; Analysis by Chase & Associates

AGE Comparing our two snapshot periods by aircraft age groups indicates that 50% of the financed transactions for pre-owned business Jets were under 15 years old and 50% were greater than 16 years old in the third quarter 2007. After the meltdown, financed transactions for older business jets dropped 33%, as shown in Table C (right). Again, while most aircraft age groups witnessed a decline, the 21-25 and 26-30 year old jets lost a significant share of the total. Interestingly, age group 16-20 maintained the same share and the 30-plus group actually grew in its share percentage of business jets that were financed in the fourth quarter 2012. One possible conclusion is that there were fewer pre-owned business jets that were financed that were older than 16 years of age over our two snapshot periods. However, it’s fair to say from this data that financing does appear to be available for all business jet age groups.

MAKE When comparing our two snapshot periods by aircraft make, Cessna’s Citations continue to have the largest number of Pre-owned financial transactions, as shown in Table D (right). Also highlighted, we can see that the Hawker and Challenger models saw the largest declines in financed transactions.

MODEL The Light Jets and VLJs dominate the rankings of business jets that were financed in large numbers when viewed by model. Most notable within the top rankings is the absence of pre-owned business jets in the Large Cabin and Ultra-Long-Range classes. The majority

116

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

TABLE D - PRE-OWNED FINANCED TRANSACTIONS - MAKE MAKE Citation Hawker Learjet Gulfstream Challenger Falcon Beechjet Westwind Eclipse Sabreliner Astra Boeing Diamond Premier Embraer TOTAL

3Q 2007 68 32 29 16 13 11 9 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 N/A 189

4Q 2012 42 9 12 6 3 5 4 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 5 92

# Change -26 -23 -17 -10 -10 -6 -5 -2 1 -2 0 -1 -1 0 N/A -97

% Change -38% -72% -59% -63% -77% -55% -56% -67% 50% -100% 0% -100% -100% 0% N/A -51%

Source: JETNET; Analysis by Chase & Associates

TABLE E - PRE-OWNED FINANCED TRANSACTIONS - MODEL R ank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

M ake/Model Citation II Beechjet 400A Hawker 800A Hawker 800XP Citation 525 Citation Ultra Challenger 604 Citation Bravo Citation I/SP Citation III Learjet 55 Citation Excel Hawker 1000A Learjet 25D

3Q 2 007 10 9 8 8 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 5

www.AvBuyer.com

C um

%

R ank

10 19 27 35 42 49 55 61 67 73 79 84 89 94

5% 10% 14% 19% 22% 26% 29% 32% 35% 39% 42% 44% 47% 50%

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

M ake/Model Citation CJ3 Embraer Phenom 100 Hawker 800XP Beechjet 400A Citation I/SP Citation Mustang Learjet 60 Citation II Citation S/II Citation 525 Eclipse 500 Hawker 900XP Learjet 31A

4Q 2 012 10 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

C um

%

10 15 20 24 28 32 36 39 42 45 48 51 54

11% 16% 22% 26% 30% 35% 39% 42% 46% 49% 52% 55% 59%

Source: JETNET; Analysis by Chase & Associates

Aircraft Index see Page 4


JetNet June13_PAMA interview November06 22/05/2013 15:18 Page 3

JETNET >>KNOW MORE of the financed models are from the Cessna family of jets. Prior to the economic meltdown, the Citation II was in top spot, but in the fourth quarter of 2012, the Citation CJ3 led all models for pre-owned financing (Table E (left)). From the analysis presented in Table D and E, we can conclude that financing is available to all makes and models of pre-owned business jets, but the Light Jet and VLJ (lowerpriced) models certainly appear to have more financed transactions.

HOW MANY AND WHAT TYPES? Since the economic melt-down, regulators have increased their scrutiny of banks, who have in turn increased their due diligence processes for customers seeking business aircraft loans. This is a different environment today compared to the free-wheeling days before the recession. Accordingly, a buyer should expect the bank’s due diligence to be more penetrating today. Perhaps this could be one of the underlying reasons for the shift toward cash transactions over the past four years. Other reasons could be higher deposit amounts required, as well as personal loan guaranty from company executives.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Debt financing for pre-owned business jets are available today, however. There were over 50 banks and financial institutions that processed and filed pre-owned business jet debt instruments (not including leases) in the fourth quarter of 2012. Security agreements were used in 86% of the financial transactions recorded in the fourth quarter 2012 followed by Amended Security Agreements and Mortgages at 7% each.

SUMMARY After recently participating in the annual National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) conference, we heard many aircraft finance professionals agree that financing is certainly available today for business aircraft. The preceding paragraphs and tables have allowed us to drill into some of the historical detail on aircraft financing, offering some insight into the current trends. As we continue moving through these unprecedented economic waters, there is no doubt that buying patterns, and the means of purchasing assets like business aircraft will continue to be affected. We will continue to keep you updated as the recovery continues.

www.AvBuyer.com

❯ For more information: • Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com • Marj Rose is president of MarketLift, Inc. and can be contacted at P.O. Box 595036 Dallas, TX 75359; Mob: 214-862-8992, Web: www.market-lift.com • JETNET can be contacted at 101 First Street, Utica, NY 13501; Tel: 800-400-2298; Web: www.jetnet.com or www.avdatainc.com * You can now follow JETNET on Twitter at www.twitter.com /JETNETLLC

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

117


Global Age June13_Gil WolinNov06 20/05/2013 12:40 Page 1

GLOBAL SYSTEMS TRACKING

Out of Sight, Front of Mind: Global systems connect business aircraft everywhere. by Dave Higdon 118

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

ntil Charles Lindbergh landed at Le Bourget, Paris in 1927, the world had received only scattered reports on his whereabouts; spot sightings occurring by happenstance during his more than 33 hours aloft. Sightings from his fly-overs of Land’s End in Nova Scotia, Ireland and England provided interim reports – and even then several hours later. Conversely, news of his touchdown in Paris, witnessed by tens of thousands, crossed the Atlantic thanks to a media awaiting his arrival with links to the transatlantic telegraph cable and transoceanic wireless.

U

www.AvBuyer.com

In the decades that followed, communicating with aircraft flying in remote regions, across oceans, over the vast, empty spaces of the Arctic, Antarctic, Africa, Mongolia, and South America had remained sporadic at worst, and periodic at best. Those links worked almost solely through the descendants of those early wireless systems: the High-Frequency (HF) radio carried onboard aircraft and ships at sea. For example, the Titanic with her massive electrical-generation capabilities carried wireless equipment powerful enough to span 2,000 miles – and word of her distress signals was received by a radio operator in New York City in what for the time was ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


Heliasset_FullPage-205x270_WAS0613_print.pdf

1

15/05/13

16:57


Global Age June13_Gil WolinNov06 20/05/2013 12:41 Page 2

GLOBAL SYSTEMS TRACKING literally real-time. But this communications required Morse Code fluency. Today, the evolution of modern satellite communications makes it possible for operators to stay in touch with home from virtually anywhere on the planet – by voice, by datalink or by Morse Code. Voice and text messages can be relayed between aircraft, base and back to aircraft automatically. If you thought the flight phone merely cut into one of the last best ways to get away from everyone, the new satellite systems virtually eliminate that final get-away, and that’s a huge positive for businesses with people on-the-move almost everywhere at all times.

WIRELESS LIMITATIONS The age of the telegraph began after Samuel F.B. Morse created his famous code and enterprising businesses began wiring the world to carry the dots and dashes of the first modern communications system. This worked well – as long as the rudimentary batteries powering each relay station kept their current flowing and the all-important integrity of the wired network remained intact. The loss of a single pole could break the wire strand – thus adverse weather and criminal acts could cause communications to be interrupted for as long as it took for repairs to happen. Ahead of the wireless age entrepreneurs of the 19th Century tackled the issue of connecting America and Europe with the transatlantic Telegraph cable – more than 2,000 miles crossing the ocean bottom. As advanced as it was for its day, the system still faced limitations on how much traffic it could carry at one time – even after the telephone, found its own way across the ocean (again, a traffic-limited cable). The world rejoiced when Marconi’s first wireless messages bloomed into a system of networks connected across open air. With no need for wire strands to bridge gaps between communicators the world began to shrink. Yet even Marconi’s invention had its limitations: Those of range, signal strength and line-of-site signals, along with limits on what a single signal could carry. From the early 20th Century, a Canadian company bridged the oceanic gap and began routinely sending wireless messages between the two continents. As advanced as it was, however, limitations on the technologies and sensitivities to environmental problems (lightning or heavy rain, for example) attenuating signal strength remained handicaps to reliability and utility. Likewise, by the time radios began to appear in aircraft in the 1920s and 1930s, those rudimentary units also struggled with their own limitations. Outside the realm of

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...the key element in common is a satellite network, a privatelyfunded constellation of communications satellites orbiting high above us...

the later HF radios, pilots and ground communications seldom could cover much more than 100 miles, with atmospheric issues being a regular constraint. But then the Soviet Union launched a tiny, beach-ball sized orb into space, named “Sputnik” and its existence shook the world even more than the telegraph and the wireless before it. Through four “whisker” antenna Sputnik broadcast a faint radio signal as it circled high above the Earth – and millions on Earth tuned in to hear it pass overhead every 90 minutes or thereabouts, its rudimentary beeping and shiny presence striking awe into the people watching and listening. Thus began the world’s move into evergreater space-based communications – and the beginning of satellites as major players in global communications. After the U.S. launched Telstar in the 1960s the world shrank again, with live television programs now broadcast from one point on the Earth to another – within seconds. Today thousands of satellites orbit Earth www.AvBuyer.com

carrying voice, data, and graphics communications, watching our weather and peering deep into space. They help us monitor our environment, navigate more precisely and communicate between mobile and stationary sites a half-world apart better than ever before.

THE WAY THEY WORK Whether you’re talking about Honeywell’s system, Blue Sky Network’s or some other product, the key element in common is a satellite network, a privately-funded constellation of communications satellites orbiting high above us. These serve as a constellation of communicators constantly in view of all parts of the globe all the time. Airborne equipment can broadcast voice or data communications to a “visible” satellite which, in turn, relays that same packet of information to those on the ground – first passing through the network’s ground stations and then to the end users on the ground. The network ground stations can relay communications to desktop and ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIC Title June_Layout 1 21/05/2013 12:16 Page 1


Global Age June13_Gil WolinNov06 20/05/2013 12:42 Page 3

GLOBAL SYSTEMS TRACKING notebook computers, internet systems, tablet computers and even smart phones set up to use the connections. Some systems can be set up so that the aircraft hardware automatically generates a position report on an established schedule; recipients are designated by the sender or can log into a network to see those reports – or the system can be set to automatically alert recipients to each update. Some systems can also be programmed to send an alert if the aircraft diverts, is overdue or goes missing. Indeed, some systems allow for the automatic broadcast of an emergency message in the event of a hostile action against the aircraft – an alert that can reach home from the far side of the globe.

HONEYWELL SKY CONNECT Avionics maker Honeywell is among the longer-tenured players in this field, thanks to the company’s early establishment of satellite telecommunications through the early incarnation of the Iridium Satellite Network. Today’s newest version is Honeywell’s Sky Connect Tracker III network. Designed to take advantage of improved bandwidth and a more-robust network, this Iridium satellite-based system supports both aircraft tracking capabilities and direct communications between aircraft and ground contacts. Most recently, Honeywell linked Sky Connect Tracker III with the company’s Zing aircraft health and usage monitoring system (HUMS). The communication capabilities of Sky Connect Tracker III already provide concurrent voice and text communications – plus ongoing flight-tracking of the aircraft. And since Sky Connect employs the Iridium satellite constellation, these network communications capabilities are available between any aircraft anywhere in the world and any ground location capable of connecting to the system.

