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WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

August 2012

proudly presents

1999 Learjet 45BR Serial Number 45-032 See page 11 for further details

Business Aviation & The Boardroom: pages 50 - 79 • Plane Sense on Refurbishments


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AC Index August2011 26/07/2012 13:03 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

AEROSTAR

PAGE

601-3A ER . . . . . 17, 18, 150, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 25, 29, 34, 43, 61, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 77, 81, 156, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 33, 34, 40, 61, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152, 156, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 34,

Superstar 700 . . 36,

AIRBUS A318 Elite. . . . . . 16, ACJ . . . . . . . . . . . 34,

Learjet 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 31, 73, 81, 109, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 36, 61, 113, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 143, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 31, 61, 67, 89, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 45BR . . . . . . . . . . 1, 11 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 29, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 59, 113, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 18, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 11, 18, 27, 149,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 33, 71, BBJ 700C . . . . . . 14, 727-100 . . . . . . . 75, 727-100 REW. . . 132, Super 27-100 . . 75, Super 27-200-REW..75, Super 727-100-REW. .16, 737-300-VIP. . . . 147, 737-500 . . . . . . . 147, 757-200 . . . . . . . 75, MD 87 . . . . . . . . . 55,

BOMBARDIER Global 5000 . . . . 16, 25, 61, 73, 151, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, Global 6000 . . . . 6, 67, 156, Global 7000 . . . . 67, Global Express . 6, 13, 16, 21, 27, 35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134, 135, 151, 156, Global Express XRS.. 35, 71, 156,

Challenger 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 34, 61, 109, 150, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 601 . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 27, 30, 36, 45, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 18, 25, 109,

PAGE

CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 30, 136, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 73, 107, 144, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 36, 37, 138, Encore . . . . . . . . 155, Encore +. . . . . . . 155, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 30, 73, 77, 155, 156, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 59, 65, 81, Mustang . . . . . . . 23, SII . . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 43, 55, 107, Sovereign. . . . . . 27, 36, 45, 77, Stallion . . . . . . . . 37, T206H . . . . . . . . . 65, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 18, 30, 91, 141,

Conquest I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 152, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31,

Grand Caravan 208B . . . . . . . . . . 149,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

Lineage 1000. . . 16, Phenom 100 . . . 59, 107,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 6, 30, 73, 81, 109, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 156, 20C-5BR . . . . . . 36, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 17, 25, 35, 36, 81, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 5, 22, 154, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 27, 36, 73, 146, 154, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 154, 900EX EASy . . . 3, 17, 71, 154, 155, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 21, 29, 154, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 3, 22, 25, 43, 140, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155, 2000DX EASy . . 34, 2000EX EASy . . 3, 17, 156, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 3, 19,

CESSNA

CIRRUS

Citation

SR22 . . . . . . . . . . 65,

GULFSTREAM

DORNIER

III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 59, 109, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 16, 17, 27, 33, 35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87, 139, 156, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 21, 27, 35, 145, 156, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 71, 105, 156, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 77, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 77, 83, 105, 113, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 27, 28, 36, 105, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 151, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 15, 16, 71, 77, 105, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 25, 77, 105, 156, Twin Commander 690B.. 107, Twin Commander 900. . . 107, Twin Commander 1000. 107,

ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 31, 59, 65, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30, 36, 65, 133, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 36, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 27, 36, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 140, 156, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 25, 59, 81, 156, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 77, 150, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 30, 34, 152, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 560 . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 23, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 59, 65, 73, 148, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150, 156,

Aviation Companies, Inc.

1981 MU-2 MARQUISE S/N 1510SA, N17HG, 3840TT, 3840/3840 SNEW, 630/630 SHSI/SGBI, 135/320 SPOH, GNS-400, Collins Pro-Line, Sandel 4” EFIS, SPZ-500 A/P, New Interior (2012). U.S. $650,000.

1980 MU-2 SOLITAIRE S/N 424SA, N82AF, 7485TT, 385/385 SOH, 75/75 SPOH, GNS 530 WAAS, Avidyne Flight Max, 7500-hr, inspection, New P&I (2010) to customer specs. U.S. $675,000.

1974 MU-2K Dash 10 on MSP - Price Reduced S/N 305, N50K, 6370TT, 1180/1180 since -10 (MSP), 750/750 SPOH, Dual Garmin 430’s, RDR-2000, M4-D A/P, New Paint (2009). U.S. $535,000.

1980 MU-2 MARQUISE S/N 756SA, 5Y-MUZ. 12925TT, 1990/2060 SOH, 1990/2060 SHSI, 260/220 SPOH, Collins Pro-Line, M4D A/P, New Paint (2010), Located in Africa. U.S. $475,000.

1975 MU-2M S/N 326, N165MA, 3750TT, 3750/3750 SOH, 235/235 SHSI, 680/370 SGBI, 410/410 SPOH, GTN-750/650, Traffic, XM Weather. U.S. $395,000.

1972 MU-2K S/N 240, N64LG, 6100TT, 4655/4655 SOH, 1100/1100 SHSI/SGBI, 920/775 SPOH, Garmin G-600, Dual GNS-430W’s, Dual GTX-320 TXP’s, TCAS, XM Weather. U.S. $295,000.

