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FC June 2012_FC December 06 23/05/2012 10:22 Page 2

WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

June 2012

proudly presents

Gulfstream GIVSP Serial Number 1433 See page 19 for further details

Business Aviation & The Boardroom: pages 50 - 77 • Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits


Project1 07/06/2012 14:41 Page 1

PRE-OWNED FALCON

WE BUILT THESE PLANES, WE TRACKED THEIR LIVES, WE KNOW THEM BEST. No one knows a pre-owned Falcon like we do. No one knows more about its past. Because we record the details of every Falcon’s history in our databases. And no one cares more about helping you get the best out of it. Because wherever you fly your pre-owned Falcon, our reputation flies with you.

Visit falconjet.com/preowned France: +33.1.47.11.60.71 - US: +1.201.541.4556


Project1 07/06/2012 14:42 Page 1

Falcon 2000

2001 • s/n 133 • 5,033 hrs. total time • 10 passengers • EUOPS 1 compliant • Eng on CSP, APU on MSP • Aero I Sat Com • May 2012 C check, Landing gear overhaul, and white paint scheme.

Falcon 2000EX EASy

2005 • s/n 063 • 2,156 hrs. total time • 8 passengers • Engines on JSSI, APU on MSP • Aug 2011 C check, new white paint scheme and winglets installation • Swift 64 Satcom

Falcon 2000LX

2008 • s/n 151 • 1,163 hrs. total time • 10 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • One owner since new • Under FalconCare • Iridium Satcom • EFB

Falcon 900EX EASy

2004 • s/n 128 • 3,845 hrs. total time • 14 passengers • EASYII retrofitted • Engines & APU on MSP • One owner since new • EUOPS1compliant • 2010 C check, 3FMS, 3IRS, 3VHF, Aero H+ • Swift 64 Satcom

Falcon 900EX EASy

2005 • s/n 150 • 2,103 hrs. total time • 14 passengers • FWD and AFT Lav, Sept 2011 fresh C check • Sept 2011 fresh C check • Aero I Satcom

Falcon 7X

2011 • s/n 128 • 140 hrs. total time • 14 passengers • No Crew Rest • Pristine condition, • HUD, EFVS, EFB, Aero H • Swift 64 high speed Satcom • Brakes wheel well heat modification


AC Index June2011 24/05/2012 13:26 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32, 41, 63, 83, 87, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 32, 39, 41, 148, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 148,

AEROSTAR Superstar 700 . . 36,

AIRBUS

Learjet

A318 Elite. . . . . . 20, ACJ . . . . . . . . . . . 148,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 26, 41, 59, 61, BBJ 700C . . . . . . 26, Super 727-100-REW. .20, 737-300 VIP . . . . 141,

BOMBARDIER CRJ . . . . . . . . . . 41, Global 5000 . . . . 13, 20, 39, 148, Global 6000 . . . . 6, 148, Global 7000 . . . . 83, Global Express . 15, 19, 20, 26, 33, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, Global Express XRS.. 13, 41, 130, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131, 148,

Challenger 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 32, 39, 67, 148, 600 . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 19, 30, 37, 69, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 12, 19, 22, 32, 67, 601-3R . . . . . . . . 43, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 16, 21, 22, 25,

31A . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 29, 30, 39, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 36, 39, 81, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 83, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 29, 128, 129, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 22, 39, 81, 83, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115, 45BR . . . . . . . . . . 59, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 24, 26, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 35, 41, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 22, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 19, 59,

AIRCRAFT

IN THIS ISSUE PAGE

AIRCRAFT

560 Ultra . . . . . . 29, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 113, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 35, 36, 55, CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 30, 127, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 144, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 35, 36, 37, 138, Encore . . . . . . . . 35, 147, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 29, 30, 147, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 113, Mustang . . . . . . . 17, 41, 144, SII . . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 87, Sovereign. . . . . . 19, 29, 37, 69, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 22, 30, 135,

Conquest II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31,

CESSNA Citation

DORNIER

ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 35, 55, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 36, 37, 42, 55, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 36, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 36, 37, 55, VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 57, 133, 148, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 35, 79, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 16, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 33, 148, 208 ............144, 525 . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 113,

Dornier 328 . . . . 141,

Aviation Companies, Inc.

EMBRAER ERJ 135 . . . . . . . 23, ERJ 145 . . . . . . . 23, Legacy 500 . . . . 35, Legacy 600 . . . . 20, 29, 35, 39, 61, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 148, Legacy 650 . . . . 29, Lineage 1000. . . 20, Phenom 100 . . . 19, 35,

PAGE

FAIRCHILD Merlin IIIB . . . . . 35,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 29, 33, 67, 79, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146, 148, 20Cargo . . . . . . . 36, 20C-5BR . . . . . . 36, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 19, 21, 33, 36, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 79, 87, 146, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 5, 39, 146, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 146, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 141, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 19, 29, 36, 41, 146, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 146, 900EX EASy . . . 3, 29, 41, 146, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 15, 21, 146, 147, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 3, 12, 15, 83, 132, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133, 147, 2000DX EASy . . 148, 2000EX EASy . . 3, 21, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 3, 137,

GULFSTREAM III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 23, 26, 29, 33, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 65, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 1, 15, 16, 19, 24, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 41, 61, 67, 148,

Need Help Navigating Aircraft Operating Costs? Conklin & de Decker products and consulting services are like having a “GPS” for your aircraft acquisition decision or budgeting process.

1980 MU-2 SOLITAIRE S/N 424SA, N82AF, 7485TT, 385/385 SOH, 75/75 SPOH, GNS 530 WAAS, Avidyne Flight Max, 7500-hr, inspection, New P&I (2010) to customer specs. U.S. $675,000.

1981 MU-2 MARQUISE S/N 1510SA, N17HG, 3840TT, 3840/3840 SNEW, 630/630 SHSI/SGBI, 135/320 SPOH, GNS-400, Collins Pro-Line, Sandel 4” EFIS, SPZ-500 A/P, New Interior (2012). U.S. $650,000.

1974 MU-2K Dash 10 on MSP - Price Reduced

Aircraft Cost Evaluator The perfect tool for benchmarking variable & fixed costs, performance and specification data for more than 460 aircraft.

S/N 305, N50K, 6370TT, 1180/1180 since -10 (MSP), 750/750 SPOH, Dual Garmin 430’s, RDR-2000, M4-D A/P, New Paint (2009). U.S. $535,000.

1980 MU-2 MARQUISE S/N 756SA, 5Y-MUZ. 12925TT, 1990/2060 SOH, 1990/2060 SHSI, 260/220 SPOH, Collins Pro-Line, M4D A/P, New Paint (2010), Located in Africa. U.S. $475,000.

1975 MU-2M S/N 326, N165MA, 3750TT, 3750/3750 SOH, 235/235 SHSI, 680/370 SGBI, 410/410 SPOH, GTN-750/650, Traffic, XM Weather. U.S. $395,000.

1974 MU-2K S/N 285, N11SJ, 4630TT, 2350/2350 SOH, 525/525 SHSI, 230/230 SPOH, Garmin 530W, RDS-81 Color Radar, M4D A/P, New Paint & Interior (2009). U.S. $345,000.

Life Cycle Cost A budgeting and financial analysis tool to understand the true cost of owning and operating an aircraft.

1972 MU-2K S/N 240, N64LG, 6100TT, 4655/4655 SOH, 1100/1100 SHSI/SGBI, 920/775 SPOH, Garmin G-600, Dual GNS-430W’s, Dual GTX-320 TXP’s, TCAS, XM Weather. U.S. $295,000.

234 Air Park Blvd., Aiken, SC (USA) 29805-8921 Tel: USA +1 803-641-9999 • Fax: USA +1 803-641-4040 www.air1st.com • Email: mike@air1st.com 4

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.was.Conklindd.com

+1- 508-255-5975


AC Index June2011 24/05/2012 13:30 Page 2

• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 41, 65, 139, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 81, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 19, 20, 24, 37, 41, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 79, 81, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 21, 26, 63, 126, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 13, 20, 27, 41, 63, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 148,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT Beechcraft 400 . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 30, 83, 144, Premier 1 . . . . . . 17, 36, Premier 1A. . . . . 36, 63, 115,

King Air 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 31, 36, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 24, 31, 35, 79, 81, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 29, 31, 35, 42, 53, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 22, 29, 81, E90 . . . . . . . . . . . 31, F90 . . . . . . . . . . 36, 115,

Hawker 400XP . . . . . . . . . 19, 36, 700A . . . . . . . . . . 43, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 43, 142, 800B . . . . . . . . . . 39, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 19, 22, 36, 41, 67, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

850XP . . . . . . . . . 41, 59, 63, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 63, 83, 147, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 22, 147,

IAI Astra 1125 . . . . . 19, 147, Astra SP . . . . . . . 13, 65, Astra SPX. . . . . . 79, 87,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

SABRELINER 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 36,

SOCATA TBM 700B . . . . . 36, 53, 134, 141, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143, TBM 700C1 . . . . 37, TBM 700C2 . . . . 53, TBM 850. . . . . . . 53,

LANCAIR Lancair . . . . . . . . 19,

MITSUBISHI MU-2K . . . . . . . . 4, MU-2M . . . . . . . . 4, MU-2K Dash 10 4, MU-2 Marquise . 4, MU-2 Solitaire. . 4,

PIAGGIO

AS 355 N . . . . . . 29, 115, AS 365 N2 . . . . . 107, AS 365 N3 . . . . . 115, EC 120B . . . . . . . 29, 107, 143, EC135P2i . . . . . . 143, EC135P2+ . . . . . 136,

HUGHES H500D . . . . . . . . 113,

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS

AGUSTAWESTLAND

MD 600N . . . . . . 63,

AW 109C . . . . . . 29, AW 109E. . . . . . . 107, AW 109S Grand 115, A119 Koala . . . . 63, 113, AW139 . . . . . . . . . 16, Power Elite. . . . . 29,

BELL

PC12/45. . . . . . . 19, 31, PC12/47 . . . . . . . 141,

PIPER

EUROCOPTER

Meridian . . . . . . . 31, Malibu Mirage . . 55,

AS 332C1 . . . . . . 143, AS350BA . . . . . . 29,

PILATUS

PAGE

HELICOPTERS

206B . . . . . . . . . . 143, 206L3 . . . . . . . . . 115, 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 142, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . . 142, 222 . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 412EMS . . . . . . . 142,

P180 Avanti . . . 19,

06.12

AIRCRAFT

SIKORSKY S-76A+ . . . . . . . . 115, S-76B . . . . . . . . . 33, 147, 148,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS Aircraft Engine /Support . 93, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 48, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 49, 71, Avionics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 85, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 140, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 140, The Global Aircraft Market Online

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

5


Project1 07/06/2012 14:43 Page 1

When It Comes To Business Aviation Professionals . . .

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Project1 07/06/2012 14:44 Page 1

IntelliJet Stands Out In A Crowd Thousands of companies around the world are involved in corporate aviation in one way or another, but their levels of expertise can vary greatly. On the surface it can be difficult to tell how one consultant differs from the next, but true aviation professionals are in a class by themselves. At IntelliJet International, we have a knack for shedding light on the aircraft that represents the best value – whether on the market or not. But finding the right aircraft is only the first step. Moving a complicated transaction to a successful conclusion requires skillful navigation around the many obstacles that can crop up along the way. Not every sales organization possesses the key disciplines and innovative abilities that may be required. IntelliJet has the expertise and the experience to manage even the most complex situations, such as reconfiguring an interior to fit a client’s particular needs or importing an aircraft from one country to another. So whether you’re searching for your next aircraft or a home for the one you currently own, call us today. When you reflect on the transaction at the end of the day, you will see why so many clients view IntelliJet in a positive light.

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Panel June12 23/05/2012 12:59 Page 1

World Aircraft Sales

iPad Edition

World Aircraft Sales EDITORIAL Deputy Editor (London Office) Matthew Harris 1- 800 620 8801 editorial@avbuyer.com Editor - Boardroom Guide J.W. (Jack) Olcott 1- 973 734 9994 Jack@avbuyer.com Editorial Contributor (USA Office) Dave Higdon Dave@avbuyer.com Consulting Editor Sean O’Farrell +44 (0)20 8255 4409 Sean@avbuyer.com

ADVERTISING Karen Price 1- 800 620 8801 Karen@avbuyer.com Karen Schaefer (USA Office) 1-386 767 8460 ks@avbuyer.com

The World of Aviation at your finger-tips app ipad r. S A a Our Wery popul ds a v is wnlo . o d 0 300 e launch sinc

View jets for sale this month worldwide on your iPad

World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), June 2012, Vol 16, Issue No 6 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & Disc’s submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

CIRCULATION Lynne Jones 1- 800 620 8801 Lynne@avbuyer.com AVBUYER.COM Nick Barron Nick@avbuyer.com

avbuyer.com/worldaircraftsales

8

STUDIO/PRODUCTION Helen Cavalli/ Mark Williams 1- 800 620 8801 Helen@avbuyer.com Mark@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Emma Davey Emma@avbuyer.com PUBLISHER John Brennan 1- 800 620 8801 John@avbuyer.com USA OFFICE 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 EUROPEAN OFFICE Cowleaze House, 39 Cowleaze Rd, Kingston, Surrey, KT2 6DZ, UK +44 (0)20 8255 4000 PRINTED BY Fry Communications, Inc. 800 West Church Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055


Panel June12 23/05/2012 12:39 Page 2

Contents

Volume 16, Issue 6 – June 2012

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 50

A Needed Resource: Without Business Aviation, our nation’s transportation system would be limited and the economy would suffer. Find out why.

52

The Changing Character of Scheduled Air Service: With fewer commercial flights to match your travel needs and more passengers filling the seats, the need for Business Aviation expands.

54

Selection of Aviation Services - The Intangibles: Pete Agur examines the intangibles of Corporate Culture and Corporate Brand in relation to business aircraft ownership.

58

Navigating the “C” Suite: Finalizing an aircraft purchase involves approvals at several levels. Here we look at the parts played by the CFO and the CEO.

62

Aircraft Reliability and Availability: Part of a business aircraft’s value is that it flies on your schedule. So how well does your aircraft satisfy your transportation needs?

66

IRS Guidance on Aircraft Management Fees: A memorandum issued by the IRS potentially has significant ramifications for companies using aircraft management companies. More details here...

70

‘PUNC’ - Your Checklist for Insurance Coverage: Pilots, Use,

50

66

Named Insured and Contracts capture the four most important areas of aviation insurance. Read more on ‘Use’ here…

74

The Helicopter Value Guide: A look at the benefits of Helicopters, and a listing of values for models built over the last several years.

74

Main Features 44

Aircraft Comparative Analysis - Challenger 605: How does the performance of the Challenger 605 stand out against the Challenger 604, Falcon 900 and Falcon 900C?

78

GAMA First Quarter 2012 Shipment Analysis & Report: Looking closely at both the good and bad bits of this latest shipment report from GAMA, Mike Potts draws his conclusions on the market.

88

RVSM Revisited: You’d think after all these years of RVSM, people would understand it. Alarmingly, regular violations into RVSM airspace occur. Dave Higdon revisits the topic.

PLANE SENSE ON PAPERLESS COCKPITS 94 The EFB Wait-Loss Program: Electronic Flight Bags are more than space-

100

Regular Features 10

Viewpoint

and weight-saving to the aircraft cockpit; they’re time-saving to the pilot that uses one.

14

BizAv Round-up

92

Aviation Leadership Roundtable

The Paperless Cockpit: Discussed from a maintenance point of view, Steve

110 JETNET >>KNOW MORE

Watkins considers issues of planning for a new cockpit installation, and some basic items of compliance.

114 Aircraft Specs & Performance Tables 126 AIReport

104 122

Top Ten Apps For The Cockpit: A look at the big hits among the flying community for iPad and phone apps that help in and around the aircraft cockpit.

Next Month’s Issue

Safety Matters - The Sterile Cockpit: Dave Higdon discusses the importance of identifying threats to a sterile, focussed cockpit environment and offers some steps to take to nurture it.

* Long-Range Jets Review

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

* Developing Markets – Asia Pacific * Inside Maintenance - Older Gulfstreams

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

9


Gil WolinJune12_Gil WolinNov06 21/05/2012 15:46 Page 1

VIEWPOINT

Habit Forming by Gil Wolin t was a bright summer day in 1979 ten years into a twopack-a-day smoking habit, acquired during my college years. A small town near Columbus, Ohio was celebrating the anniversary of its founding with a street fair, complete with food vendors, games and a two-mile road race! That would be a piece of cake for this former high school cross-country runner. I’d just lace up the Pumas and swing by the finish line to collect my medal in, oh, about 15 minutes... Suffice it to say that within 300 yards of the start six-year-olds were passing me. Message received, loud and clear – as I wheezed through the last half mile, I knew it was time to change this bad habit. But going from two packs a day to zero would require an incentive greater than avoiding future roadside embarrassment. As Mark Twain said, “Giving up smoking is the easiest thing in the world. I know because I've done it thousands of times.” I wanted to do it only once. Holding to a commitment like that meant setting a lofty goal, something requiring real dedication and focus. Fortunately Columbus provided that opportunity: the first annual Columbus Marathon, to be run about 15 months later. And “26.2 m iles in thre e ho urs” became my daily mantra. With dedication and daily training (replacing one habit with another) I crossed the finish line the following November in 3:03. By changing one habit, I had beaten a physical and mental addiction. But it wasn’t until reading Charles Duhigg’s new book, The Po w er o f Habit (Random House, 2012), that I understood exactly how that change occurred – or how much our lives, our decisions, are governed by habits, literally thousands of them. According to a 2006 Duke University study cited in the book, more than 40 percent of our daily actions are not free-will decisions, but responses to habits. Habits, it seems, are the result of a threestep process: a cue, which triggers the performance of a routine, which then generates

I

10

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

a reward for that performance. It is the desire for the reward – whether a caffeine or nicotine “rush,” praise from a parent or boss, or medal for completing a race – that drives the routine. And after the repeated delivery of that reward in response to the repeated performance of that routine your brain begins to expect the reward. That anticipation becomes a craving, and the cue-routine-reward cycle becomes a habit. And a habit once learned is never forgotten. It can, however, be changed from something detrimental to something constructive by changing the routine performed in response to the cue, which then delivers the same reward. This got me thinking about how much aviation safety depends on habits – on responding to cues without hesitation, without a conscious thought as to how we act, not only in routine flights, but in case of emergency - and how small changes in focus (in habits) can generate huge positive changes in an entire organization. Or an entire industry. By relentlessly focusing on safety, by making unswerving safety consciousness the keystone of the company culture, Paul O’Neill was able to turn Alcoa from a troubled underperformer, rife with union conflict, on-the-job accidents and offering poorquality products, to one of the safest companies in the world – and one of the most profitable. Some habits, like safety-consciousness, are termed “keystone habits,” influencing every aspect of our lives at work and at home; how we eat, play, and relate to each other. As Duhigg explains, “The habits that matter most are the ones that, when they start to shift, dislodge and remake other patterns.” O’Neill chose one habit on which to focus – safety/accident prevention. In doing so, he improved every aspect of Alcoa’s operations existence: ROI, manufacturing efficiency, worker satisfaction, and shareholder return (to learn how, you’ll have to read the book). Habits govern how we operate aircraft – how we dispatch, fly and maintain them, www.AvBuyer.com

and how we provide cabin service and ground handling. Successful habits developed over the last 109 years ensure the safety of both passengers and pilots, and are practiced and drilled into every professional pilot, during every initial and every recurrent training session. And it has been through the continual study of accidents and their causes, that IBAC developed IS-BAO - the International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations to institutionalize better habits. The requirement for a Safety Management System helps create new routines to deliver the expanded reward of fewer accidents in the air, on the ground and in the shop. As Terry von Thaden, Assistant Professor of Human Factors at the University of Illinois’ Institute of Aviation observes, “When things go right most of the time you can get into the habit of things going right. Pilots who study emergencies are really ready for them. They’re less complacent.” By studying how we deliver safe air transportation, we create better habits – ensuring that the “cues” automatically provoke the best and safest routine responses, and deliver the ultimate reward – the safe completion of another flight. ❯ Gil Wolin draws on almost forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


Global Aircraft Brokerage, Acquisitions and Consulting Firm

The Art of the Transaction A successful aircraft transaction is a work of art, requiring decades of experience, discipline and the masterful coordination of a symphony of details. At J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, you’ll experience this kind of skillful, hands-on approach at every phase of your transaction. Contact us today to learn how we will most positively affect your bottom line and turn your transaction into a work of art.

+1.303.444.6766 • www. jetsales.com

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Successfully Closing the Gap Between Buyer and Seller Since 1974

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JM12008_WAS0612_R1.pdf

PRICE REDUCED

1

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1995 CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5302

1989 CHALLENGER 601-3A S/N 5050

NOW ASKING $7,500,000 | 5846 Hrs TTAF, 2359 Landings

ASKING $2,650,000 | 8184 Hrs TTAF, 4404 Landings

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Smart Parts Plus • APU on MSP • Precision Plus avionics upgrade • Triple Collins FMS 6000 • Dual Litton LN-101 IRS • Airshow Genesys • Great paint and interior • Major inspections including the 6/12/24/48/96/192 and 240 month c/w 11/11 at Duncan Aviation

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Triple Collins VHF 422D COMS • Mode S XPNDR w/enhanced flight ID • Inspections c/w 10/11 at Pentastar Aviation including the 12/24/48 month and the 300 hour inspections • WSI Weather • RAAS • Triple laserefs • Dual flight bags • Airshow 400 • Sirius Satellite Radio • Aircell FFONE

TEXT JM5302 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM5050 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

PRICE REDUCED

1999 CITATION X S/N 93

UNDER CONTRACT

2002 CITATION CJ2 S/N 104

NOW ASKING $5,100,000 | 6917 Hrs TTAF, 4412 Landings, RRCC

3055 Hrs TTAF, 2000 Landings

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: APU on MSP • Document 11 complied with 9/11/11 • Aileron re-gearing modification c/w • Magnastar C 2000 FFONE w/3 handsets • Dual Honeywell NZ 2000 FMS w/6.0 software and CD 810 displays • Sirius Satellite Radio • Currently on a 135 certificate

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: One U.S. owner since new • Cessna Pro Parts program • Collins third AFD 3010E display option • Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS • Collins IFIS 5000 system with XM Weather • BF Goodrich WX 1000E Stormscope • Freon Air system

TEXT JM93 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM104 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

PRICE REDUCED

1997 FALCON 2000 S/N 48

NOW ASKING: $8,450,000 | 5788 Hrs TTAF, 2890 Landings, CSP AIRCRAFT FEATURES: HUD • Triple FMS • FDR • Great paint and interior • 10 passenger configuration • Great maintenance history TEXT JM48 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Read our industry blog at jetsales.com/blog. Follow us on twitter for the latest news: @jmesinger Watch airplane videos at jetsales.com/inventory 800.671.6766 / p: + 1 303.444.6766 / f: + 1 303.444.6866 / sales@jetsales.com

For full specifications and for more information, visit

JETSALES.COM


JM12008_WAS0612_R1.pdf

PRICE REDUCED

2

5/21/12

5:05 PM

2006 GLOBAL XRS S/N 9203

NOW ASKING $38,995,000 | 1701 Hrs TTAF, 700 Landings AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Delivered enrolled on RRCC • Always registered and based in the U.S. = easy sale process • Excellent pedigree and condition • HUD • EVS • Triple FMS • High speed data with wireless LAN • Tailwind 500 Satellite TV • CES (Collins) Software 7 upgrade • High service bulletin compliance

2005 GLOBAL 5000 S/N 9158 ASKING $33,500,000 | 1368 Hrs TTAF, 546 Landings AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Placed in service 2006 • HUD • EVS • SAT 6100 SATCOM • Triple FMS • Direct TV • Increased max take-off weight • Extended range • Batch 2IAC Upgrade • Build 6 avionics TEXT JM9158 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM9203 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

2004 GULFSTREAM G550 S/N 5060

1994 ASTRA SP S/N 71

ASKING $35,900,000 | 3226 Hrs TTAF, 1794 Landings

MAKE OFFER | 5804 Hrs TTAF, 4070 Landings, MSP Gold

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Dual Swift 64 High Speed Data • MCS-7000+ SATCOM • HUD • EVS • Aft galley • Fwd crew rest • 14 Passenger Configuration

AIRCRAFT FEATURES: Collins TTR-920 TCAS II with Change 7 • Long range fuel tank • EAR soundproofing package • Beautiful 8 passenger fireblocked interior

TEXT JM5060 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

TEXT JM71 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

WANTED – IMMEDIATE ACQUISITION GULFSTREAM G550 • GULFSTREAM G550 WANTED FOR IMMEDIATE ACQUISITION FOR A U.S. BUYER • FORWARD GALLEY • UNDER 1000 HRS TTAF • SIGNED EXCLUSIVE ACQUISITION AGREEMENT • BUYER PAYS OUR COMMISSION • NO FINANCING REQUIREMENTS

FILE PHOTO

Read our industry blog at jetsales.com/blog. Follow us on twitter for the latest news: @jmesinger Watch airplane videos at jetsales.com/inventory 800.671.6766 / p: + 1 303.444.6766 / f: + 1 303.444.6866 / sales@jetsales.com

For full specifications and for more information, visit

JETSALES.COM


BusAviationNewsJune12_Layout 1 22/05/2012 14:04 Page 1

BizAv Round-Up EBACE2012 DEBRIEF

06.12

LEARJET 75

More-or-less on a par with 2011 The 12th Annual European Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (EBACE2012) concluded as one of the strongest EBACE shows yet, demonstrating its value even amidst a challenging European economy. Organizers noted that as the third and final day of the show concluded, 12,638 Attendees had participated, representing 99 countries. Additionally, 491 Exhibitors were on hand, occupying a record-breaking 2,280 booth spaces across Halls 5, 6 and 7 of the Geneva Palexpo convention center. Furthermore, EBACE2012 featured 60 aircraft on its Static Display of Aircraft with a 10-percent increase in ramp space, making it the largestever EBACE Static Display. Next year’s show takes place from May 21- 23.

Airbus’ ACJ318 and ACJ319 have gained EASA, FAA and GACA eligibility for Part 135 operations, while a variant ACJ319 has also gained CAAC eligibility, making it easier for operators to seek and obtain approval to carry fare-paying charter passengers. / More from www.airbus.com

DAHER-SOCATA displayed the new TBM 850 Elite version of its very fast turboprop aircraft at EBACE. Among the aircraft’s key attributes is its unique capability to tailor the passenger cabin to meet operators’ needs. The middle seats can be oriented in forwardfacing position while the rear seats are removable. In about 30 minutes, the TBM 850 can be reconfigured in a four-seat cabin, increasing the luggage volume capacity by three and doubling the maximum luggage weight. / More from www.tbm850.com

Dassault's twin-engine Falcon 2000S is already demonstrating performance figures substantially higher than the capabilities announced when the program was launched on the eve of last year's EBACE. To date, the test aircraft has accumulated more than 300 flight hours in over 130 flights. Low-speed performance will be significantly better than 14

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

LEARJET 70 & 75 INTRODUCED Bombardier introduced the Learjet 70 and Learjet 75 light business jets at EBACE in a bid to upgrade and replace the Learjet 40 and 45 models. The Learjet 70 & 75 offer improved avionics, engines and a new winglet design. Both will be assembled in Wichita, and provide greater range, more speed, new interior styling, lighter weight and, because of improved fuel efficiency, lower operating costs,

Bombardier says. Each will incorporate Garmin’s Vision Flight Deck (used in all Bombardier business jets) with a synthetic vision system, graphical flight planning, increased situational awareness and reduced pilot workload. The cockpit’s cabin styling will extend into the flight deck and its interior. Both the Learjet 70 and Learjet 75 will achieve ranges greater

targeted figures, including up to a 10% improvement for landing distances. Certification of the 2000S is anticipated by the end of the fourth quarter of 2012. / More from www.dassaultfalcon.com

than 2,000 nautical miles at cruise speeds of Mach 0.75, and with passenger loads of eight pax, each will be able to handle a range close to 1,950 nautical miles. The Learjet 75 will enter service in the first half of next year, followed by the Learjet 70. More than fifty orders, letters of intent and commitments for the 70 and 75 have already been received. / More information from www.bombardier.com

entry-into-service later this year, set two unconfirmed city-pair records en route to Switzerland: one from Dallas to Washington, D.C., and another from Washington, D.C., to Geneva. / More from www.gulfstream.com

Gulfstream’s ultra-large-cabin, ultra-longrange G650 made its first trans-Atlantic crossing on May 12 en route to EBACE in Geneva. The aircraft flew 3,780 nautical miles (7,000 km) squawk-free and nonstop in just 6 hours and 55 minutes. The G650, which is undergoing flight test and certification for entry-into-service later this year, returned to Savannah in support of flight test. In addition, the G280, which is undergoing flight test and certification in preparation for www.AvBuyer.com

THE G650 ARRIVES IN GENEVA

continued on page 18 Aircraft Index see Page 4

/ More from www.ebace.aero


Guardian Jet 3 page June 21/05/2012 15:04 Page 1

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2005 Global Express SN 9141 Airframe TT - 3729.1 $31,495,000 * Enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care Program * Honeywell 2000 XP Integrated Avionics System * Primus 880 Color Wx Radar w/Lightning Sensor System * Third Flightdeck Seat * Securaplane Security & Camera System

Photos by FGL & Associates

2001 Falcon 900EX SN 94 Airframe TT - 6120.8 $18,250,000 * Honeywell Primus 2000/ProLine 4 * Securaplane Technologies Ultra Lite Security System * Engines & APU enrolled in MSP * Maintenance Tracking by AvTrak * New Paint & Interior in 2010

Photos by FGL & Associates

2002 Gulfstream G-IVSP SN 1476 Airframe TT - 2039 $15,500,000 * Honeywell Mark V EGPWS * RVSM Capable * MSG-3 Maintenance Program * Pilot & Copilot EVAS * One Fortune Owner since new

Photos by FGL & Associates

2004 Falcon 2000 SN 218 Airframe TT - 1631.7 $11,750,000 * Enrolled in CAMP Maintenance Tracking Program * One Owner Since New * Collins Proline IV (4 tube) Avioncs Suite with 6.1 Software Upgrade * Third Flightdeck Seat * Airshow Genesys

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 3 page June 21/05/2012 15:11 Page 2

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2006 Agusta AW139 SN 31061 Airframe TT - 516.1 $9,995,000 * Honeywell Primus Epic System/FMS * XM Weather System * Emergency Flotation System with Rigid Covers * One Owner since New * Engines enrolled in MSP Gold

Photos by FGL & Associates

2000 Challenger 604 SN 5433 Airframe TT - 3894.6 $9,700,000 * Engines enrolled in JSSI Complete Maintenance Program * Pro Line 4 Avionic System with Precision Plus Upgrade * Honeywell Mark V EGPWS * Collins 6-Tube EFIS * Airshow 4000

Photos by FGL & Associates

1994 Gulfstream G-IVSP SN 1258 Airframe TT - 6061.9 $8,995,000 * Airshow Genesys * RVSM Capable * MSG-3 Maintenance Program * Honeywell/L3 Communications TCAS II sw 7.0 * Two Fortune Owners since new

Photos by FGL & Associates

2007 Citation XLS SN 5736 Airframe TT - 1712 $6,995,000 * MSG 3 Maintenance Program * Dual Honeywell Primus 1000 3-Tube EFIS * Honeywell Primus 880 * Garmin GDL-69 for XM Weather * ST-3100 Aircell Telephone System

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 3 page June 21/05/2012 15:13 Page 3

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2008 King Air B200GT SN BY-40 Airframe TT - 495 $4,295,000 * Collins ProLine 21 and Integrated Flight Information System * RVSM Ops Capable * Raisbeck Crown Nacelle Wing Lockers * Raisbeck Dual Aft Body Strakes * One owner since new, always hangared

Photos by FGL & Associates

2009 Citation Mustang SN 510-215 Airframe TT - 407.6 $2,550,000 * Engines enrolled in Cessna's PowerAdvantage+ Program * Garmin G1000 advanced avionics system * RVSM Capable * XM Satellite Radio * Two Fortune Owners since new

Photos by FGL & Associates

2001 Raytheon Premier I Airframe TT - 1108.9 $1,995,000 * Williams Tap Elite * Collins Pro Line 21 Integrated Avionics System with 3 tube EFIS * RVSM Capable * XM Weather * New Paint June 2011

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


BusAviationNewsJune12_Layout 1 22/05/2012 14:10 Page 2

BizAvRound-Up

2

/ More from www.hondajet.com NEXTANT 400XT

Nextant Aerospace announced at EBACE that it has delivered 10 production units of the 400XT, the world’s only FAA-certified, remanufactured business jet. The "N"registered aircraft was delivered to a private client that will operate the plane in a traditional corporate flight department environment. Nextant reached this production milestone just seven months after gaining FAA certification, and is on schedule to deliver 32 aircraft by the end of 2012. / More from www.nextantaerospace.com

Pilatus announced that a PC-12 NG with special Formula 1 livery showing the Sauber C31 racing car will fly the Sauber F1 Team direct to the racetracks of Europe in 2012. The PC-12 NG took off on its first mission last month, flying the eight-man team, plus team manager Peter Sauber to the first race in Spain. / More from www.pilatus-aircraft.com PC-12 NG

18

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

CITATION LONGITUDE

CESSNA ANNOUNCES LONGITUDE Cessna introduced its newest and longest-range business jet, the Citation Longitude at EBACE. Boasting a 4,000-nauticalmile range and a maximum speed of Mach 0.86, the Citation Longitude will make a non-stop flight from New York to Paris, London to Dubai or Beijing to Moscow. The Citation Longitude will be powered by two Snecma Silvercrest engines with 11,000 pounds of thrust - selected for

their fuel efficiency, weight and maintainability. The Citation Longitude's state-of-the-art cockpit features Garmin’s G5000 avionics with touch-screen controls and all of the capabilities required to comply with emerging operating requirements for intercontinental aircraft. With space for a crew of two plus up to eight passengers and one optional additional crew member seat, the Citation

GENERAL INDUSTRY ROUND-UP

Longitude features a stand-up 6-foot high, 31foot long flat floor passenger cabin. As the longest-range business jet in Cessna's product line, the Citation Longitude is designed to offer an estimated full fuel payload of 1,950 pounds, a maximum cruise speed of 490 knots true airspeed and a maximum range of 4,000 nautical miles. / More information from www.cessna.com

Airbus and Lufthansa Technik

space on Germany’s Nuremberg airport by acquiring another hangar dedicated to maintenance. The facility will be used primarily for Bombardier Challenger and Dassault Falcon work.

have renewed their general agreement about the cooperation in the VIP and Executive Jet business and will continue to further develop their successful partnership in this area. Since 1998 both companies have already been working closely in the completion of Airbus Corporate Jets. Within the ACJ318 Program Lufthansa Technik is the cabin interior partner of Airbus.