BLUE SKY NETWORK REALITIES Blue Sky Network is another long-term player, with capabilities developed and implemented more than a decade ago. At the March Heli-Expo in Las Vegas, the company demonstrated its latest global communications solution, the new SkyRouter system. Designed to work in aviation, landmobile and maritime transportation, New SkyRouter offers a feature-rich, cloud-based

fleet management solution designed to enable unbroken connectivity for assets widely dispersed while also providing for a seamless command and control across multiple assettypes and deployments. New SkyRouter is designed to support connectivity with remotely dispersed mobile assets, including Blue Sky Network's advanced Dual-Mode GSM and Iridium tracking and communications services. During Heli-Expo Blue Sky highlighted New SkyRouter’s advanced tracking and fleet management capabilities for helicopter fleets while noting the system’s applicability and suitability to the other transportation modes. Apart from displaying the features of New SkyRouter, the company also showcased its tracking hardware and its hallmark product, HawkEyeLink – a device that connects smartphones and tablets to the Iridium network in the cockpit. Those demonstrations featured global web-based tracking maps that provided aerial views that seamlessly integrated with Google Earth to provide constant trip management and flight play-back.

LATITUDE TECHNOLOGIES EXPANDS Also at Heli-Expo, Latitude Technologies showcased what is called “the industry's first end-to-end HFDM system,” anchored by the company’s established IONode FDM recording and reporting hardware connected through to the IONode Analytics platform. Latitude provides reliable and secure aviation data and communication options for crew safety, fleet logistics, and operations and maintenance efficiency with Web Sentinel flight data management platform for desktops, dispatch centers and mobile devices.

Latitude, based in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, is a vertically integrated manufacturer and provider of flight data, flight following, and satellite communications equipment and services. The company’s SkyNode products are among the most-versatile and economical-to-operate aeronautical communication devices available today. Latitude’s IONode is the industry's first lightweight flight data recorder and advanced data acquisition unit; one capable of real-time event and exceedance alerts to ground stations, as well as automated post-flight wireless data transfer. STCs to install SkyNode and IONode are available for hundreds of fixed- and rotor-wing airframes.

ISOLATION AVAILABLE With such systems making global communication and worldwide connections fast, affordable and seemingly inescapable, the globe is quickly approaching a point at which being out of touch will be the anomaly rather than the norm. But escape and isolation remain possible, one vendor reminded people. When it’s important to be out of touch, desirable to be invisible and incognito, the only solution will soon be the use of the “OFF” switch on the airplane’s airborne global-tracking and communicating gear. But remember that even then, that decision to turn off the system will likely trigger something on the ground – they’ll notice…

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


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MarketIndicators June13_Layout 1 20/05/2013 12:56 Page 1

Market Indicators JETNET View JETNET has released its March 2013 and 1Q 2013 results for the pre-owned business jet, business turboprop, helicopter and commercial airliner markets. Highlighted in the table are key worldwide trends across all aircraft market segments comparing March 2013 to March 2012. Fleet for sale percentages for business jet and business turboprop market sectors were down in the March comparisons, but increased slightly in the helicopter markets. Business jets are showing a slow start in 1Q 2013, with a 4.2% decrease in pre-owned sale transactions, and are taking more time to sell (71 days longer) than last year, with a 3.3% decrease in average asking price. Meanwhile, business turboprops decreased 8.8% in preowned sale transactions, with a double-digit increase in average asking price of 18.7%. Helicopters - both turbine and piston - saw double-digit declines in sale transactions YTD at 34.8% and 21.5% respectively. Turbine helicopters recorded a double-digit decrease in average asking price at 38.4% in the YTD comparisons through March 2013. Commercial airliners are reported by JETNET for the first time and include for sale numbers for both commercial jets (includes

W ORLDW IDE TRENDS B usiness Aircraft

M ARCH In-Operation Fleet For Sale Fleet % For Sale 2013 Fleet % For Sale 2012 % Change For Sale Full Sale Transactions Avg. Days on Market Avg. Ask Price (US$M) Change – Transactions Change – Days on Mkt Change – Asking Price

H elicopters

J ets T urbos J ets T urbos 19,036 13,845 19,142 9,405 2,494 1,079 1,213 582 13.1% 7.8% 6.3% 6.2% 13.8% 9.2% 6.2% 5.9% (-0.7)pt (-1.4)pt (0.1)pt (0.3)pt J ANUARY TO MARCH 2013 526 300 229 194 403 296 434 296 $4.005 $1.559 $0.891 $0.220 Y TD JANUARY TO MARCH 2013 vs 2012 -4.2% -8.8% -34.8% -21.5% 71 -20 25 -30 -3.3% 18.7% -38.4% -1.3%

airliners converted to VIP) and commercial turboprop aircraft. The number of pre-owned commercial jet sale transactions (469 for 1Q 2013) showed a double-digit increase of 21.2% compared to 1Q 2012. However, commercial turboprop sale transactions declined by 25% in

Market Indicators - June 2013

C ommercial A irliners J ets T urbos 24,537 9,603 605 403 2.5% 4.2% n/a n/a

469 452

120 366

21.2% 114

-25.0% 7

the same 1Q comparisons. The average days on the market increased by more than 114 days for commercial airliners, and seven days for commercial turboprop aircraft in the same quarterly comparisons. Both were on the market for more than a year before selling. / More from www.jetnet.com

AMSTAT View the Q4 transaction “pop” that we see most years. So, Light Jet, Medium Jet and turborop activity was down for this period and Heavy Jets were flat. By comparison, Single-engine Helicopters were up 1.8% (vs. 1.4%) and Multi-engines were flat (1.1%). In general, inventories continued to contract. All market segments are nicely down from their 2009 highs, and compared to the end of Q1 2012, this trend continued with the largest drops occurring in the Light Jets (15.5% to 13.7%) and turboprops (9.9% to 8.0%). The exception was the Single-engine Helicopters where the percentage for sale was the same (5.7%). In terms of recent activity, the contraction continued across all segments, with the notable exception of the

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

Medium Jets where inventories increased from 12.3% at the start of Q1 2013 to 12.8% by April 1. Average asking price data also varied between market segments. Between the end of Q1 2012 and the end of Q1 2013, the Heavy Jets (+7.3%) and turboprops (+3.3%) showed increases. By comparison, Light Jets (-7.8%) and Medium Jets (-5.4%) continued to see price erosion during the same period. Year-on-year the Multi-engine Helicopter segment saw a 13.0% decline in average asking prices. By contrast the Single-engine Helicopter asking prices only contracted -1.4% and actually improved a little (+3.6%) during Q1 2013.

/ More from www.amstatcorp.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

According to AMSTAT, the business aircraft resale market trends continued to be a mixed bag in Q1 2013 with no single direction for all market segments. Compared to Q1 2012, retail transactions for all jet segments were up. Light Jets showed the greatest improvement at 2.9% of the active fleet turning over (versus 2.4% in Q1 2012). The turboprops were flat with 2.2% turn-over in both quarters, while both Helicopter segments (Single- and Multi-engine) were up, if only marginally in the case of the Multi-Engines (1.1% vs. 1.0%). When comparing Q1 2013 with Q4 2012, resale retail transaction activity amongst jets and turboprops was generally lower. This is to be expected as 2012 experienced


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Market Indicators

WINGX View In its latest monthly European Business Aviation Monitor, WingX observes the following key points on the market: • There were 54,000 private and charter flight departures in April - more than 10% growth on April 2012. However this Year-Over-Year (YOY) comparison is flattered by Easter falling across March and April in 2013. • To provide insight without distortion, WingX has compared March-April 2013 to March-April 2012. With respect to this two month period, YOY Business Aviation activity in Europe decreased 3.4%. This contraction was slightly less than that experienced in both January and February 2013. • Reflecting the continuing Eurozone recession, flight activity fell most in Western Europe, with declines in Germany and the UK particularly influential. There was a small increase YOY in France.

Unsurprisingly, the period saw heavy falls in Business Aviation flight activity in Italy and Spain. Established growth markets in Scandinavia, Turkey and CIS countries maintained their expansion path. There was strong growth in flight flows between some countries, such as Russia to Turkey. Over the March-April period, flight activity in Eastern Europe fell, but incoming flights from the Middle East, the US, China and West Africa notably increased. Across aircraft size segments, bizliner, ultra-long-range and super midsize jet activity increased, and all light jet activity subsided. Pilatus aircraft, however, bucked the light aircraft trend with activity growth. Bombardier fleet activity continued to grow impressively, generated by charter demand. At the heaviest and lightest ends of the market, ACJ and

Eclipse aircraft posted big activity increases. Cessna’s XLS fleet is an industry bellwether, with its continuing decline in activity. The Mustang, leading the VLJ segment, is holding its own with strong private flight demand. The most significant activity growth across the fleet was generated by Global Express aircraft.

“The year on year increase in April was flattered by Easter falling earlier this year,” concluded Richard Koe, Managing Director, WINGX Advance. “Discounting this effect by looking at the March-April period, we are losing activity. There are bright spots, such as jet activity out of Russia, charter traffic in Ukraine, private flying on VLJs, and standout demand for Bombardier aircraft. But Business Aviation in Europe won’t see light at the end of the tunnel until we’re into an economic recovery.” / More from www.wingx-advance.com

Market Indicators - June 2013

JP MORGAN View Inventory remains elevated for younger jets; used pricing has not bottomed; and flight operations are barely growing in the US and shrinking in Europe. The Chinese government’s austerity campaign is another concern. Business jets do not appear to be a target thus far, but this could change, depressing demand at least for a time in an important growth market. JP Morgan estimates that China (including Hong Kong and Macau) took 6% of new deliveries during the 2010-2012 period, including 17% of Gulfstream deliveries. Q1 deliveries probably will not be overly impressive given the atmosphere outlined above along with cautious anecdotal commentary from management teams and industry participants. JP Morgan can see the

market recovering in future quarters enough to overcome a weak Q1, but it does not expect cuts to 2013 delivery forecasts at this point although cautious commentary and mediocre order metrics are expected. Used inventories were down 20 bps in March. The used inventory of in-production models fell to 10.2%, the bottom of the 10.211.2% range in which inventories have hovered since the start of 2011, and we could soon see inventory break below 10% for the first time since September 2008. Light jets drove the March decline, falling 60 bps, while inventories for Heavy jets (+10 bps) and Medium jets (+20 bps) were marginally higher. Inventory for the “toddler and pre-K” fleet (aircraft 0-5 years old) remains elevated at an estimated 7.7%, and this is a reason to

/ More from www.jpmorgan.com

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

discount the impact that falling overall inventory could have on demand for new aircraft. Used pricing weakened further, falling for the eighth time in 12 months. Persistent declines have been a signal that new demand would remain weak, and judging by recent readings a near term recovery is unlikely. Prices fell by 60 bps for Heavy jets in March and by 80 bps for Medium jets, while Light jet pricing improved by 0.2%. Flight ops improvement took a modest step backward in February. The headline number for US flight ops was a 3.8% decline, and while this converts to only a 0.4% decline when adjusting for the extra day last year due to the leap year, it still represents a slowdown from the low singledigit gains from Oct 2012 through Jan 2013.