234 Air Park Blvd., Aiken, SC (USA) 29805-8921 Tel: USA +1 803-641-9999 • Fax: USA +1 803-641-4040 www.air1st.com • Email: mike@air1st.com 4

AIRCRAFT

IN THIS ISSUE

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

Dornier 228 . . . . 117, Dornier 328 . . . . 147,

ECLIPSE 500 . . . . . . . . . . . 151,

EMBRAER ERJ 135 . . . . . . . 33, ERJ 145 . . . . . . . 33, Legacy 600 . . . . 16, 55, 59, 61, 73, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109, 156, Legacy 650 . . . . 73,


AC Index August2011 26/07/2012 13:04 Page 2

08.12

• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT

LANCAIR

Beechcraft

Lancair L4 . . . . . 27,

400 . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 31, 150, Premier 1 . . . . . . 36, Premier 1A. . . . . 77, 89,

King Air 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 36, 200XPR . . . . . . . 36, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 36, 77, 113, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 23, 31, 59, 77, 113, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 73, 77, 113, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 18, F90 . . . . . . . . . . 36, 83, 89,

MITSUBISHI MU-2K . . . . . . . . 4, MU-2M . . . . . . . . 4, MU-2K Dash 10.4, MU-2 Marquise . 4, MU-2 Solitaire. . 4,

PIAGGIO P180 Avanti . . . 27,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

TBM 700B . . . . . 36, 83, 137, 147, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149, TBM 700C1 . . . . 36, TBM 850. . . . . . . 36, 83,

HELICOPTERS AGUSTAWESTLAND AW Grand . . . . . . 73, AW 109C . . . . . . 73, 151, AW 109E. . . . . . . 127, AW 109E Power 149,

Hawker

PILATUS

A109S Grand. . . 89, A119 Koala . . . . 77, AW 139 . . . . . . . . 22,

400XP . . . . . . . . . 27, 37, 77, 700A . . . . . . . . . . 37, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 6, 18, 148, 800B . . . . . . . . . . 61, 71, 800SP. . . . . . . . . 75, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 27, 35, 37, 77, 113, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 71, 77, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 67, 77, 155, 1000B . . . . . . . . . 142, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 18, 155,

PC12/45. . . . . . . 27, PC12/47 . . . . . . . 147,

BELL

PIPER Jetprop DLX . . . . 43, Meridian . . . . . . . 31, Malibu Mirage . . 65,

SABRELINER

Astra 1125 . . . . . 27, 155, Astra SPX. . . . . . 43, 81,

205 . . . . . . . . . . . 121, 206L3 . . . . . . . . . 89, 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 148, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 230 . . . . . . . . . . . 73, 412EMS . . . . . . . 148,

65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 36,

EUROCOPTER

SOCATA

AS350BA . . . . . . 73, AS350B3 . . . . . . 73, AS 355 N . . . . . . 89,

IAI TBM 700A . . . . . 83,

AIRCRAFT

Find an Aircraft Dealer The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

PAGE

AS 355 NP . . . . . 73, AS 365 N2 . . . . . 127, AS 365 N3 . . . . . 89, EC 120B . . . . . . . 127, EC 130-B4 . . . . . 11, EC135T2i . . . . . . 73,

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD 600N . . . . . . 77,

SIKORSKY C+ . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, C++ . . . . . . . . . . . 69, S-76A+ . . . . . . . . 89, S-76B . . . . . . . . . 27, 155, S-92 . . . . . . . . . . 69,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS Aircraft Engine /Support . 85, 94, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 48, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 49, 63, Avionics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99, Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 93, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 93,

avbuyer.com/dealers

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

5


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PanelAug12 25/07/2012 09:15 Page 1

World Aircraft Sales EDITORIAL Deputy Editor (London Office) Matthew Harris 1- 800 620 8801 editorial@avbuyer.com Editor - Boardroom Guide J.W. (Jack) Olcott 1- 973 734 9994 Jack@avbuyer.com Editorial Contributor (USA Office) Dave Higdon Dave@avbuyer.com Consulting Editor Sean O’Farrell +44 (0)20 8255 4409 Sean@avbuyer.com

ADVERTISING Karen Price 1- 800 620 8801 Karen@avbuyer.com Karen Schaefer (USA Office) 1-386 767 8460 ks@avbuyer.com STUDIO/PRODUCTION Helen Cavalli/ Mark Williams 1- 800 620 8801 Helen@avbuyer.com Mark@avbuyer.com CIRCULATION Lynne Jones 1- 800 620 8801 Lynne@avbuyer.com AVBUYER.COM Nick Barron Nick@avbuyer.com Emma Davey Emma@avbuyer.com PUBLISHER John Brennan 1- 800 620 8801 John@avbuyer.com USA OFFICE 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 EUROPEAN OFFICE Cowleaze House, 39 Cowleaze Rd, Kingston, Surrey, KT2 6DZ, UK +44 (0)20 8255 4000 WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

8

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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PRINTED BY Fry Communications, Inc. 800 West Church Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055


PanelAug12 25/07/2012 14:08 Page 2

Contents

Volume 16, Issue 8 – August 2012

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 50

Governing Specialties: Knowing when and where to find help with Business Aviation, and the need to heed the advice of your aviation professionals are fundamental Board responsibilities.

52

Managing Business Aviation: As more corporations are accepting Business Aviation as a normal travel option, aviation professionals have responded by expanding their management skills.

54

The Metrics of Business Aviation Safety: While there’s still room for development, the Risk Assessment Tool (RAT) and the Flight RAT are potentially huge advancements to measuring flight safety.

58

50

62

After the Parade Passes By: Enthusiasm and emotion can distort how you quantify value. So how can you ensure you enjoy the value of Business Aviation long after the newness of the company’s asset has worn off?

62

Preparing for Federal Tax Challenges: Tax Boards are well-advised to structure aircraft acquisition and operations with a sharp eye toward what tax auditors want to see... Here’s how you can start...

66

‘PUNC’: Your checklist for insurance coverage: Pilots, Use, Named Insured and Contracts capture the four most important areas of aviation insurance. Read more…

70

Taxpayer Value – Shareholder Value: Business Aviation provides taxpayer value when the government uses it, and provides shareholder value when corporations use it to further their business.

74

The Medium Jet Value Guide: A look at the benefits of Medium Jets, and a listing of values for models built over the last 20 years.

70

Main Features 44

Aircraft Comparative Analysis - Cheyenne II: How does the performance of the Cheyenne II stand out against the Twin Commander 980 and Mu-2 Solitaire?

Plane Sense on Refurbishments 96

It’s In The Detail: Janet Beazley outlines the ten key steps to planning a major facelift for your aircraft, internally and externally.