/ More from www.aero-dienst.de

/ More from www.airbus.com

Aero-Dienst has increased its usable

Al Bateen Executive Airport Aero Toy Store is opening a 250,000 sq ft FBO at London's Stansted Airport in time for the 2012 London Olympics, having taken over the Diamond Hangar formerly occupied by SR Technics. The company is spending $2 million refurbishing the facility. Managing director Mike Foley and colleagues marked the inaugural flight from the new FBO by flying to EBACE on the company's Bombardier Challenger 601.

announced a 26% increase in visiting Business Aviation traffic in the period between January and April 2012 versus the same period last year, and a 6% increase in total commercial aircraft movements over the same period. The report also indicated that in April alone the airport registered an increase of 38% in visiting aircraft compared with the same month in 2011, while the total commercial traffic increased by 5% during the same period.

/ More from www.aerotoystore.com

/ More from www.albateenairport.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Honda Aircraft is the first manufacturer to announce and demonstrate plans for a new 40/60 display configuration on the Garmin G3000 Primary Flight Displays for the HondaJet. This enhancement provides pilots a more user-friendly visual scan of additional flight information in a concise format that contributes to improved situational awareness and safety. The pilot or co-pilot can select and see more information within a tile that uses 40% of the width of each of the 14-inch wide, high-resolution primary flight displays. Further, Honda unveiled plans for a new Cabin Management System (CMS) and updated production aircraft interior. The new CMS will enable passengers to use a wireless mobile device, such as a tablet or smartphone, to view real time flight information and to control the HondaJet cabin's lighting, temperature, music, and window shades for enhanced comfort and productivity.

continued on page 28 Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jeteffect Inventory June 21/05/2012 15:17 Page 1

EXCLUSIVELY OFFERED

LOS ANGELES 562.989.8800

DALLAS 214.451.6953

PALM BEACH 561.747.2223

SAVANNAH 912.330.8797

Year

Model

Serial No.

1988

Astra 1125

012

1983

Challenger 601-1A

3010

1990

Challenger 601-3A

5066

1995

Citation Jet 525

0122

1997

Citation Jet 525

0198

1998

Citation Jet 525

0243

1994

Citation V

560-0252

2005

Citation Sovereign

680-0015

1982

Falcon 50

116

1995

Falcon 900B

153

2003

Global Express

9085

2001

Gulfstream G200

015

1987

Gulfstream GIV

1006

1988

Gulfstream GIV

1057

2000

Gulfstream GIV/SP

1433

2004

Hawker 400XP

RK-370

1997

Hawker 800XP

258313

1998

Hawker 800XP

258369

2006

Lancair LIV

566

1998

Learjet 31A

143

1981

Learjet 35A

392

1999

Learjet 45

052

1996

Learjet 60

085

2002

Learjet 60

244

2007

Learjet 60XR

320

2010

Phenom 100

50000112

2002

Piaggio Avanti P180

1050

1996

Pilatus PC-12/45

156


Avpro June 21/05/2012 15:30 Page 1


Avpro June 21/05/2012 15:31 Page 2


Avpro June 21/05/2012 15:31 Page 3


Bristol Associates April 19/03/2012 16:33 Page 1

Acquisitions * Appraisals * Consulting * Remarketing Challenger 605 sn 5711

Gulfstream IV sn 1124

Gulfstream V sn 627

New to Market! Boeing BBJ sn 30496

ERJ 135 and 145s Available

+1 (202) 682-4000 bristol@bristolassociates.com Www.bristolassociates.com


O'Gara June 22/05/2012 15:24 Page 1


O'Gara June 22/05/2012 15:25 Page 2


Avjet multiple June 24/05/2012 12:59 Page 1

2002 Global Express SN 9116

2003 Gulfstream GIV (G300) SN 1509

2007 BBJ 700C SN 36756

2009 Green BBJ SN 37700

2006 Gulfstream G450 SN 4044

2006 Learjet 45XR SN 304

Los Angeles: (818) 841-6190 Washington D.C.: +1 (410) 626-6162

AVJE T.COM sales@avjet.co m


Avjet - FP June 23/05/2012 10:10 Page 1



 

 

  









 



  



 

Global Sales & Acquisitionss Andrew C. Bradley Senior Vice President, Global Sales S and Acquisitions andrew@avjet.com Phone: +1 (410) 626-6162 Charter & Management Mark H. Lefever President charter@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190







AV VJET T.COM

 

 

 









 

 









World Headquarters Marc J. Foulkrod Chairman and Chief Executivve OfďŹ cer info@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190





 



 

 

 

 




BusAviationNewsJune12_Layout 1 22/05/2012 14:06 Page 3

BizAvRound-Up

/ More from www.aviationresearch.com

Comlux has announced a partnership agreement with Florida-based Merle Wood & Associates, one of the most prominent and successful Yachting Companies providing a full range of services. Through this agreement, each company will market the charter services of its partner, thereby offering to its VIP clientele the most professional one-stopshop for its luxury charter services worldwide. Comlux is a world leading VIP charter services operator. Beyond charter operations, Comlux offers a comprehensive set of services to VIP customers who wish to have their own aircraft managed personally and professionally. This includes exclusive aircraft management, sales and acquisitions, cabin design and completion as well as maintenance and engineering services. / More from www.comluxaviation.com HAMISH ROSS

AVPRO PARTNERS WITH ASIAN SKY GROUP Asian Sky Group and Avpro signed a Strategic Partnership Agreement at EBACE2012 allowing for cross referrals; joint marketing and promotions of both company's services and exclusive aircraft listings to clients and prospects; and the placement of employees in Asia and the US to work alongside each other. "Given the rapidly diversifying demand for Business Aviation aircraft and services throughout China and across the Asia-Pacific region, this strategic partnership with Asian Sky Group allows Avpro to significantly increase its presence in these critical markets at this exciting time,” Chris Ellis, Managing Partner, Avpro outlined. “Asian Sky Group is driven by the same fundamental principles as Avpro and provides crucial local and regional knowledge that will allow us both to be very successful in Asia. "What also attracted Avpro to Asian Sky Group is its highly qualified and experienced management team, its coverage throughout Asia and the solid financial support Asian Sky Group enjoys from its backers SEACOR Capital and Avion Pacific." announced the opening of its Hong Kong operating base, led by Neil Gibson and offering complete turn-key facilities to existing and potential Gama customers. Mirroring operations in Europe, USA and the Middle East, Gama is now able to offer its clients aircraft management and charter services there. / More from www.gamagroup.com

NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen re-

Gama Group announced that its newest operational base will be located in Geneva, Switzerland and will open for business in July 2012. The new location at Geneva Airport’s Executive Terminal will offer aircraft management services to existing and potential Gama customers and will also be aiming for a full Swiss AOC by the end of the year. The operation will be led by General Manager, Captain Hamish Ross. At the same time, Gama Group 28

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

leased a statement after a Virginia judge ruled last month that a 2011 traffic stop for former FAA chief Randy Babbitt, which resulted in DWI charges and led to Babbitt's resignation, was made without just cause. "For decades, Randy has been one of the most recognized and respected people in aviation. “His contributions to the safety and efficiency of air transportation in the United States and around the world are significant. We are pleased that the matter that led to his resignation from the FAA is now closed. We wish him all the best in whatever his future www.AvBuyer.com

CHRIS ELLIS, AVPRO

"Asian Sky Group is proud to enter into this agreement with Avpro as a Strategic Partner,” Jay Shaw, Managing Director, Asian Sky Group added. “Avpro's 20 years of sales experience will immediately translate into added value for our Asian clients. With Avpro as a partner Asian Sky Group will be able to provide them with the best possible opportunities in the marketplace, which along with our continued commitment to the highest level of service and professionalism, will allow us to continually meet and exceed the expectations of our clients." / More from www.avprojets.com

plans may be and trust that the aviation community will benefit from his considerable talent, expertise and commitment." / More from www.nbaa.org

Rockwell Collins’ Venue, the cabin management and HD entertainment system for business aircraft with more than 140 installations, will be installed by Jet Aviation St. Louis for the first time on a Bombardier Global Express XRS. / More from www.rockwellcollins.com

TAG Aviation has been awarded the EBAA prestigious Platinum Safety of Flight Award for 2012. The important industry category award recognizes a European operator surpassing 100,000 hours of flight without an accident. TAG Aviation has also successfully completed a Wyvern on-site audit to attain the elite Wingman status, a program known to far surpass industry standards for air charter safety. / More from www.tagaviation.com

ARGUS International has presented ExecutJet South Africa with the prestigious ARGUS Platinum Rating. ExecuJet South Africa has become the first operator in South Africa to achieve the Platinum Rating which is awarded only to those air charter operators who have demonstrated successful implementation of industry best safety practices relative to their operations and maintenance.

3

continued on page 34 Aircraft Index see Page 4


Boutsen June 21/05/2012 15:36 Page 1


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Challenger

1985 Challenger 601-1A | 3044

Citation Ultra

1996 Citation Ultra | 560-0366

Citation S11

1985 Citation SII | S550-0041

Citation Jet

2007 Citation CJ2+ | 525A-0345

Learjet

Citation V11

1996 Citation VII | 650-7074

Citation Excel

2002 Citation Excel | 560-5288

Citation 11

1994 Citation II | 550-0732

Citation 1SP

1982 Citation ISP | 501-0255

Beechjet

1993 Learjet 31A | 31A-086

Also Available: 550-0047

Also Available: 501-0687, 501-0229

1992 Beechjet 400A | RK-36 Also Available: RK-107

For Full Specs & Additional Photos on Exclusive Listings by Bell Aviation, please Visit our Website at www.BellAviation.com


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

King Air 350

1998 King Air 350 | FL-221

King Air 200

1976 King Air 200 | BB-169

Conquest

1980 Conquest II | 441-0116

Meridian

2008 Piper Meridian | 4697324

Meridian

2001 Piper Meridian | 4697110

King Air B200

1983 King Air B200 | BB-1140

King Air E90

1976 King Air E90 | LW-186

Pilatus

1998 Pilatus PC-12/45 | 195

Meridian

2006 Piper Meridian | 4697255

Meridian

2001 Piper Meridian | 4697056

For Full Specs & Additional Photos on Exclusive Listings by Bell Aviation, please Visit our Website at www.BellAviation.com


Project1 07/06/2012 14:47 Page 1

FEATURED INVENTORY IN NVENTORY

We didn’t set out to have

THE MOST PLANES.

1997 CHALLENGER 604 - SN 5351 It’s Time to Sell and Ready to Move Engines Enrolled on GE OnPoint - Honeywell Direct TV

Just the one you need. Jetcraft has become one of the world’s top aircraft resellers by recognizing a seemingly simple fact: every customer is unique. For over 50 years, we’ve excelled at finding the right aircraft for each customer through our

1999 CHALLENGER 604 - SN 5404

large inventory and extensive worldwide network. So whether you need

European Union VAT Paid - Enrolled on Smart Parts MSP on APU - Well Maintained - One Owner

a new or pre-owned business or pleasure jet, a customized craft or even a helicopter, call us. We don’t just have more planes. We have your plane. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

2003 CHALLENGER 604 - SN 5556 Exceptional Value - Flight Dynamics 2150 Heads Up Precision Plus / 3D Maps / Long Rang Cruise Upgrades

2007 CHALLENGER 300 - SN 20152

2007 CHALLENGER 605 - SN 5705

Priced to Sell - Only 700 Hrs MSP Gold & Smart Parts Plus

CAMP Systems Maintenance Tracking - JAR OPS 1 Certified Only 1550 Hrs Total - 12-Pax Interior Tastefully Completed

2010 CHALLENGER 300 - SN 20284

2013 CHALLENGER 605 - Q1 2013

EASA / JAR-OPS1 Compliant - CAMP Maintenance Tracking RVSM Compliant - Completed Delivery 29 October 2010

Newest Challenger 605 On Market Bombardier Completion with LE Package with Additional Options

1988 CHALLENGER 601-3A - SN 5018

1993 CITATION VI - SN 650-0231

Complete Soft Goods & Refreshed Paint Stripe 2011 Fresh Gear Overhaul & 60 Month

Fresh Document 8 & Engine MPI Inspection MSP Gold on Upgraded 3C Engines - Stunning New Paint


Project1 07/06/2012 14:48 Page 1

2008 CITATION XLS+ - SN 560-6006

1990 GULFSTREAM IV - SN 1154

Pristine Condition Aircraft - All Serious Offers Considered Only 597 Hours Total - Dual FMS/GSP, Dual FSU, and WAAS

Rolls-Royce Tay Mk 611-8 - Only 2 U.S. Owners Since New On Gulfstream CMP - Motivated Seller

2003 CHALLENGER 850 - SN 7755

1996 SIKORSKY S-76B - SN 760441

New VIP Completion - Numerous Upgrades New PATS Extended Range Fuel Allows Up to 3,000 nm Range

One Corporate Owner Since New New Blade Spindles - Excellent Service Bulletin Status

JJETCRAFT ETCRAFT INTRODUCES INTROD DUCES EFVS FOR CHALLENGE CHALLENGER ER 605

HUD Vision Access Program — OPPORTUNITY TO BE LAUNCH CUSTOMER 1990 FALCON 50 - SN 203 Current State-of-the-Art Technology Pedigree Operating History

A unique aftermarket enhanced flight vision system (EFVS) program, HUD Vision Access will improve the performance, safety and flexibility of the Bombardier Challenger 605 in all phases of flight and weather conditions. Previously unavailable for

2009 FALCON 7X - SN 55 Excellent Falcon 7X Opportunity - EU-OPS1 Certified HUD/EFVS/Satcom - Enrolled on FalconCare

the Challenger 605, our enhanced vision system camera is the only infrared detection system approved for use in 1000foot runway visual range (RVR) operations. It is standard fit on the FedEx wide body fleet and most Gulfstream business jets. Jetcraft’s HUD Vision Access program is currently undergoing

2001 GLOBAL EXPRESS - SN 9060

certification on the Bombardier Challenger 604.

Fresh 8C Inspection - Recent Interior Furnishings - HUD On Smart Parts & JSSI Pro Parts

Manufactured by Elbit Systems of America-Kollsman using its EVS-II and new AT-HUD technology, Jetcraft is pleased to offer the opportunity to become the launch and first Challenger 605 customer for this program. For more information on this exclusive upgrade program, please contact:

1998 GULFSTREAM IVSP Best Large Jet Value Under $10M - Ready to Sell and Fly! Rolls Royce CorporateCare Engine Program - FAR Part 135 Current

Ken Elliott, VP Avionics Systems, Jetcraft kenelliott@jetcraft.com I Office 706-650-2140 I Cell 706-631-4715


BusAviationNewsJune12_Layout 1 22/05/2012 17:26 Page 4

Market Indicators

4

AMSTAT VIEW

JETNET VIEW

The first quarter “was a mixed bag of results” for the business aircraft pre-owned market, indicating that “recovery still remains elusive,” according to Business Aviation information firm Amstat. “On the one hand, inventories generally continued to contract, but year-on-year transaction activity remained largely unchanged and average asking prices in many parts of the market continued to face downward pressure.” During the first three months, business jet resale retail transactions were largely flat compared with a year ago, with 2.3 percent of the fleet changing hands. On a consecutive quarter-over-quarter basis, transactions slid by 0.2 percentage points. Amstat also noted that the first-quarter performance was below its 20-year average of 2.9 percent. “The lower transaction activity in Q1 versus Q4 is typical of what we see; however, the flat performance versus Q1 2011 was disappointing and further evidence that we are in a transitional phase in the market cycle,” said Amstat executive vice president Tom Benson. The report also highlighted “incremental but continued improvements” in pre-owned aircraft inventory levels. At the end of the first quarter, 13.8 percent of the business jet fleet was for sale versus 14.2 percent in the same period last year. However, Amstat noted, this percentage represents a slowdown in the inventory contraction seen in previous quarters. Average asking prices for light and medium jets have continued to erode, though Amstat has seen “some stability” in large-cabin jet prices.

M ARCH For Sale Fleet % For Sale 2012 Fleet % For Sale 2011 % Change For Sale

JETNET has released March 2012 and 1st Quarter 2012 results for the pre-owned business jet, business turboprop, and helicopter markets. “Fleet for Sale” percentages for all market sectors were down in the March comparisons. However, the current “For Sale” percentages and numbers for both business jets and business turboprops are still higher than were recorded before the current downturn began in 2008. Business jet sale transactions increased 5.9% YTD ending March 2012 compared to 2011. Business turboprops decreased 5.4% and both turbine and piston helicopters saw double-digit declines in sale transactions YTD

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

9.2%

6.2%

5.9%

14.4%

10.5%

6.8%

7.0%

at 14.5% and 19.5%, respectively. Pre-owned aircraft categories showed increases in average asking price percentages in the YTD March 2012 comparisons to March 2011. Both business turboprops and turbine helicopters have continued to show double digit increases in average asking price since the start of this year. Business jets showed a positive start in the 1st Quarter of 2012, with a 5.9% increase in pre-owned sales transactions, by selling in less time than last year, and with a 7.8% increase in average asking price. However, the other market sectors are not showing similar results. Preowned sale transactions for the other

(-1.1) pt 210 328 $0.220

-19.5% 44 -2.2%

sectors decreased, taking longer to sell on average, and at much greater average asking prices compared to the same period in 2011. In addition, while the number for sale and percent for sale continue to decline, a comparison of the four years prior to the downturn (March 2005 to March 2008) to the four years since (March 2009 to March 2012) reflect on average nearly 1,000 more business jets and more than 350 business turboprop aircraft. The good news is that business jet forsale inventories are declining, and full sale transactions continue to increase. / More from www.jetnet.com

ARGUS VIEW

34

13.8%

(-0.6) pt (-1.3) pt (-0.6) pt J anuary - March 2012 Full Sale Transactions 521 313 294 Avg Days on Market 329 326 402 Avg Asking Price $3.991 $1.332 $1.483 (US$m) Y TD January to March 2012 vs 2011 Change 5.9% -5.4% -14.5% Transactions Change - Days on -95 32 -6 Mkt Change - Ask Prices 7.8% 11.8% 16.4%

/ More from www.argus.aero

ARGUS TRAQPak data for April 2012 shows a drop in flight activity month-overmonth but a rise year-over-year. TRAQPak data indicates that April 2012 business aircraft flight activity decreased from March (which is the typical annual trend), finishing the month down 4.4%. All of the operational categories finished down from the previous month, led by Part 135 activity, down 5.5%. Fractional and Part 91 finished down 4.9% and 3.7% respectively. The aircraft category results were also down from the previous month, led by large cabin aircraft, down 8.1%. Turboprops, midsize & small cabin aircraft flights were down 4.5%, 3.9% and 2.7% in that order. The only month-over-month increase came in the fractional turboprop sector, up 4.8%. Reviewing activity year-over-year (April 2012 vs. April 2011) TRAQPak observed a 1.3% increase in overall Aircraft activity. Comparing the operational categories Part

W ORLDWIDE TRENDS B usiness Aircraft H elicopters J ets T urbos T urbine P iston 2559 1246 1141 545

www.AvBuyer.com

continued on page 38 Aircraft Index see Page 4


Charlie Bravo June 21/05/2012 15:44 Page 1

1992 King Air 35 350 50 FL-87, FL-87, 6675 Hours, Hours, 2960/3090 2960/3090 SOH, RVSM, RVSM, Raisbeck Raisbeck Lockers, Recent Prop Gear Lockers, R ecent P rop and dG ear O/H

2010 Phenom 100 S/N 147, 265.8 Hours, EASA Configured

1998 Learjet 600 4819 T TT, T, 3123 C Cycles, ycles, B Belted Lav, Recent Recent 12-Year 12--Ye ear eltted Lav, Inspection Inspection

1990 King Air B200 BB-1365, 4885 TT, 1882 SMOH, Garmin 400, Avidyne ne EX 500, XM WX, Stormscope, GNS-XLS, great cosmetics. cs.

Also AAvailable vailable 2007 LLegacy egacy 600 1999 Citation Citation X 2013 Legacy Legacy 500 2001 Citation Citation C CJ2 J2 2000 Citation Citation Enc Encore ore

1998 Cessna Cessna Citation Citation Jet 1998 Citation Citation Br Bravo avo 1979 Citation Citation I/SP 1979 M Merlin erlin IIIB

You Y Yo ou wouldn't ou w wo oul ou o ouldn't u uld ul ld lldn d dn n n't n' 'tt use u us s se e a cute ccu cut utte cheerl u ute cche ch chee cheerleader he he eer ee erl er rleader ea ea ead ader d de e err tto o fix fix xy yo your our ou our ur plane, p plllan pla an ane ne, ne e, e, why wh w hy hy would w wou oul o ou ould u uld ul ld ld you y yo ou u ou use us se e a less les ess e ss knowledgeable k kno kn no owl wledgeab ed edg e d dge g gea ge ea ea ab ble broker bl b br bro rok oke oker o ker er than tth tha h han ha a an n Charlie Ch Ch ha harlie arrli llie e Bravo Br B Brav rav avo to to buy bu b u uy y one? o on ne e? ?

Scan to Scan to view our full inventory inventory

SSALE SA SALES AALE AL LESS AND LES LE AAN ND N D ACQUISITIONS AAC ACQ ACQU CQ CQU QUISI QU QUI UIS ISSIT ISI ISIT SIT ITI TIO IO ON NSS N


JetBrokers June 22/05/2012 18:21 Page 1

2004 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258674, 3052 TT, MSP Gold, Support Plus, Delivered with Fresh G Check, JAR Ops, TCAS II, CAMP, 8 pax interior, Asking $4,495,000.00

1989 Falcon 900B, S/N 071, 9464 TT, MSP Gold, 4C c/w Nov 11 by Duncan, 12 pax Interior, Triple IRS’, Asking $9,500,000.00

2001 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258503, 3159.7 TT, Engines/APU on MSP, TCAS II, TAWS-A, Dual NZ-2000’s, L/R Oxygen, Honeywell EFIS, Asking $3,300,000.00

1980 Falcon 50, S/N 010, 7977 TT, JSSI, Collins FDS-2000 EFIS, TCAS II, Dual UNS-1F w/ WAAS, C&CPCP c/w 3/09, Gear O/H in 2/12, Asking $2,200,000.00

2002 Premier I, S/N RB-48, 2620 TT, Engines on TAP Elite, TCAS 2, Dual FMS3000, 8.33 Spacing/FM Immunity, Asking $2,000,000.00

2005 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411, 615 TT, Garmin GMX-200 MFD, XM Weather, Sat Phone, Like New, Airshow, Freon, One Owner, Asking $2,995,000.00

1980 King Air F90, S/N LA-9, 4786 TT, 713/713 SMOH, Avidyne Max EX500, Raisbeck Strakes, Rudder Boost, Frakes Exhaust, Gear O/H c/w 4/12, Asking $895,000.00

2008 King Air C90GTi, S/N LJ-1902, 1356 TT, Pro-line 21 w/ IFIS, One Owner, Upgraded Transponders, Asking $2,500,000.00

Also Available Citation V, S/N 560-0112 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0871 Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039 Citation II, S/N 550-0326 Citation II, S/N 550-0216 Citation II, S/N 550-0094 Citation II, S/N 550-0082

Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0204 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Falcon 20C-5BR, S/N 142 Falcon 20 Cargo, S/N 31 Learjet 35A, S/N 138 Premier IA, S/N RB-181 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-67 King Air 200, S/N BB-263

King Air 200, S/N BB-48 King Air F90, S/N LA-45 King Air C90, S/N LJ-601 Socata TBM700B, S/N 232 Socata TBM700B, S/N 193 Aerostar Superstar 700, S/N 601P-472-188


JetBrokers June 22/05/2012 18:22 Page 2

2008 Gulfstream G200, S/N 213, 619 TT, SATCOM, Recent 3C Check, Honeywell FDR, Ext Lav Service, Asking $11,500,000.00

2008 Citation Sovereign, S/N 680-0216, Owner Looking for a partner!, 1023 TT, JAR Ops, Pro Parts, Power Advantage, Asking $5,500,000.00 for ½ share

1983 Challenger 601-1A, S/N 3013, 11,579 TT, Engines on GE On-Point, Landing Gear O/Hed 3/12, 60 M/CPCP c/w 11/11, APU on MSP, Asking $2,795,000.00

1999 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0891, 5452 TT, On Power Advantage Plus and Pro Parts, Freon Air, Phase 5 c/w 5/10, Belted Potty, Asking $1,950,000.00

1990 Citation V, S/N 560-0059, 6190.6 TT, ESP Gold, TCAS 2, 5-Tube EFIS, TAWS-A, RVSM, Fresh Phase 1-5, New Paint, JAR Ops, Asking $1,595,000.00

1988 Beechjet 400, S/N RJ-47, 4128 TT, 515 SMOH, RVSM, Freon, TR’s, Gear O/Hed 9/10, UNS-1K, Asking $875,000.00

2002 Socata TBM700C1, S/N 244, 1885 TT, KMD850 MFD, Dual Garmin GNS-530, RVSM Compliant, Mode S w/ Diversity, Asking $1,395,000.00

1980 Citation II, S/N 550-0127, 12881 TT, 1730/1941 SMOH, TR’s, TCAS II, Freon Air, 8.33/FM Immunity, Asking $600,000.00

AUSTIN +1-512-530-6900 Phone DETROIT +1-248-666-9800 Phone

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

CHICAGO +1-630-377-6900 Phone FARNBOROUGH +44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Web: www.jetbrokers.com


BusAviationNewsJune12_Layout 1 22/05/2012 14:13 Page 5

Market Indicators

5

91 continues the positive trend finishing up 4.5%. The Fractional and Part 135 markets both saw a year-over-year decline in activity; down 6.1% and 1.0% respectively. Activity by aircraft category for April saw increases in most groups with the exception of large cabin aircraft, down 4.9%. / More from www.aviationresearch.aero

NAFA VIEW

/ More from www.nafa.aero

"I wouldn't exactly call it a disappearing act," says general aviation analyst Brian Foley. "But it's been a significant attrition and not altogether surprising in view of Europe's economic woes. At this rate it may be another year before Europe's fleet can grow again." Over the last 12 months some 50 European business jets, or roughly 2% of the continent's population, have been sold into other continents whose fleets have grown an overall 3%. A commanding 79% of them have found new homes in North America, mostly in the United States and Canada. The rest have gone to Africa (7%), Australia (5%) South America (5%) and Asia (4%). Today's for-sale statistics do not bode well for a prompt recovery. Almost one European business jet in five (19%) is up for sale, which is more than onethird higher than the worldwide average of 14%. Of those exported, their average age of 12

years matches the overall European fleet age exactly, which means that the aircraft being sold are a representative mix of everything in the fleet from old clunkers to the newest, most fuelefficient models. Foley's hypothesis is that the world's preowned jet buyers have been shopping in Europe where the high supply keeps prices down. Another factor is Europe's lowering Euro, which favors outside buyers. "This underscores the seriousness of Europe's crisis," Foley says. "Europe may be the last bastion of great pre-owned airplane deals as owners must sell in this austere climate." Most pundits think that Europe's new-air-

craft sales recovery will lag until its pre-owned inventory diminishes, but Foley disagrees. "There is no cause-andeffect relationship because, generally speaking, new and preowned buyers are totally different groups. Our experience shows that those who buy new will almost invariably continue buying new in order to get the latest model that is truly personalized to their requirements and not 'tainted' by the tastes of a previous owner.” / More from www.brifo.com

Attendees at the National Aircraft Financing Association (NAFA) annual meeting held recently in Savannah, Georgia largely agreed that aircraft financing is “thawing,” but new international banking rules that will start to be phased in next year might make things worse. In an attempt to prevent another financial meltdown like that seen in 2007-2008, the new Basel III global regulatory standards are expected to strengthen bank capital requirements and introduce new regulatory requirements on bank liquidity and bank leverage for all lending institutions, not just banks, with more than $50 billion in assets. “As a result of the new rules,” Citi Private Bank director of global aircraft finance Ford von Weise told attendees, “banks will need to have more capital reserves, which means they’ll either need to raise cash or lend less.” While the new banking rules will not take full effect until 2019, four European business aircraft financiers, including Standard Corporate Jet Financing, have pulled out of the market because of Basel III, according to Corporate Jet Investor’s Alasdair Whyte. Von Weise said “relationship banking” will be key for many aircraft operators that plan to finance an aircraft in the future. Fleet operators and those seeking long-term loans will be less likely to find aircraft financing under Basel III, he noted.