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Market Indicators

LONDON OXFORD View London Oxford Airport retained its status as one of the UK’s top tier airports for Business Aviation in 2012. In terms of movements it is now ranked fifth in the Eurocontrol’s annual statistics report. Daily BizAv movements since the UK’s pre-recession peak in 2007 have grown by almost 98% (see table right).

LONDON REGION AIRPORT DAILY BIZAV DEPARTURES (2006–2012) NAME

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Luton Farnborough Biggin Hill Northolt Oxford London City Stansted Cambridge Gatwick Heathrow Southend Cranfield Lydd Manston Total London Region

37.7 26 13.7 10.8 3.2 17.3 8 2.5 2.9 3.7 2.5 1.2 0.3 0.7

43.1 32.4 18.1 10.4 4.1 18.3 9.1 3.2 2.7 3.4 2.7 1.4 0.5 0.8

38.7 29.8 17.3 9.6 5.6 13.2 8.5 3.2 2.7 3.5 1.9 1.5 0.6 0.9

29.5 26.2 12.7 8.5 5.7 10.2 6 3 2.4 4.4 1.5 1.2 0.6 0.7

33.7 27.1 13.2 9.7 7 9.9 6.6 2.8 2.6 3.8 1.6 1.2 0.6 0.7

34.4 26.9 14.9 11 7.9 8.8 6.2 2.7 2.4 3.1 1 1.2 0.7 0.7

33.8 26.2 15.2 10.6 8.1 7.7 7.2 2.8 2.5 2.2 1.6 1.1 0.6 0.5

131

150

137

113

121

122

120

Change Since 2007 -21.58% -19.14% -16.02% 1.92% 97.56% -57.92% -20.88% -12.50% -7.41% -35.29% -40.74% -21.43% 20.00% -37.50%

Annual BizAv Movements 24,674 19,126 11,096 7,738 5,913 5,621 5,256 2,044 1,825 1,606 1,168 803 438 365 87,673

Source: Eurocontrol OneSky Database for year end, each year since 2006.

Market Indicators - June 2013

/ More from www.oxfordjet.com

FOLEY View It should come as no surprise that the private aviation industry hasn’t improved much in Western Europe over the past year. Amid austerity measures and weak economic news, there has been a cautious hesitance to take on the discretionary costs associated with private air travel. “The situation will drag on a bit longer,” predicts aviation advisor Brian Foley. “But one shouldn’t lose perspective that Europe still remains the second largest Business Aviation market.” According to AMSTAT, the Western European business jet fleet has shrunk two percent since this time last year. About three quarters of the jets leaving the area went to North America, an indicator that the market has

been improving there. The prolonged European slowdown has seen both the small and midsize cabin fleet shrink 10% from their respective 2011 and 2010 peaks. In contrast, the large cabin fleet population actually increased 70% since 2007, growing from 493 aircraft to today’s 837. Foley’s local sources note some other interesting market shifts. For example, those chartering big cabin aircraft have continued to do so since they’ve had adequate financial resources to stay the course all along. However the smaller entities which typically chartered medium-sized jets are now chartering smaller ones, and many of those who once chartered small-cabin jets have left the market for now. In the process, the mid-sized charter jet has

/ More from www.brifo.com

Market Indicators - June 2013

ARGUS View TRAQPak data shows that April 2013 flight activity levels decreased slightly from March (which is the normal trend), finishing the month down 1.9% overall. The results by operational category were mixed with Part 91 activity posting the only month-over-month increase, up 1.3%. Aircraft category results were down across the board with turboprops posting the smallest month-over-month decrease, down 1.1%. Reviewing year-over-year activity (April 2013 vs. April 2012), TRAQPak data indicates

a very slight decrease of Turboprop 0.4% overall. The results Small Cabin Jet Mid-Size Cabin Jet by operational category Large Cabin Jet indicate Part 135 activity A ll Combined posted a year-over-year increase of 10.5%. Part 91 Turboprop and fractional markets Small Cabin Jet posted year-over-year deMid-Size Cabin Jet creases of 3.2% and 10.6% Large Cabin Jet A ll Combined respectively. Looking at activity by aircraft category, the turboprop segment showed the only de-

A PRIL 2013 vs MARCH 2013 P art 91 P art 135 F ractional -0.5% -2.0% -2.1% -0.4% -4.4% -8.6% 4.2% -4.9% -8.8% 4.4% -8.4% -15.7% 1 .3% - 4.2% - 8.6% A PRIL 2013 vs APRIL 2012 P art 91 P art 135 F ractional -7.5% 2.7% -22.6% -2.8% 12.1% -12.6% -0.4% 20.4% -8.4% 3.6% 9.3% 1.6% - 3.2% 1 0.5% - 10.6%

A ll -1.1% -2.6% -2.2% -2.0% - 1.9% A ll -5.7% 1.0% 2.5% 4.9% - 0.4%

cline, finishing the month down 5.7%. Yearto-date, flight activity has declined 1.4%. / More from www.argus.aero

Market Indicators - June 2013 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

been caught in the middle forcing owners to store or put the airplane up for sale as opportunities to charter it out have declined. Given all of the financial turmoil that’s occurred in the last 12 months it’s reassuring to note that while the market has been slow, it has at least remained relatively stable over the past few years. Many in the region believe it could take another 2-3 years to get back on a growth course. “Europe will eventually come back, but not to its previous prominence,” Foley concludes. “In our forecast all of Europe accounts for 19% of future jet deliveries, down from 25% in the previous decade. That difference has largely been ceded to Asia which has shown steadily increasing market potential.”

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BizAv Round-Up

06.13

NEWS ROUND-UP 328 Support GmbH had three reasons to be cheerful recently. The final aircraft in a series of three Dornier 328 jet conversions was delivered to Nigerian charter company SkyBird Air in early April. The latest delivery completes a contract worth over 14 million Euros in total. In all, the refurbishments involved two 32-seat passenger airliner conversions and a VIP configured 328DBJ TM. / More from www.328.eu or www.jets.eu SKYBIRD CABIN

Aircell has named five organizations to receive the company’s highest dealer honor for 2012, The Aircell 51,000 Five Award. Recipients were Constant Aviation (Cleveland, OH); Duncan Aviation (Lincoln, NE and Battle Creek, MI); Gulfstream Aerospace (Savannah, GA); Jet Aviation (St. Louis, MO); and StandardAero (Springfield, IL). / More from www.aircell.com

Bombardier Aerospace continues to expand its worldwide customer services network with the appointment of Harrods Aviation Limited as an Authorized Service Facility (ASF) for business aircraft customers based in, or flying to Europe. The new ASF in London Luton, United Kingdom will be capable of performing line maintenance for Challenger 300 and Challenger 605 aircraft and line and heavy maintenance for Global business aircraft. / More from www.bombardier.com

Conklin & de Decker has released the

“I’VE FOUND THE BIRD” Five decades ago, a Pan Am delegation headed to France led by Charles Lindbergh, mandated by CEO Juan Trippe to find the right aircraft to equip Pan Am’s new executive aviation division. Lindbergh quickly wired back “I’ve found the bird”, and the Mystère 20 subsequently became the first Falcon Jet to be introduced to America. The Mystère 20 was born on the pages of a

notebook belonging to Paul Déplante, engineering director of Dassault’s plant in Bordeaux-Mérignac. In November 1961, Déplante drew a simple ink sketch, a cutaway of an aircraft cabin, with two rear-mounted engines. Two years later, in April 1963, s/n 001, the prototype, rolled off the production line. In 1971, FedEx founder Frederick Smith selected the Mystère 20, by then re-

Dassault has confirmed that the two newest members of the Falcon family, the Falcon 2000S and Falcon 2000LXS have been certificated by the FAA. / More from www.dassaultfalcon.com

/ More from www.conklindd.com

/ More from www.eagle-creek.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Eagle Creek Aviation announced that it has received the 2012 Twin Commander Service Center of the Year Platinum Award. The award represents the highest level of recognition for outstanding support and leadership in servicing the Twin Commander aircraft fleet.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

/ More information from www.dassaultfalcon.com

DASSAULT FALCON 2000LXS

Aircraft Cost Evaluator 2013 Volume I, delivering the most up-to-date benchmarking, operating, and ownership cost data available to the aviation industry. Aircraft Cost Evaluator is a flagship product from Conklin & de Decker enabling users to make critical decisions on aircraft acquisitions whether they are downsizing to a smaller asset or upgrading to a larger aircraft purchase or trade.

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named the Falcon 20 as the basis for his fledgling overnight freight service. In the years since its introduction more than 450 Falcon 20s were built and Dassault continued to make inroads into business jet manufacturing that provided the platform for today’s high-end market offerings from the company.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BusAviationNewsJune 13_Layout 1 20/05/2013 14:13 Page 2

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BizAv Round-Up Embraer Executive Jets delivered the first of up to 125 Phenom 300 light jets to NetJets recently. “The NetJets delivery is a significant milestone in the Phenom 300 program,” said Ernest Edwards, President, Embraer. “We are especially pleased that we will begin producing the NetJets’ Signature Series Phenom 300s on the Melbourne production line in 2014.”

EMBRAER EXECUTIVES MARCO TULIO PELLEGRINI, SENIOR VP AND COO, ERNEST EDWARDS, PRESIDENT (HANDING THE KEYS TO NETJETS CHAIRMAN AND CEO JORDAN HANSELL), AND CHUCK SUMA, SENIOR VP GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT.

/ More from www.embraerexecutivejets.com

Flying Colours Corp. has been appointed by Beechcraft as an Authorized Service Center (ASC) for the entire King Air, Baron and Bonanza product lines. The new service centre status for the Ontario location will offer Canadian owners of these models a convenient one-stop center for all their aircraft service requirements as Flying Colours Corp. can provide maintenance, modifications, refurbishment and paint work services under the terms of the ASC. In other news, Flying Colours expanded its CRJ conversion program beyond executive aircraft. It is presently a third of the way through an extensive schedule which will see eight CRJ 200 regional airliners converted into sixteen seat Executive Shuttle configuration for an undisclosed client. / More from www.flyingcolourscorp.com

Meridian Teterboro has once again been voted # 1 FBO in the US by FlightPlan.com, and is the top ranked FBO at Teterboro Airport (TEB) in the AIN and ProPilot surveys. Betsy Wines was voted # 1 Best Customer Service Representative (CSR) for the 15th year. Victor Seda, close behind, earned the # 4 spot. Now, for the 7th year in a row Meridian Teterboro has had two CSRs in the top five slots.

CESSNA M2

NEW SOVEREIGN & M2 PROGRAM ADVANCES CESSNA PRODUCTION TO CUT CLOTH ACCORDINGLY  Cessna's New Citation Sovereign recently made its first production flight, lasting a little more than two and a half hours and including tests of the Garmin G5000 avionics with auto throttles, autopilot, engine system, aircraft systems and instrument approaches. Winglets have been added to the New Sovereign ensuring its capability of reaching a top speed of 458kts, contributing to an increased range, and enabling a direct climb to 45,000 feet. In addition, the first production unit of the new Citation M2 has reached the significant milestone of wing and fuselage mat-

ing. Certification is expected in the second half of 2013. Developed with input from the already strong Citation Mustang customer base, the engineering in this aircraft reflects the customers' desires, resulting in a larger and faster jet with a greater range. The latest progress in Cessna’s developmental jet programs would back CEO Scott Ernest, as reported in The Wichita Eagle, when he spoke to reassure 400 Citation owners at a conference last month that, despite speculation, the company is not halting production on its jet products. “Let me be clear,” Ernest said

nation’s best aviation operations. The Wilson Air Center chain (Memphis, Charlotte, Houston, and Chattanooga) has been voted #1 six times in the last seven years.