102

The FAQs of Refurb: A selection of the popular questions asked before,

110

during and after the refurbishment process, along with some answers…

Regular Features

Refurb ‘Gotchas’: To avoid expensive surprises, it’s well worth budgeting for

10 20 26 39 80 82 92 112

some surprises along the process of your refurbishment. Steve Watkins explains.

116

Safety Matters – Man versus Machine: Dave Higdon looks at why, with the increasingly sophisticated panels available to pilots, it becomes ever more important to maintain hand-flying skills.

120

Dealer Broker Market Update: Profits soar, equities grow – but aircraft sales are comparatively sluggish. We ask the dealers and brokers for their up-closeand-personal experiences of the market.

129

Aircraft Ownership Trusts: With a final position from the FAA on Non-Citizen Trusts iminent, Greg Cirillo reviews the role of aircraft ownership trusts and the expected enhanced role of the trustee.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Viewpoint AIReport BizAv Round-up Market Indicators Aviation Leadership Roundtable Aircraft Specs & Performance Tables Teal Briefing Navigating 360˚

Next Month’s Issue Plane Sense on Cockpit Avionics Medium Jets Review WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

9


Gil Wolin Aug12_Gil WolinNov06 23/07/2012 17:10 Page 1

VIEWPOINT

A Sea Change in Business Aviation by Gil Wolin ne benefit of the free market system is that competition does keep the cost of goods and services low. Sometimes it keeps them too low…a fact that is abundantly evident in business jet charter. But maybe – just maybe – that is about to change. The charter client never has paid the fullyloaded cost to fly a business jet. And it’s been that way since business jet charter first surfaced with EJA in 1964. EJA owned its original fleet of Learjet 23s and 24s – but as a dealer/distributor, its capital cost was low, as was Jet A fuel (at less than twenty cents per gallon). What’s more, pilot services were relatively inexpensive. Recently-retired Air Force colonels were available from Lockbourne (later known as Rickenbacker) Air Force base near EJA’s Columbus, Ohio headquarters. These were seasoned jet captains who needed a relatively small salary to supplement their government pensions and retirement benefits. That, coupled with EJA’s position as a “loss leader” for its original parent, the Penn Central Railroad, meant jet charter in the 1960s was a very good deal, especially since other charter companies had to match EJA’s pricing in order to compete. Even when a new operating model surfaced in 1967 with the advent of jet charter management company Executive Air Fleet (EAF) at Teterboro, NJ, the cost of charter in the US remained unusually low. EAF managed a range of aircraft makes and models for owners who were willing to have their aircraft chartered to third parties when they weren’t flying. This enabled charter clients to fly mid-size and large cabin aircraft paying only the trip’s direct operating costs plus some modest contribution to fixed costs, while the aircraft owners shouldered the burden of the cost of capital. Charter remained a very good deal, even when it required paying a higher price for non-military pilots. This was all in direct contrast with the European charter model, in which fleet aircraft were dedicated to charter, and the charter client had to pay a fullyloaded price per hour.

O

10

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

That began to change with the advent of fractional operators. While ostensibly shared aircraft ownership, fractional simply was a repackaging of the original EJA charter model, with the capital cost broken out as “share ownership.” The tax advantages – investment tax credits and bonus depreciation – made the cost to own a share quite attractive for those who had been charter clients, as did the uniform standard of safety, equipment, personnel and service. On the heels of fractional came jet cards. Originally developed by charter brokers to sell flights aboard fractional fleet aircraft without any capital investment, “pure charter” jet cards soon were developed by other charter brokers, offering a guaranteed discounted rate in exchange for a pre-paid deposit. The Internet then enabled brokers to shop for “empty legs” and/or auction each individual trip to the lowest bidder. Again, charter became a terrific deal for the client – providing that the “low bidder” is also a high-quality, properly-audited operator. Today, there is a sea change afoot in business jet flight services. Several new charter sales organizations and aircraft management companies have surfaced recently, each with key employees with former national charter broker or jet card company experience – perhaps they sensed a coming shift in business jet travel buying habits... That shift in buying habits certainly does appear to be the case. Data indicate that there may be a migration of fractional owners into jet cards, once their five-year share commitment expires. The jet card gives them more flexibility without the capital commitment, increasingly important during this sluggish economy. Some fractional programs are moving into straight charter. CitationAir already has migrated to that model and it appears that Flight Options is moving in that direction, with its recent purchase of Sentient Flight. CitationAir has defined a smaller area of operations (the Eastern US) to avoid the excessive non-revenue flying required to cover West Coast operations. There will be a higher rate for flying outside of that primary area – exactly what EJA did during the 1970s, where www.AvBuyer.com

guaranteed rates and response times were available only east of the Mississippi. Fractional programs rarely have made money on the operating line, but they have on the resale of the depreciated aircraft – hence the five-year contract term. Restricting the guaranteed response time and creating differential pricing should help them move toward operating profitability. But if customers are moving away from fractional ownership and into jet cards or pure charter, then the fractionals are still faced with the cost of owning the aircraft. That leaves them with two choices – follow their clients into charter and convert (as CitationAir has). Alternatively they can move into leasing their fleets much as the airlines have done for the last thirty years, via either captive OEM finance companies or third-party leasing organizations. The lessors would make the fleet purchases at significant discounts and garner any tax or depreciation benefits. The fractional operating company then gets lower equipment costs, which will be critical if they are to compete with pure charter management companies, whose owner-clients continue to carry the cost of capital. Charter remains the best deal in Business Aviation. But the rules – and prices – are about to change. ❯ Gil Wolin draws on almost forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jet Collection August 23/07/2012 12:09 Page 1

1455 W W.. Hubbar Hubbard d St. - 2nd Floor Floo or Chicago IL 60642 USA Chicago, A thejetcollection.com m 312 P: 312.226.8541 2 2.226.8541 F: 312.226.8542 info@thejetcollection.com m

Please allow us to match you with the perfect air craftt for your needs aircraft and budget. W e look l forward to We forward your phone call or o email inquiry. inquiryy.