BRIFO EURO VIEW

Find an Aircraft Dealer

Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

Business Aviation

avbuyer.com/dealers continued on page 42

38

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

freestream aircraft limited

freestream aircraft usa ltd

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.820.1920 aircraftsales@freestream.com

www.freestream.com

new york | LAS VEGAS | london | hong kong | new delhi | mexico | Moscow | Bermuda


Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions Gulfstream G550/5063

Gulfstream GV/605

Gulfstream GV/512

Gulfstream GIVSP/1317

Gulfstream GIV/1081

Gulfstream G200/17

Global Express XRS/9195

CRJ/7159

Falcon 900EXy/171

Falcon 900B/50

Challenger 605/5704

Challenger 604/5491

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

Boeing BBJ/30076

Boeing BBJ/36714

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 800XP/258386

Lear 60/297

Citation Mustang/266

freestream aircraft limited

freestream aircraft usa ltd

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.820.1920 aircraftsales@freestream.com

www.freestream.com

new york | LAS VEGAS | london | hong kong | new delhi | mexico | Moscow | Bermuda


BusAviationNewsJune12_Layout 1 22/05/2012 14:18 Page 6

aerosmithpenny.com

BizAvRound-Up

6

ARRIVALS Neil W. Book - has been promoted to

Dave Eickhoff or Bob Nygren 8031 Airport Blvd. Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061 Phone: (713) 649-6100 • Fax: (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com

1990 Citation II, S/N 550-0636

the position of co-president at Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI). Book will be responsible for Sales, Marketing and Technical Services Operations.

William (Bill) Clarey — Gulfstream has named Clarey as sales director in the company’s North American Sales, East Division, Mid-Atlantic Region. His territory is Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington, D.C. and West Virginia.

Yousif Hassan Al Hammadi – moves to the position of acting general manager at Al Bateen Executive Airport.

Total Time: 6202, Sperry 3 Tube EDS-603 3 Tube EFIS, Global GNS XLS w/GPS, Thrust Reversers, Freon A/C. PRICE REDUCED

1986 Gulfstream III, S/N 477

Fresh Engines Due 2017 and 2019. 72 Month done C/W Gulfstream Dallas 6/09, Excellent Interior, New Exterior Paint 2009

1982 Gulfstream III, S/N 375

Steve Jones - Marshall Aerospace has appointed Steve Jones as Managing Director of Business Aviation and Marshall Executive Aviation. Before joining Marshall, Jones was General Manager of three General Aviation Airports in the United Arab Emirates; and prior to his time in the Middle East he was the Managing Director at Oxford Airport, UK.

Robert Lewis - was named president and CEO of Pentastar Aviation recently. He succeeds Rick Maloney, who retired last month after a four-decade aviation career.

1987 King Air B200, S/N BB -1262

YOUSIF HASSAN AL HAMMADI AL BATEEN EXECUTIVE AIRPORT

Susan K. Marr – has been promoted to the position of co-president at Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI). Ms. Marr will lead the Legal, Human Resources, Client Services and Office Services Teams. Aoife O’Sullivan - partner at specialist aviation legal firm Gates and Partners has been invited by the European Business Aviation Association to chair the AMAC Finance and Leasing working group.

Total Time: 9032.7, 13 Passenger Seating

WILLIAM (BILL) CLAREY GULFSTREAM

AOIFE O’SULLIVAN GATES AND PARTNERS

Julie Timmons - West Star Aviation recently announced Julie Timmons as corporate aircraft interior sales manager at its East Alton facility, St. Louis Regional Airport (ALN).

European Business Aviation Awards - The European Business 4057.6 Total Time, Engines Hours: Hours Since Overhaul left – 1166.1, right-1166.1

aerosmithpenny.com 42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

Aviation Association (EBAA) and National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) have announced that David McMillan, director general of Eurocontrol, and Don Spruston, director general of the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC) are the recipients of the 2012 European Business Aviation Awards.

www.AvBuyer.com

JULIE TIMMONS WEST STAR AVIATION

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BusAviationNewsJune12_Layout 1 22/05/2012 17:31 Page 7

7

BizAvRound-Up

Chuck Collins & Associates, Inc.

AVBUYER.COM iPAD OWNER’S REVIEW WINNER Thanks to everyone who has reviewed their aircraft for our ‘Owners’ Reviews section at AvBuyer.com. The good news is that we have a winner and we are launching another competition this month to win an iPod Touch. The winner of the iPad competition is pilot, Mr Xavier Marchant from France who wrote about his King Air C90XP (1984). Ratings: Comfort: 4, Value: 5 I started flying the Beechcraft 90 series in 1998. I now fly a 1984 C90XP (original C90A converted to XP with Blackhawk engines, PT6A-135A). These engines are the same ones that come with the newer C90GT and give the old C90A a new boost in performances: 272 Knots TAS at FL220 on a standard day. Max torque can be maintained up to FL190 and gives a solid 1,500 Ft/Min at 150 Kts. Overall this is a very strong aircraft, able to cruise fast (for a turboprop) and high. It can take eight people on board (six for "business class" comfort) over 1,000 nm (if you get the Max gross weight upgrade). The aircraft can also take-off from short and unpaved runways. The minor problems encountered were with the autopilot which can get old and expensive to maintain. Nevertheless, I'd recommend this plane to any pilot as they are safe and easy to fly, and easy to maintain.

Visit ~ www.ccajets.com E-mail ~ sales@ccajets.com Phone ~ (760) 929 0302 Fax ~ (760) 929 0304 2100 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 214, Carlsbad, California 92011

1995 Hawker 800A 9,592.2 total time 8415 Landings, MSP, Honeywell Avionics, AFIS, HF, TCAS II,TRs, E Check Due: November 2012 F Check Due: November 2013 G Check Due: November 2015. Ask - $1,975,000

IPOD TOUCH COMPETITION: To be in with a chance of winning an iPod Touch, please rate your aircraft and include a minimum of 150 words when you enter your reviews at : http://www.avbuyer.com/owner-reviews/

EVENTS 1980 Hawker 700A s/n NA 280

NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION REG FORUM June 7 Teterboro, NJ, USA / www.nbaa.org

CANNES AIRSHOW June 7 – 9 Cannes, France / www.cannesairshow.com

CBAA (CANADIAN BUSINESS AVIATION ASSOCIATION) Jun 13 – 14 Toronto, Canada / www.cbaa-acaa.ca

9282TT, 6211 Landings, H1 “3D” Engine Mods, Garmin 500A, Garmin GDL 69 WX Weather downlink. Excellent Paint and 8 Place Firblocked ASKING $875,000.00 sold with fresh 48 mo inspection

AVIATIONEXPO EUROPE June 22 – 24 Bitburg, Germany / www.expo.aero

IRISH BUSINESS AVIATION CONFERENCE June 27 – 28 Shannon Airport, Ireland / www.miuevents.com

THE ROYAL INTERNATIONAL AIR TATTOO Jul 7 – 8 Fairford, Glos., UK / www.airtattoo.com

BUSINESS AIRCRAFT TRANSACTIONS FARNBOROUGH INT’L AIRSHOW CONFERENCE Jul 9 – 15 Jun 21 – 22 Farnborough, UK New York, NY, USA / www.nbaa.org

/ www.farnborough.com

If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

1994 Bombardier Challenger 601 3R s/n 5155 TT 6,242.7, 2891 Landings, Engines enrolled in General Electric on Point Engine Protection Program, APU on MSP, New forward S-Galley

Acquisition

www.AvBuyer.com

v

Brokerage

v

Consultation

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

43


AirCompAnalysisJune12_ACAn 22/05/2012 10:16 Page 1

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHALLENGER 605

FALCON 900

Bombardier Challenger 605 by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, information is provided on a selection of pre-owned business jets in the $8-24m price range for the purpose of valuing the new and pre-owned Bombardier Challenger 605 aircraft which started delivering in 2006. We’ll consider the productivity parameters - specifically, payload and range, speed and cabin size - and cover current and future market values. The aircraft compared with the Challenger 605 within this study are Bombardier’s Challenger 604, and Dassault’s Falcon 900 and 900C models.

I

44

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

BRIEF HISTORY Bombardier introduced its Challenger 604 in 1996 as a major upgrade on the Challenger 601 design that incorporated more powerful engines, larger fuel supply, a completely new undercarriage, structural improvements to its wings and tail and a new electronic flight instrumentation system. Ten years later the Challenger 605 was introduced with an avionics and structural upgrade on the 604 design. Structural improvements included larger cabin windows. Cockpit instrumentation was updated with new avionics displays and "electronic flight bag" capability. This model can be visuwww.AvBuyer.com

ally identified by a new, rounded tailcone. Today there are an aggregated 540 Challenger 605 and 604 models in service.

PAYLOAD AND RANGE The data contained in Table A (overleaf) is published in Business & Commercial Aviation’s May 2012 issue, and is also sourced from Conklin & de Decker. A potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. The Challenger 605s ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 1,535 pounds is more than that of the Challenger 604 at 1,263 pounds and the Falcon 900C at 1,260 pounds. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


1 page corporate June_LEAS 21/05/2012 15:47 Page 1


AirCompAnalysisJune12_ACAn 22/05/2012 10:17 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHALLENGER 605

TABLE A - PAYLOAD & RANGE MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel Range (nm)

Challenger 605

48,200

19,850

5,085

1,535

4,145

3,010

Challenger 604

48,200

19,850

4,815

1,263

4,119

3,010

Falcon 900

45,500

19,165

3,535

1,850

3,970

3,263

Falcon 900C

45,500

19,165

2,945

1,260

4,080

3,370

Model

CABIN VOLUME According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Challenger 605 and 604 (1,150 cubic feet) is less than that of the Falcon 900 and 900C (1,264 cubic feet) as shown in Chart A (left).

POWERPLANT DETAILS

Challenger 605/604

351

Falcon 900

345

The Challenger 605 has two General Electric CF34-3B engines each offering 8,729 pounds of thrust. The Challenger 604 has the same engines and thrust. Meanwhile the Falcon 900 has three General Electric TFE731-5AR1C engines with thrust at 4,500 pounds each. The Falcon 900C has three General Electric TFE 731-5BR-1C engines with thrust at 4,750 pounds each. Using data published in the May 2012 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2011 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet A fuel cost used from the August 2011 edition was $6.04 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. (Note: Fuel price used from this source does not represent an average price for the year.) Table B (left), as sourced from the Aircraft Cost Calculator (ACC) shows the fuel usage by each aircraft model in this field of study. The Challenger 605 and 604 (351 gallons per hour - GPH) are less frugal than the Falcon 900 (345 gallons per hour) and the Falcon 900C (338 gallons per hour).

Falcon 900C

338

COST PER MILE COMPARISONS

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker; JETNET: B&CA May 2012 and Aug. 2011 Operations Planning Guide

CHART A - CABIN VOLUME Falcon 900 & 900C

1,264

1,150

Challenger 605 & 604

0

1,000

500

1,500

Cubic Feet

TABLE B - GPH CONSUMED Fuel Usage (GPH)

Model

Source ACC - www.aircraftcostcalculator.com

CHART B - COST PER MILE * Falcon 900C

$7.66

Falcon 900

$7.26

Challenger 604

$6.88

Challenger 605

$0.00 *1000nm MISSION COSTS, 800LBS PAYLOAD

46

The Falcon 900 offers the largest payload capability in this field of study at 1,850 pounds.

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS

$5.70

$4.00

$2.00

$6.00

$8.00

US $ per nautical mile

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

Chart B (left) details ‘Cost per Mile’ and compares the Challenger 605 to its competition factoring direct costs and with all aircraft flying a 1,000nm mission with an 800 pound (four passengers) payload. The Challenger 605 has the lowest cost per mile in the field of study at $5.70 per nautical mile, which is less expensive to operate by 17.2% than the Challenger 604 at $6.88 per nautical mile, and by $1.56 than the Falcon 900 and by $1.96 per nautical mile than the Falcon 900C.

www.AvBuyer.com

‘Total Variable Cost’ illustrated in Chart C (top right) is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense and Miscellaneous trip expense. The total variable cost for the Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisJune12_ACAn 22/05/2012 15:36 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHALLENGER 605

Challenger 605 at $2,462 per hour is less expensive to operate by 17.1% than the Challenger 604 at $2,970 per hour. Both the Challenger aircraft, however, are considerably less costly to operate on a variable cost basis than either the Falcon 900 or 900C.

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS The points in Chart D (center, right) center on the same group of aircraft. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors. 1. 2. 3.

Range with full payload and available fuel; The long range cruise speed flown to achieve that range; The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities.

CHART C - VARIABLE COST

Falcon 900C

$3,260 $3,227

Falcon 900 Challenger 604

$2,970

Challenger 605

$0

$2,462

$1,000

$2,000

$3,000

$4,000

US $ per hour

CHART D - PRODUCTIVITY $30.0

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

CL605 Price (Millions)

The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the aircraft in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all aircraft are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious business aircraft buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size we can conclude that the Challenger 605 is competitive with the other aircraft in this field of study. There was a major change in the productivity index from the original Falcon 900 to the Falcon 900C drawing it nearer the Challenger 604. Overall, the Challenger 605 has a slightly smaller cabin volume (by 9%) than its competition, but is considerably less expensive to operate. However, it does burn more fuel, and being a far newer model costs more to purchase. Table C (right) contains the retail prices from the latest Vref edition for each aircraft. The prices shown are for the last year of manufacture listed. The number of aircraft in-operation, percentage ‘For Sale’ and the number ‘Sold’ over the past 12 months are from JETNET. As shown, the Challenger 605 has the lowest percentage of the in-operation fleet ‘For Sale’ at 5.7% (seller’s market). Over the past 12 months the Challenger 605 is showing an average of four sold per month. This sales activity provides many opportunities for the savvy dealer/broker ❯ specializing in the Challenger 605.

$25.0 $20.0

F900C $15.0

CL604 $10.0

F900 $5.0 $0.0

1.8000

1.6000

2.2000

2.0000

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE Average sold per month (past 12 months)

Long Range Cruise Speed

Cabin Volume (Cu Ft)

Max P/L w/avail Fuel Range (nm)

Vref Retail Price $m

In Operation

% For Sale

Challenger 605

425

1,150

3,010

$24.0 ’11

177

5.7%

4

Challenger 604

425

1,150

3,010

$14.5 ’07

363

15.7%

3.8

Falcon 900

428

1,264

3,263

$8.0 ’91

177

17.0%

1.6

Falcon 900C

428

1,264

3,370

$17.5 ’04

25

16.0%

n.c.

Model

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker; JETNET; B&CA May 2012 and Aug. 2011 Operations Planning Guide

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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AirCompAnalysisJune12_ACAn 22/05/2012 10:22 Page 4

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHALLENGER 605

BY CONTINENT The majority of the wholly-owned Challenger 605 aircraft in operation are located in North America (37%), followed by Europe (29%) and Asia (28%) - a combined 94% of the wholly-owned fleet, see Chart E (right).

CHART E CHALLENGER 605 IN-OPERATION BY CONTINENT

SUMMARY Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that business aircraft operators value in a jet. There are other qualities such as airport performance, terminal area performance, and time to climb performance that might factor in a buying decision, too, however. The Challenger 605 fares well among its competition, so those operators in this market should find the preceding comparison of value. Our expectations are that the Challenger 605 will continue to do well in the pre-owned market for the foreseeable future.

Africa 2% S. America 4%

Asia 28%

North America 37%

Europe Asia South America

Europe 29%

❯ For more information: Michael

North America

Africa

Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com

™

Attorneys for business aviation.

™

Purchase, sale, lease and finance contract support for owners and operators.

™

Tax structuring and compliance.

™

Federal regulatory compliance.

™

Dispute resolution.

Wiley Rein LLP

Washington, DC

Northern Virginia

www.wileyrein.com/aviation

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wright Brothers November 24/10/2011 15:01 Page 1

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title is a provider of aircraft title management and escrow services for all types of aircraft. Doing business both domestically and around the globe, Wright Brothers offers quick, personalized service from Debbie Mercer, always with the utmost of confidentiality. Available 24.7.365

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title 9075 Harmony Drive Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73130 Telephone: (405) 680-9289 Toll-Free (within the US): (866) 217-5700 Fax: (405) 732-7457 e-mail: dmercer@wbaircraft.com

Title Search Title Clearing Escrow Services Registration Services Accident / Incident searches Preparation of Documents Domestic and International Services


Boardroom guide 1 June12_FinanceSept 21/05/2012 15:24 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

A Needed Resource The enlightened Board Member looks beyond the rhetoric that vilifies corporate jets and focuses on serving the company’s travel needs. Without Business Aviation, our nation’s transportation system would be limited and the economy would suffer, notes Jack Olcott. Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

50

ecently the New Yo rk Tim es published a front-page article about the loss of regional airline service in the USA. To illustrate the point that travel options between smaller cities are sparse and rarely nonstop, the Times reporter featured a trip between Mobile, Alabama and Cincinnati, Ohio—a distance of 720 miles—that required 12 hours and three stops to complete because the person traveling sought the lowest fare available. Also noted by the NYT reporter was the increase in airfares for flights that originate or terminate in smaller cities.

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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My travels often require flying between the New York area and mid-America. Direct flights are few to non-existent, and ticket prices are typically higher than the airfare between New York and the major cities in Europe. More significant than price, however, is the lack of business-friendly flights. Schedules typically preclude one-day trips, and often three days are needed to support one full day of meetings. The USA has over 5,000 public-use airports, about ten times the number of locations served by the

Aircraft Index see Page 4

U


Boardroom guide 1 June12_FinanceSept 21/05/2012 15:24 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation scheduled airlines. But over 75 percent of business friendly service is available to less than 50 locations. Often the only efficient way to reach rural America is via business aircraft—either a company aircraft or a charter flight. Certainly Business Aviation provides access to most of mid-America that the airlines are unable to serve. As the Times article illustrated, the traveler who depends solely on scheduled airlines faces considerable travel time and much hassle, whereas a light jet could have flown nonstop between Mobile and the traveler’s ultimate destination near Cincinnati in about two hours, and the aircraft could have carried up to five passengers.

COMPLIMENTARY, NOT COMPETITIVE Business Aviation does not compete with the scheduled airlines. The enlightened company uses the scheduled airlines when the trip can be made efficiently and when there is no need to conduct sensitive discussions with business associates en-route. And they use business aircraft when the objectives of the trip are not well served by scheduled air carriers. In fact, Member companies of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), the world’s most active users of business aircraft, purchase billions of dollars-worth of airline tickets annually. Robert Crandall, possibly American Airline’s most prominent former CEO and the originator of many innovations that are still used by airlines today, addressed the 50th Annual Meeting of the NBAA by expressing his pleasure to speak with his best customers. The airlines offer a stellar safety record (as does Business Aviation), and the cost of travel is impressively low. As the result of a business model that focuses on cost rather than customer service, scheduled airlines provide attractive fares to the major hubs throughout the USA. Several decades ago the price of a round trip flight from New York to Los Angeles or San Francisco was several times today’s ticket costs, and that comparison does not consider that “then” dollars were worth considerably more than 2012 dollars. For those city pairs where frequent flights exist, the airlines often are the right business choice. But much business throughout the USA originates in locations removed from the 35 hubs where most airline passengers enplane. Business Aviation provides access to commerce for many more locations throughout rural America than do the scheduled airlines. Nor do the airlines want to provide access to those smaller areas. Even with today’s system of regional airlines that were envisioned to link smaller cities with major hubs, thereby forming a hub and spoke transportation system, the economics of the airline business model is forcing the use of bigger aircraft operating between larger cities, leaving Business Aviation as the effective means of timely travel. Consider Walmart, the retailer that Sam Walton started in 1962 from his home base in Bentonville, Arkansas. From that relatively remote location, Mr. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

THE ECONOMY DEPENDS ON EFFECTIVE LINKS TO THE RELATIVELY REMOTE REGIONS

Walton used a business aircraft to find sites from which Walmart outlets could serve the needs of consumers throughout rural America. The company is now among the world’s largest public corporations, and its payroll of over 2 million employees is the world’s largest. In part because its fleet of about 30 business jets enables Walmart to connect efficiently with locations throughout the USA and the world, the company is still headquartered in Bentonville. Many people who may never fly in a business aircraft are employed because Walmart uses Business Aviation as one of its transportation resources.

“Business Aviation provides access to commerce for many more locations throughout rural America than do the scheduled airlines. Nor do the airlines want to provide access to those smaller areas.”

ENLIGHTENED POLICY Transportation is a necessity for business development. Without timely, efficient means for dealing with clients, partners and supporting counterparties, business cannot expand and the overall economy suffers. Jobs depend upon businesses being mobile. The airlines and Business Aviation are safe, highly effective and necessary tools of business. Shareholders are well served by Board Members who establish policies incorporating both forms of air transportation. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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Boardroom guide 2 June12_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 15:54 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

The Changing Character Of Scheduled Air Service With fewer commercial flights to match your needs and a greater likelihood that whatever you discuss or analyze en-route may catch the attention of strangers seated nearby, the need for Business Aviation expands, Jack Olcott observes. hether for business or pleasure, more people traveled on U.S. Scheduled Airlines in 2011 than in the previous year—about 1.3 percent more. While that percentage number may seem small, 1.3 percent of the 637.5 million passengers who flew on domestic airlines last year equates to 8.0 million more travelers. (The increase in passengers between 2010 and 2011 was even greater—something in the order of 11.4 million, or 1.9 percent.)

W

The number of available seat miles supplied by the airlines increased by only 1.1 percent from 2010 to 2011, which was not sufficient to match the increased demand. Therefore, load factor—the percentage of seats occupied divided by the seats available— increased. If you get the impression that airline flights are usually full these days, you are correct. As you can see from the chart entitled U.S. Scheduled Airline Load Factor, aircraft became increasingly more crowded during the last decade. Another trend that affects air travel is the system’s reliance on regional air carriers. Approximately half

of all scheduled flights are flown by regional airlines, mostly with aircraft that accommodate between 50 and 75 passengers. These smaller airliners provide the mainstay of service to and from smaller airports. As can be seen in the chart entitled Retention of Nonstop Service Between 2006 & 2011, non-stop service to and from smaller airports fell by 19 percent. Thus the supply of convenient, business-friendly flights is diminishing. With fewer flights to match the needs of business men and women, and with a greater likelihood that whatever you discuss or analyze en-route may catch the attention of the stranger seated next to you, the need for Business Aviation expands. Select the form of air transportation that best serves your company’s objectives. For many situations Business Aviation—a needed resource—may be your best option. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

U.S. SCHEDULED AIRLINE LOAD FACTOR

RETENTION OF NON-STOP SERVICE BETWEEN 2006 & 2011

All Airports

U.S. Airports

90 80 70 60 50 % 40 30 20 10 0

1 0.95 0.9 0.85 0.8 0.75

20 0 20 0 01 20 0 20 2 03 20 0 20 4 0 20 5 0 20 6 0 20 7 0 20 8 0 20 9 1 20 0 11

0.7

Top 25

26 - 50

51 - 100

Smaller

Airport size by passenger enplanements

Year SOURCE: BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS, U.S. GOVERNMENT

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

SOURCE: ATMOSPHERE RESEARCH GROUP, VIA NY TIMES

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL, INC. PHONE: 561.433.3510 | www.caijets.com

2008 KING AIR B200GT

2006 TBM 850

S/N BY-48 Only 195 Hours Total Time Since New. Aircraft loaded with $275K in options including BLR Winglets, Raisbeck Crown Wing Lockers, HF with Selcal, Aircell ST3100 Flite Phone, and Aft Jump Seat.

S/N 351 Only 675 hours TTSN. Equipped with RVSM, 2-Tube Bendix EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s with WAAS, Garmin GMX-200 MFD with Chartview, TAS/TAWS, WX-500, Garmin GDL-69A Real Time Weather, and Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 Transponders.

2005 TBM 700C2

2002 TBM 700B

S/N 317 1,175 hours TTSN. Equipped with RVSM, Bendix 2-tube EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s, King KMD-850 MFD with TAS & TAWS, WX-500, Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 Transponders and No Damage History.

S/N 239 1,641 hours TTSN. Equipped with 2-Tube Bendix EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s with WAAS, Garmin GMX-200 MFD with Chartview, Skywatch HP, Garmin GDL-69 Real Time Weather, and No Damage History. Aircraft located in Europe.

BELL 222

2001 TBM 700B

S/N 47081 Only 4,605 TTSN. 6,413 Landings, Single Pilot IFR Configuration. Equipped Heated Windshield, Dual Windshield Wipers, Environmental Control System, Cockpit Foot Switches, Davtron Voltmeter and OAT, Auxiliary Fuel Tank, Hinged Fuel, Caps, Search Light, Dual Controls Incl. Co-Pilot Brakes. NO DAMAGE HISTORY CONTACT J.P. HANLEY PRESIDENT, CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL

jp@caijets.com PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

S/N 200

1,575 TTSN, 718 SHS, 405 SPOH, Honeywell/ Garmin Avionics incl. 2-Tube EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s, KGP-560 EGPWS, Sandel SN 3308 EHSI, WX-1000E Stormscope, Annual and 10-Year Inspection c/w January 2012 and NDH.

LIST YOUR AIRCRAFT WITH CAI CALL US FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PROVEN SUCCESS RECORD.

PHONE: 561.433.3510

www.caijets.com


Boardroom guide 3 June12_FinanceSept 21/05/2012 15:27 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Selection Of Aviation Services: The Intangibles Continuing his evaluation of tangible and intangible elements that must be considered when selecting aviation services, Pete Agur examines the intangibles of Corporate Culture and Corporate Brand.

Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

usiness aircraft and Business Aviation services can be adjusted and applied in an amazing variety of forms. Line up a dozen identical aircraft belonging to different owners and you will find each firm uses its aircraft very differently. Yet, each company gains its own version of optimum benefit from their diverse aviation services.

B

CORPORATE CULTURE It starts with corporate culture. Corporate culture is the derivative of what you do, not what you say. Your aviation assets, services and their use policies

should be consistent with your corporate culture and the policies that support it. Business Aviation enhances the vast majority of corporate cultures. It allows your corporate torch-bearers to bring light to many more locations in a much shorter time and with greater effectiveness than any other mode. Why? Most enterprises have a small dynamic team of leaders. Getting them out and about, individually or in teams, makes business happen. Commercial travel alternatives are a constraint. Business Aviation creates the freedom that key people U need to create maximum impact.

BUSINESS AVIATION FREES YOUR KEY PERSONNEL TO CREATE MAXIMUM IMPACT

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Eagle June 22/05/2012 18:24 Page 1

Eagle Aviation, Inc. 2861 Aviation Way, West Columbia, SC 29170 Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

2002 CJ2, S/N 525A-0064

1991 CITATION V, S/N 560-0118

1982 CITATION II, S/N 550-0416

1979 CITATION II, S/N 550-0091

1982 CITATION I/SP, S/N 501-0242

2006 MALIBU MIRAGE, S/N 4636394

After hours contact • Jet Sales: Dennis Dabbs +1 803 822-5533 • Lee Thomas +1 803 822-5526 • Piston Sales: Ralph Lacomba +1 803 822 5578

Aircraft Sales, Maintenance, Avionics, Completions, Executive Charter, 24/7 Line Service


Boardroom guide 3 June12_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 15:26 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM But, the image of using Business Aviation still causes some concerns. What does it say to the rest of the organization? What does it say to your stakeholders? Is it seen as a royal barge or is it a tool? Consider: The leaders of an enterprise are the primary deal makers. The more they travel, the more deals they can do. Our study of clients show that (as compared to commercial alternatives) business aircraft allow busy executives to redirect at least 6% of their annual hours of employment from travel to work. That is a huge benefit to the entire organization.

“The problem you create by not allowing these activities to be part of your brand is you are not accruing good will as it relates to Business Aviation services.”

For most companies, Business Aviation services represent a smaller portion of the annual budget than personal cars do. Putting this situation into perspective, a union shop steward for one of the big three auto makers once told me his thoughts on his company’s executive aircraft fleet: “I’m glad they have them. The more they travel, the more deals they can make. And that lets us build more cars and trucks.” He understood the culture and function of his business and how aviation services support both.

CORPORATE BRAND If corporate culture is the banner under which you assess intangible Business Aviation issues internal to the company, “brand” is your basis for looking at intangible public issues. Continuing with the automotive theme, just like your car, your plane says a lot about you and your company. That is one of the reasons many CEOs have such strong opinions about which aircraft their companies will use… or not use. But business aircraft have a much larger impact on brand than “ramp presence.” During the 1970s and 1980s, it was common to put company logos on the tails of aircraft. Today, primarily for security reasons, the vast majority of aircraft display no corporate identity. In fact, some companies are not satisfied with an aircraft that allows them to travel incognito. They have opted for color schemes and tail numbers that lead most observers to assume the aircraft is a factory demonstrator or belongs to someone else. That kind of misdirection manages brand identification with the aircraft itself. But what about managing brand behavior? The press loves to tell stories of company aircraft abuses. After all, it’s sexy and it sells. It sells especially well if the abuse appears either indefensible or there is no existing good will to offset the allegations. That is why you should proactively manage the branding impact of your aviation services. The use of Business Aviation services allows you to do more business in more places. That is a huge benefit to the communities within your reach, which has a positive effect on your brand. That is the traditional public side of Business Aviation. But, there is a side of Business Aviation use that is kept very private when maybe it should not be - humanitarian use.

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IS BUSINESS AVIATION APPLAUDED BY YOUR SHAREHOLDERS ?

Most companies allow their business aircraft services to be used for humanitarian missions. Whether it is for the Corporate Angel Network (or others like it) or hurricane, tornado, or earthquake relief, Business Aviation services are used every day to support others. Yet, most companies avoid public exposure for their Good Samaritan acts. The reasons for keeping a low public profile for such generosity range from simply wanting to remain anonymous to fearing a flood of requests. The problem you create by not allowing these activities to be part of your brand is you are not accruing good will as it relates to Business Aviation services. That good will establishes a basis for dialogue if and when you are publicly challenged about your Business Aviation services. I contend you should deliberately roll your Business Aviation services into your brand strategy. Anyone who has bought a car or an airplane realizes there are often overriding intangible components in making the final decision. Since there are numerous “buyers” (financial, user, operator, etc.) in the aircraft services selection process, the intangible side has some nuances that can have critical influences on the end decision. Considering your culture and brand can make that decision even better. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Action Aviation May 23/04/2012 17:21 Page 1

ed at iv er ot ll M Se

1996 Cessna Citation VII Serial Number 650-7070

THE CITATION VII IS A VERY CAPABLE AIRCRAFT FOR A REMARKABLY LOW ACQUISITION COST: · Range with six passengers and reserves: 2220 nm (4110 km) · Max range with two passengers and reserves: 2500 nm (4600 km) · Max Cruise Speed 476 kts (881 km/hr) · Up to 8 passengers with a stand-up cabin and enclosed lavatory at back · 700 lbs of externally accessible baggage (8-10 medium soft bags) · Engines on Honeywell Gold MSP · Aircraft on Cessna Pro-Parts program · Fresh Annual Inspection · JAR OPS 1 Compliant, RVSM THE CITATION VII WAS CESSNA’S CULMINATION OF THE C650 LINE OF AIRCRAFT AND ORIGINALLY SOLD FOR $11M IN 1996

TTSN: 7580. Cycles: 5560. Honeywell SPZ 8000 dual digital flight director / autopilot system comprising: 5-Tube EFIS · Dual Honeywell FMSs · EGPWS · TCAS II · CVR · FDR · RAD ALT · HF Radio - Dual Mode-S RNZ-850 transponders · Dual RNZ-850 ADFs · Honeywell Primus Color Radar · ELT · Cabin Airshow For Further Information: Europe: +44 20 7266 2845 or Middle East: +971 4397 1828

Action Aviation FZE co. (UAE):

Action Aviation Ltd. (UK):

Action Aviation Pvt Ltd. (India):

Tel: +971 4 397 1828 Mob: +971 50 457 6639 sales@actionaviation.com

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7266 2845 Mob: +44 7715 990936 infoUK@actionaviation.com

Tel: +91 80413 30900 Mob: +91 98450 68784 infoIndia@actionaviation.com

w w w. A c t i o n A v i a t i o n . c o m


Boardroom guide June12_FinanceSept 21/05/2012 15:33 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Navigating The “C” Suite Finalizing an aircraft purchase involves approvals at several levels. Gone are the days when all that was needed was a slap on the back and a friendly nod by someone on Mahogany Row, observes Jay Mesinger.

Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Additionally, Jay is a Member of the Board of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the Chairman of the Associate Member Advisory Council (AMAC). He also sits on the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Mr. Mesinger can be contacted at jay@jetsales.com

he process for acquiring a business aircraft reflects the growing acceptance of Business Aviation as an established resource for a company with sophisticated travel needs. Similar to evaluating other capital equipment, the decision to obtain a multimillion dollar company aircraft is done with painstaking deliberation and consideration. The justification process and discussions about value added are exacting.

T

Complex tax and regulatory standards also add a new dimension of detail. Optics being what they are today, the need for penetrating due diligence by the Board has never been higher. Usually the Chief Financial Officer (CFO), as requested by the Board, leads financial modeling and projections of benefits derived from the mission profile. Costing methodology as well as tax treatment for the purchase is at the direction of the CFO. Assumptions and projections are vetted for accuracy and authenticated for meeting specific corporate needs. While the CFO may not be the final authority, the findings of the CFO and Staff are pivotal to the final decision-maker.

FROM CFO TO CEO What happens next is often a hand-off to the office of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO). This is, in many cases, where the rubber meets the road— where the final questions are asked and buying priorities are discussed. This debate tends to be less about financials (since that piece of the process has already been developed) and is more focused on the specific aircraft. Decisions are needed regarding key issues such as how the aircraft will be equipped to provide maximum efficiency for passengers while traveling

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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(i.e., the broad issue of “connectivity”), where the aircraft will be based, and which areas of the firms will have access to the equipment. Particularly with long-range business aircraft that are capable of being aloft for 12 or more hours, the ability to work while traveling is ever-more critical. U Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jet Collection June 22/05/2012 11:56 Page 1


Boardroom guide June12_FinanceSept 21/05/2012 15:34 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“ The acquisition process touches many levels of decision makers. Each executive and analyst adds value and justification management to the final decision, and each contributes according to his/her specific job title.”

Passengers need a communication bridge between the aircraft and their home office as well as their clients. Furthermore, passengers need to arrive at a destination rested and informed so as to be able to hit the ground running upon landing in what may be a far off and unfamiliar destination. That capability is of utmost importance to the CEO. Work station seating and berthing seats are all very important priorities for the CEO as well as other passengers. Please do not think for even a moment that the input of the CEO in this process should be considered non-essential. In fact, for this ‘office-inthe-sky’ to be of high value to the company, the business day must not end when the aircraft door closes and the flight begins.

LINES OF RESPONSIBILITY So as we look at the different levels of decision making within the company, we see distinct lines

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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of responsibility. The acquisition process touches many levels of decision makers. Each executive and analyst adds value and justification management to the final decision, and each contributes according to his/her specific job title. The Board starts the discussion and directs the CFO to build the financial model of the acquisition. Once that piece is produced and findings presented to the Board, the CEO is engaged to add the ‘office-in-the-sky’ components to the process. The CEO typically makes the presentation to the Board for final sign off and purchase authority. The CEO is the person who takes final responsibility for asking the Board to approve the purchase. Once all sectors have been engaged and have provided their respective conclusions, the wheels go up and the value begins! Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Corporate Concepts June 22/05/2012 15:26 Page 1

Like-New Boeing BBJ - 60 total hours

VAT Paid, State Room, Shower, Second Private Sleeping Area, Private Office, 18 seats, Crew Rest, 5950 nm range, Security Cameras, HUD, Low Cabin Modification, Humidifiers, Training/Warranties

2008 Legacy 600

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Gulfstream G-IV SP

Enhanced EEC and Corporate Care programs High Speed Internet Satellite phone system Current Pt. 135 New generation cabin with increased headroom L1/L2/L4/L8 inspections recently completed in April 2012 by Embraer Service Center in New York

■ ■ ■ ■

Current Pt. 135 16 passenger – Forward and Aft Lavs Engines On Condition Large flat screen monitors and 4 individual monitors ■ Dual zone entertainment – Emteq LED lighting ■ Inspections and ASB 469 scheduled in May 2012

Absolutely the Next Aircraft to Sell - Make Best Offer See www.flycci.com for details and additional aircraft and helicopters for sale or lease Dennis Blackburn

Fernando Garcia Latin & S. America

+1 832 647 7581

+52 55 54077686

Chris Zarnik +96 65 33316842 +1 919 264 6212

Geoff Kaufman

Mike Zaporzan

+1 203 733 4390

+1 204 296 5389

Canada

Larry Wright +1 704 906 3755 Austin • Ft. Lauderdale • Charlotte • Winnipeg • New York • Mexico City • Middle East-Northern Africa

Corporate Concepts International, Inc.

Member NBAA, NAFA, ISTAT, AOPA


Boardroom Guide June12_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 12:45 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Aircraft Reliability (And Availability) Part of a business aircraft’s value is that it flies on your schedule, observes David Wyndham. If the aircraft is not available for service, cannot fly due to a mechanical problem or is significantly late departing, its value is compromised. The terms reliability and availability measure how well the aircraft satisfies transportation needs. David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

eliability, or more precisely Disp atch Reliability, is defined as the percentage of departures that leave within a specified period (typically 15 minutes) of a scheduled departure time. Is the aircraft ready to fly when scheduled? Ninety-eight percent reliability is a standard that many business aircraft operators achieve.

R

Availability is defined as the percentage (typically measured in days per year) when the aircraft is ready for dispatch. Time spent in the shop either for scheduled maintenance or for an unscheduled (unexpected) event that requires special attention

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detracts from the aircraft’s availability. Due to many factors, aircraft availability typically is less than dispatch reliability. If an aircraft does not make its scheduled departure, what is the reason? Weather, Air Traffic Control (ATC) delay, crew delay or maintenance delay? Weather and ATC are beyond your control, but the other two should be at - or very near - to zero.

CREW ISSUES The crew needs to observe a duty day limit in order to maintain an alertness and high degree of U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aradian June 22/05/2012 15:29 Page 1

FILE PHOTO

2013 Gulfstream 450

Gulfstream 550

1st Quarter delivery position

Several aircraft available including 2012 delivery positions

1997 Challenger 604

2008 Hawker 900XP

8200TT. Beige leather interior. GE On Point. Smart Parts. Satcom

1175TT. Beige leather interior. MSP Gold. Support Plus. Satcom

2007 Beech Premier 1A

2007 Hawker 850XP

2007. 1200TT. Support Plus 2008. 540TT. TAP Elite. Support Plus

1290TT. MSP. Tan leather interior. Satcom

2004 Agusta 119 Koala

McDonnell Douglas MD 600N

1550TT. Recent paint. Air Con. Very well equipped

Three MD600N available

ALSO OFFERING: Beech King Air C90GT/C90/B200/350, Hawker 400XP, Citation XL/XLS/Sovereign, Agusta Koala, Gulfstream G100/G150, Hawker 800XP/850XP/900XP. Call/Email For Details

www.aradian.com UK office Tel. +44 1481 233001 Fax.+44 1481 233002 steverogers@aradian.com

US office: Mesa Tel. +1 480 396 9086 Fax. +1 480 393 7008 rick@aradian.com

Also in: South America, South Africa, Russia, Spain, Germany, India & UAE


Boardroom Guide June12_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 12:46 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM safety, and in some cases in order to comply with Federal Air Regulations. Pushing the crew beyond these limits is not a good idea and may be illegal. But, the crew is responsible for keeping you informed of this limit and for making other arrangements if needed. If your crews are routinely running out of allowable duty time, do you need to augment them with an extra pilot? It is not uncommon for global business jets to fly with three pilots on very long missions. Sometimes, an intermediate stop is needed to swap out crews. These situations should be planned for well in advance.

DISPATCH RELIABILITY Dispatch reliability should be at or near to 100%. Can you remember the last time your car didn’t start? Neither can I… While the aircraft is a much more complex machine, the level of maintenance it receives should ensure reliable operation.

“ If the aircraft breaks more often than rarely, do you need to replace the aircraft, get better training for the maintenance team or find another maintenance vendor? “

A few years ago, an Aviation Manager and client of ours related this anecdote: He was called downtown to report to a Senior VP. When he arrived, the VP was irate. His flight was cancelled the day prior to its scheduled departure due to a maintenance issue. In other words, the aircraft was not available for the mission. To make matters worse, this was the second time in less than a year that it had happened. Fortunately, our Aviation Manager was well armed with information and was able to show that the Senior VP happened to have the unfortunate distinction of being on the only two trips in the

past two years where the aircraft was unavailable due to unscheduled maintenance. A key to maintaining both aircraft availability and dispatch reliability is the quality and timeliness of the maintenance. If the aircraft breaks more often than rarely, do you need to replace the aircraft, get better training for the maintenance team or find another maintenance vendor? Aircraft manufacturers are seeking ways to better monitor and predict the upcoming maintenance requirements without increasing maintenance costs by replacing or overhauling components that still have sufficient, safe operating life remaining. One area that is relatively new for business aircraft is in-flight condition monitoring. Numerous operating parameters are measured, collected and reported to a maintenance analysis facility. The purpose is to correlate changes in the data with maintenance issues. The goal is to reduce unscheduled maintenance and possibly generate data that can extend inspection intervals, thus increasing aircraft availability and dispatch reliability. This sort of data collection requires the cooperation of the aircraft owner and operator. The payoff may not be immediately obvious as it takes time to collect and analyze much of the data. If your aviation department has the opportunity to install and use such equipment, however, it may reduce surprises and be a worthwhile, long-term investment. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

DON’T ALLOW POOR DISPATCH RELIABILITY TO DISRUPT YOUR BUSINESS TRIP

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Gulfstream June 22/05/2012 15:38 Page 1

Gulfstream 550 S/N 5086

Gulfstream 200 S/N 164 TT on Aircraft 2034 Hours, 16 seats, JSSI Select, Fwd Lav, Aft Lav Kollsman EVS $36,950,000

Gulfstream V S/N 662

450 TT,10 seats Right Hand Side Galley and Lav, Fwd Right Hand Galley and Aft Lav, APU on Honeywell MSP Program, ESP Gold Program $9,950,000

Gulfstream 200 S/N 063 4834 TT, 16 seats, Corporate Care, Fwd and Aft vacuum lav $34,500,000

Gulfstream V S/N 634

TT 2732, 9 seats, Fwd Cabin: Four (4) Single seats, Aft Cabin: (3 seats) LH Side and (2) Seats RH Side, Fwd RH Galley and Aft Lav, Pratt and Whitney ESP $7,500,000 5526 TT, 14 seats, APU, Aft Cabin, Right-hand side Galley and Lavatory: Aft Galley, Fwd Crew Vacuum Lav, Aft Vacuum Lav $23,000,00

Gulfstream 200 S/N 050

Gulfstream V S/N 518

TT 3421, (10) seats, Forward RH Galley and Aft Lav, Enrolled in Pratt and Whitney ESP Gold $7,000,000 TT 7190, 14 seats, APU-Honeywell, Fwd Galley and Lav, Aft Lav, Rolls Royce Corporate Care Please call for price

Gulfstream 200 S/N 007

Gulfstream IV S/N 1207

TT 3421, (10) seats, Forward RH Galley and Aft Lav, Enrolled in Pratt and Whitney ESP Gold $6,950,000

5815 TT, 10 seats, right hand side Lav and Galley, fwd gallery and aft lav $6,150,00

Astra SP S/N 074 Gulfstream 200 S/N 233

519 TT, 9 seats, ESP Gold , APU, MSP Program, Left Hand Side, galley and Lav, Fwd right hand Galley and Aft Lav $13,900,000

TT 5435, 8 seats, Aft Cabin: Four (4) Single Club Chairs, Forward LH Galley, Aft lav, Honeywell MSP Gold $2,475,000

Gulfstream Pre-Owned. Contact Lynn Beaudry. lynn.beaudry@gulfstream.com Tel: (912) 965-4000 • Fax: (912) 965-4848


Boardroom guide Swirsky_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 12:27 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

New IRS Guidance: Aircraft management fees subject to transportation excise taxes A recent memorandum issued by the Chief Counsel of the Internal Revenue Service potentially has significant ramifications for companies using the professional services of aircraft management companies. Attorney Keith Swirsky examines the issue for Boardroom readers. Keith G. Swirsky is a tax specialist and President of GKG Law. He may be reached via email: kswirsky@gkglaw.com

O

n March 9, 2012 the IRS Office of Chief Counsel released a Chief Counsel Advice memorandum (CCA) in which the IRS concluded that, with respect to aircraft operations conducted under FAR Part 91, control of an aircraft’s pilots is a primary factor in determining which party has “possession, command and control” of an aircraft for purposes of imposing transportation excise taxes imposed under Internal Revenue Code Section 4261 (FET). Based on the facts described in the CCA, the IRS determined that virtually all fees and reimbursements paid by an aircraft owner to its aircraft management company, for flights conducted under FAR Part 91, are subject to Federal Excise Tax (nominally 7.5 percent) when the aircraft management company

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has primary control of the aircraft’s pilots, among other things. In the July and August 2011 issues of World Aircraft Sales Magazine we explained the law concerning Federal Excise Taxes as well as the IRS’ audit position. Since that time, the only substantive change that has occurred is that the pace of IRS audits of aircraft management companies has accelerated and now, of course, auditors can refer to the CCA as their mandate. To date, however, we are aware of no court decisions that have been rendered in suits pertaining to disputed audits. Prior to the issuance of the CCA, IRS auditors relied on rulings issued by the IRS since the 1950s containing facts and analysis that are generally more pro-

Aircraft Index see Page 4

U


General Aviation June 21/05/2012 17:11 Page 1


Boardroom guide Swirsky_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 12:28 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“To make matters worse, IRS auditors are asserting that the conclusion reached in the CCA is retroactive to all open tax years.”

taxpayer than the CCA position. As a result of the recent CCA memorandum, however, it is likely that a substantial majority of IRS auditors, who generally have limited experience auditing aircraft management companies, will commence such action with the bias that management fees (and other reimbursements) paid by an aircraft owner to an aircraft management company are subject to FET. To make matters worse, IRS auditors are asserting that the conclusion reached in the CCA is retroactive to all open tax years. If the IRS imposes FET on amounts collected by management companies for past years, the financial burden on management companies will be very harsh and the effects of this will reverberate throughout the Business Aviation community.

OVERREACTION From our perspective, it appears that the IRS is overreaching with its conclusions in the CCA. The memorandum states that a management company has possession, command and control of an aircraft where it “exercises virtually all decision making with regard to the operation and maintenance of the aircraft” and where “the operational authority that the owner exercises over the aircraft is limited to selecting flight destinations.” Aircraft management companies typically provide aircraft owners with comprehensive services for a fee and receive reimbursements from owners for coordinating third party vendor services. Despite the fact that many management agreements are drafted with an explicit statement that “the management company is an independent contractor, and not the agent of the owner,” this provision is normally drafted to reflect state law considerations, and does not reflect the actual relationship of the parties. Notwithstanding standard language in management agreements designed to ensure compliance with FAA regulations, to provide liability protection and to address non-tax commercial law objectives, as a practical matter a management company acts solely at the

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direction and control of an aircraft owner. A typical aircraft management agreement may generally be terminated on very short notice in the event the owner is dissatisfied with the services provided by the management company. It is our strong position that the IRS does not understand the practical relationship between a management company and an aircraft owner. Based on the standards articulated in the CCA, the IRS is likely to assert an FET liability under a traditional management relationship despite the existence of this principal-agent relationship between an aircraft owner and the management company. The National Business Aviation Association and the National Air Transportation Association are working with both the IRS and Congress to resolve these issues. Until such time as these issues are resolved, it is prudent for aircraft management companies and owners to modify their agreements to clarify the role of the management company as the agent of the owner and to emphasize the substantial control the owner has over the day-to-day management and operations of the aircraft. It is essential that the parties address the issues identified in the CCA memorandum and prior IRS rulings that support the conclusion that an aircraft owner has possession, command and control of its aircraft. In addition to the foregoing, an aircraft owner should consider paying third party vendors directly to minimize amounts paid by the owner to the management company. While there is no guarantee that the IRS could not assess FET on such amounts, it is certainly a “belt and suspenders” approach that may lower the amount that is potentially subject to the FET in the event of an adverse tax audit assessment. We will continue to update readers upon future developments regarding this important subject. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAP June 22/05/2012 16:20 Page 1

‘Charleston Aviation Partners was established to promote a better understanding of the overall needs and requirements of aircraft owners. The services we offer go well beyond the basic concepts of marketing and selling your aircraft or helicopter� commented Bill Quinn, Managing Director of Charleston Aviation Partners.

Available Immediately 135 Ready/Management Programs Available

Co Tra ns de id s er ed

About Us...

2007 Citation Sovereign. S/N: 680-0120, N621CS. Total time, 2,762, landings 1,823. Aircraft is enrolled on Pro-Parts, ESP and Aux Advantage. Currently managed by CitationAir and operated FAR 135. Turnkey management options available.

Impeccably Maintained Two Owner Aircraft William J. Quinn Managing Director Charleston Aviation Partners LLC 103 Palm Boulevard, Suite 2-B Isle of Palms, SC 29451 +1 843 886-3313 (office) +1 843 743-6500 (mobile) +1 843 410-5698 (Fax) billquinn@charlestonaviation.com

Let us help you market and sell your aircraft. We know what it takes to get the job done.

1983 Challenger 601-1A. S/N: 3005. Total time, 12,655, landings, 7,215. Aircraft has only had two Owners. No known damage. Impeccably maintained. Thirteen place executive interior. US Registered and operated under FAR Part 91

Business Aircraft Transaction Specialists


Boardroom guide HOPE June12_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 12:30 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

‘PUNC’: Your Checklist For Insurance Coverage ‘PUNC’ (Pilots, Use, Named Insured and Contracts) is an acronym capturing the four most important areas of aviation insurance that result in the largest percentage of claims denials, asserts Stuart Hope. This month, we review the Usage Clause. Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

I

n 2005, a Challenger 600 ran off the departure end of New Jersey’s Teterboro Airport (TEB) at a ground speed of about 110 knots; smashed through an airport perimeter fence; carried across a six-lane highway (where it struck a vehicle) and into a parking lot; before impacting a building. The two pilots were seriously injured, as were two occupants in the passing automobile. The cabin aide, eight passengers, and one person in the building received minor injuries. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post-impact fire. According to the NTSB, contributing to the accident was the operator’s conduct of charter flights without proper Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification--perilous words from an insurance perspective. Technically a Part 91 non-commercial operator was conducting a Part 135 charter flight. Many aircraft owners allow friends to use their aircraft provided they are reimbursed at an agreedupon rate. Others dry lease their aircraft to affiliate companies on a per-hour basis. Such owners should pay particular attention to the following discussion.

THE USAGE CLAUSE One of the least understood (and therefore most dangerous) clauses in an aviation insurance policy is the Approved Use clause. This provision spells out exactly what use [Commercial or Non-Commercial] the insurance carrier has agreed to cover. The corresponding definition of the agreed-upon Use will also detail the “compensation” an aircraft owner may receive for the operation of his/her aircraft. Particularly with respect to aircraft written for Non-Commercial use, the allowable reimbursement can vary widely. Let’s look at the variations as they relate to the above accident.

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DO YOU UNDERSTAND AND ADHERE TO THE ‘APPROVED USE’ ON YOUR INSURANCE POLICY ?

‘PLEASURE & BUSINESS’ Non-Commercial Approved Use clauses are often worded differently by different insurers. The most basic and restrictive clause reads: “Pleasure & Business,” which means used in the business of the Insured including personal and pleasure, but excluding any operation for hire or reward. Cost

Aircraft Index see Page 4

U


AIC Title February 23/01/2012 16:05 Page 1


Boardroom guide HOPE June12_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 12:34 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“ Why are insurers so focused on commercial vs. noncommercial? Because in the eyes of the law, an entity engaged in a commercial operation owes a much higher standard of care to the general public.”

reimbursement shall be included within the definition of Pleasure and Business, provided that such cost reimbursement is limited to:

Insured for any purpose involving a charge intended to result in financial profit to such Insured unless otherwise indicated herein.”

(1) (2)

Fuel, oil, lubricants and other additives Travel expenses of the crew, including food, lodging and ground transportation (3) Hangar and tie-down costs away from the aircraft’s base of operation (4) Insurance obtained for the specific flight (5) Landing fees, airport taxes and similar assessments (6) Customs, foreign permit, and similar fees directly related to the flight (7) In-flight food and beverages (8) Passenger ground transportation (9) Flight planning and weather contact services (10) An additional charge equal to 100% of the expenses listed in subparagraph (1) of this paragraph.

This allows full reimbursement of operating expenses provided the charge isn’t intended to result in financial profit. Again, there would have been no coverage under our case example with this usage clause, since it was flown as a commercial charter.

Note that the clause excludes any operation for hire or reward. In other words, any exchange of goods or services (whether a case of your favorite wine or a week at a friend’s vacation home) violates the terms of the policy.

In our case example, this is the only clause that might have validated coverage under the policy regarding the cited charter operation by a Part 91 operator. Note, however, that the FAA prohibits flights for hire or reward unless the operator holds a Part 135 certificate. Thus be assured that your coverage does not become invalid if your flight department inadvertently violates the Federal Air Regulations.

You may calculate the per hour operating cost of your aircraft including reserves for maintenance, engine overhaul, insurance & hangar expense, etc., and apply this figure when seeking reimbursement for aircraft usage. With the above usage clause, however, reimbursement is strictly limited to the cost of the items listed above (the most significant being twice the cost of fuel, oil, lubricants and other additives for the flight). That’s it. Any reimbursement in excess would void the usage clause. In our case example, this clause would have been a basis for claim denial.

KNOWLEDGE & CONSENT The next consideration is a more liberal wording of the usage clause regarding reimbursement: “The Policy shall not apply to any Insured while the aircraft is being used with the knowledge and consent of such

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Why are insurers so focused on commercial vs. noncommercial? Because in the eyes of the law, an entity engaged in a commercial operation owes a much higher standard of care to the general public. The courts will hold the commercial operator [and therefore the insurance company] much more liable than a non-commercial operator.

ALL OPERATIONS OF THE NAMED INSURED This broadest usage clause is normally reserved for an insurer’s best non-commercial corporate flight departments. It allows maximum flexibility on reimbursement for aircraft operations. If you can get it, this is the one you want.

Remember ‘PUNC’, our recommended checklist. The importance of the Usage clause cannot be overstated. I strongly urge you to call your aviation insurance broker and review exactly what your clause states. Be sure to communicate to your flight department precisely what is allowable and thus insured. It may seem like splitting hairs at times, but I assure you it won’t after a loss. Next month we’ll address the “N” - Named Insured - in PUNC. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jet Black May 25/04/2012 11:52 Page 1

Toll Free 866.983.9009 | Local 941.201.1211 info@jetblackaviation.com LOS ANGELES | SARASOTA


Boardroom Guide 8 June12_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 17:37 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Drop Right In: Helicopters work like nothing else Choice dominates every level of our lives. Variety within aviation is largely solution-driven: we pick aircraft matched to as many of our needs as possible, and thanks to the helicopter, that includes the need to launch and land vertically (for convenience or space reasons), and even hang suspended in mid-flight. ecent arrivals to the aviation community often express amazement at the huge variety within the aircraft fleet. The helicopter delivers variety that fulfills a myriad of missions.

R

When Paul Cornu piloted the first helicopter in 1907 the world was only beginning to awaken to the reality of flight. Cornu’s dual-rotor ship failed, as did subsequent efforts (with one or two rare exceptions). In the U.S. in 1942, however, pilot and engineer Igor Sikorsky put the first commercially successful helicopter into full production. He built 131 aircraft the first year. The helicopter world embraced this innovation as the helicopter solution which, with very few

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exceptions, is at it remains today. The singularity of the helicopter is down to its merger of thrust creation and lift creation into one device: the main rotor. The blades overhead become stronger and stiffer thanks to centrifugal force; once up to speed the rotor blades serve as the lifting surface, just as a pair of wings does for a fixedwing aircraft. Helicopters also move about the horizontal axis on the thrust produced by those same horizontally rotating blades. In fact, some claim helicopters parallel the bumble bee, a hybridization of engineering resulting in an amazing ability to move straight up or down, left, right, forward – even back, simultaneously defying logic and the precepts of gravity.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Boardroom Guide 8 June12_FinanceSept 22/05/2012 17:38 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

NO RUNWAY, NO PROBLEM As with many elements of aviation, military service preceded the spread of rotary aircraft to personal and business use. However, it took the business community little additional time to embrace the helicopter’s potential. Companies have integrated helicopters into logging and fishing; they use helicopters to deliver engineers and surveyors to otherwise inaccessible terrain, or to shuttle people and supplies between shore and off-shore energy platforms (and much, much more) all owing to their unique abilities. Of course, the various manufacturers design and outfit their aircraft tailored to specific jobs. As with picking the correct fixed-wing aircraft, choosing the proper helicopter for your needs entails answering questions about need and use.

THE BUSINESS ADVANTAGE Those traits the Army found attractive help deliver executives quickly and securely between airports and offices, eliminating cars and traffic delays where the users enjoy access. Whether from a rooftop heliport or a ground-level facility, the helicopter makes short work of long drives out of busy cities, or from any city to remote development sites. The helicopter offers an excellent platform for scouting real estate locations for development or investment, thanks to its ability to slow to (almost) a stop while circling one location: a trait that law enforcement finds essential. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

The weakest aspects of helicopters (among many attractive traits) involve their cross-country capabilities. First, helicopters aren’t particularly fast, generally cruising in the same range as a piston-powered single-engine fixed-wing aircraft (150 knots to 175 knots). Second, they mostly offer limited range, with anything over 400 nautical miles relatively rare. Nevertheless, the market offers an excellent variety, from small piston-single helicopters seating two and four, to turbine-engine singles, twins and triples which excel at lifting large loads for several hundred miles.

“As with picking the correct fixed-wing aircraft, choosing the proper helicopter for your needs entails answering questions about need and use.”

Ultimately, whether a helicopter matches the needs of your corporation all depends on what you need in terms of corporate travel. If a helicopter does fill the requirement, you can rest assured there’s a suitable model available to match that need.

HELICOPTER PRICE GUIDE The following Helicopter Retail Price Guide (overleaf) represents current values published in the Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 2002 through 2011. Values reported are in USD millions. Each reporting point represents the current retail value published in the Aircraft Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year.

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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Retail Price Guide June12_PerfspecDecember06 22/05/2012 15:20 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM HELICOPTER AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE - SUMMER 2012 What your money buys today YEAR OF MANUFACTURE

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

2005 US$M

AGUSTA A109 GRAND

6.700

5.500

5.200

4.800

4.600

4.300

4.000

AGUSTA AW109 POWER

5.600

5,100

4.800

4.000

3.500 3.300 3.200

MODELS

AGUSTA A109E POWER BELL 430

4.200

3.500

2004 US$M

2003 US$M

2002 US$M

3.000

2.750

2.600

2.500

2.700

2.400

2.300

2.200

BELL 427

1.800

BELL 412EP

9.200

8.200

7.900

7.100

6.600

6.300

5.800

5.400

5.000

4.850

BELL 407

2.350

2.250

2.100

2.050

1.950

1.850

1.800

1.750

1.700

1.650

BELL 206 L-4

2.100

2.000

1.800

1.700

1.650

1.600

1.550

1.500

1.450

1.400

1.200

1.100

1.050

1.000

950

900

850

800 .450

BELL 206 B 111 ENSTROM 480B

.950

.850

.800

.750

.700

.650

.600

.550

.500

ENSTROM F28F

.390

.390

.350

.315

.290

.285

.270

.260

.245

ENSTROM 280FX

.410

.380

.360

.325

.300

.290

.275

.265

.255

10.000

9.000

7.500

6.900

6.600

6.400

6.200

5.800

5.600

EUROCOPTER EC 155 B1 EUROCOPTER EC 155

5,100

EUROCOPTER EC 145

6.800

6.300

5.700

5.500

5.100

5.000

EUROCOPTER EC 135P2

5.000

4.900

4.300

3.700

3.600

3.500

3.300

3.000

EUROCOPTER EC 135P1 EUROCOPTER EC 135T2

.245

4.950

4.800

4.200

3.600

3.500

3.400

3.200

2.900

2.700

2.800

2.600

2.900

EUROCOPTER EC 135T1 EUROCOPTER EC 130 B4

2.800

2.300

2.100

2.000

1.900

1.800

1.700

1.600

1.500

1.400

EUROCOPTER EC 120 COLIBRI

1.700

1.400

1.300

1.150

1.050

1.000

.950

.900

.860

.810

EUROCOPTER AS 365 N-3 DAUPHIN 2 8.000

7.500

7.200

6.800

6.400

6.000

5.600

5.300

5.200

5.000

EUROCOPTER AS 355NP TWIN STAR

3.200

2.600

2.500

2.400 2.300

2.200

2.100

2.000

1.900

4.000

EUROCOPTER AS 355N TWIN STAR EUROCOPTER AS 350B-3

2.600

2.200

2.100

2.000

1.900

1.800

1.700

1.600

1.500

1.450

EUROCOPTER AS 350B-2

2.200

2.000

1.900

1.800

1.700

1.600

1.500

1.450

1.400

1.350

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD530F

1.600

1.550

1.500

1.400

1.250

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Retail Price Guide June12_PerfspecDecember06 22/05/2012 15:21 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation HELICOPTER AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE - SUMMER 2012 What your money buys today YEAR OF MANUFACTURE MODELS ROBINSON R44 RAVEN I/II

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

2003 US$M

.415

.400

.360

.330

.320

.285

.255

.245

.235

ROBINSON R44 RAVEN

2002 US$M

.225

ROBINSON R44 CLIPPER I/II

.420

.380

.350

.330

.305

.265

.255

.250

ROBINSON R44 CLIPPER

.235

ROBINSON R22 BETA II

.235

.220

.200

.180

.175

.170

.165

.160

.155

.150

SCHWEIZER 333

1.400

1.300

.900

.775

.675

.570

.530

.500

.480

.460

SCHWEIZER 300C

.380

.360

.340

.300

.280

.240

.230

.220

.210

.200

SCHWEIZER 300CBI

.330

.320

.310

.270

.240

.210

.200 .190

.180

.170

4.800

4.400

4.100

SCHWEIZER 300CB SIKORSKY S-76C++

11.000

10.200

8.800

8.000

SIKORSKY S-76C+

7.300

6.800 5.300

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

77


GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 22/05/2012 12:55 Page 1

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS

GAMA First Quarter 2012 Shipment Analysis Good news and bad news tempered on closer inspection. by Mike Potts igns of a looming recovery that I had expected to see reflected in the first quarter 2012 shipment report of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association were sadly absent. Instead of an upturn, the general trend was negative, with total shipments and billings both down from a year ago. More disappointing, almost all of the weakness came in the jet market, which was down by 4.7 percent from a year ago at 122 units, compared with 128 in the first quarter of 2011. Piston sales were down 2.1 percent at 184 deliveries, off from 188 the year before. Turboprops were reportedly up by 3.3 percent, from 61 to 63, but even this bright spot was tempered by a closer look at the numbers. GAMA added deliveries from a new turboprop manufacturer – Thrush Aircraft – to this quarter’s report totals, and it turns out the gain were entirely due to increased Thrush sales over last year. Counting just the turboprop builders that reported in previous years, deliveries were down 1.8 percent from 56 to 55. Although the good news (such as it was) was tempered by a closer look at the numbers, so, too, was the bad news. On balance, things may be better than they initially appear. While it is hard to feel good about a jet market that continues to trend downward, there were signs in the jet market totals to suggest that things may, in fact, be starting to turn around. More jet makers had equal or improved results in this latest quarter than lost ground. Moreover, the stagnation that gripped the low-end of the jet market throughout last year may be

S

78

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

starting to pass. There was also some encouragement hiding in the piston numbers. Specifically, much of the weakness was in piston twins – a segment of the market that seems to march to its own drummer. Single-engine piston deliveries (which have historically provided a more accurate barometer of industry health and pending recovery) were actually 4.4 percent ahead of last year at 167 units, up from 160. It’s not a huge improvement, but it is, nonetheless, a gain in a segment that seemed to be in freefall throughout much of last year. GAMA President and CEO Pete Bunce acknowledged a mixed performance across the industry segments and cited concerns over “the lack of available financing around the world.” But he believes reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank by the U.S. government could help to revitalize the manufacturing sector. It could stand some revitalization. One long-standing member of our industry – Hawker Beechcraft – was forced into bankruptcy since the last GAMA report. On May 3, 2012 Hawker Beechcraft filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, allowing it to continue to operate while reorganizing finances. Hawker Beechcraft did not report its delivery numbers in time to be included in GAMA’s year-end industry summary in late February. Instead it reported them on March 16 after filing its 10K annual financial report required by the U.S. Government. Thereafter, GAMA issued a revised report and the year-end results changed only slightly based on the new information. The biggest difference came in total www.AvBuyer.com

billings, which had previously shown an upturn of 0.4 percent, but in fact proved be a downturn of 0.4 percent – from $19.7 billion in 2010 to $19.6 billion last year. Looking on the bright side, the industry still finished 2011 with a total of 703 jet deliveries – well above the 600 total that some observers had thought the market would be lucky to exceed last year. With the bankruptcy filing behind it, Hawker Beechcraft did issue first quarter delivery numbers in time to be included in the current GAMA report.