/ More from www.meridian.aero

Wilson Air Center has again been voted the #1 Best Small Chain in Professional Pilot Magazine’s 2013 Preferences Regarding Aviation Services and Equipment (PRASE) survey. In this annual survey, Professional Pilot Magazine asks its readers, which includes pilots, aircraft owners, passengers and flight crews, to vote on the 130

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

DAVID IVEY VICE PRESIDENT (LEFT) AND BOB WILSON, PRESIDENT.

/ More from www.wilsonair.com

www.AvBuyer.com

in a statement reiterating his remarks, “we are not halting production; we are simply reducing our production levels to meet current demand.” Recently, Scott Donnelly, CEO of Textron, Cessna’s parent company, told analysts that Cessna is cutting production this year because of weak demand in its light jet products despite traditional leading economic indicators, such as corporate profits, looking better. In a conference call with analysts, Donnelly said the company planned to “shut down” various portions of the production line. / More from www.cessna.com or www.kansas.com

TAG Farnborough Airport and TAG Aviation Geneva, both part of TAG Group, have placed first and second respectively in the Aviation International News (AIN) International FBO Survey 2013. It is the seventh consecutive time TAG Farnborough Airport has been voted ‘International FBO of the Year’ and a yearon-year success for TAG Aviation Geneva, which placed fourth in 2012. TAG Farnborough Airport is biennial host to the Farnborough International Airshow, and Farnborough itself is the birthplace of British aviation as the location for the first British powered flight in 1908. / More from www.tagfarnborough.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Tianjing Show June_Layout 1 21/05/2013 12:31 Page 1


BusAviationNewsJune 13_Layout 1 20/05/2013 14:14 Page 3

3

BizAv Arrivals

Jenny Estes has been promoted to the position of sales manager, Light Aircraft Branch on behalf of NationAir Aviation Insurance. Estes previously served as Van's Program Manager for NationAir's successful Van's RV aircraft program.

David Armstrong

Alan Barnes

Keith Garner

David Armstrong - is the newly-appointed vice president of sales for the Light and Mid-size Aircraft Division at Embraer Executive Jets.

Keith Garner - joins Embraer Executive Jets as vice president, sales for the Large and Ultra-Large Aircraft Division. He has held toplevel management positions with several business aircraft manufacturers. He also previously served as president of Greenwich Aero Group. Skip Madsen - has joined Landmark Aviation as vice president of

Susan Aselage has been named president at Sabreliner Corpora-

MRO. Before joining Landmark, Madsen was the vice president of MRO operations for Jet Aviation.

tion. Aselage additionally serves as vice chairman and vice president, secretary and assistant treasurer.

Greg Sahr is the new President, Elliott Aviation. In his new role,

Alan Barnes has joined 328 Group-owned JETS as managing director from Inflite Jet Centre, where he was Customer Support Manager.

Sahr will focus on strengthening the Elliott Aviation brand, enhancing the customer experience, increasing efficiencies, solidifying industry partnerships and developing new business opportunities. He was previously Vice President of Sales, Marketing and Business Development.

AEA APPOINTMENTS Members of the Aircraft Electronics Association recently elected new representatives to its board of directors, and the AEA board of directors elected a new chairman and new vice chairman. The new AEA chairman is Gary Harpster, a senior avionics sales representative for Duncan Aviation. David Loso, manager of avionics sales for Jet Aviation St. Louis, was elected by the board to serve as its new vice chairman. Meanwhile, the following members were also elected to serve for a three-year term April 2013 to April 2016:

• • • • • • •

Chuck Freeland, Otto Instrument Service Tom Harper, Avidyne Garry Joyce, IAE Michael Kus, Avionics 2000 Mike LaConto, Epps Aviation Rick Peavley, Vero Beach Avionics Brian Wilson, Banyan Air Services.

BizAv Events 2013 AEROEXPO UK JETNET IQ GLOBAL BUSINESS AVIATION SUMMIT NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION REGIONAL FORUM CANNES AIRSHOW ROTARY OPERATIONS CONFERENCE MIDDLE EAST CORPORATE AVIATION SUMMIT NBAA: FLIGHT OPERATIONS MANUAL WORKSHOP PARIS AIR SHOW NBAA: MANG FUNDAMENTALS FOR FLIGHT DEPTS NBAA: FLIGHT ATTENDANTS/TECHNICIANS CONFERENCE IRISH BUSINESS AVIATION CONVENTION NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION REGIONAL FORUM EAA: AIRVENTURE OSHKOSH AEA (AIRCRAFT ELECTRONICS ASSOCIATION MEETING) BOMBARDIER SAFETY STANDDOWN LABACE: (LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS AV CONF & EX) BUSINESS AVIATION IN LATIN AMERICA (BALA) AEA (AIRCRAFT ELECTRONICS ASSOCIATION MEETING) Events in RED indicate Business Aviation related.

May 31 – Jun 2 Jun 4 – 5 Jun 6 Jun 6 – 8 Jun 12 Jun 13 Jun 17 – 18 Jun 17 – 23 Jun 19 – 20 Jun 21 – 22 Jun 26 – 27 Jul 11 Jul 29 – Aug 4 Aug 12 - 13 Aug 12 - 13 Aug 14 – 16 Aug 15 Aug 27 - 28

Sywell, Northants, UK New York, NY, USA White Plains, NY, USA Cannes, France London Heliport, UK Abu Dhabi, UAE Washington DC, USA Le Bourget, France Washington DC, USA Washington DC, USA Shannon Airport, Ireland Denver, CO, USA Oshkosh, WI, USA Sao Paulo, Brazil Sao Paulo, Brazil Sao Paulo, Brazil Sao Paulo, Brazil Ottawa, Canada

/ www.expo.aero/uk / www.jetnet.com / www.nbaa.org / www.cannesairshow.com / www.miuevents.com / www.aeropodium.com / www.nbaa.org / www.paris-air-show.com / www.nbaa.org / www.nbaa.org / www.miuevents.com / www.nbaa.org / www.airventure.org / www.aea.net / www.safetystanddown.com / www.abag.org.br / www.aeropodium.com / www.aea.net

If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com

COMPARE AIRCRAFT FOR SALE USING OUR

Aircraft Comparative Facility at www.AvBuyer.com Whilst selecting from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 132

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Project1_Layout 1 20/03/2013 14:07 Page 1


Florida Jet June_Avaitrade 21/05/2013 12:03 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1995 Dassault Falcon 900B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

140 N140FJ 6628.7 3078

• 14 Passenger Interior • Forward & Aft Lavs • GoGo WiFi • LED Lighting • New soft goods and veneer May 2013 • New Plating and Switching • New 17” HD Monitors with dual BluRay DVD/CD Players • New iCabin server stores 400 movies & 15,000 songs for 15 iPads • Aircell Axxess II Dual Line Sat Phone • Engines & APU on MSP • 6630.0 Total Time • 3079 Cycles • 1B, C, 3C Completed February 2013 at Standard Aero

Engines Garrett TFE 731-5BR-1C - Engines enrolled on MSP Gold with DEEC’s S/N: P101218/P101222/P101220 Hours: 6508/5938/6508 Cycles: 2998/2736/2998 APU Garrett GTCP 36-150F S/N: P257 Hours: 3370 TT on MSP Gold

Avionics Autopilot Dual Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS, Comm Triple Collins VHF22C w/ 8.33 spacing, Navs Dual Collins VIR 32 w/ FM immunity, ADF Dual Collins ADF 60, DME Dual Collins DME 42, Transponder Dual Collins TDR 94D w/mode S & Enhanced Flight ID, HF Dual King KHF 953 w/ SELCAL, EFIS Honeywell EDZ 820 5 tube, IRS Triple Honeywell LASEREF II, RAD ALT Honeywell RT-300, WX Radar Collins WXR 870 w/2 RCU’s, TAWS Allied Signal MK V w/Windshear & Terrain Display, Phone Dual Line Aircell Access Iridium Satphone, TCAS Collins TTR-920 w/Change 7, FDR Fairchild F-800, Universal CVR-30A, FMS Dual Honeywell NZ 2000 w/ 5.0 software, DL-950, ELT Airtex C406-1, GPS Dual 12 Channel

addition, new MCCI switch panels. A state-ofthe-art entertainment system includes a 17” HD monitor in the aft cabin and 17” HD monitor in the forward cabin, with a Blue Ray DVD/CD player for each monitor, new speakers and amplifiers, iPod docking station, and audio switches, Airshow 400 Moving Map System. New up wash, down wash, lav indirect, and galley LED Lighting. The iCABIN in-flight entertainment and cabin management system allows you to simultaneously stream movies to up to 16 iPads. A new dual line Aircell Access Iridium satellite phone system with GoGo high speed internet installed to help you get more done in the sky

Interior A 14 passenger interior features a forward four place club, mid cabin four place conference group with Hi/Lo table w/extension opposite the credenza with a kibitzer, and aft dual three place berthable divans with a privacy bulkhead. Forward galley with bulkhead pocket door, a forward and aft lavatory. The interior was refurbished with new soft goods, wood veneer, and plating, as well as a new single cup coffee maker. In

Asking Price: Call!

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406

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Exterior Exterior paint is in like new condition, repainted by Standard Aero SPI

All Trades Considered

Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Florida Jet June_Avaitrade 21/05/2013 12:04 Page 2

S H O W C A S E

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

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2 Starbase 13 Lear60XR 423 WAS June 22/05/2013 15:38 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2013 Lear 60XR Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

423 N760AA Factory New

• Factory New, AVAILABLE TODAY • Pratt & Whitney Engines on MSP Gold • Full Factory Warranty • Bombardier Smart Parts • Airshow Cabin Information System • Touch Screen Cabin Management • Aircell Axxcess SATCOM Phone System • High-Speed Broadband w/Wi-Fi (option) • Seven Place Executive Interior • Trades Welcome

This aircraft qualifies for Starbase Jet’s optional Turn Key Management program including Guaranteed Charter

Starbase Jet Aviation www.starbasejet.com

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Contact: Blair Descourouez Cell: (214) 354-2738 blair@starbasejet.com Contact: Randall Mize Cell: (214) 676-6975 rmize@starbasejet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


2 Starbase 98 Lear60 143 WAS June 22/05/2013 15:39 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1998 Lear 60 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

0143 N143AA 4850 3283

This aircraft qualifies for Starbase Jet’s optional Turn Key Management program including Guaranteed Charter

• No Damage History • Pratt & Whitney ESP Gold • Bombardier Smart Parts • 12 Year Completed July 2010 • In-Flight Phone Satcom Aircell Axxess • Airshow 400 • Titanium Flap Brackets • Three Rotor Brakes with Smart Stems • Beautiful Eight (8) Passenger Interior • Private Enclosed Lavatory • Trades Welcome

Starbase Jet Aviation www.starbasejet.com

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Contact: Blair Descourouez Cell: (214) 354-2738 blair@starbasejet.com Contact: Randall Mize Cell: (214) 676-6975 rmize@starbasejet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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AeroSmith Penny June 21/05/2013 12:14 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1999 Gulfstream IVSP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1337 N52MK 4504 2573