2014 BBJ S/N TBD

1999 Lea Learjet rjet 45BR S/N 45-032

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2002 EC130-B4 S/N N 3515

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SpeciямБcations and/or descriptions ar are e pr provided ovided as int introductory troductory information. They do o not constitute reprerepresentations or warranties should ely on your own inspection inspectio es of The Jet Collection. You You o sh hould rrely on of the aircraft. aircraft. warrantie


Avjet - FP July 23/07/2012 12:14 Page 1

A Unique 50% Ownership Opportunity With No Cash Down

987 GU

S

Avjet is pleased to offer 50% ownership of one of the greatest business jets ever made, the Gulfstream IV. This aircraft is expertly managed and operated by Avjet. This is a turn-key VIP air travel solution that leverages all the benefits of private jet ownership without the complexities of staffing a flight department. U 50% ownership opportunity for potentially no cash down! U Partner will pay value difference in loan to fair market value.

U Buyer must assume an existing loan. U Aircraft presently generates almost $2,000,000 per year in charter revenue.

To learn more about this unique opportunity contact us at: sales@avjet.com

+1 (818) 841-6190

AVJET.COM


Avjet - FP July 23/07/2012 12:15 Page 2







 







 







 

World Headquarters Marc J. Foulkrod Chairman and Chief Executivve OfďŹ cer info@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190

  

 







Global Sales & Acquisitions Andrew C. Bradley Senior Vice President, Global Sales S and Acquisitions andrew@avjet.com Phone: +1 (410) 626-6162



Charter & Management Mark H. Lefever President charter@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190

   











 

    













 

 

   

  

 







AVJET V T.COM





 

 



 

  

    

 



  

 






Avjet - FP July 23/07/2012 12:15 Page 3



 

 

 



 

 



 

 



 





 

 

 





 

















 



World Headquarters Marc J. Foulkrod Chairman and Chief Executivve OfďŹ cer info@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190

  

Charter & Management Mark H. Lefever President charter@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190

 







AV VJET T.COM





 

 

  

Global Sales & Acquisitionss Andrew C. Bradley Senior Vice President, Global Sales S and Acquisitions andrew@avjet.com Phone: +1 (410) 626-6162

  



   

    



  



  

 

 

 



 


Avjet - FP August 23/07/2012 12:16 Page 1

SERIAL NUMBER 4044 AIRFRAME Total Time: 1,965.1 hours • Landings: 857 ENGINES Rolls Royce TA Y611-8C

Serial Number Total Time Total Cycles Ten Year Calendar Due

Engine #1 85094 1,935 hours 842 2016

Engine #2 85095 1,935.8 hours 843 2016

APU Honeywell GTC P36-150 S/N P-168, 1,449 TT , 1,750 Cycles. Honeywell MSP. Serial Number 4044 entails an extensive options list which includes: • Honeywell Primus Epic Cockpit – Certified “F” Foxtrot • Low total time • Gulfstream Broadband Multilink (BBML ) • 14 passenger interior/Aft Galley Configuration


Avpro August 23/07/2012 12:29 Page 1


Avpro August 26/07/2012 14:55 Page 2


Avpro August 23/07/2012 12:30 Page 3


ACS August 23/07/2012 12:32 Page 1

AVIATION CONSULTING SERVICE

presents

FALCON 2000LX Serial Number 83 1800 TT Falcon Care Delivered with a fresh C check Impeccable condition Input into Little Rock for C check set for August 5th

Aviation Consulting Service Queenstown, Maryland USA Tel: +1 443 262 9182 Fax: +1 443 262 9182 bruce@aviationconsultingservice.com

MPLANES Geneva, Switzerland Tel: +41 22 557 62 47 Cell: +41 76 381 36 65 jason.mulcock@mplanes.com


AIReportAug12_AIReport Sept08 23/07/2012 16:36 Page 1

AIREPORT

Do You Know What You Don’t Know ? by David Wyndham he Harvard Business Review is an esteemed business publication offering a very well written Blog that covers a wide array of topics. Some of the ones that I seem to find interesting deal with Psychology and Cognitive Science. Business is nothing more than applied psychology. It involves human behavior, both as individuals and in groups. I like reading some of the science behind why we behave (management) and act (or buy = marketing). I just read two articles that, although unrelated, seemed to come together for me. The first article was titled "Do You Know What You Do n't Know?" When you really ask people, it is amazing how much we don't know. The author used an example of how does a zipper work? We all use them quite successfully, but evidently we don't all understand the mechanics of it. The same logic applies with buzz-words and jargon. "Streamlining our processes" may make sense to many, but when you ask what it really means, we differ in our opinion. Psychologists call this the illusion of explanatory depth. We think we know what we know, but we really don't have the depth of knowledge that leads to understanding. The second article was titled “When Cho o sing a Jo b, Culture Matters”. As that title suggests, the author (not a Psychologist, but a Business Professor) talks of how important it is to understand the organization's culture in order to understand how well you'd fit in as a new employee. What is the organization's purpose? How do they get things done and work together to achieve this? Both of these need to come together when evaluating aircraft for an organization. You need to understand the culture of your organization and to examine what your boss/client thinks they know about the aviation function.