THE JET MARKET Looking at the specifics of the most recent quarter’s jet deliveries, Cessna has jumped in to an early lead in the race for this year’s most prolific business jet builder with 37 units. This is an improvement of more than 19 percent above the 31 jets Cessna delivered in the first quarter of 2011, making it one of three manufacturers with better GAMA jet totals than a year ago. The other companies with improved deliveries were Dassault and Embraer. Perhaps more important than Cessna’s totals was where the gains came in its product lines… the lower-end. This recession has had its biggest impact on the lower-tomiddle end of the jet market – where Cessna’s products are mostly grouped, as ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 22/05/2012 12:55 Page 2

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS are Hawker Beechcraft’s jet offerings. As a result, this downturn has hit these two companies proportionately harder than some of the other manufacturers. This quarter, Cessna saw major improvement in the sales of its three CitationJet models, with deliveries up 61 percent (21 units compared with 13 last year). This, I believe, represents a significant indicator that something good is starting to happen in the jet market. Finishing a distant second in jet deliveries for the quarter was Bombardier, with a total of 29 units - down almost 31 percent from the 42 it enjoyed a year ago. In recent years Bombardier has been the leader in business jet billings by a fairly wide margin, but this quarter’s sales slump landed the OEM in second place for billings, with $818.5m. Gulfstream led the jet billings with just under $861m, in spite of reporting five fewer units than last year. However, the 19 deliveries Gulfstream reported this quarter only put it in third place behind Bombardier in terms of units. The Gulfstream total compares with 24 last year, but GAMA notes that the criterion for defining a Gulfstream delivery has changed, effective in this quarter. [A Gulfstream jet is no w rep o rted as d elivered w hen it is “o utfitted ” rather than w hen it is d elivered “green” fro m the facto ry. The m echanics o f this change had the effect o f red ucing Gulfstream ’s rep o rted d elivery to tal, as a few aircraft that w o uld have been reco rd ed as d eliveries in the o ld system w o uld still have been in the co m p letio n p ro cess und er the new rep o rting criterio n. Rep o rted ly, und er the o ld system , Gulfstream ’s to tal this q uarter w o uld have been 26.] Dassault came third in jet billings with $664 million, and finished fourth in total deliveries with 15 units (up from nine last year). Embraer was fifth in delivery totals with 13 units, up from eight a year ago. That’s a gain of 62.5 percent, and, like Cessna, Embraer’s increase came in the lower-end of its product line where it recorded 12 deliveries of its Phenom 100 and 300 series, compared with six in this grouping last year. That’s further evidence that the drought in the lower-end of the jet market is beginning to break. Elsewhere in the jet market, Hawker Beechcraft reported six jet deliveries, down from 11 a year ago. Improvements in the low-end of the market didn’t extend to Hawker Beechcraft either, which made no Premier 1A deliveries. All of the Hawker Beechcraft deliveries were in its top-end Hawker 900XP and Hawker 4000 series. At the very top end of the business jet

80

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

CITATIONJET DELIVERIES WERE UP 61% OVER LAST YEAR, REPRESENTING SOMETHING GOOD IN THE JET MARKET

market, results were neutral for the airlinerbased market entries. Airbus reported two units while Boeing reported one (both companies had the same total a year ago). GAMA did observe that Boeing also delivered an executive-configured 747 during the quarter, however. If we count Boeing’s extra delivery (GAMA doesn’t), then four of the eight business jet manufacturers enjoyed a better quarter this year than last. And if we count Gulfstream in the plus column, based on its traditional reporting method, then a majority of the jet makers are ahead of last year’s 1Q report. Along with renewed strength in the lower-end of the market, I can actually see reasons for optimism.

THE TURBOPROP MARKET In the turboprop segment there is again evidence that things are looking up. Five of the eight traditional turboprop builders reported equal or better results than a year ago. Perennial market leaders Cessna and Hawker Beechcraft both recorded improved results this quarter. Hawker Beechcraft led the market with 18 deliveries (up from 16 last year). Cessna was in second place, but up two units over a year ago. Between them, Cessna and www.AvBuyer.com

Hawker Beechcraft accounted for almost 62 percent of all turboprop deliveries. This, however, is likely to change henceforth. GAMA has added two new turboprop manufacturers as of this report: Air Tractor, based in Olney, Texas and Thrush Aircraft of Albany, Georgia. Both specialize in agricultural aircraft and have common roots. The totals in the latest GAMA report include eight Thrush units (which, by the way, is an increase over the five aircraft the company delivered in the first quarter of 2011 - the 2011 Year-End GAMA report was amended to include Thrush deliveries from that year, when the company delivered a total of 35 units). Also listed in the current GAMA report are 46 first quarter deliveries from Air Tractor, including 45 turboprops and one piston model. These have not been incorporated in the report totals at this time, but presumably will be in future reports. Among the remaining traditional turboprop manufacturers, all reported deliveries in the single-digit range. Piper reported six, down one from a year ago. Pilatus and Socata were tied with five each. Socata matched its total from a year ago while Pilatus was down from eight. Pacific Aerospace had three, as it did a year ago, ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 22/05/2012 12:57 Page 3

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT ANALYSIS while Quest had two, also matching its 2011 first quarter result. Piaggio made no first quarter deliveries - a one-unit reduction from a year ago. In summary, then, the business turboprop market appears to be performing much as it did last year. It is poised for recovery with some signs starting to trend that way, but is clearly still mired in the recession.

THE PISTON MARKET: SINGLES The state of the piston market is about the same. Single-engine piston deliveries are slightly ahead of last year at 167 units, compared with 160 in the first quarter of 2011. Of nine active manufacturers, five have increased sales while four are down. Cessna leads the pack with 50 units, up by eight from the 42 it reported in the same period last year. That’s actually a 19-percent increase, but on such a small number of units that it’s not too meaningful. Cirrus is next with 45, down from 61 last year. That’s a 26-percent reduction, but again the numbers are small and it wouldn’t take much to turn the trend around. Diamond was third with 28, up 10 from last year, but the increase was offset by a downturn in twin deliveries so they are likely not celebrating too hard. Piper was a close fourth with 25 units – closer than they’ve come to capturing the third position in single-engine sales for some time. Piper’s total was up 10 units from last year, which represents an increase of 66 percent. Piper’s performance comes in the wake of a strong showing in all four quarters last year, so there probably are smiles in Vero Beach right now. All the remaining piston manufacturers delivered in the single-digit range.

THE PISTON MARKET: TWINS The small increase in single engine deliveries was more than offset by piston twin sales, which were off 39 percent from last year. Diamond, which has led this market

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ever since introducing the DA42 Twin Star in 2006, reported just eight deliveries, down from 19 a year ago. Hawker Beechcraft was off from five to three, while Piper was the only builder with a modest increase from four units to six. Combined, that saw the piston twin market down 39 percent, from 28 units to 17 but again, the numbers are small so it won’t take a very big turnaround to put this segment back in positive figures again. As I noted at the beginning, this report

Airplane shipments1,2,6 by type: MANUFACTURED WORLDWIDE

was a disappointment. With corporate profits high, the U.S. stock market starting to approach record levels, and the economy apparently on the upswing, most of the critical factors needed to support a Business Aviation recovery seem to be in place. For the moment, however, the market is persistently refusing to turn around. Maybe next time? ❯ To view a full reproduction of GAMA’s First Quarter 2012 shipment report, see ❯ overleaf.

Airplane shipments1,2,6 by type: MANUFACTURED IN U.S. ONLY 3

Q1

YTD

Q1

YTD

SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON

167

167

SINGLE-ENGINE PISTON

133

133

MULTI-ENGINE PISTON

17

17

MULTI-ENGINE PISTON

9

9

TOTAL PISTON

184

184

TOTAL PISTON

142

142

TURBOPROPS

63

63

TURBOPROPS

50

50

BUSINESS JETS

122

122

BUSINESS JETS

66

66

TOTAL TURBINE

185

185

TOTAL TURBINE

116

116

GRAND TOTAL

369

369

GRAND TOTAL

258

258

82

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 22/05/2012 12:58 Page 4

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT REPORT

First Quarter Airplane Shipment Report 2012 MAKE & MODEL

Q1

YTD

MAKE & MODEL

Q1

YTD

AIRBUS

172R SKYHAWK

14

14

ACJ3138

0

0

172S SKYHAWK SP

11

11

ACJ319

2

2

182T SKYLANE

9

9

ACJ320

0

0

T182T TURBO SKYLANE

8

8

TOTAL UNITS

2

2

206H STATIONAIR

4

4

TOTAL BILLINGS

$166,000,000

$166,000,000

T206H TURBO STATIONAIR

3

3

350 CORVALIS

1

1 0

AIR TRACTOR8 AT-402A

1

1

400 CORVALIS TT

0

AT-402B

5

5

208 CARAVAN 675

4

4

12

12

AT-502B

22

22

208B GRAND CARAVAN

AT-504

2

2

510 CITATION MUSTANG

7

7

AT-602

4

4

525A CITATION CJ2+

5

5

AT-802

4

4

525B CITATION CJ3

6

6

AT-802A

8

8

525C CITATION CJ4

10

10

TOTAL UNITS

46

46

560 CITATION ENCORE+

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$21,096,676

$21,096,676

560 CITATION XLS+

3

3

AMERICAN CHAMPION

680 CITATION SOVEREIGN

4

4

ADVENTURER 7GCAA

0

0

750 CITATION X

2

2

AURORA 7ECA

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

108

108

CHAMP 7EC

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$360,911,427

$360,911,427

SUPER DECATHALON 8KCAB

2

2

CIRRUS AIRCRAFT

CITABRIA EXPLORER 7GCBC

1

1

CIRRUS SR20

19

19

SCOUT 8GCBC

2

2

CIRRUS SR22

13

13

TOTAL UNITS

5

5

CIRRUS SR22T

13

13

TOTAL BILLINGS

$778,500

$778,500

TOTAL UNITS

45

45

TOTAL BILLINGS

$23,068,699

$23,068,699

7

BOEING BUSINESS JETS

5

BBJ

0

0

DASSAULT FALCON JET

BBJ 2

1

1

FALCON 900LX

2

2

BBJ 3

0

0

FALCON 2000LX

4

4

TOTAL UNITS

1

1

FALCON 7X

9

9

TOTAL BILLINGS

$63,000,000

$63,000,000

TOTAL UNITS

15

15

TOTAL BILLINGS

$664,100,000

$664,100,000

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40XR/45XR

2

2

DIAMOND AIRCRAFT6

LEARJET 60XR

3

3

HK-36

0

0

CHALLENGER 300

11

11

DV20

1

1

CHALLENGER 605

8

8

DA20-C1

6

6

GLOBAL 5000/6000

4

4

DA40 (ALL)

21

21

CL850/870/890

1

1

DA42 (ALL)

8

8

29

TOTAL UNITS

36

36

TOTAL BILLINGS

$13,057,380

$13,057,380

4

4

TOTAL UNITS

29

TOTAL BILLINGS

$818,500,000

CESSNA AIRCRAFT 162 SKYCATCHER

84

$818,500,000

EMBRAER

6

5

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

5

5

PHENOM 100

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 2


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GAMA JUNE2012 BOTH_GAMA DEC05 22/05/2012 12:59 Page 5

GAMA FIRST QUARTER 2012 SHIPMENT REPORT MAKE & MODEL

Q1

YTD

MAKE & MODEL

PHENOM 300

8

8

PACIFIC AEROSPACE LTD

LEGACY 650

1

1

PAC 750XL

3

3

LINEAGE 1000/E190 HEAD OF STATE

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

3

3

SHUTTLES (ERJs & E-Jets)

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$5,332,446

$5,332,446

TOTAL UNITS

13

13

PIAGGIO AERO

TOTAL BILLINGS

$112,485,000

$112,485,000

P.180 AVANTI II

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

$0

$0 0

GIPPSAERO PTY LTD

5

Q1

YTD

GA8 AIRVAN

6

6

TOTAL BILLINGS

TOTAL UNITS

6

6

PILATUS

N/A

N/A

PC-6

0

PC-12

5

5

TOTAL BILLINGS GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE

5, 9

GULFSTREAM 150/200

2

2

TOTAL UNITS

5

5

GULFSTREAM 350/450/500/550

17

17

TOTAL BILLINGS

$22,325,000

$22,325,00

TOTAL UNITS

19

19

PIPER AIRCRAFT, INC

TOTAL BILLINGS HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORP

$860,875,000

$860,875,000

5

PA-28-161 WARRIOR III

8

8

PA-28-181 ARCHER III

2

2

BEECHCRAFT BONANZA G36

4

4

PA-28R-201 ARROW

1

1

BEECHCRAFT BARON G58

3

3

PA-34-220T SENECA V

4

4

BEECHCRAFT KING AIR C90GTx

10

10

PA-44-180 SEMINOLE

2

2

BEECHCRAFT KING AIR 250

2

2

PA-46-350P MALIBU MIRAGE

12

12

BEECHCRAFT KING AIR 350i

6

6

PA-46R-350T MATRIX

2

2

BEECHCRAFT PREMIER IA

0

0

PA-46-500TP MERIDIAN

6

6

HAWKER 900XP

3

3

TOTAL UNITS

37

37

HAWKER 4000

3

3

TOTAL BILLINGS

$31,578,203

TOTAL UNITS

31

31

QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY

TOTAL BILLINGS

$218,361,100

$218,361,100

KODIAK 100

2

2

TOTAL UNITS

2

2

XL2

N/A

N/A

TOTAL BILLINGS

$3,340,000

$3,340,000

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

SOCATA

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$0

TBM 850

5

5

TOTAL UNITS

5

5

$17,200,000

$17,200,000

LIBERTY AEROSPACE

MAULE AIR MXT-7-180

2

2

TOTAL BILLINGS

M-7-235C

1

1

THRUSH AIRCRAFT, INC.

$31,578,203

8

M-7-260C

1

1

S2R-T34

7

7

TOTAL UNITS

4

4

S2RHG-T65

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$760,830

$760,830

S2R-T660

0

0

S2R-G10

1

1 0

MOONEY AIRCRAFT M20R OVATION

0

0

S2R-H80

0

M20TN ACCLAIM

0

0

TOTAL UNITS

8

8

TOTAL UNITS

0

0

TOTAL BILLINGS

$6,098,797

$6,098,797

TOTAL BILLINGS

$0

$0

GRAND TOTAL CIVIL SHIPMENTS6 GRAND TOTAL AIRPLANE BILLINGS

374 $3,387,772,382

374 $3,387,772,382

NOTES: 1. A shipment occurs when a general aviation airplane is shipped from its production facility to a customer located anywhere in the world. 2. Shipments may include deliveries to a fractional operator owned by the company or to an aircraft dealer. 3. An airplane is considered to be manufactured in the United States when produced under an FAA production certificate. 4. Military airplane shipments are not included in shipment table totals. 5. Company billings are not reported. Where available, GAMA estimates total billings using public information including B&CA Purchase Planning Handbook 2011. 6. Cessna Aircraft Company C162 SkyCatcher (SLSA) and Diamond Aircraft HK36 Motor Glider models are included in civil make-model shipment total, but not summary tables. This change is intended to properly capture all deliveries by the companies listed while maintaining a consistent baseline of shipments from previous years' reports. 7. Boeing also delivered one B747-8VIP during Q1. 8. Air Tractor and Thrush Aircraft are new to the report starting first quarter 2012. Thrush data has been added to the 2012 report summary table as well as the 2011 report. Air Tractor data is listed in the report, but not included in the summary table to allow for a comparison with the 2011 report which does not include Air Tractor data. Gulfstream deliveries will be recognized at the time of completion ("outfitted") starting 2012 to better align with shipment recognition with other OEMs. The 2011 report has been updated and prior years data will be amended. ■

86

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


J Hopkinson June 21/05/2012 17:21 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

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Falcon 50 SN 087, 13,640 TTAF, Dual Sperry SPI-501 Flight Director, Cabin Management System, Universal Unilink-Aircell System, 9 Passenger

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Falcon 2000 SN 088, 4702 TTAF, Enrolled on CSP, Collins EFIS 4000 4-Tube, Dual Honeywell Laser REF III Inertial Reference System, Heads-Up Display, 3-Tube EIED, RVSM

Citation S/II SN S550-0036, 8576 TTAF, 6755 Cycles, 1304 SMOH, Cosmetics Refreshed & Perma-guarded (08/2011), GNS-XLS, GPWS, New Windows 2007, RVSM

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


RVSM Revisted_Gil WolinNov06 21/05/2012 15:49 Page 1

REVISITING RVSM

Revisiting RVSM Avoiding Ops Errors In RVSM Airspace. by Dave Higdon 88

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e saw the traffic a couple of minutes before hearing it called out by the controller at Jacksonville Center; it showed up on the Collision Avoidance System inset on the Primary Flight Display in front of me, in a climb. A glint of sunlight gleaming off a polished surface grabbed our focus like a beacon in the night – “JAX Center, we’ve got that traffic.” “Ah, good…he’s leveling at Flight Level 360. Won’t be a factor. Thanks.” As the jet passed 1,000 feet beneath us just

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a few degrees left of a reciprocal heading the other pilot said, “Good deal! Nobody needs to take a vector (to an off-course heading). Don’t you just love RVSM?” Thousands of pilots love it; probably a lot of their aircraft owners, too, if they know about Reduced Vertical Separation Minimums (RVSM). Operators, interest groups and regulators applaud RVSM for its benefits – including higher airspace capacity, less need to vector traffic converging and only 1,000 feet apart vertically, greater precision and improved efficiency in ATC management. Aircraft Index see Page 4


RVSM Revisted_Gil WolinNov06 21/05/2012 15:51 Page 2

RVSM DEFINED

But (and there is always a ‘but’) not everyone seems to recognize requirements that must be fulfilled before an aircraft or its crew qualify to operate in RVSM airspace. Some who do qualify fail to operate appropriately; some simply don’t qualify and, knowingly or unknowingly attempt to file for, and use RVSM airspace. The divergences have increased to the point that the FAA is going out of its way to re-emphasize the limitation and responsibilities of operators and crew, and requirements for aircraft and crew. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

For decades imprecision in flight instrumentation and surveillance equipment combined to prompt the FAA to set very conservative standards for separating traffic in the instrument flight environment – even in Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC) and in daylight. So aircraft flying in the en route section of their flights were separated horizontally by five miles or more (a standard violable only if one of two aircraft affirmed eye contact with the other). In vertical terms, 1,000 feet was the standard below 29,000 feet (FL290), so layers of traffic could exist only at 290, 310, 330 and so forth, leaving a lot of unused airspace. Above FL410 standard separation increased to 4,000 feet. Starting nearly a decade back, RVSM brought back 50 percent of the missing half of the 1,000-foot cruising-altitude layers (between FL290 to FL410). Thus, where before no one could cruise at FL300 or FL320 they can today; likewise at FL360, FL380 and so forth. Credit for this improvement belongs to the combined efforts of users, developers and regulators to apply improved procedures, technology, equipment standard and training requirements under the auspices of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). RVSM is an international standard applied the same in virtually any airspace you might fly. From 1997 to 2005 RVSM implementation occurred in all of Europe, North Africa, Southeast Asia and North America, South America, and over the North Atlantic, South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The North Atlantic implementation initially began in March 1997 for FL330 through FL370; the entire western hemisphere implemented RVSM FL290-FL410 on January 20, 2005, and Africa followed on September 25, 2008. Since then, the Russian Federation implemented RVSM and transition to Flight Levels in feet from meters starting just last fall (November 17th 2011). Below the transition level, however, Russia continues to use meters for altitude. The good news in the international community is that your home-country RVSM authorization covers you in all RVSM airspace. But, as with anything that changes, sometimes not all participants seem to be on the same page of the ops manual, and from that comes the risk of an accident or incident related to unauthorized flight in RVSM airspace, where the crew or aircraft lack the approval to be there. www.AvBuyer.com

APPROVED TECHNOLOGY, APPROVED TRAINING Access to RVSM is as restricted as the National Capital Airspace and its FlightRestricted Zone. Only aircraft with specially certified altimeters and autopilots may fly in RVSM airspace, otherwise the aircraft must fly lower or higher than the airspace - or seek special exemption from the requirements. Additionally, aircraft operators (airlines or corporate operators) must receive specific approval from the aircraft's state of registry in order to conduct operations in RVSM airspace. Non-approved aircraft may transit RVSM airspace provided they can take a continuous climb throughout the designated airspace. While transiting they receive 2,000 ft vertical separation at all times between the non-RVSM flight and all other traffic for the duration of the transition, whether climbing or descending. Further, authorization to remain RVSM hinges on the equipment status remaining RVSM-approved and functional. Thus, if a critical item fails, it’s incumbent on the pilot or crew to inform ATC and get a clearance to vacate the RVSM airspace. And an approved aircraft may not be flown by crew who haven’t been trained and qualified in the make, model and equipment standard of that aircraft. So an approved pilot may fly it on regular business but an unapproved pilot from the same organization will have to avoid RVSM while making a ferry flight, for example. Regardless, pilots - even approved pilots flying approved aircraft - must obtain a clearance to enter RVSM airspace – and that clearance requires some precise verbiage and coding on flight plans. Yet despite years of the word being out there, the rules are not always working.

THE FAA’S REACTION According to the FAA, controllers have reported numerous instances of pilots requesting RVSM flight levels or cruising in RVSM airspace without the required authorization, without using proper phraseology or flight plan filing practices. In the first 15 days of November 2011, 35 Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations were filed incorrectly. These events indicate that not only are “non-RVSM” aircraft being filed as RVSM-authorized, but authorized aircraft unable to conduct RVSM due to equipment malfunctions (operations in accordance with an MEL item) are being incorrectly filed as RVSM-authorized. ❯ NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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REVISITING RVSM found in AIM, Section 4-6-10. An operator may annotate the equipment block of the FAA or ICAO flight plan with an equipment or capability qualifier indicating RVSM capability only after it has been determined that both the operator and its aircraft are RVSM-compliant and issued RVSM authorization. An aircraft or operator not authorized for RVSM operation or an operator/aircraft without operable RVSM equipment is referred to as “non-RVSM.” Non-RVSM aircraft must not file a flight plan with an RVSM equipment/capability qualifier (i.e. W for ICAO flight plan or /Q, /W, /L, or /K for an FAA flight plan). When an erroneous RVSM equipment/capability qualifier is included, ATC automation will not alert the controller to provide required 2000 foot vertical separation for the Non-RVSM aircraft.

COMPLIANCE AND OPERATIONS TIPS Program Managers, Directors of Operations, Directors of Safety, Pilots, dispatchers, flight planning services and flight followers should review the AIM guidance regarding RVSM airspace. The FAA recommends that they: •

Service database shows more than 325 reports in which RVSM airspace or authorization issues came into play since RVSM took effect. In many cases the report was filed because of an equipment failure or confusion of who was and wasn’t legal to fly an RVSM-approved aircraft in RVSM airspace.

HELP ABOUNDS The information on proper procedures and phraseology is covered in the training required to obtain crew authorization and is also in the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM). Resources are plentiful, with RVSM guidance also included in FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 91-85, Autho rizatio n o f Aircraft and Op erato rs fo r Flight in RVSM

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Airsp ace, and in AIM, Sectio n 4-6, Po licy/ Pro ced ures fo r RVSM in the Do m estic U.S., Alask a, Offsho re Airsp ace and the San Juan FIR. FAA inspectors recommend paying specific attention to AIM Sections 4-6-4, Flight Planning into RVSM Airsp ace; 4-6-5, Pilo t RVSM Op erating Practices and Pro ced ures; and 4-6-10, Pro ced ures fo r Acco m m o d atio n o f No n-RVSM Aircraft. Basic Pilot RVSM Operating Practices and Procedures stipulate if either the operator and/or aircraft has not received RVSM authorization or an operator/aircraft does not have operable RVSM equipment, the pilot will neither request nor accept a clearance into RVSM airspace except when using procedures www.AvBuyer.com

Be knowledgeable of flight planning requirements and do not file an RVSM equipment/capability qualifier unless authorized and capable of operations into RVSM airspace. Understand and comply with the MEL guidance for inoperative items that disqualify an aircraft from RVSM airspace operations. Do not request accommodation for non-RVSM operations in RVSM airspace unless meeting one of the permitted exceptions documented in AIM Section 4-6-10. If accommodated, use proper phraseology and never indicate RVSM capability in the equipment and capabilities field. Remember that regardless of who files the flight plan; the PIC is responsible for operating within § 91.180 including correct flight plan filing.

The goal is to operate safely, legally and efficiently, and RVSM exists specifically to help that last point – efficiency. But without following the approved procedures and using proper processes in an appropriately equipped-and-approved airplane, safety will be sorely at risk. And safety is, as we know, no accident.

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Sentinel Aviation June 21/05/2012 17:25 Page 1


JMesingerJune12_JMesingerNov06 22/05/2012 15:31 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

International Transactions: If you think they’re easy, you’ve probably never done one... he thought of a global market expansion can be very exciting. Imagine that the world is now your playground. Countries you cannot even pronounce, or places you never thought you would travel are now on your business radar. The trade publications (like the one you’re reading) have International distribution and so the four corners of the earth can know who you are, and what you have for sale. Furthermore, the internet has given us all realtime, instant access to all of this information. Yes, it is true sometimes we are working late at night or very early in the morning to capture a far off land’s time zone, but that’s a small sacrifice viewed from the perspective of the more expansive business opportunities just waiting to be embraced. The reality is, of course, that much more than a few extra hours of late-night or early morning phone calls are needed to truly seize such opportunities. Take the example of a Gulfstream based and registered in the UAE being sold to a buyer from Indonesia. Such a transaction is bound to be extremely complex and laden with challenges even if you are working with stellar people on both sides of the transaction (complete integrity and the highest standards are an absolute must from all parties in an international transaction). Starting way back at the contracting phase of the deal, the contract must deal with multinational laws. These laws differ in terms of liability, tax, regulatory and jurisdiction. Working to find common ground so that both the buyer and seller feel protected (and not at the cost of the other side) will prove a difficult task. The usual ‘give and take’ during the negotiations will be required, but ultimately this is far more difficult than a buyer in New York and a seller in California trying to figure out which state will have jurisdiction in the case of a conflict. Often in that circumstance a neutral state may be chosen. In the International arena there may not be a mutually agreed-upon country readily available. The give and take may mean bridging huge gulfs, after which, a delivery location becomes the central issue (along with the mandates of the different countries with

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respect to Export and Import requirements). Just agreeing on a location for the pre-purchase inspection can be incredibly problematic. Not only might the distances the seller is being asked to move the aircraft be long, but the very idea of finding a service center qualified to sign-off the necessary inspections in a way that will be recognized by the importing country will be another challenge. (Of course, the exporting country has to be satisfied too.) Where do you close an international transaction such as this? We have remedied such issues by bringing the airplane back to the US to the OEM to perform the inspections. Now let us imagine that the closing of the UAE-registered Gulfstream transaction was at first contemplated to be in Singapore. Where, then, does acceptance of the airplane take place? Here in the US, before the movement to a closing location? Moving a few states with a plane is easy. When the closing location is fifteen hours away, the seller may have real heartburn about that.

Every bit of the process is compounded by a factor of at least ten when taking place across different regions.

And would you expect the buyer to accept that if the airplane breaks on the way to the closing location, that’s too bad? Every bit of the process is compounded by a factor of at least ten when taking place across different regions. So what else, along with the process generally, is compounded by a factor of ten? You’ve guessed it - the cost of the transaction is www.AvBuyer.com

certainly compounded. Legal fees are far higher to both sides. It is not unlikely that teams of lawyers will be hired, rather than just one per side, and the buyer and seller will probably have representation that is located in the buying country as well as the selling country. There will likely be representation for both sides in the country of recordation (if different from the selling country). Then there will no doubt be representation for both in the country that wins mutual agreement on jurisdiction if that country is in fact a different country. It’s enough to make your head spin! The business aircraft industry is not alone in the quest for, and dealing with the complexity of doing business internationally. Almost every industry is trying to expand their goods and services globally. Learning the higher costs and greater challenges to complete deals internationally is huge. Each of us engaged in this business must be realistic and have the right expectation for how to claim success. The only constant in this international expansion is that the client’s needs are still the most important; the integrity we apply here is expected globally and the idea that it is a people business first and an aircraft business second. Everything else is different. ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He served on the Duncan Aviation Customer Advisory Board for two terms and is now on the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. More information visit www.jetsales.com Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Plane Sense June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 14:50 Page 1

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

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They’re more than weight-savers, EFBs save time.

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The Paperless Cockpit - From a maintenance point of view.

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Top Ten Apps for the Cockpit

The EFB Wait-Loss Program: They’re more than weight-savers EFBs save time. by Dave Higdon

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www.AvBuyer.com

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ake delivery of a new business aircraft this year and the odds favor that the package includes a couple of bonuses: The unparalleled gratitude of the successful sales team…and an Electronic Flight Bag loaded with the digitized copies of all the salient documents (save for the pieces of hard copy still required - namely the airworthiness certificate and aircraft registration). Whether your EFB solution meshes with the governing Federal Air Regulations and others depends to some extent on the operational rule under which you generally fly the aircraft. But the increasingly ubiquitous iPad is at the head of the pack when it comes to winning approval for use in operations covered by commercial rules – FAR Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

Plane Sense June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 14:51 Page 2

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

THE GOOD, THE BETTER AND THE BAD… The EFB, whether purpose-built, homerolled, or adapted on an iPad, can in one device obviate the need for a portable GPS back-up navigator, an E6B flight computer, and that heavyweight vestige of aviation’s first century: paper manuals, company operational documents, aircraft-specific checklists and that signature accessory of the working aviator: the leather chart case. Already growing in popularity as a purpose-made system of hardware and software, the advent of these tablet devices and EFB software was driving a fresh new wave of interest before Apple introduced its monumentally successful profit center known as the iPad.

The device and the way Apple works in advance with developers positioned the device to quickly become a pilots’ hottest new gadget. The pilot simply needs to acquire that iPad, buy and load the appropriate software and as quickly as the device loads and launches it becomes an EFB. This fresh wave of iPad appeal washes beyond prior EFB solutions and attracted more pilots than had ever seemed drawn to the purpose-built, factory-created EFBs – even though most of those arrived ready to work, delivering charts, plates and procedures while also providing GPS-driven geo-referencing. According to officials from Jeppesen, the company’s use of paper in 2010 – the year of the iPad debut – dropped to 1 billion pieces,

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

121, FAR 125, even FAR 91 Sub-part K for fractional programs. EFBs deliver benefits on several levels – increasingly important among them is the time saved with the reduced trouble and expedited ability to communicate between manufacturers and operators – a channel dating back decades. But before tackling the changeover, it’s worth assessing operation plans to use an electronic device to its best potential. There’s no sense reducing one set of problems while increasing another (like running afoul of the FARs or finding oneself aloft, lacking important documents, and wishing you were back on the ground… something the missing documents would help expedite).