Airframe & Engines Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 Engines: Mid-Life Inspection C/W at Rolls-Royce Canada: 17/Sep/2007 L/H Engine S/N: 16795 Mid-life done at 3061 TT 1865 Cycles Enrolled JSSI at Mid Life R/H Engine S/N: 16796 Mid-life done at 3061 TT 1865 cycles Enrolled JSSI at Mid Life Honeywell GTCP 36-100 (G) APU S/N: P-741, on JSSI Avionics HAAP and Corporate Jet Support Maintenance Programs Standard Honeywell SPZ 8400 Cockpit Package w/NZ 2000 Navs Triple Honeywell HG1075 Inertial Reference Units Dual Honeywell FMS and Single Lasertrak Nav Display Collins Nav/Comm Package with Three Comm’s, w/Dual Collins RTU’s Collins TDR 94 Transponders with Eight Parameter Enhanced Surveillance SAT AFIS Equipped with Printer Magnastar & Honeywell SATCOM 6000, One Cockpit and Three Cabin Handsets G-Monitor Computer Heads-up Checklist Flight Data Recorder 2 Hour Voice Recorder

Features & Equipement Airshow Genesis Moving Map/Info Four External Video Cameras Dual Hi-Def/Blue Ray DVD Players Audio System with iPod Dock and Remote Control Game Port Connections and LAN Connections Throughout Eight Rosen Video Monitors; VCR/DVD/Camera/Game and Airshow Available Six Club Seat Rosen Monitors Updated to 6500 Series in March 2007 Interior The 13 passenger executive interior was designed for functionality and flexibility with three separate seating areas making it ideal for entertaining or conducting business. The aircraft is configured with a forward crew lav as well as an aft passenger lavatory. The forward cabin contains four single seats in a double-club configuration with two pull out writing tables and four 5.6 inch video monitors. Exterior Matterhorn White base with Super Jet Black underside, Coral, Cashmere and Gray striping. New April 2012 Maintenance 72 Month inspection done 2010

AeroSmith Penny II LLC 8031 Airport Blvd., Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061

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Tel: +1 (713) 649-6100 Fax: +1 (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com www.aerosmithpenny.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Dassault 900EX Easy June 21/05/2013 12:16 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Falcon 900EX EASy II Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

162 N876C 3614 1544

Engine Type Honeywell TFE731-60 (On MSP) APU (s/n P493 ): Honeywell GTCP36-150(F) (On MSP) Maintenance CAMP. C Inspection and Landing Gear Dimensional Corrosion Inspection complied with August 2012 Interior Light Beige leather seats, Tan leather lower sidewalls, Ivory headliner, Beige and light Blue designer wool carpet, Quarter Figure Makore veneer with dark stain, brushed aluminum plating (Original) Seating 12 passengers; 4 forward club seats, 4 midcabin club seats, aft 3-place divan with opposing executive seat, forward and aft lavatory, folding (floor) third crewmember seat Avionics Honeywell Primus Epic System EASy II (Baseline – without options) Flight Management System - triple Honeywell EASy Global Positioning System - dual Honeywell VHF Communication Systems - triple Honeywell TR-866B VOR/ILS/Marker Navigation System - dual Honeywell NV-875A

DME Systems - dual Honeywell DM-855 ADF Systems - dual Honeywell DF-855 Mode S Transponder System - dual Honeywell XS-857A TCAS II System - Honeywell TCAS-2000 (Change 7) Color Weather Radar System - Honeywell Primus 880 Communication Management Function Honeywell EASy SATCOM Aero H+/Swift Broadband Honeywell MCS-7120 (installed August 2012) HF Communication Systems - dual Collins HF9000 Micro Inertial Reference System - triple Honeywell Laseref V Enhanced Ground Proximity & Windshear Warning System – Honeywell EASy Radio Altimeter System – Honeywell RT-300 Cockpit Voice Recorder – Honeywell SSCVR (120 minutes) Flight Data Recorder – Honeywell SSFDR Data Acquisition & Central Maintenance Computer – Honeywell EASy Additional Equipment Honeywell: 20 inch LCD monitor, DVD-C player, three AV-900 Flight Deck Audio, Selcal, DL-700 Data Management Unit, LSS-860 Lightning Sensor System. Honeywell EASy: Electronic Jeppesen Charts. Miltope printer, Meggitt MK2 Secondary Flight Display, ELTA ADT-406 (tri-frequency), NAV interface to ELT, Airshow 410, Rosen plug-in receptacle for an 8.4 inch LCD monitor, 115 cubic inch oxygen bottle

www.falconjet.com/preowned

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Mark Verdesco: Director, Pre-owned Aircraft Sales USA Tel: + (1) (201) 541-4556 Tel: + (1) (201)-541-4620 E-mail: preowned@falconjet.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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AeroAir June 21/05/2013 12:18 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Challenger 601-3R Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5191 N605T 6085 2801

Engines Left: S/N: 807347 - 6085 TTSN - 2797 TCSN Right: S/N: 807348 - 6085 TTSN - 2797 TCSN APU Garret GTCP36-150: 1545 Hours On MSP Avionics Honeywell Primus II System; Honeywell AFIS/VHF SATCOM; Dual Honeywell HF; Dual Collins ALT-55B Rad Alt; Dual Honeywell RCZ-833J Coms; Honeywell WU 880 Radar; Dual Honeywell RNZ-850 VHF Navs; Dual Honeywell DI-851 DME; Dual Honeywell Mode S Transponders; Baker Audio Amplifier; Dual NZ-2000 FMS w/Update; Honeywell Mark V EGPWS; L3 TCASII, TCZ-910 w/Change 7; Fairchild A100A CVR; Fairchild F1000 FDR; Honeywell SPZ 8000 Autopilot; Heads Up CMS-400 Voice System; 406Mhz Elt. Interior New in 2004: 10 place with normal four place forward club, aft four place divan across from two place club, or 12 place with second four place divan

installed in place of aft two place club. Galley has forward w/convection oven, microwave oven, coffee maker, large cold storage, separate clean ice drawer. Phone is Aircell system, 3 lines (1 is dual Aircell/Iridium), conference calling capability, (Aircraft is provisiioned for Honeywell MCS 3000 Sat-Comm), FAX/Printer Cabin Information System is Airshow Genises w/Briefer. Entertainment has DVD six disk changer with 2 screens 14" & 15", and CD player w/10 disk changer and full rnage speaker system w/subwoofer. Also forward jump seat. Aft lav with 10 gal water system. Emergency equipment consists of fourteen life vests, two twelve man life rafts. Interior and exterior exceptionally well cared for. Exterior New in 2004. White top with blue bottom and three silver pin strips down the side. Maintenance CIMMS enrolled since new. SMART PARTS with SUPPLEMENTAL AVIONICS coverage. Empty Weight: 25503 BOW: 26597

Make Offer

Aero Air, LLC 2050 NE 25th Avenue Hillsboro, OR 97124-5964

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Tel: +1 503 640 3711 Fax: +1 503 681 6513 Email: nralston@aeroair.com www: www.aeroair.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Air Fleet Leasing June 22/05/2013 15:32 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Hawker 850XP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

258781 A6-ELC 2,381 1,084

Engines Honeywell TFE-731-5BR TIME CYCLES Engine #1 2,229 hours 1,026 Engine #2 2,306 hours 1,053 MSP / Fresh, shop visits APU Honeywell GTCP-36-150W - 2320 TSN MSP / Fresh, shop visits Avionics Communications: (2) Collins VHF 4000 (1 Collins HF 9000 with SELCAL Navigation (VHF): (2) Collins NAV 4000/4500 all + ADF

Flight Director: (1) Collins PROLINE 21-FOUR TUBE Flight Management System: (2) Collins FMS 6000 Auto Pilot: (2) Collins FGC-3000 (Cat. II) Long Range Navigation: (2) Collins GPS 4000A AHARS: (2) Collins AHC-3000 Radar: (1) Collins Color TWR 850 with Turbulence Transponder: (2) Collins TDR-94D TCAS II: (1) Collins TCAS 4000 Enhanced Ground Prox. Warn: (1) Honeywell Mark V+TAWS, wind shear DME: (2) Collins DME 4000 Air Data Computer: (2) Collins ADC 3000 w/ RVSM Interior The 8-passenger interior is divided into two four-place seating groups: the forward section consists of four individual club chairs with side executive foldaway writing tables; the aft section consists of a side facing three-

place divan opposite a single club chair. Other features: Center seat cushion of Divan folds out to table, optional under-seat stowage and drop down seat rests. All upholstery is leather with wool carpet and color coordinated sidewalls and trim with recessed lighting. The Lavatory has a belted seat allowing an extra passenger or Flight Attendant for a total of 9-passengers and 2-crew Aircraft Condition and Maintenance The aircraft has recently emerged from post-lease maintenance for fresh airframe inspections as well as early shop visits for both engines and APU. The Aircraft emerged from maintenance on the week of April 22, 2013, and is in excellent mechanical condition. Please contact AFL for further details

Price: (please make cash offer for immediate sale)

Two Corporate Owners Since New

Boeing 727-100REW “Super 27” Long Range Executive Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

20512 N311AG 31,876 17,343

Engines Pratt & Whitney #1, #3: JT8D-217C, #2: JT8D-9A3 TIME CYCLES Engine #1 5,627 1,683 Engine #2 32,426 45,000 Engine #3 5,627 1,683 APU Garrett GTCP-85-98C TIME CYCLES Since HSI: 2,945 2,740 Since new: 5,233 4,267 Avionics Communications: (2) Honeywell Primus 2 - VHF

For further details please contact: Daniel E Boyajian

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

(1) Collins VHF-22B – VHF (2) Collins HF-628 with SELCAL (5) Honeywell Audio Panels (Primus 2) (1) Aircell Iridium– phone + ICS (3 phones) (1) Honeywell AFIS Navigation (VHF): (2) Honeywell Primus2: VOR, ILS, DME Instrument Panel Display: (5) Tube EFIS – EDZ-805 Autopilot / Flight Director: (2) Honeywell FMS FMZ 2000 (1) Flight Management System: (2) Honeywell Long Range Navigation: (3) Honeywell IRS Laseref (2 Honeywell GPS (1) Honeywell Laser Trak w/ Display Weather Radar: (1) Honeywell Primus P880 (color) Transponder: (2) Honeywell – Mode S (enhanced) TCAS II: (1) Honeywell w/ change 7 Interior There are two galleys: forward (crew) and mid-cabin (main). The three lavatories are located forward, mid-cabin

Air Fleet Leasing and Management Company, Inc. 1209 Ward Avenue – Suite 100 West Chester, PA 19380 www.AvBuyer.com

and aft. In-cabin baggage storage is conveniently located at the rear air-stair boarding area and forward vestibule. Large volume baggage stowage is located in the lower cargo bay with external access. There are eight (8) Aircraft Crewmember positions located on the flight deck for Captain, First Officer, Engineer and Observer; in the forward vestibule with bulkhead seats for two Cabin Attendants Aircraft Condition and Maintenance This Aircraft is efficiently maintained under the FAA approved Centurion Aircraft Maintenance Services MSG-3 program, which includes 24-month C-check intervals and progressive inspections for low utilization. LR Tanks recently re-certified

Price: (please make cash offer for immediate sale) Tel: +1 (0) 610-436-4875 Fax: +1 (0) 610-436-1185 Mob: +1 (0) 610-547-2311 E-mail: DEB@airfleetsales.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Chuck Collins Gulfstream G400 June 23/05/2013 14:56 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2003 Gulfstream G 400 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1504 N902L 3,220.4 1,381