T

20

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

The corporate culture can be one that values innovation and efficiency. Does it focus on growing the company by getting and keeping customers? An organization exhibiting such culture might tend to value mission effectiveness of the business aircraft: Get there quickly, get home quickly. So when discussing the merits of the business aircraft with such an organization, you need to focus on how the business aircraft matches up with its culture, and how well the aircraft accomplishes the mission. However, what if the culture is one that focuses on controlling and cutting costs, and being careful with every dollar spent? The organization exhibiting this culture probably

In both instances, the company must see a value in having an aircraft. But how that value is perceived can be different. is fiscally conservative. While it may see "value" in the business aircraft, it may be much more focused on the cost, rather than mission-effectiveness. In this case, the business aircraft decision will be guided primarily by the total costs. In both instances, the company must see a value in having an aircraft. But how that value is perceived can be different. So how do you apply the logic of knowing what you d o n't know? When communiwww.AvBuyer.com

cating about the aircraft, its capabilities and costs, we need to have an understanding of the fact that we may not have all the information about the business to understand why it makes the decision that it does. Equally, it may not understand the aircraft as much as we might believe it does. So we need to do our best to explore the gaps in knowledge and be open to new concepts. Do not assume that just because the CEO had an aircraft at his/her former company they understand crew rest, maximum range and sales and use taxes on the airplane. When I work with a client regarding their options for an aircraft, or with the aviation department concerning their justification for a replacement of the current aircraft, it helps to understand not only their measurable requirements such as payload, trip length, etc., but also their culture and depth of knowledge about Business Aviation. So , ho w d o es a zip p er w o rk ? ❯ David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker. The mission of Conklin & de Decker is to furnish the general aviation industry with objective and impartial information in the form of professionally developed and supported products and services, enabling its clients to make more informed decisions when dealing with the purchase and operation of aircraft. With over 1,800 clients in 90 countries around the world, Conklin & de Decker combines aviation experience with proven business practices. ❯ More information from www.conklindd.com; Tel: +1 508 255 5975. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Guardian Jet 3 page August 23/07/2012 12:36 Page 1

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2005 Global Express SN 9141 Airframe TT - 3831.4 $29,995,000 * Enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care Program * Honeywell 2000 XP Integrated Avionics System * Primus 880 Color Wx Radar w/Lightning Sensor System * Third Flightdeck Seat * Securaplane Security & Camera System

Photos by FGL & Associates

2001 Falcon 900EX SN 94 Airframe TT - 6276.5 $18,250,000 * Honeywell Primus 2000/ProLine 4 * Securaplane Technologies Ultra Lite Security System * Engines & APU enrolled in MSP * Maintenance Tracking by AvTrak * New Paint & Interior in 2010

Photos by FGL & Associates

2002 Falcon 900EX SN 110 Airframe TT - 6155.2 $18,250,000 * Honeywell Primus 2000 * Pilot & Co-Pilot EVAS Systems * Aircell ATG4000 High Speed Internet Broadband System * New carpet installed July 2012 * One Fortune Owner Since New

Photos by FGL & Associates

1996 Gulfstream G-IVSP SN 1301 Airframe TT - 7860.6 $11,995,000 * Honeywell SPZ-8400 system * Engines enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care * Securaplane 450 Security System * Magnastar C2000 * Single Fortune 100 Owner Since New

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 3 page August 23/07/2012 12:38 Page 2

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2004 Falcon 2000 SN 218 Airframe TT - 1631.7 $11,750,000 * Enrolled in CAMP Maintenance Tracking Program * One Owner Since New * Collins Proline IV (4 tube) Avioncs Suite with 6.1 Software Upgrade * Third Flightdeck Seat * Airshow Genesys

Photos by FGL & Associates

2006 Agusta AW139 SN 31061 Airframe TT - 516.1 $9,995,000 * Honeywell Primus Epic System/FMS * XM Weather System * Emergency Flotation System with Rigid Covers * One Owner since New * Engines enrolled in MSP Gold

Photos by FGL & Associates

1999 Falcon 2000 SN 86 Airframe TT - 6338 $9,400,000 * Engines enrolled in CSP * Collins EFIS-4000/ Pro Line 4/ Version 6.1 * Collins TWR-850 Weather Radar System * HUD * Wireless Broadband (GoGo Biz) – ATG-4000

Photos by FGL & Associates

2002 Dassault F50EX SN 320 Airframe TT - 4629.3 $6,499,000 * Engines enrolled in Honeywell MSP * Collins EFIS-4000 /Pro Line 4 * Collins TWR-850 Color Wx Radar * Airshow Genesys * ICS-200 Iridium Flight Phone

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 3 page August 23/07/2012 12:39 Page 3

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2008 King Air B200GT SN BY-40 Airframe TT - 495 $4,295,000 * Collins ProLine 21 and Integrated Flight Information System * RVSM Ops Capable * Raisbeck Crown Nacelle Wing Lockers * Raisbeck Dual Aft Body Strakes * One owner since new, always hangared

Photos by FGL & Associates

2006 Cessna CJ1+ SN 0610 Airframe TT - 655.8 $3,100,000 * Collins Pro Line 21 Avionics System * Engines enrolled in Williams TAP Elite * WX-1000E Lightning Detection * Mode S Diversity Transponders with Enhanced Surveillance capability * One Owner Since New

Photos by FGL & Associates

2009 Citation Mustang SN 510-215 Airframe TT - 497.8 $2,345,000 * Engines enrolled in Cessna's PowerAdvantage+ Program * Garmin G1000 advanced avionics system * RVSM Capable * XM Satellite Radio * Two Fortune Owners since new

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


J.Mesinger August 23/07/2012 12:43 Page 1

Global Aircraft Brokerage, Acquisitions and Consulting Firm

The Art of the Transaction A successful aircraft transaction is truly a work of art. There are subtle details and vast complexities that make up the big picture. If addressed with dexterity and vision, the result is a masterpiece. At J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, you will experience this kind of artful, hands-on approach at every phase of your transaction. Call us today to learn how we will most positively affect your bottom line and turn your transaction into a masterpiece.