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Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits down 75 percent from the 4 billion being used at the turn of the century. The paper use dropped again in 2011, but not as dramatically. And the company ascribes those two years of paper declines wholly to the embrace of electronic charting – predominantly driven by the iPad. Advantages of the EFB also extend beyond reduction of paper usage. Better managing updates stands as one of the mostnoted appeals. The serious aviator diligently (if not necessarily happily) tracks and files chart, plate and procedure updates as they come in – every 28 days, 13 times a year. One-click update management is one of the more significant gains of a well-executed EFB – beyond the paper reduction.

FAR 91 FIRST: WHAT IS LEGAL?

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http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/ rgAdvisoryCircular.nsf/list/AC%209178/$FILE/AC%2091_78.pdf).

Other issues, approvals and classifications are available in AC 120-76a (http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/ rgAdvisoryCircular.nsf/0/b5de2a1cac2e1f7b86256ced 00786888/$FILE/AC%20120-76A.pdf).

SEPARATE ISSUES: EQUIPMENT & USE The FAA Advisory Circular 120-76a referred to above provides the needed framework for defining and implementing EFB solutions while adhering to the applicable FARs, and is written primarily for aircraft operators flying under Part 121 or Part 135 rules, or anyone else with OpSpecs or MSpecs. Conversely, AC 120-76a does not directly apply to Part 91 (or Part 91 Sub-Part F) www.AvBuyer.com

“ Advantages of the EFB also extend beyond reduction of paper usage. Better managing updates stands as one of the most-noted appeals.”

Commercial, whether chartered or scheduled airline, mostly develop and win approval of company Operational Specifications. FAA approval gives an operation’s OpSpec the legal equivalence of the FARs themselves. Under FAR Part 91 we lack such formalities. While equally strong company policies may set their own operating limits, under FAR Part 91 we’re free to be as liberal or conservative as we wish. That’s a lot of freedom, comparatively. The requisite FARs tell us we need to be properly prepared for the trip we plan to take, to be familiar with the route or routes, the arrival airport and salient information on conditions and facilities between here and there. Technically, that means no requirement for charts or plates when flying under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) under Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC). Fly under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) – even if conditions aren’t Instrument

Meteorological Conditions (IMC) – and the charts and plates appropriate for the trip should be at your finger tips, digitally or pulp-based Below 18,000 msl and under VFR rules we need carry nothing in the way of charts and approach plates, but we still need the Pilot Operating Handbook, a valid Weight-andBalance document, and instructional manuals for sundry avionics equipment. To that role under FAR Part 91, we’re free to meet those needs as best we see fit – as long as the need is being met when that rare Ramp Check arrives. The FAR Part 91 pilot can use an EFB, iPad or otherwise, to provide all the POH, Operating Manuals, Avionics Instructional Manuals, VFR and IFR charts, plates and procedures. In fact, all the basics of EFB use are found in an Advisory Circular, AC 9178b, (which can be viewed at

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Banyan June 21/05/2012 17:39 Page 1

Scan this QR code to see our current inventory.


Plane Sense June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 14:53 Page 4

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

operators, except as a “best practices” document, or when the EFB is used to replace required equipment. AC 120-76a separates EFB hardware into three Classes and EFB software into three Types; the AC also provides guidelines on maintenance and airworthiness requirements, on human factor considerations, and serves up guidance on the OpSpecs approval process and how it can be applied to the use of EFBs.

EFB HARDWARE CLASSES: •

Class 1 EFBs – A Portable Electronic Device (PED) that is usually stowed during critical phases of flight. Class 1 EFBs can connect to ship’s power and read-only data sources. Other than power and data connectivity, Class 1 EFBs are not subject to airworthiness requirements such as DO-160E, and can run Type A and Type B applications. Class 2 EFBs – Still considered a PED, Class 2 have all of the capabilities of a Class 1 EFB, but may be used during critical phases of flight using either an airworthy mounting device or knee board. Like Class 1 EFBs, Class 2 EFBs are typically Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) systems modified for aircraft use or are designed specifically for EFB applications. Class 3 EFBs – These are essentially avionics systems subject to airworthiness and regulatory requirements such as DO160E hardware requirements and DO178A software requirements. They range from panel mounted Multi-function Displays (MFD) to custom integrated airworthy systems (such as those based on Paperless Cockpit’s FliteServ C3 platform).

• • • •

Require FSDO/PI approval for OpSpecs holders; Require AEG evaluation for OpSpecs holders; Do not require an AIR design approval; Are not subject to RTCA DO-178B software requirements.

Type C Applications: These are avionicsgrade applications subject to airworthiness requirements, including DO-178B Software Assurance, AEG evaluation and AIR design approval.

WORTH THE WEIGHT – AND THE WAIT With the successful testing of them in catastrophic decompression events, the iPad won approval for use in Part 91 Sub-Part K fractional and Part 135 operations, with Part 121 use of Type A applications already available. The question should be “what does my operation need, and how do I assure the legality?” after which you should ask what’s taking you so long to make the move. Flight crew, flight department managers and even maintenance crew have found the portable tablet a useful tool. And with cockpit applications expanding to include twoway communications between the iPad and aircraft systems, the utility of what started as an EFB candidate can hardly be considered at its peak. So for all you Part 91 operators out there who hunger for a way out of paper charts, heavy chart bags and monthly updating chores, your options are available, multiple and - best of all - cheap and legal. Now…when will you make the switch? ■

“ The question should

be ‘what does my operation need, and how do I assure the legality?’ after which you should ask what’s taking you so long to make the move.”

AC 120-76A APPLICATION TYPES: Type A Applications: Typically pre-composed, static versions of traditionally paper documents. Under AC 120-76a, Type A Applications: • May be hosted on any of the hardware classes; • Require Flight Standards District Office (FSDO)/PI approval for OpSpecs holders (i.e. Part 135, Part 121); • Do not require an AIR design approval; • Are not subject to RTCA DO-178B software requirements. Type B Applications: Typically interactive applications that allow manipulation of the presentation, such as panning and zooming on a chart. Under AC 120-76a, Type B Applications: • May be hosted on any of the hardware classes;

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Plane Sense 2 June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 15:02 Page 1

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

The Paperless Cockpit (From a maintenance point of view. ) by Steve Watkins

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

â–˛

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ust a few years ago, anyone could walk through a General Aviation airport FBO lobby and see corporate pilots passing the time as they waited for the return of their passengers with a stack of little brown binders and large piles of papers in front of them. One pile was made up of the sheets that had been ripped out of the binders and the other pile was a pristine, neat, new stack, ready to repopulate the little brown binder. Anyone from the industry knows that these were Jeppesen navigation charts, and the updating process for the pilots was time consuming and never-ending. Now, with new digital systems, it can all be done by hitting the download button. I just wonder what pilots are doing now to fill their day while sitting in a remote FBO, without any Jeppesen charts to update. There are several Advisory Circulars issued by the FAA to help explain and provide guidance on the Paperless Cockpit, which is now commonly known as the


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Plane Sense 2 June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 15:03 Page 2

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

”As a technician planning for a new installation, it is good to start with determining

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what Class (Hardware) and Type (Software) of EFB the operator is buying”

Electronic Flight Bag (EFB).There are three Advisory Circulars (ACs) that I referenced for this article; the AC 20-173, titled Installation of Electronic Flight Bag Components; the AC 91-78, titled Use of Class 2 or Class 3 Electronic Flight Bag (EFB); and the AC 120-76a for Part 91, Guidelines for the Certification, Airworthiness, and Operation Approval of Electronic Flight Bag Computing Devices. I recommend that anyone operating an aircraft with an EFB or planning an installation, should do a full review and understand these ACs and all of the regulatory documentation that is referenced within each. Due to the various types of EFBs and the different types of operations that use them, I will address the important points contained in AC 20-173 that apply to the Aviation Technicians.

PLANNING FOR A NEW INSTALLATION As a technician planning for a new installation, it is good to start with determining what Class (Hardware) and Type (Software) of EFB the operator is buying. Each Class varies, depending on what part of the Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) rules the aircraft operates under; Part 91, Part 91 Subpart F, or Part 121, 125, 129 or 135. Whether it is a new install or an existing EFB that needs to be maintained, someone from the crew and the maintenance provider should review the ACs and FARs to assure that the requirements are being met for both Operations (Pilots) and Airworthiness (Mechanics). Doing research up front is always a good idea because the “I didn’t know” excuse is not a very good defense if something happens

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associated with the EFB that causes an incident or accident. Mounting of an EFB Class 1 or Class 2 requires an experienced mechanic and an appropriate repair station. The days of simply sticking the EFB to the yoke of the aircraft with Velcro are long gone. (The Velcro mounting option was never a good idea for many reasons, but especially due to Velcro losing its strength with age. It is almost impossible to determine how many times you could attach and remove it before the EFB unit would fall off into the pilot’s lap during a final approach.) Mounting any new sophisticated EFB today requires a specific installation plan and design. The EFB cannot obstruct visual or physical access to the aircraft controls and displays, or obstruct flight crew movement or external vision. In today’s modern aircraft this can be a challenge. The mounting also needs to be accessible to the flight crew without impeding the performance of any task. The unit must be easy to lock into position while minimizing the wear and tear of the mechanism. It’s also important to install a welldesigned mount that meets the requirements and all of the numerous Parts of the FARs that deal with crashworthiness and continued airworthiness.

BASIC ITEMS COMPLIANCE There are basic items that must be complied with whenever the aircraft power and data sources are involved. The required power source cannot affect safe operation when the EFB has a failure and it must meet the electrical requirements of the system and be fault protected. This power source must also be labeled correctly so that, when an EFB is being used, the person plugging in the EFB can make sure it is properly connected. I would not want to be the one that hooks up an EFB that is supposed to have a 12V input to a 120 volt plug and then have to explain to the boss why his brand new EFB is smoking and somewhat warm to the touch. Further, don’t forget that in an aircraft, the bundle of tangled wires like the ones behind your work desk, are not allowed, so be sure all cabling is properly secured and out of the way. Data connectivity and processors also depend on the Class and Type of EFB being used or installed. If it is a read-only access system, the interface must ensure one-way communication of data. The design of the interface connection between the EFB and the aircraft systems must ensure that all vulnerability to computer viruses, worms, unauthorized access and malicious access are prevented. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Like the interface, the processor must also be partitioned to guarantee that the data flow and resources (memory, hard drive, avionics data, etc.) meet requirements. Display installation must take into account factors like accessibility, glare and reflection. The screen-size should be adequate and able to display a standard instrument approach procedure chart in a format similar to a published paper chart. No matter what type or class of EFB is installed, a continuous inspection program that details the maintenance, updating and testing of the system is required.

CONTACT THE REGULATORY AGENCY EFB operation and airworthiness regulations and procedures are still being designed, tested and regulated. To avoid spending too much time and money on a system that may not meet the local regulatory agency’s concept of the requirement, it is a good idea to contact them and have them approve it first. Plan to provide the agency representative with documentation and be ready to explain your paperless cockpit plans. Include the Class and Type, the installation and the ongoing maintenance and training programs. I also recommend having a six-month plan that includes both the paperless EFB and a backup

system to assure that everything can be maintained and updated, even if there is an EFB failure. As a final thought, it does appear that mechanics today are providing exceptional installation planning and ongoing maintenance for these new EFBs, allowing pilots more free time - perhaps to go play a round of golf - instead of tearing and inserting paper charts into that little brown binder while sitting in the FBO. You’re welcome!  Steve Watkins is Technical Services Manager, Western Region for Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI). Steve has been an A&P mechanic, IA and Private Pilot for over 35 years and was a Designated Mechanics Examiner in Wichita, KS and Long Beach, CA. He has also spent time as Director of Maintenance and Chief Inspector for various FAR 135 and FAR 145 operations, owned his own maintenance shop as well as instructed at an A&P technical school and is an active member of the AMT Society.  Contact Steve at: SWatkins@jetsupport.com ■

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

Plane Sense 2 June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 15:04 Page 3

“To avoid spending too much time and money on a system that may not meet the local regulatory agency’s concept of the requirement, it is a good idea to contact them and have them approve it first.”

Find an Aircraft Dealer Business Aviation Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today avbuyer.com/dealers Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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Plane Sense 3 June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 16:52 Page 1

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

Jeppesen’s FliteDeck

A Top Ten Apps For The Cockpit: WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

104

device so popular that it’s moved from cockpits into panels, the iPad serves many masters with a myriad of functions and applications – or “apps” as Apple calls them. Apps have become increasingly popular in aviation. One company, built the Cub-like Zlin Savage iCub aircraft around it (http://icub.aero/?p=21), but most aviation users take their iPad into their cockpits, apps loaded and ready to work in a myriad of ways. Apps serve as flight planners and record keepers, weather resources and more. Go online to the Apple iTunes store or Google the Internet: aviation apps are a growing segment of the iPad marketplace, and pilots up and down the scale are embracing the touch-screen tablet. With the standard caveats about not trying to learn to use new tools in the airborne cockpit, following is a run-down of what (by a non-scientific consensus) seems to be the top ten must-have products for the iPad for pilots – all available through Apple’s iTunes store.


Bombardier Pre-Owned Except the Price World Aircraft Sales Bleed: 10.25”w x 12.5”h Trim: 8.125” w 10.625” d

EXPECT EVERYTHING YOU’D EXPECT FROM A NEW JET (EXCEPT THE PRICE)

Who’s a better source for a pre-owned jet than its makers? We bring it back home, inspect, renew and thoroughly restore to OEM standards. You can even customize your paint and interior package. So, it’s not pre-owned. It’s totally re-owned. All yours. All Bombardier original, with a program full of warranties, training, factory re-delivery and support that makes buying from the OEM the only way to fly. (Things a broker can’t provide.) Take a look at the full line of pre-owned aircraft on our website. Then call us for a closer look at just how much more than a jet you get with our pre-owned program. Put the Bombardier back in your business plan. www.bombardierpre-ownedaircraft.com • 972-960-3810 WARRANTY • TRAINING • FACTORY RE-DELIVERY • SMART PARTS • FIELD SUPPORT • CARBON OFFSET OPTION

LEARJET • CHALLENGER • GLOBAL


Plane Sense 3 June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 16:53 Page 2

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

zation is needed – as long as the crew adheres to applicable FARs in terms of preparing for a trip. For 135 and 121 – as well as Sub-Part K of 91 for Fractional operations – prospects should consult Jeppesen, as well as referring to FAA Order 8900.1, Advisory Circular AC 120-76a, and other applicable regulations. The applications themselves are free; Jeppesen prices apply for the document subscriptions. http://ww1.jeppesen.com/aviation/products/mobileflitedeck/index.jsp?kwpgus=&cid=sem90021807

Jeppesen’s FliteDeck

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

NUMBER 5: FLIGHT GUIDE iEFB

ForeFlight Weather Update

NUMBER 3: FOREFLIGHT MOBILE, V 4.4 Released just this past April, ForeFlight Mobile is considered by many to be the highvalue player in the field of flight planning and charting. Pilots can personalize or customize charts, plates, flight planning, tap live weather and turn the iPad into a notepad for copying clearances onto the screen – with your finger as the stylus. Additionally, ForeFlight 4.4’s new Documents view lets you bring your favorite electronic or scanner POHs, manuals and flip charts into the app. Download legends and manuals from the FAA and NAV CANADA catalogs; make your own document binders for fast access in flight; then tap to open your document viewer. You can try it free for 30 days, and if you like it, you’ll then pay $75 for annual subscription to the basic package, or $150 annually for the pro package.

Charts & Plates (and plenty more) from Flight Guide iEFB gives the iPad pilot georeferenced charts, plates, and procedures with the addition of any iPad compatible GPS accessory or an iPad with GPS integral to the tablet. The package includes a robust flight planning program, scaleable geo-referenced charts, plates, SIDS, STARS, airport diagrams and even live weather that will continue to update in-flight if you wish. You may also consider adding a Zaon portable traffic detector and getting a portable, back-up anti-collision system in case the airplane’s installed system fails. Pricing is simple and affordable, starting at $129 and going to $199 annually for the IFR package, with a year’s worth of updates in the second data plan. http://www.flightguide.com/flight_guide_iefb.html

106

The pro-pilot dual companions, the Federal Air Regulations (FAR) and Aviator’s Information Manual (AIM) have long been among the banes of cost-conscious aviators because of the ongoing changes that inevitably occur between printings. From the Apps4Pilots site the PilotFAR/AIM app (By CoDeveloper LLC) makes the benefits of electronic documents stand out in stark beauty. Download now and update as often as you want. You can find this app free at the Apple iTunes store and be comfortable knowing that updates are a few touch-drag-and-taps away, so that no aviator should ever worry whether the paperbacks in the flight bag are badly out of date – or even only mildly out of date. http://itunes.apple.com/app/ pilotfar-aim/id349193960?mt=8

NUMBERS 1 & 2: JEPPESEN MOBILE FLITEDECK & FLITEDECK PRO Subscribe to one of Jeppesen’s many electronic charting options and get free access to the corresponding app. For Mobile FliteDeck customers such as General and Business Aviation operators, that means JeppView 3, Express JeppView, JeppView MFD or NavSuite chart subscription; all make the subscriber eligible to download the app. For free access to FliteDeck Pro the subscriber must have a tailored charting data subscription. Both applications will have the following features/functionality: • Data-driven and interactive en route display; • Display of your aircraft position on the en route display and airport diagrams; • Standard or Tailored Airway Manual text; • Arrival, departure and approach procedures including Chart Change Notices; • Chart Change Notices (terminal and en route); • Full-color, high-quality, vector-based data with crisp, clear detail and zoom capabilities; • Routing building. Additionally, the Windows platform will support Airport Moving Map, documents, Customer Inserted Content and the Software Development Kit. (The iOS platform will support Airport Moving Map and documents later in 2012.) FliteDeck Pro is aimed primarily at commercial operators and their use, while Mobile FliteDeck commands a major presence among Business and General Aviation operators and pilots. For FAR 91 operations, no special authori-

NUMBER 4: PILOTFAR/AIM

Flight Guide iEFB

http://www.foreflight.com/

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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Plane Sense 3 June_FinanceNov 22/05/2012 16:54 Page 3

Plane Sense on Paperless Cockpits

NUMBER 6: WINGSX PRO 7 WingsX Pro 7 from Hilton Software delivers sharp, high-resolution moving maps, sectionals, and approach plates, plus graphics depicting Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs) – an important piece of knowledge at any time, but particularly in a presidential election year. Then there are real-time and free ADS-B weather with a compatible ADS-B In receiver working with the iPad in colorful NEXRAD graphics, airspace alerts, even high- and lowaltitude IFR charts and approach plates. WingsX Pro 7 also delivers synthetic vision graphics for an out-the-cockpit-window view of the world ahead – and with terrain-alerting functions. And the app turns the iPad into a passive radar altimeter to help guide the pilot to the ground on those tough approaches. Prices start at $99.99, not including any accessory hardware needed to make all the functions, well, functional.

WingsX Pro 7 Screen Shots

http://www.hiltonsoftware.com/sportys/WingXPro7.html

“WingsX Pro 7 also delivers synthetic vision graphics for an out-the-cockpitwindow view of the world ahead – and with terrain-alerting functions.”

NUMBER 7: iATIS APP iATIS brings into the cockpit a wealth of live, real-time and graphically helpful information, such as a graphic depiction of the wind in relationship to the runway at your arrival airport and calculating headwind and crosswind components and their impact on your aircraft performance among the 14 important data information displays. It even calculates density altitude. Each topic on the display side of the iATIS app coincides with the sequential information reported by the tower in the airport terminal area’s ATIS broadcast. This broadcast information is first entered on the data input screen which is on the obverse page of the iATIS main display. All of this is available for about $10. http://iatisapp.com/about.html

NUMBER 8: AOPA’S AIRPORTS AFD AOPA’s Airports is an Airport & Facilities Directory (AFD) app by ForeFlight, available free to members of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, and offering many handy features. Among these features, cross-platform iOS compatibility is already available and Droid compatibility is scheduled to arrive this summer. All public airports, FBO information, airport diagrams, FAA offices and contact information (and more) are available in AOPA’s Airports, and useable on the iPhone as well as the iPad. http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ aopa-airports/id312173435?mt=8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

NUMBER 9: LOGBOOK PRO VERSION 3.0.0. Logbook Pro for iPad/iPhone, now in Version 3.0.0 from NC Software Inc. offers so much depth and capability that it’s somewhat baffling that it’s offered for free. This is an iPad app that includes pilot certificate records, flight times, aircraft used, and helps you maintain currency with alerts, note day versus night operations, and now supports synchronization of local and universal times records. Again, it’s free – as are updates. http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/logbook-pro-flightlog-for/id410773111?mt=8

NUMBER 10: PLANEMINDER ONLINE/MOBILE APP Finally, for the light business aircraft operators, Sporty's PlaneMinder Online/Mobile App offers an aircraft-records solution to match the often smaller budgets of the onepilot/one-plane flight department. This inexpensive little $5.99 app turns the iPad into a record keeping and logbook program for the aircraft, serving up reminders of maintenance needs, scheduled inspections, AD revisits and the like. http://www.sportys.com/PilotShop/product/16994 ■

www.AvBuyer.com

Logbook Pro Version 3.0.0.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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JetNet June12_PAMA interview November06 22/05/2012 12:23 Page 1

JETNET >>KNOW MORE

Trying Times: The Light/Medium Business Jet Markets. by Michael Chase & Marj Rose

US ECONOMY/GDP Chart B (right) shows the US Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP - the output of goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States) as reported by the Bureau of Economic Analysis by quarter from 2001 to present. In the fourth quarter of 2011, the US GDP ended the year at a 3.0% (compared to 3.1% for the fourth quarter of 2010). Generally, Business Aviation does well when the US GDP percentage is 3% or greater. The first quarter of 2012 advanced estimate of the US GDP changed downward to 2.2%, a similar pattern to what was seen in the first quarter of 2011.

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

CHART A - NEW BUSINESS JET 2011 DELIVERIES New Aircraft Deliveries 2010

2011

Change

%

Bombardier

OEM

150

182

32

21%

Cessna

178

183

5

3%

Gulfstream

99

107

8

8%

Hawker Beechcraft

73

52

-21

-29%

Embraer

145

99

-46

-32%

Dassault Falcon

95

63

-32

-34%

Airbus

13

9

-4

-31%

Boeing

10

8

-2

-20%

763

703

-60

-8%

Total

Source: GAMA; HBC 10K, Analysis by Chase & Associates

CHART B - U.S. GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT 2001 to 2012 By Quarter 10.0 9.0 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 -1.0 -2.0 -3.0 Q1 '01 -4.0 -1.3% -5.0 -6.0 -7.0 -8.0 -9.0 -10.0

Q3 '03 6.9%

Q4 '09 5.6% Q4 '10 Q4'11 3.1% 3.0% Q1'12 2.2 High = 6.9% Low = -6.4% Avg = 1.8%

Q1 '09 -6.4%

Q1 2001 Q2 2001 Q3 2001 Q4 2001 Q1 2002 Q2 2002 Q3 2002 Q4 2002 Q1 2003 Q2 2003 Q3 2003 Q4 2003 Q1 2004 Q2 2004 Q3 2004 Q4 2004 Q1 2005 Q2 2005 Q3 2005 Q4 2005 Q1 2006 Q2 2006 Q3 2006 Q4 2006 Q1 2007 Q2 2007 Q3 2007 Q4 2007 Q1 2008 Q2 2008 Q3 2008 Q4 2008 Q1 2009 Q2 2009 Q3 2009 Q4 2009 Q1 2010 Q2 2010 Q3 2010 Q4 2010 Q1 2011 Q2 2011 Q3 2011 Q4 2011 Q1 2012

H

Percentage Change

awker-Beechcraft declaring Chapter 11 bankruptcy would seem to be another sign of the trying times for our industry. As new business aircraft deliveries slipped again for the third year in a row, it seemed inevitable that one of the OEMs would succumb to the pressures of dwindling buyers. As depicted in Chart A (right), new deliveries gave a conflicting messages with three OEMs showing positive change and the others (Hawker Beechcraft included) showing declining delivery numbers in the 2010 vs 2011 year-over-year shipment comparison. Worth noting at this point is that HawkerBeechcraft’s fleet revolves around the light and medium business jet and turboprop market. Within this month’s JETNET >>KNOW MORE, we’ll take a closer look at these segments and offer an update on the pre-owned markets. As we all try to stay optimistic about prospects for future growth of the Business Aviation industry, the actual improvements just don’t seem to keep a pace. Of course we can point to the Gulfstream G650 as one of the few success stories launched in such dismal economic times, as well as the Ultra-LongRange market generally, but what has happened to the light and medium aircraft markets and where are these segments headed? To begin answering these questions, we must first look at the economy as well as the financing environment.

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis; Presentation and Analysis by Chase & Associates;

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


JetNet June12_PAMA interview November06 22/05/2012 12:24 Page 2

JETNET >>KNOW MORE CHART C - BUSINESS JET FULL SALE TRANSACTIONS U.S. FAA FINANCIAL DOCUMENTS - FINANCED vs CASH * Start of Economic Melt-down

19%

FINANCED

81% 60%

50%

CASH*

Data based on the 4 quarter total moving average

Q4 2000 Q2 2001 Q4 2001 Q2 2002 Q4 2002 Q2 2003 Q4 2003 Q2 2004 Q4 2004 Q2 2005 Q4 2005 Q2 2006 Q4 2006 Q2 2007 Q4 2007 Q2 2008 Q4 2008 Q2 2009 Q4 2009 Q2 2010 Q4 2010 Q2 2011 Q4 2011

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Source: JETNET; Presentation and Analysis by Chase & Associates

* Aircraft transactions without FAA debt instruments are presumed to be cash

3

CHART D - 2011 vs 2010 GLOBAL MARKET DISTRIBUTION All Aircraft markets in North America and Jets and Pistons in Asia Pacific showed positive increases in 2011 compared to 2010.

Europe Share Jets 20% -3% Turboprops 12% -3% Pistons 13% -6% North America * Jets Turboprops Pistons

Asia Pacific Jets Turboprops Pistons

Share 50% +8% 58% +15% 59% +5%

Latin America Share Jets 10% -5% Turboprops 12% -3% Pistons 9% -1%

Middle East/Africa Share Jets 7% Turboprops 3% Pistons 5%

Share 14% 15% 16%

+2% -2% +2%

-2% -7% -1%

Source: GAMA; * North America includes US, Canada & Mexico

CHART E - BUSINESS JETS FOR SALE 1990 TO 2011

36%

FINANCING VS. CASH After the recession, lending to small and medium-size businesses slowed in the U.S. more so than in Canada, France and Italy, according to a report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). U.S. banks of every size, pulled back on small-business, cutting lending to small and medium-size businesses by $43 billion, the OECD observed, citing statistics from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. The biggest U.S. lenders, those with over $50 billion in assets, cut back the most lending - $18 billion less to small businesses in 2010 than in 2009. "The financial institutions in the U.S. tightened credit to small and medium-size businesses for five [quarters] longer than many other countries," said Sergio Arzeni at OECD, adding that this was the opposite of the 2001 credit-tightening cycle. There is little doubt that this lack of funding had an adverse impact on the Business Aviation markets. There are still large inventories of business aircraft available at very affordable prices as 2012 unfolds. Chart C (top, left) shows that the percentage of financed versus cash-bought Full Sale transactions for business jets in the United States from 2000 through mid-September 2008 were roughly split 50–50. Then with the start of the economic melt-down in late 2008, financing of business jets became increasingly difficult to obtain, resulting in only 19% of the deals being financed at the end of the 1Q 2012. In 2011 compared to 2010, the percentage of distribution of new business jets, turboprops, and piston aircraft (as reported by GAMA) increased in North America and in Asia (jets and pistons) but were negative for the other regions of the world (see Chart D, left). The growth in the U.S. Market is coming from increased sales to international markets and the percentage ‘For Sale’ compared to the rest of the world has been declining for several years. The percentage of Business Jets ‘For Sale’ in the U.S. vs International in 2011 was at the highest percentage split (64% vs. 36%) since 1994 as seen in Chart E, left. Meanwhile, Chart F (overleaf) depicts the New Business Jet Shipments by size from 2005 to 2011. Since the economic downturn the large business jet segment has gained the largest percentage share of New shipments, while the light and very light have lost the largest percentage share. The Medium and Bizliner market segments have seen a decline in the number of new shipments as well but have maintained the same market share percentage.

FOR SALE INVENTORY LEVELS Chart G (overleaf) outlines the pre-owned business jets for sale and the percentages for sale from March 2005 to March 2012. While the number and percent For Sale continues to ❯

Source: JETNET/AvData; Presentation and Analysis by Chase & Associates

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

111


JetNet June12_PAMA interview November06 22/05/2012 12:25 Page 3

JETNET >>KNOW MORE

SUMMARY Our outlook for 2012 continues to be cautiously optimistic. More trends are pointing in the right direction as we slowly transition to better times. Corporate profits are up, emerging markets continue to fuel the recovery and flight activity continues to improve at a marginal rate. All of these indicators are positive signs that should help spur growth in our industry, maybe even for the Light and Medium business jet markets. Time will tell, and we will continue to monitor the progress across future articles. ❯ For more information: • Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com

CHART F - WORLDWIDE NEW BUSINESS JET SHIPMENTS PERCENTAGE BY MARKET SEGMENT 2005 T0 2011 100% 750

90% 357

60%

* You can now follow JETNET on Twitter at www.twitter.com/JETNETLLC ❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

497

40%

38%

206

27%

Medium

258 20%

148

20%

Large

228 17%

38 0% 2005

5%

CBJ

68

2007

2008

10%

41% 29%

145 21%

30% 20%

12%

206

58%

Light

48%

84

20%

50%

229 33%

2006

39 5%

5% 2009

2010

2011

VLJ = Very Light Jet; CBJ = Commercial Business Jet

Source: GAMA; Analysis and Presentation by Chase & Associates

CHART G - PRE-OWNED BUSINESS JETS FOR SALE vs FLEET PERCENTAGE FOR SALE

• Marj Rose is president of MarketLift, Inc. and can be contacted at P.O. Box 595036 Dallas, TX 75359; Mob: 214-862-8992, Web: www.market-lift.com

Months of March 2005 to March 2012 3,000.0

20.0%

4 yr. avg. 2,679

For Sale

2,700.0

18.0%

Percentage For Sale

2,400.0

For Sale

• JETNET can be contacted at 101 First Street, Utica, NY 13501; Tel: 800-4002298; Web: www.jetnet.com or www.avdatainc.com

264

80% 70%

703

1,315 VLJ

16.0%

4 yr. avg. 1,683

2,100.0

14.0%

1,800.0

12.0%

1,500.0

10.0%

1,200.0

8.0%

900.0

6.0%

600.0

4.0%

300.0

2.0%

0.0 For Sale Percentage For Sale

Mar. '05 Mar. '06 Mar. '07 Mar. '08 Mar. '09 Mar. '10 Mar. '11 Mar. '12 1,678 13.0%

1,676 12.4%

1616 11.3%

1762 11.5%

2857 17.4%

2696 15.6%

2603 14.4%

Percentage For Sale

decline, a comparison of the years just prior to the downturn (March 2005 to March 2008) to the years since (March 2009 to March 2012) reflect nearly 1,000 more business jets on the market. The good news is that business jet inventory For-Sale is declining, and full sale transactions continue to increase, but at a slow pace.