Engines Eng #1: 3.220.4 since New. 18 since Midlife-Jan. 2013 Eng #2: 3,220.4 since New. 18 since Midlife-Jan. 2013 Avionics Collins Pro Line IV Avionics Suite with Honeywell SPZ 8400 Flight Control System w/6-Tube EFIS system, Altitude Alert and Preselect, Dual Honeywell AZ-810 Digital Air Data Computer Triple Collins Pro Line IV VHF 422 Communication Transceivers with 8.33 MHz Dual Collins Pro Line IV VIR 432 VOR/LOC/GLS/MKR Receivers w/FM immunity Triple Honeywell FMZ-2000 FMS w/dual GPS and triple LaserRef II IRU Dual Collins Pro Line IV TDR 94D Xpdr Dual Collins Pro Line IV ADF 462 Dual Collins Pro Line IV DME-442 Dual Honeywell HF-9000 HF Systems Dual Collins AA-300RadioAltimeters Fairchild A-100 Cockpit Voice Recorder Fairchild 1000 FDR Flight Data Recorder Honeywell Primus 880 Radar w/Turbulence Honeywell MCS 7000 SATCOM Honeywell TCAS 2000 TCAS II Honeywell HUD-2020 Heads Up Display AlliedSignal (AFIS) BF Goodrich ADI-335 Attitude Indicator

SATCOM MCS 7000 EVS Enhanced Visual System Honeywell Heads up Display Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Gold, Orange and Blue with factory horizontal Stripes, Painted in October 2008 by Gulfstream Aerospace, Paint is Excellent Interior Gulfstream Aerospace best selling Executive 14 passenger floor plan. This FAR Part 135 fireblocked interior’s main cabin features forward 4 place club, mid-cabin 4 place divan opposite 2 captain chairs in club and aft 4- place conference group with Hi/Lo table w/extension opposite credenza. All oversized swiveling captain chairs were used in the club arrangements throughout and are appointed in buckskin glove leather. The 4 – place conference group is appointed with chamois leather chairs. The berthing 4 place divan is finished in a designer walnut fabric. The pilot and copilot seats are gray leather with gray sheepskin. • Forward and aft Lavatories • Large Aft Cabin Galley with a Cold Storage Compartment • Airshow w/ two 17" video monitors • Dual Coffee Makers, Microwave Oven and High Temp Convection Oven • Three 110 V electrical outlets • Fax and Printer • Jump Seat The interior is exceptionally clean, in excellent condition and shows as new with no defects

CHUCK COLLINS & ASSOCIATES, INC. Premier Jet Complex * McClellan-Palomar Airport, 2100 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 214 Carlsbad, California 92011

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Price – Motivated Seller Tel: +1 760-929-0302 Cell: +1 760-420-7400 Email: Chuck@CCAJets.com http://www.chuckcollinsassociates.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAI Socata TBM 700B June 22/05/2013 16:22 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2000 TBM 700B Serial Number: Airframe TT:

182 1,625

• Only Two Owners Since New • RVSM Equipped • Dual Garmin 530's with WAAS • Enlarged Freon Air System Engine PRATT & WHITNEY PT6A-64. 536 Hours Since Hot Section Propeller HARTZELL De-Iced 4-Blade Propeller. 36 Hours Since Overhaul – April 2013 Avionics Garmin Audio control panel stereo with music input capability and markers EHSI/EADI EFIS 40 with symbol generator, KVG 350, KCS 305 with comparator alarm and switching mode Dual Garmin 530s with WAAS GPS/VHF/VORILS (8.33 Mhz spacing) RDR 2000 radar displayed on KMD-850 WX 500 Stormscope with indicator and output to KMD-850 KNI 582 RMI Indicator connected to heading nº2 DME KN 63 with output to the EHSI Honeywell KDR-810 Traffic Advisory System displayed on KMD-850/Garmin/HSI Honeywell Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (EGPWS) Dual Amtek 2000 Altimeters, RVSM Capable

Artex 406 ELT (USA) tri-band with aircraft identification and connection to GPS KFC 325 3 Axis digital Auto Pilot with pre-select Altitude and Yaw damper Stand-by vacuum Artificial horizon Shadin ETM Engine Trend Monitor Additional Equipment Hour meter airborne Electrically heated windshield on Right Hand Side Only – Replaced April 2013 Supplementary Gaseous Oxygen system Keith Air Conditioning Electrical starter/generator Oil cooler Inertial separation anti-icing air inlet Dual exhaust Exterior White upper half with Light Blue lower half with dark blue and maroon accents Interior Two Pilot Seats and Four Passenger Seats in a club configuration completed in Medium Grey Leather with Burlwood Trim. Platinum Edition including: • High comfort leather seats • Burlwood overhead panel • Burlwood made baggage compartment frame • Burlwood made retractable working table • Black chrome color metallic finishing • Smoked brown mirror in baggage compartment • Carpet runner

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com

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FAI June 21/05/2013 12:27 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

UNIQUE AIRCRAFT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM AVAILABLE

2000 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: 9013 Registration: D-AFAU Airframe TT: 5846 Landings: 1879 • EU OPS 1 • New Paint in 2012 • 8C & Gear Inspections C/W June ‘10 • Batch 2+ Upgrade Engines Rolls Royce BR700-710A2-20 S/N 12117 & 12118 APU Honeywell RE-220 S/N P-110 AVIONICS • Honeywell Primus II Avionics Package • Six Tube 8 x7 DU-870 Color EFIS Display, 2 PFD / 2 EICAS / 2 MFD • Triple Honeywell Laseref IV Inertial Reference System • Triple AZ-840 Micro Air Data Computers (MADC) • Dual NZ-2000 Integrated Flight Management System w/Dual HG-2021 Channel GPS • Triple IC-800 Integrated Avionics Computers (IAC) with EFIS revisionary capability • Primus 880 Color Weather Radar w/Lightning Sensor • TCAS II RT-950 Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (Change 7 incorporated) • Engine Indication/Crew Alerting System (EICAS) • Dual Primus II RM-855 Integrated

NAV(COM/Ident Radios w/VOR/ILS/MKR/ ADF/DME/VHF Comm and Enhanced Mode S Diversity Transponders (Dual RCZ-833 K and Dual RNZ-851) 8.33 kHz channel spacing and FM Immunity compliant • Dual Collins ALT-4000 Radio Altimeter • Thales IESI Standby Attitude Indicator • Collins HF-9031A HF Communication System • Single Coltech CSD-714 SELCAL • Dual Honeywell CD-820 CDU s • Honeywell EGPWS w/RAAS & Windshear Detection • Honeywell Digital Flight Data Recorder (25 Hrs) • QAR (Quick Access Recorder) • Honeywell Cockpit Voice Recorder (120 Min.,) • Honeywell DL-950 Data Loader • Artex 406 Hz Emergency Location Transmitter w/GPS • Emergency Vision Assurance System (EVAS) • MCS-6000 SATCOM (6 channel, 5 voice, 1 data) INTERIOR • 9 + 1 (crew rest seat) Certified Pax Original Interior for Take-off and Landings • FWD/RH Crew Rest area with 1 Rear Facing Seat • FWD/LH Full Galley • Jump Seat • FWD double Club with 4 Electrically Controlled Single Seats and Pull-Out Executive Tables • MID LH/RH Storage Cabinets • MID/LH 3-Place Divan [not certified for takeoffs/landings] • MID/RH 3-Place Divan EXTERIOR • Overall White w/Brown Stripe Design.

FAI rent-a-jet AG Flughafenstr. 100 (Hangar 6) 90268 Nuremberg - Germany

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Tel: +49 (0) 911 36009 375 or +1 561 771 1322 Fax: +49 (0) 911 36009 5375 Email: JetSales@fai.ag www.rent-a-jet.de Aircraft Index see Page 4


JB Park June 21/05/2013 12:29 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Owner is interested in a quick deal!

2008 Challenger 850 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

8063 OE-IKG 2000

Engines Maintenance Tracking Program: CAMP General Electric CF34-3B1. E950527. 1500. HSI and Overhaul: On Condition General Electric CF34-3B1. E950528. 1500 HSI and Overhaul: On Condition APU Honeywell GTCP 36-150 RJ, s/n P-1311; 1168 hrs Avionics Collins Proline 4 w/ EICAS: Dual FCC-4000 Digital Flight Control Computers Dual ADC-850 Digital Air Data Computers Dual DCU 4000 Data Concentrator Units Dual RTU-4000 Radio Tuning units

Make offer

MDC-4000 Maintenance Diagnostic Computer Collins WXR 840 Color Weather Radar Dual Collins FMS-4200 Flight Management System Dual Collins GPS-4000A GPS Dual Collins AHRS Dual VHF 422C Comm System with 8.33 spacing Dual VIR-432 Nav System with FM immunity Dual DME 442 Dual ADF 462 Dual TDR-94D Mode S Transponders Dual Collins ALT-55B Radio Altimeter Collins TCAS 94 (TCAS II with Change 7) Collins HF-9000 HF with Coltech SELCAL Additional Equipment RVSM, MNPS and RNP 5 Equipped L3 Communications SSCVR Cockpit Voice Recorder (2 hour) L3 Communications SSFDR Digital Flight Data Recorder

Honeywell Mk V EGPWS Artex C406-2 ELT Iridium ICS-200 SATCOM Communications System Airshow 4000 Passenger Information System Audio International Cabin Management System Interior Originally completed by Midcoast Aviation; March 2008. The cabin features a twelve (12) place executive interior configuration. Forward cabin features four (4) club seats. The mid cabin has a four (4) place conference group on the left with a manually operated - hi-low table, opposite is a credenza with storage as well as a 20" LCD pop-up monitor. The aft cabin has a two (2) place divan opposite two club seats. The lower sidewalls are a cream colored ultraleather. The carpet is light tan. Exterior Painted March 2008. Overall Matterhorn white, dark and light blue accent stripes run from nose to tail.

Two Corporate Owners Since New

2006 Cessna Citation Sovereign Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

0066 OE-GBY 4000

Engines Engine Hours L&R 2,381 Engine Cycles L&R 1,357 APU Hours 1,937 Avionics Multifunction Displays 4 Honeywell DU-1080 VHF COM 2 Honeywell TR-865A VHF NAV 2 Honeywell NV-875A HF Communication 1 Honeywell KHF 1050 ADF 2 Honeywell DF-850 DME 2 Honeywell DM-855 FD/Autopilot 2 Honeywell Primus Epic

Interior Total 11 certified seats including 3 seats sofa. One owner since new. Engines are covered with JSSI program and airframe with Cessna Pro parts

JB Park GmbH Mr Andrei Aleynikov Sales Director

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Make offer

Transponder (Enhanced Mode-S) 2 Honeywell XS-857A EGPWS 1 Honeywell EGP-100 TCAS II 1 Honeywell CAS-67 FMS Control Unit 2 Honeywell MC-850 GPS 2 Honeywell GR-2400 Radio Altimeter 1 Honeywell RT-300 Weather Radar 1 Honeywell WU-880 SSFDR 1 L3 Communications CVDR FA 2100 SSCVR 1 L3 Communications CVDR FA 2100 ELT 1 Kannad 406AF Satcom 1 Aircell ST 3100

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +38 044 351 70 26 Cell: +38 095281 1 282 Fax: +38 044 351 77 67 E-mail: aleynikov@upi.com.ua WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

145


John Hopkinson Ultras April 22/05/2013 15:34 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation Ultras Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell Primus GNS-XL FMS System Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS Interior Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior Exterior Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior Maintenance Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale Zero Engine Option follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

146

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Mente Citation XLS/Hawker June 21/05/2013 12:34 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1998 Hawker 800XP

Mark Payne Cell: +1 (972) 897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

Airframe TT: Landings:

sound proofing. Beautiful eight passenger executive interior, featuring a well appointed, spacious forward galley. A forward four-place club arrangement with foldout tables. The spacious mid cabin boasts another single seat across from a side facing three-placed divan. Seating is tastefully finished in light earth-tone leathers. Interior is complemented by luxurious carpeting found throughout the cabin. Forward galley poses ample storage and a microwave oven. Cabin Entertainment includes: Worldwide Airshow 4000, and Airshow briefing system, four 5-inch Rosen color monitors, DVD, CD, and forward and aft 14 inch LCD monitors. The aircraft also has power outlets for laptops and other electronic devices Exterior Original Paint 1998 By Hawker Beechcraft Matterhorn white with green, gray and gold stripes.