Successfully Closing the Gap Between Buyer and Seller Since 1974

+1.303.444.6766 • www. jetsales.com


J.Mesinger August 23/07/2012 12:44 Page 2

1995 CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5302

1989 CHALLENGER 601-3A S/N 5050

ASKING: $7,500,000 | 5846 Hrs TTAF, 2359 Landings

ASKING: $2,650,000 | 8191 Hrs TTAF, 4408 Landings

Major inspections including the 6/12/24/48/96/192 and 240 month c/w 11/11 TEXT JM5302 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Mode S XPNDR w/enhanced flight ID • WSI Weather • Triple laserefs TEXT JM5050 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

UNDER CONTRACT

1999 CITATION X S/N 93

1997 FALCON 2000 S/N 48

6924 Hrs TTAF, 4417 Landings, RRCC

ASKING: $8,450,000 | 5788 Hrs TTAF, 2890 Landings, CSP

Document 11 complied with 9/11/11 • Aileron re-gearing modification c/w TEXT JM93 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

HUD • Triple FMS • FDR • Great paint and interior • 10 pax TEXT JM48 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

1990 FALCON 50 S/N 207

2005 GLOBAL 5000 S/N 9158

ASKING: $3,095,000 | 7669 Hrs TTAF, 4042 Landings, MSP Gold

ASKING: $33,500,000 | 1374 Hrs TTAF, 551 Landings

Great paint and interior • Collins 4 tube EFIS • TCAS II change 7 TEXT JM207 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Placed in service 2006 • Direct TV • Batch 2IAC Upgrade • Extended range TEXT JM9158 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Also available Falcon 50 S/N 83. Details coming soon.

2004 GULFSTREAM G550 S/N 5060

WANTED – 3 IMMEDIATE ACQUISITIONS

NOW ASKING: $34,900,000 | 3259 Hrs TTAF, 1815 Landings, RRCC High Speed Data • Aft galley • Fwd and aft lavs • 14 pax TEXT JM5060 TO 727-399-6059 FOR MORE INFORMATION

• SIGNED EXCLUSIVE ACQUISITION AGREEMENTS • BUYERS PAY OUR COMMISSION • NO FINANCING REQUIREMENTS

GULFSTREAM G550 2008 OR NEWER, UNDER 1,000 HRS TTAF, FORWARD GALLEY

GULFSTREAM G550 2007 OR OLDER, 4,000 HRS TTAF OR LESS, AFT GALLEY

LEAR 45XR 2007 OR NEWER, UNDER 2,000 HRS TTAF

Read our industry blog at jetsales.com/blog. Follow us on twitter for the latest news: @jmesinger Watch airplane videos at jetsales.com/inventory 800.671.6766 / p: + 1 303.444.6766 / f: + 1 303.444.6866 / sales@jetsales.com

For full specifications and for more information, visit

JETSALES.COM


BusAviationNewsNew 2_Layout 1 24/07/2012 12:44 Page 1

BizAv Round-Up

08.12

NEWS IN BRIEF AgustaWestland announced that the second prototype of the AW169 – a new generation 4.5 ton light intermediate helicopter – successfully completed its maiden flight at Cascina Costa in Italy. Meanwhile the first AW169 prototype premiered at the recent Farnborough International Air Show. The AW169 program is on schedule to achieve civil certification in 2014. / More from www.agustawestland.com

Aircraft Cost Calculator, creators of an aircraft Web Application that determines business aircraft operating costs, announced the formation of the ACC Advisory Board recently. “We formed this Advisory Board to further strengthen our Web Application for our clients,” outlined Chris Doerr, President of ACC. The four new Advisory Board Members include: Rene Banglesdorf, CEO, Charlie Bravo Aviation (Austin, TX); Dan Dickinson, Chairman, INAV Group, LLC (Chicago, IL); Emmanuel Dupuy, Managing Director, Heli Asset (Paris, France); and Robert Gort, President, Sterling Aviation (Milwaukee, WI). The ACC Advisory Board’s objective is to provide strategic advice and present ideas/issues relevant to the operation of business aircraft. / More from www.aircraftcostcalculator.com

Arinc Direct has released Version 2.3 of its iPad flight-planning app, a major upgrade designed to help users eliminate paper from their cockpits, that includes a new note-taking annotation feature on flight plans. With the annotation feature, users can add notes on flight plans by clicking on the action arrow at the bottom of the screen, then clicking anywhere on the flight plan and adding text. The notes can be emailed along with the flight plan. Two pilots using the app on their own iPads can see each other’s notes via Bluetooth communication between the iPads. Shared notes appear in green, while a user’s own notes are blue. / More from www.arincdirect.com

26

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

BOMBARDIER EXPANDS SERVICE & SUPPORT... ...AND REMAINS ON TRACK WITH ITS LEARJET PROGRAMS  Bombardier Aerospace has announced that construction work has begun on its full-scale factoryowned and operated service centre for business aircraft at Singapore’s Seletar airport. The state-of-the-art service facility, which is set to open in 2Q 2013, features 31,500 sq. feet of hangar space and 28,800 sq. feet for office and back shops. Additionally, Bombardier has opened its newest Regional Support Office (RSO) at Farnborough, United Kingdom. The new office, the 10th

Bombardier RSO to open outside North America in the past four years, will anchor regional support capabilities for the growing number of Bombardier business aircraft customers in Europe. While it was at Farnborough for the recent Air Show, Bombardier also confirmed that it is on track with its three new Learjet business aircraft as it shared further details of its ongoing development programs. The Learjet 85 aircraft program continues to progress towards first

flight with four test aircraft in various stages of fabrication. The recently launched Learjet 70 and Learjet 75 aircraft program is progressing well and the first two flight test aircraft, a modified Learjet 40XR jet and a modified Learjet 45XR aircraft have already logged more than 135 flights, as the two are used to continue to develop the avionics that provide the core of the Learjet aircraft's Vision Flight Deck. / More information from www.bombardier.com

Banyan Air Service was issued a FAA

Conklin & de Decker announced the

supplemental type certificate for installation of Honeywell’s Aspire 200LG Wi-Fi-enabled satcom system on the Gulfstream GII/III/IV.

release of its 2012/2013 Aircraft Performance Comparator. Part of a family of innovative software products created by Conklin & de Decker, the Aircraft Performance Comparator is a must-have tool for anyone that is acquiring a Business Jet, Turboprop, Piston airplane, or Helicopter (Piston and Turbine) and who needs to compare aircraft performance data quickly and easily.