0.0%

2559 13.8%

Source: JETNET; Analysis & Presentation Chase & Associates

Find an Aircraft Dealer

and brokers - find one today

Business Aviation

avbuyer.com/dealers

112

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jetfina May_Layout 1 23/05/2012 12:03 Page 1

Office: +41 (0) 91-9214603 Fax: +41 (0) 91-9214663 Mobile 1: +41 (0) 76-5069030 Mobile 2: +41 (0) 76-4122695 Email: info@jetfina.com www.jetfina.com

2006 CESSNA CITATION CJ3 SN: 525B-0077. TTAF: 1370. Make offer, EEC VAT has been paid and is included in price Tap Elite / ProParts / Cescom

2001 CESSNA CJ1 SN: 525-0435. TTAF: 2020. $2,050,000 USD Inc. EEC VAT Tap Elite / ProParts / Cescom

2000 CESSNA CJ1 SN: 525-0391. TTAF: 1470. $2,300,000 USD Tap Elite / Cescom

1998 CESSNA 525 SN: 525-0260. TTAF: 3250. $1,595,000 USD Inc. EEC VAT JSSI / ProParts / Cescom

1994 CESSNA JET SN: 525-0082. TTAF: 2450. $1,490,000 USD Tap Elite / ProParts / Cescom

2004 AGUSTA A119 KOALA SN: 14037. TTAF: 1740.4. $2,500,000 USD PT6B-37A, On Condition TBO: No

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ACSpecs IntroJune12_AC Specs Intronov06 22/05/2012 11:52 Page 1

❯ July Issue:

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: LONG RANGE JETS

Medium Jets

❯ August Issue: Small Jets

❯ September Issue:

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Turboprops

❯ October Issue:

Ultra Long Range & Large Cabin

he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost

T

numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Long Range Jets – appears overleaf, to be followed by Medium Jets next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only.

DESCRIPTION OF COST ELEMENTS

baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.).

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs.

CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.).

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door.

WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight.

BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the

SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats

114

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know. ❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixedwing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For singleengine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Take-off Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing dis-

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tance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


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AircraftPer&SpecJune12_PerfspecDecember06 23/05/2012 09:16 Page 1

BO M BA RD IE R CH BO AL M LE BA NG RD ER IE R 30 CH BO 0 AL M L BA EN RD GE IE R R 60 CH BO 0 AL M LE BA NG RD ER IE R 60 C BO HA 11A M LL BA EN RD GE IE R R 60 CH BO 1AL 3A M L BA EN RD GE IE R R 60 CH BO 1AL M 3A BA LE ER NG RD ER IE R 60 CH BO 1A M LL 3R BA EN RD GE IE R R 60 CH 4 AL LE NG ER 60 5

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: LONG RANGE JETS

LONG RANGE JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$3,142.79

$5,083.36

$4,729.83

$4,570.99

$4,656.03

$4,160.16

$3,729.38

$3,497.06

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.08

6.1

6.1

6.1

6.1

6.1

6.08

6.08

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.17

8.2

8.2

8.2

8.2

8.2

8.17

8.17

CABIN LENGTH FT.

28.6

28.3

28.3

28.3

28.3

28.3

28.4

28.4

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

860

1035

1035

1035

1035

1035

1150

1150

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

6.22

5.8

5.8

5.8

5.8

5.83

5.83

5.83

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.2

3

3

3

3

3

3.08

3.08

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

106

115

115

115

115

115

115

115

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

MTOW LBS

38850

41250

43100

43100

45100

45100

48200

48200

MLW LBS

33750

36000

36000

36000

36000

36000

38000

38000

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

23700

24150

25900

26000

26250

26250

27100

26915

USEABLE FUEL LBS

14045

14640

16420

16420

17635

17635

19850

19850

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1255

2610

930

830

1365

1365

1263

1535

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

3300

6850

3600

3500

4750

4750

4815

5085

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3100

2800

3180

3080

3380

3380

3824

3879

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3320

2880

3450

3370

3590

3590

4119

4145

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4810

6200

6300

6100

6500

6500

5765

5840

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3833

4150

4583

4500

4500

4500

3833

3833

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4240

3400

4200

4443

4259

4259

4345

4345

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

474

743

1048

1314

1207

1207

680

581

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

476

458

459

459

459

459

488

488

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

458

443

443

443

443

459

459

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

401

425

425

425

425

425

425

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

HTF 7000

ALF 502L

CF34-1A

CF34-3A

CF34-3A

CF34-3A1

CF34-3B

CF34-3B

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

116

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


FA LC DA ON SS 20 AU 00 LT FA LC DA ON SS 20 AU 00 LT DX FA L CO DA N SS 20 AU 00 LT EX FA LC DA ON SS 20 AU 00 LT EX FA EA LC DA Sy ON SS 20 AU 00 LT LX FA LC DA ON SS 20 AU 00 LT S FA L CO DA N SS 50 AU LT FA LC ON 50 -4

DA SS AU LT

CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N

X

05

AircraftPer&SpecJune12_PerfspecDecember06 22/05/2012 17:34 Page 2

LONG RANGE JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$4,002.75

$3,836.90

$3,245.15

$3,391.68

$3,267.41

$3,148.86

$3,147.58

$4,275.18

$4,006.41

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

5.7

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

5.8

5.8

CABIN WIDTH FT.

5.5

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

6.1

6.1

CABIN LENGTH FT.

23.92

31

31

31

31

31

31

23.5

23.5

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

593

1024

1024

1024

1024

1024

1024

700

700

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.54

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

5

5

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

-

134

131

131

131

131

131

25

25

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

82

-

-

-

-

-

-

90

90

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

9

9

MTOW LBS

36100

35800

41000

42200

42200

42200

41000

38320

38800

MLW LBS

31800

33000

39300

39300

39300

39300

39300

35715

35715

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

22025

22750

23190

23190

23190

24440

24750

22000

22200

USEABLE FUEL LBS

12931

12155

14600

16660

16660

16660

14600

15520

15520

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1444

1095

3410

2550

2550

1300

1850

1280

1080

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2375

5910

6510

6510

6510

5260

4950

3570

3370

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

2890

2975

3335

3915

3915

4125

3658

3057

3210

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3125

3130

3440

4045

4045

4255

3681

3200

3360

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5480

5440

5300

5585

5585

5850

4652

5000

5000

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4693

4333

4333

4333

4333

4450

4450

3500

3500

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3650

3730

4575

4375

4375

4350

4350

3430

3430

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1120

377

490

490

490

490

490

601

601

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

525

475

482

482

482

482

482

480

500

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

525

459

459

459

459

459

459

431

458

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

470

430

442

442

442

442

442

410

430

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

AE 3007C

CFE 738 -1-1B

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

PW308C

TFE 731 -3-1C

TFE 731-4

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

117


DA SS AU LT

DA SS AU LT

FA LC ON

50 -4 0

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: LONG RANGE JETS

FA LC DA ON SS 50 AU EX LT FA LC DA ON SS 90 AU 0 LT FA LC DA ON SS 90 AU 0B LT FA LC DA ON SS 90 AU 0C LT FA LC DA ON SS 90 AU 0D LT X FA LC DA ON SS 90 AU 0E LT X FA L CO DA N SS 90 AU 0E LT X FA EA LC Sy ON 90 0L X

AircraftPer&SpecJune12_PerfspecDecember06 22/05/2012 12:12 Page 3

LONG RANGE JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$3,867.16

$3,686.15

$4,238.37

$4,041.60

$3,838.75

$3,566.74

$3,708.49

$3,568.45

$3,452.41

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

5.8

5.9

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

CABIN WIDTH FT.

6.1

6.1

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

7.7

CABIN LENGTH FT.

23.5

23.5

33.2

33.2

33.2

33.2

33.2

33.2

33.2

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

700

700

1264

1264

1264

1264

1264

1264

1264

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5

5

5.6

5.7

5.7

5.6

5.6

5.6

5.6

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.7

2.7

2.6

2.6

2.6

2.6

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

25

25

127

127

127

127

127

127

127

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

90

90

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

9

9

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

MTOW LBS

38800

39700

45500

45500

45500

46700

48300

48300

49000

MLW LBS

35715

35715

42000

42000

42000

42200

44500

44500

44500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

22000

22250

24685

25275

25275

25800

24700

24700

26400

USEABLE FUEL LBS

15520

15520

19165

19165

19165

18830

21000

21000

21000

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1280

2130

1850

1260

1260

2270

2800

2800

1800

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

3570

3320

3535

2945

2945

5064

6164

6164

4464

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3267

3223

3590

3450

3450

4100

4500

4500

4800

MAX. RANGE N.M.

3443

3388

3970

4080

4080

4290

4725

4725

5000

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4890

5000

5800

5144

5144

4890

5215

5215

5215

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3500

3500

3633

3633

3633

3633

3750

3750

3833

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3515

3515

3700

3755

3755

3880

3880

3880

3880

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

595

671

753

645

645

796

755

755

703

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

480

480

500

500

500

482

482

482

482

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

459

459

456

466

466

459

459

459

459

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

430

430

428

428

428

430

430

430

430

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

TFE 731-40

TFE 731-40

TFE 731 -5AR-1C

TFE 731 -5BR-1C

TFE 731 -5BR-1C

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

TFE 731-60

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

118

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


GU LF ST RE AM G GU IV LF ST RE AM G GU IV LF -S ST P RE AM G2 GU 00 LF ST RE AM G2 GU 80 LF ST RE AM G3 GU 00 LF ST RE AM G3 GU 50 LF ST RE AM G4 GU 00 LF ST RE AM G4 HA 50 W KE R 40 00

90 0L X

AircraftPer&SpecJune12_PerfspecDecember06 22/05/2012 12:12 Page 4

LONG RANGE JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$5,093.25

$4,891.17

$3,082.56

$3,060.29

$4,728.91

$4,689.80

$4,731.68

$4,701.66

$3,675.76

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

6.1

6.2

6.25

6.25

6.2

6.2

6.2

6.2

6

CABIN WIDTH FT.

7.3

7.3

7.2

7.2

7.3

7.3

7.3

7.3

6.46

CABIN LENGTH FT.

45.1

45.1

24.5

25.8

45.1

45.1

45.1

45.1

25

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

1513

1525

868

935

1525

1525

1525

1525

762

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5

5

6

6

5

5

5

5

6

DOOR WIDTH FT.

3

3

2.75

2.75

3

3

3

3

2.5

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

169

169

25

34

169

169

169

169

114

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

125

120

-

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

13

13

8

8

13

14

13

14

8

MTOW LBS

73200

74600

35450

39600

72000

70900

74600

73900

39500

MLW LBS

58500

66000

30000

32700

66000

66000

66000

66000

33500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

43100

43700

19950

24150

43700

43000

43700

43000

23700

USEABLE FUEL LBS

29280

29281

15000

14600

26700

25807

29281

29281

14600

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1220

2019

650

1000

2000

2493

2019

2019

1400

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

3400

5300

4050

4050

5300

6000

5300

6000

2300

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

3800

3880

3130

3115

3486

3680

3880

4100

3283

MAX. RANGE N.M.

4200

4166

3530

3487

3820

3900

4166

4400

3100

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5700

5700

6600

5160

4700

5065

5700

5770

5459

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4992

4458

4352

4745

4417

4417

4417

4417

4373

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4219

3640

3700

-

3805

3960

3640

3760

-

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1068

701

395

-

767

736

701

712

880

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

500

500

470

470

500

500

500

500

489

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

476

476

459

470

476

476

476

476

470

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

445

445

430

459

445

445

445

445

447

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TAY 611-8

TAY 611-8

PW306A

HTF 7250G

TAY 611-8

TAY 611-8C

TAY 611-8

TAY 611-8C

PW308A

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

I

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

119


D e d i cat e d to h e l p i n g b u s i n e ss ac h i e v e i ts h i g h e st g oals .

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Safety Matters June12_Gil WolinNov06 22/05/2012 09:47 Page 1

SAFETY MATTERS - STERILE COCKPIT

The Sterile Cockpit: Inoculating crew against the virus of distraction. by Dave Higdon he embarrassed pilot was left no choice but to confess to investigators that conversing with his pilot passenger while on final approach caused him to overlook that one switch and led him into that most-embarrassing of all cockpit foibles: the gear-up landing. The gear horn blared continuously through a video of two pilots chatting in the cockpit of a popular piston single as they turned base to final and, ultimately, landed – again, sans landing gear.

T

122

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

An airline captain’s failure to switch off his smartphone broke the sterility of his cockpit when, as his airplane approached its destination, the device started chirping the alerts of incoming text messages. Fortunately in this case the First Officer caught the issue of landing gear still stowed in their wells and commanded a go-around while the Captain, stunned, failed to catch that he caused the incident. Thankfully, the three incidents above injured no one, but such are the risks of a cockpit virus so insidious that airlines have www.AvBuyer.com

developed operating policies to combat it. The disease: a creeping fuzzy focus (that is not focused at all). The antidote: the socalled sterile cockpit.

EPIDEMIOLOGY OF AN INFECTIOUS EPIDEMIC Sterile. A dictionary definition is given thus: “free o f co ntam inants, o f co ntam inatio n, o f m atter fo reign to the p urp o se.” Cockpits act as command centers, the veritable nerve center of an aircraft. Ideally, ❯ pilots and other crew should need no Aircraft Index see Page 4


AvBuyer February 2011_Layout 1 23/05/2012 10:44 Page 3

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Safety Matters June12_Gil WolinNov06 22/05/2012 09:48 Page 2

SAFETY MATTERS STERILE COCKPIT reminder of that function; but the myopialike focus on flying the airplane of the ideal professional pilot faces many challenges. The introduction of cockpit activities into the scenario immediately challenges the sterility of the cockpit and the crew’s focus on the job at hand. The infections arrive into the sterile environment of the cockpit via many channels and from multiple sources. It can be sourced from innocent conversation about flying the plane, the job, family issues – and so on. The sterile cockpit, however, lays the foundation for focused flying absent the distractions and dubious engagements with others. This means limiting exchanges to standard topics: check list, procedures and briefing approaches. No conversations about bad dates, great vacations, excellent off-day movie experiences, or the wonders of the Chief Pilot. Sadly, other aviators violate the sterility protocol with the same nonchalance as drivers without turn signals violate traffic laws. They know in the abstract, but can’t seem to help themselves when stricken by the urge to speak. Aside from rated pilots, other passengers routinely contribute to violating the sterility of business aircraft cockpits – children, sometimes pets, the guests of passengers or regular passengers themselves. Perhaps the most uncomfortable issue for many pilots is enforcing a sterile cockpit when colleagues, supervisors or some other flight-deck newcomer arrives and wants to participate. This should be no problem for the professionals piloting most FAR 91 aircraft, and only a small issue for all others. There’s no reason for it to be a problem even when nothing more than a curtain separates cabin from cockpit. And it’s not always a human causing the distraction: the aircraft itself can violate the spirit of a sterile cockpit by sounding off an alert annunciating a failure of an electrical system component. There can be nothing like the blare of a horn or the toot of an alarm to put you off-balance. As we saw above, an errant cell phone, MP3 music player, a hyper focus on a laptop, even aviation technology can combine to give the cockpit a serious case of cockpit noise infection also.

THE ONGOING SEARCH FOR A CURE… It’s certainly no surprise that when cockpit crew allow their attention to divert from their primary task that flight safety can and sometimes does suffer. We have decades of examples punctuated by dozens of air carrier accidents, business jet accidents and incidents, all of which occurred because flight

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crew allowed their attention to divert from the task at hand – flying the airplane. When they became occupied with items totally unrelated to flying, serious, flightsafety steps got missed: setting proper flaps prior to take-off, failure to lower landing gear on approach, monitoring altitude assignments or waypoints on instrument approaches, failure to activate engine and wing anti-ice when needed. What is surprising (discouraging even) is the persistence of violations to sterilecockpit practices more than three decades after the FAA acted to resolve the issue – at least, for commercial operations. The effort became formal in 1981 when the FAA enacted FAR 121.542 and FAR 135.100 to help curb the growing list of incidents and accidents related to the problem. Almost immediately tagged the “sterile cockpit rule,” these regulations specifically prohibit crew member performance of nonessential duties or activities while the aircraft is involved in taxi, takeoff, landing, and all other flight operations conducted below 10,000 msl, except cruise flight. While not specifically required in FAR 91 operations, most operators employing NBAA best practices in their operations enforce their own variation of cockpit sterility – essentially applying the same standard www.AvBuyer.com

as required under Parts 121 and 135. Sterile Cockpit Rules should be in force and enforced under the following circumstances: • Between engine start and 10,000 msl the aircraft cockpit should be devoid of conversation or any activity unrelated to flying the airplane, including time in climb; • From the start of a standard descent to the ramp, with extra enforcement starting at 10,000 msl; • En route, allow a lower standard of enforcement; as long as you keep the focus on flying the airplane a bit of non-flying conversation is reasonable – though not all operations allow so much as a peep that isn’t about the airplane or the flight.

STERILIZING THE COCKPIT – THE BASICS The following briefing was designed for everyone on the needs and reasons for maintaining a sterile cockpit. •

Start your Sterile Cockpit Requirement with the pre-flight inspection of the aircraft; if possible and viable, include any passengers, rated and otherwise, and include them in a pre-flight Aircraft Index see Page 4


Safety Matters June12_Gil WolinNov06 22/05/2012 15:56 Page 3

SAFETY MATTERS STERILE COCKPIT

passenger briefing. Relate why you need quiet at certain times; explain that you will insist on it when it’s needed. By explaining as much as you can about what’s going to occur, what those guests will see, hear and feel in advance, they’ll enjoy the experience even more because they’ll be able to relate what’s happening to what you told them to expect. In smaller aircraft where separation between crew and passengers is minimal, remember to employ the benefits of a modern audio-control system, which should let you isolate passengers and crew from the PIC; use it to help create that sterile environment on the flight deck. Likewise, remind your passengers how they may talk so that no one on the flight deck will hear them. Finally, enlist passengers in working the flight if they’re interested, keeping them busy watching for other traffic and tapping your shoulder to alert you to anything they spot.

Crew members should all use the same pages of the Sterile Cockpit guide when dealing with each other and passengers. But do be sure they understand that the Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

need for a sterile cockpit may manifest itself on short notice.

ADVANCED STERILIZATION TECHNIQUES It would be manifestly unfair to leave readers with the impression that only humans and human interaction threaten the sterility of any given flight deck. As touched on above, the sterile-cockpit atmosphere suffers at the hands of technology just as often. The 2010 airliner incident outlined in our opening paragraphs brought to light how the sterility of an A320 cockpit suffered when the captain’s mobile phone started chirping alerts of new text messages while descending for Changi Airport. This bit of sterile-cockpit violation actually began before departing Darwin, Australia – when the captain, for whatever reason, failed to switch off the phone. When that phone started beeping newmessage alerts the captain went hyper-focal trying to unlock and then turn off the chirping smartphone; meanwhile, the Airbus A320 descended through 2,500 feet agl toward 2,000 agl as the First Officer (FO) worked without success to refocus the captain’s attention on the cockpit and restore cockpit sterility. Thankfully, the FO eventually hit the www.AvBuyer.com

autopilot-disconnect button to handle the landing – and, in his own zone of semi-sterility, noticed the three red lights indicating stowed landing gear. As the Airbus descended through 800 for 700 feet the FO made the smartest decision of the flight, opting to goaround. No flight crew should be engaged in any activity unrelated to actually piloting the aircraft – thus is the nature of the sterile cockpit. Of course, the safety aspects of flying with two pilots on the flight deck came through for the flight and its passengers. But what happens when both crew members abandon sterile-cockpit best practices? In the case of two Northwest Airlines pilots, you get an Airbus flying happily along - all on its own. It was October 2010 when a pair of Northwest Airlines pilots made the news by flying beyond their destination… 150 miles beyond! Filed for Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP), the flight crew members lost themselves in working on their laptop computers (yes, on the flight deck!) working in a program to schedule their next month’s duty days. With a cockpit distraction so severe and long-lasting, both crew members missed radio calls from ATC and navigation point alerts on their panel…for more than an hour! Thankfully, alert Flight Attendants came to the rescue - happily before the aircraft suffered a fuel crisis - after realizing the flight had been aloft far longer than it should have been without starting its descent. Imagine, if you will, the unhappy outcomes possible had other traffic, or some other crisis erupted during those 70-plus minutes the two pilots were “off-line” and in violation of the FAA’s Sterile Cockpit rules.

STERILIZE THE COCKPIT Regardless of the size or scope of the operation, the Sterile Cockpit philosophy should have a place in every operation in which safety matters. Of course, for operators at the lighter-end of the scale some adjustment to the parameters may be warranted. After all, for an aircraft that seldom cruises at 10,000 msl – let alone above – the thought of no one talking or engaging with the pilot is a little ludicrous. But the adjustment for the operation should be just that – an adjustment, not an abandonment or refusal to recognize the benefits. It takes only one moment focused elsewhere for an airplane to transition from ‘controlled flight’ to ‘terminal arrival’ when down low. Think safe – think sterile cockpit.

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on

the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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Florida Jet May 24/05/2012 10:46 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2012 Gulfstream 450 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

4236 125 42

Engines Rolls Royce Tay MK 611-8C On Rolls-Royce Corporate Care Engine 1 Engine 2 Serial Number: 85489 85490 Engine time hrs: 119 119 Cycles: 35 35 APU Honeywell 36-150 on MSP G450 Optional Equipment Installed • Synthetic Vision – Primary Flight Display • PlaneView Enhanced Navigation Package • PlaneView XM WX Weather • Category II Instrument Landing System • Runway Awareness Advisory System • Data Link Recording • 88 Parameter Flight Data Recorder • Emergency Vision Assurance System • Aircell High Speed Internet System • Aircell Axxess II Iridium Satellite Telephone • Part 135 Certified Interior & Exterior Fourteen passenger executive interior with an aft galley. Single seats are 28” with recliner leg rest on the forward facing single seats and each single seat has a 9” widescreen LCD monitor mounted in the outboard armrest, one additional 24” flat screen monitor is located on the forward bulkhead and a 19” monitor is located above the

credenza, the forward cabin features a four place club, the mid cabin area features a right side four place divan opposite a two place club arrangement and the aft cabin features a four place left side conference group opposite a credenza which incorporates the Cabin Entertainment System, facsimile machine and miscellaneous storage. The aft galley features a High-Temp and Microwave oven as well as a Coffee & Espresso maker, counter tops are quartz polymer material. Forward crew lavatory and aft passenger lavatory. The cabin Entertainment System features an Airshow 4000 System with three external cameras as well as an Enhanced Vision System Video Interface Installed to enable passengers to view FLIR camera images. There are also two Multi-Region DVD players and a five Disc CD Player. Eight 115V/60Hz power outlets located throughout the cabin. The cabin interior was completed with Enhanced Soundproofing and features a high gloss QTR comp ebony walnut wood cabinetry complimented by light satin almond champagne gold colored plating and patterned carpet. Exterior Matterhorn white with royal blue, blue haze and gray stripes, Teflon Coated Asking: Make Offer All Trades Considered

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Albinati Citationjet 2+ February 22/05/2012 18:14 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Cessna Citationjet 2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

525A-0385 HB-VOP 1439 1409

Engines on TAP Elite Williams International FJ-44- 3A-24 FADEC Controlled LH: S/N 216179 1439 TT / 1409 CSN RH: S/N 216178 1439 TT / 1409 CSN Avionics Collins Proline 21 Avionics System with 3 (8x10 inc) color, active matrix liquid crystal displays. AHRS 2 Collins AHC-3050 ADC 2 Collins ADC-3000 IFIS 1 Collins IFIS-5000 FMS 2 Collins FMS-.3000 (incl. DME II) GPS 1 Collins GPS-4000A w/12-Channel RTU 2 Collins RTU-4200 NAV 2 Collins NAV-4000 and NAV-4500 ADF 1 Collins ADF DME 1 Collins DME-4000 VHF 2 Collins VHF-4000 w/8.33KHz spacing XPDR 2 Collins TDR-94 Mode S TCAS II 1 Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II EGPWS Mark V EGPWS with RAAS Radar 1 Collins WXR-800 ESIS GH-3000 ESIS CVR Provisions for installation of L3 connection FA 2100 CVR ELT 1 Artex C406-N w/3 freq. ELT MDC 1 Collins Maintenance Diagnostic System

Additional Equipment Gnd Com Dispatch Switch (powers 1Radio, 1 RTU and both audio panel) Pulselight System with interface to TCAS II Tail Log Lights Nose Landing Gear in/protection boot Installation Jeppesen Electronic Charts on MFD Crew Seat Sheepskin Slipcovers 110V Ac Universal Electrical Outlet w/500W Inverter Monorail Sunvisors – Entry Step Upgrade to Airstair Style Steep Approach Option Interior Two (2) Cockpit, six (6) Cabin passengers seats. Four executive club chairs with two fold-out executive tables. RH Fwd Refreshment Center. Aft Divider Assembly with sliding door Aft Low Boy storage cabinet with drawer One Aft Potty Belted Seat. Townsend Leather Satin finished wood veneer – Australian Walnut Brushed Aluminium Hardware Finish. Exterior Overall white with dark grey stripes JAR OPS 1

Asking Price: Make Offer

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: Mob: E-mail: Web:

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 +41 (0) 79 2005265 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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Northern Air N412ET June 22/05/2012 14:27 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2007 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

45-2083 N412ET 2134 1827

Airframe Factory Warranty Through Sept. 2012 Smart Parts Engines Both Engines 2134 hours TT \1827 Cycles Enrolled on MSP Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS, • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder

• Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Black and Platinum Stripes. Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Elm Burl gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Balsam leather with Milkweed lower sidewalls, and finished Elm Burl wood gloss laminate. Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


Northern Air N959RP June 22/05/2012 14:29 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

40-2100 N959RP 1895 1538

• Extended Range Fuel Airframe Factory Warranty Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 1907 / Right Engine 1899 MSP Gold Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter

• Cockpit Voice Recorder • Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue and Yellow Stripes Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Imbuia gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Almond Crunch leather with Surfside lower sidewalls and finished Imbuia wood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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2000 Global Express April 23/05/2012 11:55 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2000 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9067 N67RX 7160 2125

As owner, Japat AG offers for sale its 2000 Bombardier Global Express, Serial Number 9067. This aircraft features: • Honeywell Avionics • 8C-Check and Landing Gear Overhaul in April 2012 • Buyers Choice of new Interior and Paint Colors

Airframe Empty Weight: 49,696 Lbs, Max Gross Weight: 96,000 Lbs, Max. Landing: 78,600 Lbs. . No Known Damage History. Engines BR710A2-20 on Corporate Care. Left: S/N-12235, TT: 7160.1 Hrs, TC: 2,125 Cycles. Right: S/N-12246, TT: 7160.1 Hrs, TC: 2,125. All Inspections Current. APU: RE-220(GX). On MSP Avionics DU-870 EFIS, Honeywell FMS, Honeywell IC800 Flight Director & Autopilot, GPS-550 GPS, RNZ-850 NAV, ADF, & DME, RCZ-833K VHF, HF-9000/Selcal HF, RCZ-833 Mode S Enhanced Transponder, Primus-880 Radad, TCAS, FDR, CVR, ELT

Interior Original, 14 seat interior. Baker Cabin Management System. Electric Window Shades. 4 Club Seats in Forward Cabin, 2 Club Seats plus 4-Seat Dining Group in Mid Cabin, 2-Seat Divan plus 2 Club Seats in Aft Cabin. Fwd and Aft Magair Toilets. DVD, CD, & VCR. 6-6.5” Seat Monitors. Crew Rest has built-in PMAT plus 10” Monitor. Fax. TIA Oven. Freezer. Chiller. Microwave. Aircraft will be delivered with fresh soft goods in April 2012. Color can still be decided by buyer. Exterior July 2003 Paint. Overall White with Blue and Gold Stripes. Aircraft will be delivered with new, April 2012 Paint. Color can still be decided by buyer. Aircraft Located in Morristown, New Jersey Price: Please Inquire

Japat AG Daniel Stieger

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

E-mail: daniel.stieger@novartis.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


2001 Global Express March 22/05/2012 12:55 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2001 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9086 M-MNAA 6370 2229

As owner, Japat AG offers for sale its 2001 Bombardier Global Express, Serial Number 9086. This aircraft features: • Honeywell Avionics • 8C-Check and Landing Gear Overhaul in October 2012 • Buyers Choice of new Interior and Paint Colors

Airframe Empty Weight: 49,545 Lbs, Max Gross Weight: 96,000 Lbs, Max. Landing: 78,600 Lbs. Engines BR710A2-20 on Corporate Care. Left: S/N-12287, TT: 6370.19 Hrs, TC: 2,229 Cycles. Right: S/N-12286, TT: 6370.19 Hrs, TC: 2,229. All Inspections Current. APU: RE-220(GX). On MSP Avionics DU-870 EFIS, Honeywell FMS, Honeywell IC800 Flight Director & Autopilot, GPS-550 GPS, RNZ-850 NAV, ADF, & DME, RCZ-833K VHF, HF-9000/Selcal HF, RCZ-833 Mode S Enhanced Transponder, Primus-880 Radad, TCAS, FDR, CVR, ELT. Interior Original, 14 seat interior. Baker Cabin Management System. Electric Window

Shades. 4 Club Seats in Forward Cabin, 2 Club Seats plus 4-Seat Dining Group in Mid Cabin, 2-Seat Divan plus 2 Club Seats in Aft Cabin. Fwd and Aft Magair Toilets. DVD, CD, & VCR. 6-6.5” Seat Monitors. Crew Rest has built-in PMAT plus 10” Monitor. Fax. TIA Oven. Freezer. Chiller. Microwave. Aircraft will be delivered with fresh soft goods in October 2012. Color can still be decided by buyer. Exterior July 2002 Paint. Overall White with Blue and Gold Stripes. Aircraft will be delivered with new, October 2012 Paint. Color can still be decided by buyer. Aircraft Located at Basel-Airport, Switzerland Price: Please Inquire

Japat AG Daniel Stieger

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

E-mail: daniel.stieger@novartis.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

131


Mente 2001 Falcon 2000 June 24/05/2012 10:01 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Mark Payne Tel: +1 972-897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

2001 Falcon 2000 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

131 N707MM 5,187 3,010

• Exterior Paint in January 2011 • Engine Program: 100% JSSI • One Owner • Fortune 500 Owned & Operated

Airframe Camp Maintenance & Tracking Program Engines CFE 738-1-1B 100% JSSI Left: S/N P105379. 5,068 Hours 3,010 Cycles Right: S/N P105387. 5,066 Hours 3,010 Cycles APU S/N P-243. 2,679 Hours. APU is not on a Program Avionics • Four Tube Collins 4000 EFIS • Dual Collins VHF-422C Comm • Dual Collins VIR-432 NAV • Dual Collins ADF-462 ADF • Dual Collins DME-442 DME • Dual Collins TDR-94D Mode S TDR • One Collins TWR-850/2 Cntrls Radar • Dual Collins FMS-6000/CDU-6100 FMS • Dual Collins 4000 GPS • Dual Honeywell Laseref IV • Dual Collins 9000 w/ Selcal HF

• Dual Collins ALT-55B Rad Alt • Meggitt LCD Secondary Flight Display • Collins 4000 w/ Chng 7 TCAS II • Collins APS-4000 Autopilot • Socata 97 Tri Band Elt • Honeywell MK-V EGPWS • Allied Signal SS (120MIN) CVR • Allied Signal SS FDR • AirCell Axxess II Satcom w/ High Speed Internet • Flight Dynamics HGS-2850 – HUD • Selcal – Coltech (2 Channel) • Honeywell AFIS with Skyprinter • Honeywell SSCVR & SSFDR • Airshow GENISYS w/ Cockpit Display Interior Eight passenger interior consisting of a four place aft cabin package including left hand dining/coffee table and two sets of dual passenger seats, two individual 18” wide passenger seats. Jumpseat (ERDA). Crew seat sheepskin inserts. Aircraft flight/performance box. Aircraft logbook holder. Forward right hand galley annex (15”). Right hand galley(46”) with pop-out work surface, high temp oven, Tia coffee maker, and Tia microwave oven. Forward left hand entryway closet/entertainment cabinet with 15” LCD monitor on cabin side. Headliner lighting system. Galley pocket/sliding door. Audio international video cassette player. Audio international DVD player. Cabin Rosen video monitors. Custom metal plating. Custom aft bulkhead. Custom wood veneer side-ledge. Mente Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320, Addison, TX 75001