3830 3735

Will deliver on MSP Gold Engines TFE 731-5BR-1H Left: S/N P107259 3830 Hours 3735 Cycles Right: S/N P107289 3762 Hours 3776 Cycles APU Garrett GTCP 36-150W S/N P-291 1978 Hours Avionics Honeywell SPZ 8000 Avionics Suite AFIS: Global/Wulfsberg AFIS Autopilot: Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS w/DFZ-800 Avionics Package: Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS / Primus II Comm Radios: Dual Honeywell Primus II w/8.33 spacing

CVR: Universal CVR-30B EFIS: Dual Honeywell EDZ-818 Flight Director: Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS Flight Phone: MagnaStar C-2000 digital (2 handsets) FMS: Dual Honeywell FMZ-2000 w/GPS Hi Frequency: King KHF950 Navigation Radios: Dual Honeywell Primus II Radar Altimeter: Honeywell AA-300 Stormscope: Honeywell LSZ-850 lightening sensor TAWS Maintenance Inspection Status: 48-Month, Landing Gear and GInspection complied with in June 2011 Gross Weight: TBD. Operating Weight: TBD Empty Weight: TBD. FAR Part 91 Interior Original Installation 1998 by Hawker Beechcraft. Partial interior refurbishment by WestStar Aviation in 2007 that included headliner, side and lower panels, carpet and

2005 Cessna Citation XLS

Mark Payne Cell: +1 (972) 897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Precise Pulselites HF-1050 Provisions Av Visor Plus, LED wing, navigation and strobe lights Interior Six premium grey leather executive seats are complimented by a two-place side facing divan opposite entry door and belted seat opposite the lav. Burl cabinetry, grey headliner, grey sidewalls, neutral lower sidewalls and grey carpeting, extended galley with ample storage and ice cooler. Three 110-volt outlets. Exterior Matterhorn White with Starlight Silver, Ocean Blue Metallic and Columbia Blue Pearl striping. Inspections/Maintenance CESCOM-CAMP DOC 44 c/w May 2012

560-5575 N75XL 4,954.2 4,574

• FRESH ENGINES • DELIVERS ON ESP GOLD Engines PW545B: L/H: 4954.2 HRS TSN R/H: Completion in July 2013 APU Honeywell RE100XL 808.5 HRS TSN, 1789 CSN Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 Dual XS-852 Mode “S” Enhanced XPDR Honeywell Primus 1000 A/P Honeywell Primus 880-Color Radar

Dual Honeywell RCZ-833 Comms Heads Up Technologies Automated Pax PBS-250 Dual Honeywell NV-850 Navs TCAS II w/ change 7 Honeywell DF-850 ADF Honeywell Mark V TAWS A EGPWS with RAAS Dual Honeywell DM-850 DME AirCell ST-3100 Satcom Phone Dual UNS-1Esp 803 Software UniLink UL-701 COM Data Management System Features & Equipment RVSM Artex C406-2 ELT MSG-3 maintenance as of July 2008 8.33KHz & FM-Immunity RG-380E/44LA3 Lead Acid Concorde Battery L3 FA2100 CVR Cockpit Speaker Mute Switch

Mente Group, LLC 15301 North Dallas Parkway, Suite 1010 Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

147


JetFlight June 22/05/2013 15:37 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1998 Learjet 60 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

60-125 VP-CRB 2162 2394

• 8 seats • No damage history • Engines on ESP Gold • Immaculately maintained by British private owner from new • Collins Pro-line avionics • 3 Rotor brakes/tyre pressure sensors • Phase A/B/C/D due April 2014 • On CAMP

Avionics Collins Pro Line 4 tube EFIS Dual Collins ADC-822 Air data computers Dual Collins AHC-85 Attitude heading computers Dual UNS 1C FMS with GPS and new DTU memory stick Dual Collins FCC-850A Flight control computers Dual Collins RTU-870 Radio tuning units Dual Collins VIR 432 Nav units Dual Collins VHF-422B Com units 8.33kHz spacing and FM immunity Dual Collins DME-422 DME units Dual Collins ADF-462 ADF Dual Collins TDR-94 Mode S transponders TCAS 94 Traffic alert avoidance system Single Collins ALT-55B Radio altimeter

Single King KHF-950 HF Radio with SELCAL Collins SXR-840 Color weather radar Interior Original cream leather by Learjet, Tucson, beautiful condition New cabin carpet 8 passenger seats including 2 seat divan, single fwd facing seat, 4 place club seats Belted toilet seat High gloss Burlwood laminate woodwork with 2 fold out executive tables Airshow 400 with forward and aft displays Entertainment system with DVD player 115v Cabin outlet Dual Concorde lead acid batteries Exterior Colour overall - Matterhorn white with blue trim lines re-painted March 2010 3 Rotor Brakes Tyre pressure sensors SB60-32-32R1 Maintenance PHASE A due 2461 hours or April 2014 PHASE B due 2761 hours or April 2014 PHASE C due 2761 hours or April 2014 PHASE D due 4299 hours or April 2014 Weights MTOW 23,750 lb Empty weight 14,565 lb Compliance RVSM MNPS RNP Price: US$2.65m

JetFlight Ltd Roger Stainton

148

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Tel: +44 (0) 7785 245400 E-mail: JetSalesUK@aol.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Welsch Aviation June 21/05/2013 14:41 Page 1

For details contact:

Edward Vesely phone: 713-644-5100 Email: Evesely@welschaviation.com www.welschaviation.com

Falcon 50 S/N 138

State-of-the-art flight deck with Collins Proline 21 FDS, JSSI engine program 100%, -3D engines, owner financing to qualified buyers, CAMP maintenance tracking program, dual Collins FMS 6100, Laseref V, 8.33 comms, FM immunity, MNPS, RNP 5/10, EGPWS. Owner will consider trading for a Falcon 900B, Falcon 900C or Falcon 900EX.

Gulfstream III S/N 450

21st Century Primus EPIC glass cockpit, Stage III hush kits, one of the lowest total time GIII's on the market, beautiful refurbished interior 2012, Gulfstream IV features and benefits at a Gulfstream III price, worldwide transcontinental operations equipped, GCMP, 72 month inspection accomplished July 2012, excellent records. Specifications Subject to Verification Upon Inspection

New York

Washington DC

Texas

Georgia


P149-153 MB 22/05/2013 09:27 Page 3

Marketplace Boeing 737 500 VIP

European Skybus Ltd Price:

Please Call

Year:

1995

S/N:

27425

Reg:

N463AC

TTAF:

31,908

Location: United Kingdom

Gulfstream IIB

Year:

1974

S/N:

180

Reg:

N180AR

TTAF:

14,200

Location: USA, TX

Learjet 55

40 Passenger corporate interior. This aircraft has recently undergone a passenger to VIP conversion in October 2011 by European Aviation. Refurbished to the highest standards, this 1995 example is now available for sale or lease. The Cabin area is divided into two sections, the forward section is arranged into a ‘Club 4’ configuration around 4 HI-LO folding tables, which can be converted into 8 sleeping positions. The aft section of the cabin is configured with a further 24 forward facing lie flat business class seats. Contact: Stefan Kondak for more information.

Candler & Associates Inc. Price: SHORT TERM LEASE

Jet Speed LLC Price:

Please Call

Year:

1982

S/N:

22-036

Reg:

N273CC

TTAF:

11414.4

Tel: +44 (0) 1202 581 111 Email: sales@europeanskybus.com

Tel: +1 (210) 341 3395 Email: candlerbus@sbcglobal.net

We recently purchased an excellent and well maintained Gulfstream GIIB aircraft and are making it available for a short-term (approx. 30 month) lease through December 31, 2015, when U.S. Stage 3 noise regulations take effect. The aircraft was owned for 20 years by Mobil Oil and by a private individual here in San Antonio for the past 10 yrs. Please let me know if your organization (or any others you know) have an interest in leasing this fine Gulfstream GIIB aircraft. SHORT TERM LEASE.

Tel: +1 (561) 719 9692 Email: jetspeedllc@gmail.com TSN 11414.4 CSN 7609, Engines P85179 TSN 10955.5 CSN 7325, P85175 TSN 10862.0 CSN 7329, 100% JSSI, CAMP MX tracked, Needs nothing for 180 hrs, next due 200hr inspection. Conveniently based at KBCT Boca Raton airport. Contact: Jeff Coursey for more information.

Location: USA

BAS GmbH

Challenger 300 Price:

US$ 10.800.000

Year:

07/2004

S/N:

20004

Reg:

D-BFJE

TTAF:

5450

Tel: +49 (0) 7403 914 04 66 Email: sales@basjets.com New Paint and Interior Dec 12, 96 mth. Done Dec. 12; Airframe and Engines on MSP and Smart Plus; No Damage History; only one Owner since new; CVR/FDR; SATCOM, Airshow with DVD; Microwave, Coffee-maker; 8 Pax Club Seat config; belted Toilet Seat; CAT II; MNPS; In and Out like new

Location: Germany

Challenger 601-3A

Kent Grayson Price:

Please Call

Year:

1992

S/N:

5113

Reg:

N770GE

TTAF:

7655

Location: USA

150

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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Tel: +1 (727)-754-5722 Email: skykng@verizon.net AlliedSiginal Mark V EGPWS w/ Windshear, Honeywell MCS-3000 SATCOM, ELT Artex C-406, Duel Collins Air Data Computers, EFIS Master Switch, Damage History, Smart Parts Warranty Program, Engine Mantenance Program, RVSM, Terrain Awareness and Warning System, Extended Range Model, Trafic Collision Avoidance system (TCAS), 8.33 Channel Spacing, FM Immunity, SATCOM, Winglets, Thrust Reversers, Auxiliary Power Unit, FAR Part 135, JSSI TIP TO TAIL

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P149-153 MB 21/05/2013 16:06 Page 4

Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,375,000

Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

Reg:

N337WR

TTAF:

6615.3

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,375,000 or consider trades for Citation CJ1, CJ2, or Bell 212, 412 or 407.

Location: USA

BELL 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $1,975,000

Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

Reg:

N339MC

TTAF:

1700

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not

do justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners.

Location: USA

BELL 412EMS

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,875,000

Year:

1981

S/N:

33017

Reg:

N554AL

TTAF:

15265

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’.Fresh annual / Export C of A

Location: USA

BELL 212 (Seven Available)

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Please Call

Year:

Call for details

S/N:

Call for details

Reg:

Call for details

TTAF:

Call for details

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

Location: USA

Premier 1A

Oleg Shulgin Price:

Make offer

Year:

2007

S/N:

RB-189

Reg:

VP-CFW

TTAF:

1555

Tel: +79 1666 96642 Email: aeroresume@gmail.com EU Ops compliant, RVSM certified, CAMP, Collins Pro Line 21, Nose and tail baggage compartments. Exterior White with Toreador Red, Aztec Yellow, Bristol Blue stripes. Interior: Six passenger Platinum leather seats with retractable headrests and armrests. Showcase Mahogany decorative laminates, Pebble Frieze carpeting, Grey Lustreheadliners. Make offers.