/ More from www.banyanair.com

Cessna and Avic are aiming to deliver the first Citation Sovereign from their planned Chengdu, China assembly line within 18 months. The plant will supply aircraft to the Chinese market. The Cessna Latitude, although not yet certified, is also earmarked for assembly at Chengdu. / More from www.cessna.com

www.AvBuyer.com

/ More from www.conklindd.com continued on page 32 Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jeteffect Inventory August 23/07/2012 12:45 Page 1

EXCLUSIVELY OFFERED

LOS ANGELES 562.989.8800

DALLAS 214.451.6953

PALM BEACH 561.747.2223

SAVANNAH 912.330.8797

Year

Model

Serial No.

1988

Astra 1125

012

1983

Challenger 601-1A

3010

1995

Citation Jet

525-0122

1997

Citation Jet

525-0198

1998

Citation Jet

525-0243

2008

Citation CJ3

525B-0263

1994

Citation V

560-0252

2005

Citation Sovereign

680-0015

1995

Falcon 900B

153

2003

Global Express

9085

2001

Gulfstream G200

015

1987

Gulfstream GIV

1006

1988

Gulfstream GIV

1057

2000

Gulfstream GIV/SP

1433

2004

Hawker 400XP

RK-370

1997

Hawker 800XP

258313

1999

King Air 350

FL-226

2006

Lancair LIV

566

1998

Learjet 31A

143

1981

Learjet 35A

392

1999

Learjet 45

052

1996

Learjet 60

085

2002

Learjet 60

244

2007

Learjet 60XR

320

2002

Piaggio Avanti P180

1050

1996

Pilatus PC-12/45

156

1994

Sikorsky S-76B

760416


O'Gara August 23/07/2012 12:52 Page 1


O'Gara August 23/07/2012 12:52 Page 2


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Falcon

Challenger

2011 Falcon 7X | 111

Citation Excel

2002 Citation Excel | 560-5288

Citation Ultra

1996 Citation Ultra | 560-0366

Citation 11

1994 Citation II | 550-0732

Citation Jet

2007 Citation CJ2+ | 525A-0345

1985 Challenger 601-1A | 3044

Citation XLS+

2009 Citation XLS+ | 560-5060

Citation S11

1985 Citation SII | S550-0041

Citation 11

1979 Citation II | 550-0047

Citation 1SP

1982 Citation ISP | 501-0255

For Full Specs & Additional Photos on Exclusive Listings by Bell Aviation, please Visit our Website at www.BellAviation.com


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Citation 1SP

Learjet 45

2004 Learjet 45 | 45-250

1981 Citation ISP | 501-0229

Learjet 31A

1993 Learjet 31A | 31A-086

Beechjet

1992 Beechjet 400A | RK-36

King Air 200

1976 King Air 200 | BB-169

Conquest

1980 Conquest II | 441-0116

Beechjet

1995 Beechjet 400A | RK-107

King Air B200

1983 King Air B200 | BB-1140

King Air 200

1979 King Air 200 | BB-545

Meridian

2008 Piper Meridian | 4697324

For Full Specs & Additional Photos on Exclusive Listings by Bell Aviation, please Visit our Website at www.BellAviation.com


BusAviationNewsNew 2_Layout 1 24/07/2012 17:04 Page 2

2

BizAv Round-Up Dassault Falcon’s 200th Falcon 7X has rolled off the production line at the Bordeaux-Merignac production facility in southern France. While most 7Xs are outfitted at the company’s Little Rock facility, this one will be completed in Bordeaux. To date, Dassault Falcon has delivered more than 150 completed Falcon 7Xs, while another 80 are in various stages of production or outfitting. The Falcon 7X fleet has logged more than 130,000 flight hours since the first aircraft went into service in 2007 and is in operation in 32 countries around the world. Dassault also launched a new, multiplatform global website that allows visitors quick access to information on Falcons and product enhancements, and customer service capabilities. / More from www.dassaultfalcon.com

/ More from www.duncanaviation.com

ExecuJet Aviation Group and Angkasa Pura 1 announced recently that they have signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to design, construct and manage General Aviation Terminals at as many as 13 of the Indonesian Airports under the management of Angkasa Pura 1. / More from www.execujet.net

Grossmann Jet Service and its CEO Dagmar Grossmann celebrated some recent milestones in Business Aviation. Dagmar, an Austrian national is marking 30 successful years in aviation with the publication of her third book ‘Group Dynamics and the Orientation of a Newly Formed Foundation’, and the third anniversary of CEPA (Central European Private Aviation DAGMAR GROSSMANN Association). / More from www.grossmannjet.com

Gulfstream received approval from the FAA and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) recently to retrofit Gulfstream GV, GIV, GIV-SP, G400 and G300 aircraft with the PlaneDeck cockpit upgrade. The optional upgrade, an exclusive for Gulfstream operators, converts the primary flight display 32

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

PHENOM PROGRESS IN N. AMERICA FAA AWARD FOR PHENOM 100, TCCA AWARD FOR PHENOM 300  Embraer has been presented by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) a Production Certificate to assemble Phenom 100s in the United States. Previously, Phenom jets assembled in Melbourne, Florida have

been certified under the FAA type certificate granted to those produced in Brazil. Meanwhile, Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA) has granted a type certificate to Embraer for its Phenom 300

light jet. The Phenom 300, which received its initial certification by U.S. and Brazilian aviation authorities in 2009, is now certificated in more than 40 countries. / More information from www.embraerexecutivejets.com

from cathode ray tube to liquid crystal. Gulfstream’s six-panel display configuration remains the same.

The company’s new Savannah office includes a business office and a satellite testing and integration lab.

/ More from www.gulfstream.com

/ More from www.satcomdirect.com

Jetex Fueling Services has made operators from Austria, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Poland and Switzerland that are receiving fuel uplifts from Jetex Fueling Services Limited eligible for the Jetex Fueling Services Limited VAT exemption program. More countries will be added for eligibility in due course.