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Windslow life rafts with storage in aft baggage. Tow bar and ladder mounted in forward servicing compartment Exterior Last Painted: January 2011. By: Duncan Aviation. White (Jetglo snow white) with blue (Jetglo light blue) and black (Jetglo gloss black) stripes. Dry bay mod complied with prior to repaint

Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Mente Citation VII & Falcon 2000 June 24/05/2012 10:03 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1995 Citation VII Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

650-7059 N14DG 4,456.4 3,504

• LOW TOTAL TIME, 4,456.4 HOURS • MSP • XM RADIO • HERMISTATIC DOOR SEAL TO REDUCE CABIN NOISE LEVEL • 2 LARGE MONITORS & 5 INDIVIDUAL SEAT MONITORS Engines Garrett TFE - 731-4R-2S MSP Gold Left: S/N: P102227. 4,220.5 Hours. 3,337 Cycles Right: S/N: P102228. 4,267 Hours. 3,329 Cycles

Kyle Foddrill Tel: +1 (817) 372-4527 E-mail: kfoddrill@mentegroup.com APU Honeywell S/N: 36-150. 2,459 Hours On MSP Avionics • Honeywell SPZ-8000 Avionics Suite • Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS • Honeywell Primus 670 • Dual Collins VHF 22A • Dual Collins DME 42 • Dual Collins ADF 452 • Collins TDR -94 • Collins ALT-55 • Honeywell TCAS-II • Fairchild GA-100 Cockpit Voice Rec. • Dual Honeywell NZ-2000 • King KTR-953 with SeCal • Honeywell Mark VIII

Magnastar 2000 air to ground flitfone system with dual handsets. Airshow 400. RVSM Compliant. VHS and CD player. Hermistatic Door Seal Interior Six passenger configuration features a forward four place club with two fold out executive tables and two forward facing aft seats. The aircraft features a belted aft lavatory. Soft Goods Refurbished November 2008; New Carpet November 2008 Exterior New Paint November 2008, by Jim Miller Additional Features 5 Individual monitors. XM Radio IPod docking station. Camera 14" Monitor in the forward right cabin 10" Monitor in the forward left cabin Hermistatic Door Seal to reduce cabin noise level

Two Corporate Owners Since New

2002 Falcon 2000

Kyle Foddrill Tel: +1 (817) 372-4527 E-mail: kfoddrill@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Interior Featuring a 10 passenger executive interior. Forward full service galley. Four place club arrangement with stowable tables. Aft four place conference group across from a two place club. The six individual seats have ‘quick change’ full recline berthing capabilities with 5 mattresses that provides 3 single and 1 double bed options. The four place conference group is serviced by a telescoping dining table. Baker cabin entertainment and environment control system incorporating. Infrared controls, Airshow 400, dual DVD, dual Amplifiers, 15-inch monitor flush mounted in the forward bulkhead, 18-inch monitor mounted in the aft bulkhead. Four 115 VAC power outlets Exterior Aircraft is painted Overall White with Grey belly and Grey with Bordeaux Stripes 4 (upper and lower) Tailplane Floodlights

184 G-MDBA 2,018 979

• EASA Certified (Previously FAA Compliant) • Low Total Time, 2,018 Hours • On MSP • 10 Passenger Interior Airframe Enrolled on CSP Engines CFE-738-1-1B. On MSP Gold Left: S/N: TBA. 2,018 Hours. TBD Cycles Right: S/N: TBA. 2,018 Hours. TBD Cycles APU S/N: TBA. 1,366 Hours. On MSP

Avionics • Collins 4 Tube EFIS-4000 w/ 6.1 Upgrade • Auto Pilot: Collins APS-4000 • COMM: Triple Collins VHF-422C w/ Dual Control • NAV: Dual Collins VIR-432 • HF: Dual Collins HF-9000 • Radio Turning Units: Dual Collins 4220 • ADF: Dual Collins 462 • DME: Dual Collins 442 • FMS: Dual Collins 6100 • GPS: Dual Collins GPS 4000 • TCAS: Collins TCAS II-94 w/ Change 7 • EGPWS: Honeywell Mark V EGPWS • Transponders: Dual Collins TDR-94D w/ Flight ID • Weather Radar: Collins TWR-850 w/ Dual Control • Radio Altimeter: Collins ALT 55B Collins • Altitude Reference System: Collins AHS 85E

Mente Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320, Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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CAI Socata TBM700B June 22/05/2012 14:32 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2002 TBM 700B Serial Number: 239 Airframe TT: 1,641 Engine PRATT & WHITNEY PT6A-64 (3,500 Hr. TBO) 288 Hours Since Hot Section Propeller HARTZELL 196 SPOH - Nov. 2008 Avionics NAV/COMM: GARMIN GNS-530W AP/FD: KING KFC-325 (W/PRESELECT) DME: KING KN-63 XPNDR: DUAL GARMIN GTX-327 ALTIMETER: KING KEA-346 R/ALT: KING KRA-405B EGPWS: KING KGP-560 (ON GMX-200) R/ALT: KING KRA-405B AUDIO: GARMIN GMA-340 GPS: DUAL GARMIN GNS-530W EFIS: TWO-TUBE BENDIX EFS-40 MFD: GARMIN GMX-200 W/CHARTVIEW RADAR: KING RDR-2000 (ON GMX-200) S/SCOPE: WX-500 TCAD: SKYWATCH HP Wx: GARMIN GDL-69 (DOWNLINK) Features THREE OWNERS SINCE NEW, GASEOUS OXYGEN SYSTEM, ROLL STEERING UPGRADE FOR MORE PRECISE AUTOPILOT CONTROL FOR APPROACHES, UPGRADED THE EFIS 40 TO COUPLE WAAS VERTICAL (LPV) APPROACHES, ETM 700 ENGINE TREND MONITOR, FULL COPILOT

INSTRUMENTS: KING KI-525 HSI, AIRSPEED & VERTICAL SPEED INDICATORS, ALTITUDE INDICATOR, ELECTRIC ARTIFICIAL HORIZON, ELECTRIC TRIM CONTROL, ALTIMETER AND AIRSPEED INDICATOR. KEITH FREON AIR, TRI BAND ELT, KNOWN ICING (DE-ICE BOOTS, ELECTRIC PROP, ELECTRICALLY HEATED RIGHT HAND SIDE WINDSHIELD, PITOT/STALL, INERTIAL SEPARATOR), ELT, OAT GAUGE AND NO DAMAGE HISTORY Maintenance FRESH ANNUAL INSPECTION FEBRUARY 2012 BY SOCATA AIRCRAFT, LANDING GEAR ON 10 YEAR LONG LIFE INSPECTION PROGRAM WHICH INVOLVED REBUILDING THE ACTUATORS TO 10 YEAR SPECS, REPLACING ALL THE TORQUE LINK PINS AND BUSHINGS IN ALL THREE GEAR AND RESEALING THE GEAR, NEW WING BOOTS NOVEMBER 2008. Interior PLATINUM EDITION, HIGH COMFORT BEIGE LEATHER SEATS, GOLD METAL FINISH FOR READLING LIGHTS, BEIGE ALCANTARA WALLS, WOOD OVERHEAD PANEL, EXECUTIVE WRITING TABLE, AND HIGH GLOSS CHERRY CABINETRY. Exterior WHITE UPPER FUSELAGE AND WINGS, LOWER FUSELAGE BLUE WITH SILVER, BLUE AND RED ACCENTS The aircraft is based in Europe

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

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Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


John Hopkinson Ultras April 22/05/2012 14:36 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation Ultras Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell GNS-XLS FMS Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS Interior Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior Exterior Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior Maintenance Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale One Year Cescom Enrollment Zero Engine Option

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

135


Jetsales May 22/05/2012 18:18 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2007 Eurocopter 135P2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

0561 SP-KOT 300

• Immaculate and VIP configuration • Lowest time on market • One owner • This as new beautiful Eurocopter EC135P2+ has black paint with matching gold stripes. • Since new it has one owner and was only for private use. The SPKOT has a dedicated hangar in which it is kept and taken care of. • All inspections are to date and all SB are complied. • This helicopter is configured for single pilot VFR day and night as also IFR Flights. • There are 7 seats (5+2) in a VIP configuration. • This EU registered helicopter is located in EPPO (Poznan, Poland)

Avionics Glass cockpit Autopilot Stormscope WX500 2xGarmin GNS430 NAV/COM/GPS 10” copilot instrument panel Garmin GTX Mode S Transponder DME DMS44A Other features Bleed air heating, safe battery, 450W landing and search light, copilot flight controls, windscreen wipers, standby horizon, AL804DC with backup Passenger comfort VIP Interior Air conditioning 7 Bose X Headsets Enhanced sound proofing Other options include Ground power plug, Hydraulic handling

Engines 2x Pratt & Whitney

Jetsales Ltd

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +44 (0) 777 14 33 999 Email: sales@jetsales.pl

Aircraft Index see Page 4


JetFlight Ltd June 22/05/2012 14:49 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Photo: Natalie Bruggemann

2008 Falcon 2000LX Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

141 G-WLVS 1275 675

New to market EASA certified Main features • 10 Seats • Delivered April 2008 • 1275 hours only, 675 landings • No damage history • Engines on ESP • Immaculately maintained • Range 4000nm at MO.8 and 6 pax • Lowest DOCs in class • Full specifications Cockpit • 3rd Honeywell TR866B VHF Voice and AFIS Data Comms System • 3rd Honeywell AV-900 Audio System • Aircell ST3100 Iridium Satcom • Honeywell “EASy” Comms Management Function • Miltope Flightdeck printer • Honeywell DFDR Flight Data Recorder • KGS Electronics Auxiliary 115VAC 60Hz Power • Teleflex Tail Recognition Light System • Al Electroluminescent Entertainment Controls • Honeywell 20 inch monitor

• Rosen Plug-In 8.4 inch seat monitors • 3rd Flight Crew Seat Cabin • Sony Stereo Headsets • Airshow 410 Cabin Display System and Worldwide maps • Custom wood veneer side ledge • 30 inch LH entryway closet “rounded styling” • DASC increased height seating with hidden headsets and electrical lumbar • 2 Recliner type leg rests Galley • 46 inch galley “rounded styling” • 15 inch galley annex “rounded styling” • 3 Atlas Tray Carriers and 3 Storage Drawers • Extra-wide high temperature oven plus TIA microwave oven • Ice drawer, trash drawer, cold storage drawer • Galley pocket sliding door Other • 115 cubic feet oxygen bottle • Telescopic towbar Price US$23.75m Subject to contract / Subject to prior or withdrawal from sale

JetFlight Ltd

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +44 (0) 1353 661636 or +44 (0) 7785 245400 Email: JetSalesUK@aol.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

137


Eurojet June 23/05/2012 16:19 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2000 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550B-0917 G-IDAB 2745 2321

• On Power Advantage & ProParts • EU-Ops Compliant • Fresh Phase I through V just completed Engines Eng 1 (L): 2,745 SNEW - 4,000 TBO - 2,309 CSN Eng 2 (R): 2,745 SNEW - 4,000 TBO - 2,309 CSN Avionics Avionics Package: Honeywell P-1000 Flight Director: Primus 1000 Autopilot: Primus 1000 FMS: Honeywell GNS-XLS Communication Radios: Dual King With 8.33 Spacing Navigation Radios: Dual King DME: Dual King ADF: King CNI-5000 Transponder: Honeywell MST-67A Mode S enhanced TCAS: Honeywell CAS-67A TCAS-II TAWS: Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS Hi Frequency: Bendix/King KHF-950 Weather Radar: Collins RTA-800 CVR: Fairchild FDR: Fairchild

Additional Equipment and Options Rosen Monorail sun visors EROS Crew Masks 50 Cubic Foot Oxygen Bottle Large SAFT 43 Amp Battery Overwater Life Vests Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS Artex ELT w/triple channels Camino window inserts Exterior Matterhorn with navy blue & burgundy stripes Interior Attractive lightly appointed interior features grey leather seating with Elite style tailoring and high gloss laminate cabinetry. Full LH Galley with hot liquid and storage cabinet Executive writing tables. Non belted flushing lavatory. Indirect lighting, and an aft divider. Price Reduced

Current owners trading up Excellent aircraft for either private or charter purposes In exceptional condition

Tel: +44 (0) 121 782 1700 Fax: +44 (0) 121 782 1711 Email: aircraftsales@eurojet.eu.com

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Carolinajets May 22/05/2012 14:52 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1999 Gulfstream V Airframe TT: Landings:

4463 1487

Engines Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Model: BR-710 Total hours: 4240.5 (LH) and 4379.5 (RH) Total cycles: 1349 (LH) and 1375 (RH) Engines on Rolls-Royce Corporate Care program APU Manufacturer: Honeywell Model No. RE220-G-V Total hours: 3201 APU on MSP Program Avionics 6 Honeywell DU-880 Display Units 3 Honeywell SG-884 Symbol Generators 2 Honeywell DC-884 Display Controllers 1 Honeywell DP-884 Dimming Control 2 Honeywell FC-S80 Fault Warning Computers 2 Honeywell DA-800 Data Acquisition Units 1 Honeywell GBC-2020 Head Up Display System (HUD) Completion installed equipment: Enhanced Vision System (EVS) with HUD Wide Combiner, with display capability on Copilot’s Universal UCD Display 2 Honeywell IC-800E Integrated Avionics Computers(IAC) 2 Honeywell CD-810 Control Display Units 1 Honeywell DL-900 Data Loader 1 Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel

3 Honeywell AZ-840 Micro Data Computers Completion installed equipment: 1 Honeywell IC-800E Integrated Avionics Computer (third unit) 1 Honeywell CD-810 Control Display Units (third unit) Ethernet/CD-ROM FMS Nav DB update feature activated 2 Universal Cockpit Display (UCD) Electronic Flight Bag systems; Display Jeppesen approach charts and aircraft position Communication Systems 3 Collins VHF-422D VHF transceivers 2 Collins HF-9000 HF Radio Systems 3 orbit Cockpit Audio Control Systems wi integral Selcal 2 Collins RTU-4280 Radio Frequency Management Units Completion installed equipment: 1 Magnastar C-2000 Multi-Channel Radio Telephone System 1 Honeywell MCS-6000 6 Channel Satcom System 1 AlliedSignal AFIS System with VHF and Satcom Link 1 Danka MFP-6000 Fax/Printer/Copier/Scanner 3 RJ-11 modern ports (Cockpt, Fwd VIP seat, Aft Divan) Additional Equipment Long Range Navigation Sensors, Short Range Navigation Sensors, Pulse Systems, Hazard Avoidance Systems, Exterior Lights - Precise Flight Pulselite Visual Contact System

Carolina Corporate Jets

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (0) 704 662 8680 info@carolinajets.com www.carolinajets.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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P140_JMesingerNov06 23/05/2012 10:39 Page 1

Find an Aircraft Dealer Business Aviation

Not just a tug. Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

8900 Series

It’s a

.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today avbuyer.com/dealers

800-535-8767 / 503-861-2288 w w w. l e k t r o. co m / s a l e s @ l e k t r o. co m

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace June12 23/05/2012 09:33 Page 1

Marketplace Boeing 737-300 VIP

European Skybus Ltd Year:

1990

S/N:

24570

TTAF:

53457

Reg:

N470AC

Location: United Kingdom

This Boeing 737-300 has recently undergone extensive maintenance and engineering work and has been converted to a VIP configuration in February 2011. The aircraft has been completely refurbished to the highest standards. The new owner will benefit from the millions of dollars and thousands of man hours that have gone into completing this VIP conversion. Winglets have been fitted to improve the aircraft performance and range. Price: Please call

Dornier 328

EPSN Year:

1998

S/N:

3095

TTAF:

2011

Reg:

PH-EVY

Location: Netherlands

Aircraft in Executive lay-out 12 pax. Exceptionally wide corporate cabin arrangement with forward kitchen and aft Wardrobe/Lavatory room (wider then e.g. G V or Falcon 900). Kitchen with oven, coffeemaker, wash bin, ample stowing cabinetry. Cabin with moving map display, video/audio system. Wardrobe / lavatory area with large wardrobe space. With access to the aft baggage compartment. Fresh Phase V inspection, Fresh LG Overhaul. EASA JAR/OPS1 equipped. Dual S-Transponder. RVSM mod c/w. Price: Please call

Royce Air, LLC Year:

1983

S/N:

496

TTAF:

4,317

Reg:

N202AR

Email: trevorw@euroav.com Tel: +31 (0) 629 560 272

Dassault Falcon 200

Tel: +44 (0) 1531 633 000

Email: hwac@kpnmail.nl Tel: +1 (630) 268 4000

Nine Place Interior, Fwd DBL Club, Aft Three Place Divan Opposite Club, Three Tables, Seats in Tan Leather, Ultrasuede Headliner, Beige Carpet and Side Panels, Mahogany Veneer Cabinetry, Cockpit Seats Recovered and Cabin Seats Re-Dyed, Wired for Entertainment Center w/VCR, Fwd Galley with Bar, Aft Lav. Price: Please call

Location: USA, FL ✈

Socata TBM 700B

Avia Source, Inc. Year:

2001

S/N:

208

TTAF:

3939

Reg:

LX-JFE

Email: kris@plencner.com Tel: +1 626-584-8170

Engines are 220 since overhaul. Take advantage of the best value available in the 700Bs. This fine aircraft is one owner since new, has updated Garmin avionics, Socata maintained and Extensive 10 year inspection is completed. The interior and exterior are in excellent condition. Price USD$1,200,000

Location: Switzerland ✈

Pilatus PC-12/47

Avia Source, Inc. Year:

2006

S/N:

732

TTAF:

1550

Reg:

M-ZUMO

Email: jason@aviasource.aero Tel: +1 626-584-8170

This excellent PC-12/47 is equipped with the Second Battery, Large Oxy System and Additional Air Conditioning. It has the 8 passenger interior with the 6 seat BMW Platinum Upgrade and two additional standard seats. Price USD$2,675,000

Location: United Kingdom ✈ Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: jason@aviasource.aero WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

141


Marketplace June12 23/05/2012 09:34 Page 2

Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

TTAF:

6615.3

Reg:

N337WR

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,975,000.

Location: USA jetphotos.net

Bell 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

TTAF:

1700

Reg: Location: USA

justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners. US $1,975,000.

1981

S/N:

33017

TTAF:

15265

Reg:

N554AL

Location: USA

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’. Fresh annual / Export C of A. Price US $3,875,000 ✈

Bell 212

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not do

Bell 412 EMS

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

S/N: TTAF: Reg: Location: USA

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Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace June12 23/05/2012 09:35 Page 3

Marketplace Eurocopter AS 332C1

Europavia (Suisse) SA Year:

1982

S/N:

2033

TTAF:

13,595

Reg:

HB-XVY

Location: Switzerland

Eurocopter EC 135P2i Executive

Beautiful as New, G-Inspection in 2011, number of inspection on various equipment, complete documentation and maintenance, new perfect paint, provided with large number of spare parts and equipment, Immediately available ready for Operation, Transferable Turbomeca Engine Service Support Agreement. Contact directly Swiss Official Eurocopter Distribution www.europavia.ch Price: Make offer ✈

www.europavia.ch

Tel: +41 (0) 31 310 41 13

Email: gtsilalidis@europavia.ch

Europavia (Suisse) SA Year:

2011

S/N:

0938

TTAF:

Ferry fly

Reg:

HB-ZTJ

Tel: +41 (0) 31 310 41 13

BRAND NEW EC135P2i Executive Immediately available, perfect configuration, Exceptional Price.

Price: Make offer

Location: Switzerland ✈

www.europavia.ch Eurocopter EC 120B

Europavia (Suisse) SA Year:

2001

S/N:

1248

TTAF:

5200

Reg:

HB-ZDS

Location: Switzerland

Price: Make offer Contact: WWW.EUROPAVIA.CH Swiss Official EUROCOPTER Distributor.

Apple International Year:

1973

S/N:

1153

TTAF:

10117.5

Reg:

C-GBSP

Location: United Kingdom

This JetRanger has been carefully maintained, recently refurbished interior to include leather seats. Comes complete with Logs & Records. Ext: 8/10, Int: 8/10, Cream, Black & Tan quality leather seats with Tan thick pile wool carpets. Exterior Gold metallic with Black & Silver accents. Low skids, good avionics, particle separator, dual controls, heater. Recently imported from Canada. Excellent condition, fresh annual inspection, new TT straps, fresh Containment ring Mod. 100 to 1200 hour inspections completed. To be delivered with fresh British C of A. Export C of A is available at additional cost. Price: Sterling £259,950

JT Air Ltd Year:

2002

S/N:

230

TTAF:

1426

Reg:

N324JS

Location: United Kingdom

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: sales@206Bell.com Tel: +44 (0) 7957 106 952

An extremely well presented and cared for Example of a Socata TBM 700 B with recent Hot Section Inspection, Socata Service Centre Maintained, Annual Inspection Completed Dec 2011. Complete and Original Logs. No Exceedences. Always Hangared. VAT paid in Europe. Garmin 530, KMD 850 MFD, EFIS-40 EHSI & EADI, Annual 31 Dec 2012, Gear Inspection & Long Life Enrolled, Garmin 330 Mode S, Prop 260SN, Interior Flawless, 2 Drink /Storage Cabinets, 6 Place Bose, Crew/Pac Music. Full Detail www.jtair.net/n324js. Price: Please Call

www.jtair.net/n324js

gtsilalidis@europavia.ch Tel: +44 (0) 1508 533 180

Socata TBM 700B

Tel: +41 (0) 31 310 41 13

Owned Since New, Perfectly maintained by certified Eurocopter Maintenance station, Immediately available!

www.europavia.ch Bell 206B

Email: gtsilalidis@europavia.ch

Email: mail@jtair.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

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Marketplace June12 23/05/2012 09:36 Page 4

Marketplace Cessna Citation Mustang

Tel: +27 11 548 3000

ComAir South Africa Year:

2010

S/N:

510-0303

TTAF:

550

Reg:

510-0303

Location: South Africa

ENGINES: 550 Hours 350 Cycles, LANDINGS: 320, AVIONICS: Garmin G1000 EFIS System, OPTIONAL EQUIP: Automatic Direction Finder, Chart View, 40 Cu. Ft Oxygen Bottle, G1000 SVT, Life Vest, Locking fuel caps, SOD Dirt Kit FK 1871 (Factory installed), INTERIOR: Bronze, EXTERIOR: White with silver, blue and navy stripes. Price: USD$2,595,000 ✈

Cessna 208

Email: comair@comairsa.co.za

CAAD Inc. Year:

2008

S/N:

2045

TTAF:

3,656.24

Reg:

Tel: +1 305 593 9929 Total Aircraft Cycles: 6,733. Configuration: 12 Pax Seats. Aircraft Status: OPERATIONAL Info. updated to: 31-Jan12. Out of operations 31-Jan-12. Propellers Type & Model: 3GFR34C703-B. Serial Number: 100940. Propeller TBO: 4000. Time Since New: 1063.30. Time Since Overhaul: 1068.30. Price: $1,650,000

Location: Costa Rica ✈

www.caadinc.com Cessna 208

Email: colinward@caadinc.com

CAAD Inc. Year:

2008

S/N:

2050

TTAF:

3,809.54

Reg:

Tel: +1 305 593 9929 Total Aircraft Cycles: 7,065. Configuration: 12 Pax Seats. Aircraft Status: OPERATIONAL Info. updated to: 31-Jan-12 Out of operations 31-Jan-12. Propellers Type & Model: 3GFR34C703-B. Serial Number: 110577. Propeller TBO: 4000. Time Since New: 437.14. Time Since Overhaul: 437.14. Price: $1,650,000

Location: Costa Rica ✈

www.caadinc.com Cessna Citation CJ3

Tel: +43 (0) 664 8513233

Miss A. Angerer Year:

2009

S/N:

525B-0314

TTAF:

400

Reg:

OE-GPD

Location:

Engine Time: 400 Engines on TAP Elite, Avionics:Pro Line 21 3-Tube, Dual NAV 4500, DME NAV 4500, Dual FMS 3000, AFIS Datalink XMWR 1000, EGWPS Mark V, Cockpit Voice Recorder. Other Equipment: RVSM, MNPS, 8,33, FM Immunity, Aircell Iridium. Additional Info: On TAP Elite, On Pro Parts, On Cescom, JAR OPS I, No Damage History. Price: US-$ 6,290,000 millions, immediately available. ✈

Beechjet 400A

Email: colinward@caadinc.com

Email: a.angerer@palfinger.com

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Year:

1990

S/N: TTAF:

6.165

Tel: +49 (0) 821 7003 100

EU Reg, TSHSI 982 hrs (Engines), 9 Pax (opt.), HF-9000, GPS-4000A, 2x FMC-5000, TWR-850, 2x TDR-94D XPDR (ID), Rohr Thrust Reversers, RVSM + Incr. Weight Modification - Top Deal!

Reg: Location: ✈

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Email: info@beechcraft.de Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace June12 24/05/2012 13:34 Page 5

Marketplace Par Avion Ltd

+1 832 934 0055

Alberth Air Parts

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011

Find an Aircraft Dealer

Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

Business Aviation

avbuyer.com/dealers

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 13th June Advertiser’s Index 1st Source Bank ........................................................85

Corporate Aircraft Photography...........................140

Jeteffect .................................................................FC,19

21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................146

Corporate AirSearch Int’l................................53, 134

JETFINA SA..............................................................113

Action Aviation ............................................................57

Corporate Concepts .................................................61

JETNET ......................................................................121

AeroSmith/Penny .......................................................42

Dassault Falcon Jet Europe....................................2-3

Jetsales Ltd ...............................................................136

AIC Title Services.......................................................71

Duncan Aviation ................................................79, 101

John Hopkinson & Associates........................87, 135

Air 1st Aviation ..............................................................4

Eagle Aviation..............................................................55

Leading Edge Aviation Solutions............................45

Albinati Aeronautics SA .........................................127

ExecuJet Aviation........................................................39

Lektro .........................................................................140

Aradian Aviation..........................................................63

Flight Partners ..........................................................138

Mente Group ...................................................132-133

AviationExpo – Bitburg...........................................109

Florida Jet ..................................................................126

NBAA Business Aviation Forums ........................120

Avjet Corporation.................................................26-27

Freestream Aircraft USA....................................40-41

New Jet International .................................................83

Avpro ......................................................................20-22

General Aviation Services ........................................67

Northern Air......................................................128-129

Banyan..........................................................................97

Guardian Jet ..........................................................15-17

O’Gara Aviation Company.................................24-25

Bell Aviation ..........................................................30-31

Gulfstream Pre-Owned.............................................65

Par Avion.........................................................................5

Bombardier ...............................................................105

Heliasset.com ...........................................................107

PremiAir Global Aircraft Sales..............................115

Boutsen Aviation ........................................................29

Intellijet International .................................................6-7

Rolls-Royce .................................................................93

Bristol Associates ......................................................23

Japat AG ...........................................................130-131

Sentinel Aviation.........................................................91

Carolina Corporate Jets .........................................139

J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ......................11-13

Southern Cross Aviation...........................................81

Central Business Jets .............................................147

Jet Flight.....................................................................137

The Jet Collection ......................................................59

Charleston Aviation Partners...................................69

JetBlack Aviation.........................................................73

Universal Avionics ......................................................99

Charlie Bravo Aviation...............................................35

JetBrokers..............................................................36-37

VREF Aircraft Values.................................................48

Chuck Collins & Associates ....................................43

Jetcraft Corporation....................................32-33, BC

Wiley Rein....................................................................48 Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................49

Conklin & de Decker ....................................................4 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

145


21st Century May 24/04/2012 18:08 Page 1

Copyright of Leor Yudelowitz

When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet In the sky; and the Federal Aviation Adminstration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope, and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 Series aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter than the Gulfstream IV and provide a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. Furthermore, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN, with eight passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. Revolutionary and the world’s first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology. FBW enables a MMO of .90 and enhanced low-speed handling, pitch and roll stability characteristics. The 7X can climb directly to FL 410 at ISA + 10° conditions. Two Hundred (200)+ very high speed, ultra long range Falcon 7X business jets have been ordered!

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ June_CBJ November06 22/05/2012 15:05 Page 1

General Offices

Vienna Office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Austria

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +43 660 549 1099

FAX: (952) 894-8569

FAX: +44 20 7900 2890

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

EMAIL: erich@cbjets.com

2004 FALCON 2000 S/N 217

FALCON 900EX EASy S/N 121

US & EASA Certified, 10 PAX Interior, 100% JSSI, Less than 400 Hours since C Inspection

Former Falcon Demo, Only 2400 Hours TT, Most Systems are Triple, Satcom/HUD, Over $3M worth of Options, US & EASA Certified, Owners New 7X Has Arrived

FALCON 900EX EASY S/N 170

FALCON 900B S/N 110

Single US Owner Aircraft, 1175 Hours TT, MSP Gold, Honeywell EVS, Triple IRS and FMS, 13 PAX with Fwd and AFT lav

Meets All EASA / Transport Canada / FAA Approvals; 3C Inspection completed 2010, Owners 900EX Easy has Arrived, MSP Gold, Forward Galley or Normal Galley with Forward Lav.

2009/2010 HAWKER 4000 S/N RC-35

2008 HAWKER 900XP S/N 033

Upgrade and Enhancement Program Already C/W, HBC support plus program pre-paid up to 2000 Hours or 5 Yrs; Fully transferable 5 year warranty expires 12/23/2014, no damage history

853.31 Hours, MSP Gold, EASA / JAR Ops / FAA Certified, Standard 8 Place Interior, Dual FMS, Dual GPS, Dual AHRS, Etc…

CITATION ENCORE S/N 646

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5220

Single US Owner Aircraft, Power Advantage with recent Engine Overhauls, Pro Parts, No Damage History

Single Owner, Fresh Engine Overhauls, Power Advantage Engine & APU Program, Spectacular Cockpit including Dual NZ-2000’s and Honeywell RAAS, Aircell Access, XM Sat Weather… 9 PAX Interior

CITATION ENCORE+ S/N 756

1125 ASTRA SP S/N 49

Single US Owner Aircraft, Power Advantage Plus with Pro Parts, No Damage History

3322.1 TT; Fresh C Check, new paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center 08/11, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod

SIKORSKY 76B S/N 344 Fortune 100 Owned, 8 Place Executive, Fully Loaded EFIS Cockpit, Freon Air -conditioning


This being the aviation industry, you’d think more companies would share our

51,000 foot view.

Up here, the air and the competition are rare. Our birds-eye view of the aircraft brokerage market comes from our unmatched combination of over 50 years’ experience and a large, global network of partners and customers. That means you have more buy, sell and trade options. put a tailwind on your transaction. Call us and see. You’ll love the view. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

FEATURED INVENTORY

2001 Global Express - SN 9076

Available for Immediate Sale & Delivery RSVM Compliant - EASA/ JAR OPS1 Certified

2008 Falcon 2000DX EASy - SN 601 Available for Short Term Lease Extremely Attractive Rates

was_51,000ft_06.2012.indd 1

2005 Challenger 300 - SN 20041 Pristine Condition - Low Time - One Owner Over $1M in Options 2012 Airbus ACJ 2007 Challenger 300 2011 Challenger 300 1999 Challenger 604 2003 Challenger 604 2005 Challenger 604 2007 Challenger 605 2013 Challenger 605 2003 Challenger 850 2008 Challenger 850 1994 Citation VII

2008 Citation XLS+ 2009 Falcon 7X 2010 Falcon 7X 2013 Global 5000 2012 Global 6000 2007 Global XRS 2003 Gulfstream 550 1998 Gulfstream GIVSP 2000 Hawker 800XP 2008 Legacy 600 1996 Sikorsky S-76b

2002 Challenger 604 - SN 5546

Impeccably Maintained - Exceptionally Equipped Honeywell 36-150 APU

2012 Challenger 605 - 4Q 2012

JAA Requirements Package I - RVSM Certification Preferred 12 Pax Configuration

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

Better perspective on market trends. And worldwide connections that

5/15/12 4:29 PM


World Aircraft Sales Magazine June-12