Location: Germany

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

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P149-153 MB 22/05/2013 09:33 Page 5

Marketplace Tel: +44 (0) 23 80 696992 Email: aircraftsales@xclusivejet.com

Xclusive Jet

Challenger 605

Price:

Priced to sell

Year: S/N: Reg: TTAF:

220

Location: UK

Pilatus PC12/45

This is a unique opportunity to own this immaculate Challenger 605 that is priced to sell. Only 220 hours total time – Engine: 2 General Electric CF34-3B turbofans – APU: Honeywell GTCP36-150 (CL) gas turbine – Avionics: Collins Pro-Line 21 avionics suite 9 Capacity configuration with forward club seating and aft divan - Available immediately - contact our sales team today if you would like to express your interest.

Tel: +41 (0) 44 828 88 88 Email: r.schmid@lionairgroup.com

Lions Air Ltd. Price:

Make Offer

Year:

2000

S/N:

349

Very well equipped aircraft. Maintained by Pilatus Aircraft or his Service Centres and always flown by professional pilots. Managed under EASA CAMO organisation. One owner. Located Zurich International Airport, LSZH.

Reg:

HB-FOQ

Contact: Renè Schmid for more information.

TTAF:

3000

Location: Switzerland

Eurocopter AS 350B

Tel: +32 (0) 475 308 908 Email: pdr@seatec.be

Skytec Price:

USD 550,000 +Tax

Year:

1980

S/N:

1244

Reg:

N350UK

TTAF:

4300

A perfect machine in service right now for a new tailrotorgearbox and hydraulic acumulator and hoses. Airframe inspection 2014 engine 2,3,4 July 2014. Contact: Pim de Rhoodes for more information.

Location: Belgium

Agusta 109E

Tel: +1 (571) 933-7393 Email: mail@plmaviation.com

PLM Aviation, Inc Price:

Please Call/Email

Year:

2001

S/N:

11129

Reg:

VH-RUA

TTAF:

2,066

Location: Australia

PLM Aviation is pleased to present this excellent 2001 Agusta 109E for sale. Currently based in Australia, s/n 11129 is finishing a military contract and will be delivered with both its original VIP interior and a utility interior. Features include Air Conditioning, 230 US Gallon Fuel Tanks, Sliding Doors, Option to purchase P&WC ESP Gold and/or Breeze Eastern Rescue Hoist. 2,066TT. Two owners from new. Please contact Peter Leonard-Morgan for more information.

www.plmaviation.com

Par Avion Ltd

Alberth Air Parts

+1 832 934 0055

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011 152

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P149-153 MB 22/05/2013 15:44 Page 6

Not just a tug.

It’s a

8900 Series

.

800-535-8767 / 503-861-2288 w w w. l e k t r o. co m / s a l e s @ l e k t r o. co m

World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), June 2013, Vol 17, Issue No 6 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & DVDs submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 12th June 2013 Advertiser’s Index 1st Source Bank ........................................................99 21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................154 Aero Air ......................................................................140 AeroSmith/Penny ....................................................138 AIC Title Services ....................................................121 Air Fleet Leasing ......................................................141 AMJET...........................................................................76 Aradian Aviation ..........................................................97 Avjet Corporation.................................................38-39 Avpro ......................................................................19-23 Bell Aviation ..........................................................48-49 Bombardier..................................................................63 Boutsen Aviation ........................................................69 Central Business Jets .............................................155 Charleston Aviation Partners ...................................77 Charlie Bravo Aviation...............................................51 China Helicopter Exposition..................................131 Chuck Collins ...........................................................142 Conklin & de Decker ...............................................117 Corporate Aircraft Photography ...........................117 Corporate AirSearch Int’l ..............................111,143 Corporate Concepts .................................................61 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Dassault Falcon Jet Europe ...........................2-3,139 Dominion Aircraft .....................................................115 Duncan Aviation....................................................55,93 Eagle Aviation..............................................................43 ExecuJet Aviation........................................................47 FAI rent-a-jet..............................................................144 Florida Jets .......................................................134-135 Freestream Aircraft USA ....................................10-17 General Aviation Services ........................................57 Global Corporate A/C Transactions ...................129 Guardian Jet..........................................................24-27 Gulfstream Pre-Owned ......................................34-35 HELI UK.....................................................................133 Heliasset.com ...........................................................119 Inada..............................................................................37 Intellijet International .................................................6-7 J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ......................40-41 JB Park GmbH .........................................................145 Jet Support Services (JSSI).......................................4 JetBlack Aviation ........................................................95 JetBrokers..............................................................44-45 Jetcraft Corporation....................................52-53, BC Jeteffect ........................................................................67

www.AvBuyer.com

JetFlight......................................................................148 JETNET ......................................................................123 John Hopkinson & Associates ........................85,146 Leading Edge ..............................................................73 Lektro..........................................................................153 Mente Group.............................................................147 NBAA Business Aviation Convention .................125 NBAA Regional Forums............................................78 OGARAJETS................................................FC, 30-31 Par Avion.........................................................................5 RocketRoute ....................................................102-103 Rolls-Royce .................................................................81 Royal Saudi Air Force.............................................112 Southern Cross Aviation ........................................113 Starbase Jet Aviation .....................................136-137 Tempus Jets.................................................................59 The Jet Collection ......................................................29 Universal Avionics ......................................................91 VREF Aircraft Values ..............................................153 Welsch Aviation .......................................................149 Wentworth & Affiliates...............................................87 Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................79 WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2013

153


21st Century December 2010

17/11/10

16:47

Page 1

Tri-Jets Range Map 7X=5950nm 900EX=4500nm 900DX=4100nm 50EX=3267nm

When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet in the sky; and the Federal Aviation Administration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. Aircraft safety is determined by reliability and redundancy. In the event of an engine failure a reduction of climb rate, speed and altitude occur. Critical engine-driven systems may be compromised including the hydraulic, electrical and bleed-air systems which draw their power from the aircraft’s engines. The FAA emphasizes redundancy more than the number of engines for flight safety over water; although there is a relationship between the two. Very High levels of safety are achieved with the Tri-Jets; the 900 for example has two hydraulic systems that are powered by hydraulic power from four sources; three engine-driven hydraulic pumps plus a standby pump powered electrically. The left-hand and right-hand engines provide power for the right hydraulic system; and the center engine supplies power for the right hydraulic system with backup from the standby pump. One system can supply enough hydraulic power to operate the aircraft and land safely if a system fails. An erroneous conclusion is that Tri-Jets cost more to operate than competitive twin-jets. Many long-range twin-jets use excessively large engines and supporting structure. Tri-Jets with their effective configuration, utilize smaller more fuel efficient engines. With fuel efficient engines, Tri-Jets carry less fuel than twin-jets. This results in a reduction of weight and operating costs. Smaller engines, the Tri-Jets aerodynamic improvement and lower operating weight culminates in an aircraft that burns less fuel than many heavier twin-jets. Tri-Jets have earned a stellar reputation among owners and operators; and usually have higher resale values than the competition.

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ June_CBJ November06 23/05/2013 10:19 Page 1

General Offices

Mexico office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Enrique A. Ortega Lapham

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +52.55.5211.1505

FAX: (952) 894-8569

CELL: +52.55.3901.1055

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

E-MAIL: Enrique@CBJets.com

C e l e b r a t i n g 3 0 Ye a r s

De Int sign er er ior

ial g t i In erin f Of

GULFSTREAM V S/N 567

CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5577

Of fered by Original Fortune 100 Corporation, 35 year history as a Fleet Operator of Gulfstream Aircraft; Immaculate Maintenance, Rolls Royce Corporate Care Engine Program, Can Deliver w/ New Interior & Configuration

Freshly completed by Duncan Aviation for its 96-Month Inspection and Landing Gear Overhaul, 2000 Hours TT, On Smart Parts Plus and MSP -150 APU Engine Programs, Spectacular Terence Disdale Designed 10 Place Interior

ial g t i In erin f Of

GULFSTREAM G200 S/N 199

2009 CHALLENGER 300 S/N 20264

1700 TT / 900 Landings, ESP Gold, Meets all EASA / JAR OPS Requirements, Impressive List of Options including Aerial View Camera, Factory Warranties thru 09/13

1451 TT, Iridium SAT Phone w/ Swift Broadband Wifi, MSP GOLD, 2nd IFIS FSU (Paperless Cockpit), Impressive list of Options including Sliding cabin/galley Pocket Door, Deluxe Galley w/ sink, Maintained to Part 135 Standards

al De ing nd Pe

GULFSTREAM ASTRA SP S/N 49

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5248

3597.9 TT; Recent C Check, paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod, Replacement of Horizontal Stab Trim Actuator

Power Advantage Engine Program, w/ Fresh Engine Overhauls, Pro-Parts Airframe Program and on Cescom Since New; Dual Universal UNS-1ESP FMS; Aircraft can be delivered anywhere in the world

al De ing nd Pe

FALCON 900B SN/65 Will be Delivered w/ Fresh 4C and Landing Gear OH, MSP Gold Engine Package, Preferred 13 PAX Configuration w/ FWD & AFT Lav; Impeccable US Ownership History

FALCON 20F "500NH" SN/470 w/ FALCON 900C Engines & APU Modification 7700 TT / 4900 Landings, MSP Gold, Collins Proline II EFIS Cockpit, Dual Collins Radio Tuning Units, Dual Universal 1L's w/ WAAS, ETC

Also Available - Falcon 900EXy, Falcon 900C, JetStar II


Just because you no longer have connecting flights

you no longer need connections.

The right aircraft can turn up anywhere—which means you need to know the right people everywhere. We’ve been cultivating worldwide connections for over 50 years, from legal and financial resources to the top aviation experts. Today our unmatched global network gives you eyes, ears and business savvy around the planet. A larger inventory of options. And fast, smooth, face-to-face transactions. Want the best value in the business? Just connect the dots. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

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I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

FEATURED INVENTORY

2006 Challenger 300 - SN 20087

New to Market - One US Owner Since New Smart Parts. CASP and MSP - North East Based

2011 Citation CJ4 - SN 525C-0063

New to Market - Airframe On Cessna ProParts Engines on Cessna TAP Advantage Elite

WAS_5-28-13_back cover_Connections.indd 1

2004 Falcon 2000EX EASy - SN 29

Aggressively Priced to be the Next to Sell Engines Enrolled on ESP Gold - APU Enrolled on MSP 1988 Airbus A310-304 2011 Airbus A318 Elite 1988 Challenger 601-3A 2005 Challenger 604 2009 Challenger 605 2010 Challenger 605 2007 Challenger 850ER 2005 Citation X 2006 Citation XLS 1997 CRJ 200 2009 Falcon 2000LX

2013 Falcon 7X 2005 Global 5000 Q1 2014 Global 6000 2005 Global Express 2010 Global XRS 1998 Gulfstream GIVSP 1988 Gulfstream IV 2008 Hawker 750 2003 Hawker 800XP 2008 Hawker 900XP Q1 2015 Legacy 500 - Position

2003 Global Express - SN 9113

Available for Immediate Lease 8C Inspection Currently Underway at BAS - Dallas

2006 Global XRS - SN 9181

One Corporate FAA Part 91 Owner Since New Full Engines/Airframe/APU Coverage

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

DOESN’T MEAN

5/10/13 12:01 PM


World Aircraft Sales Magazine June 2013