TrueNorth Avionics has introduced the

/ More from www.jetex.com

NetJets signed a 15-year OnPoint solution agreement with GE Aviation for the maintenance, repair and overhaul of its upcoming CF34-powered Bombardier Challenger 605 fleet, which was part of the fractional provider’s recent $9.6 billion aircraft order. / More from www.netjets.com

Satcom Direct opened a new domestic office at the Sheltair FBO at Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport. www.AvBuyer.com

new Stylus multilingual handset. A member of the Simphonē OpenCabin family of products, Stylus is Business Aviation’s first multilingual handset, and incorporates TrueNorth’s intuitive, one-button interface. The handset is offered in wired and wireless configurations, provides high definition sound for near broadcast-quality voice communications, and can be programmed to operate in any language, including those with dedicated character sets such as Chinese, Japanese, Arabic and Russian. / More from www.truenorthavionics.com

Duncan Aviation opened a new $11.5 million, 45,000-sq-ft aircraft paint shop for business at its Lincoln, Nebraska, facility. It can support aircraft as large as the Gulfstream G650, Bombardier Global Express, Dassault Falcon 7X and Embraer Legacy 650.

continued on page 38 Aircraft Index see Page 4


Bristol Associates April 23/07/2012 14:28 Page 1

Acquisitions * Appraisals * Consulting * Remarketing Challenger 605 sn 5711

Gulfstream IV sn 1124

Gulfstream V sn 627

New to Market! Boeing BBJ sn 30496

ERJ 135 and 145s Available

+1 (202) 682-4000 bristol@bristolassociates.com Www.bristolassociates.com


Project1 30/07/2012 14:48 Page 1


Project1 30/07/2012 14:49 Page 1


JetBrokers August 23/07/2012 14:36 Page 1

2008 Gulfstream G200, S/N 213, 619 TT, SATCOM, Recent 3C Check, Honeywell FDR, Ext Lav Service, Asking $11,500,000.00

1989 Falcon 900B, S/N 071, 9464 TT, MSP Gold, 4C c/w Nov 11 by Duncan, 12 pax Interior, Triple IRS’, Asking $8,695,000.00

1992 Falcon 50, S/N 227, 7072.6 TT, Engines on MSP, C Check c/w 9/10, Gear O/Hed 12/03, Aft Lav, TCAS 2, Nice Paint and Interior, Asking $3,200,000.00

1980 Falcon 50, S/N 010, 7977 TT, JSSI, Collins FDS-2000 EFIS, TCAS II, Dual UNS-1F w/ WAAS, C&CPCP c/w 3/09, Gear O/H in 2/12, Asking $2,200,000.00

1977 King Air 200XPR Blackhawk, S/N BB-226, 7678 TT, 1193 TSN on -61 Engines!, Dual Garmin 430W, , Skywatch, Raisbeck Performance Mods, Asking $1,595,000.00

1983 Challenger 601-1A, S/N 3013, 11,579 TT, Engines on GE On-Point, Landing Gear O/Hed 3/12, 60 M/CPCP c/w 11/11, APU on MSP, Asking $2,795,000.00

2010 King Air 350i, S/N FL-689, 450 TT, Venue Cabin Mgmt – Aircell Axxess II, TCAS 2, Hi-def Video Displays, L3 ESIS, Asking $6,350,000.00

2008 King Air C90GTi, S/N LJ-1902, 1356 TT, Pro-line 21 w/ IFIS, One Owner, Engine Fire Ext., Skywatch, Asking $2,500,000.00

Also Available Beechcraft Premier I, S/N RB-48 Citation Sovereign, S/N 680-0216 Citation V, S/N 560-0059 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0871 Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039 Citation II, S/N 550-0326

Citation II, S/N 550-0216 Citation II, S/N 550-0127 Citation II, S/N 550-0094 Citation II, S/N 550-0082 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Falcon 20C-5BR, S/N 142 Learjet 35A, S/N 138 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-67

King Air 200, S/N BB-48 King Air F90, S/N LA-45 Socata TBM850, S/N 440 Socata TBM700C1, S/N 244 Socata TBM700B, S/N 232 Socata TBM700B, S/N 193 Aerostar Superstar 700, S/N 601P-472-188


JetBrokers August 23/07/2012 14:36 Page 2

2005 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411, 615 TT, Garmin GMX-200 MFD, XM Weather, Sat Phone, Like New, Airshow, Freon, One Owner, Asking $2,795,000.00

2004 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258674, 3052 TT, MSP Gold, Support Plus, Delivered with Fresh G Check, JAR Ops, TCAS II, CAMP, 8 pax interior, Asking $4,495,000.00

1999 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0891, 5452 TT, On Power Advantage Plus and Pro Parts, Freon Air, Phase 5 c/w 5/10, Belted Potty, Asking $1,850,000.00

2001 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258503, 3159.7 TT, Engines/APU on MSP, TCAS II, TAWS-A, Dual NZ-2000’s, L/R Oxygen, Honeywell EFIS, Asking $2.995,000.00

1988 Citation III, S/N 650-0164, 10552 TT, MSP Gold, PATS In-flight APU, KMD-850 MFD, Dual GNS-XLS, Doc 8 c/w 12/10, Asking $995,000.00

1977 Hawker 700A, S/N 257010, 8612 TT, MSP Gold, TCAS I, RVSM, 48 Month c/w 12/09, Gear O/Hed 8/08, New Interior 2010, Asking $899,000.00

1982 Citation Stallion, S/N 501-0317, 3494 TT, 502 TSN on Williams -2A engines, Avidyne EX5000 MFD, Dual GNS-430’s, Meggitt Engine Inst., Asking $2,150,000.00

1988 Beechjet 400, S/N RJ-47, 4128 TT, 515 SMOH by Dallas Airmotive, UNS-1K, TR’s, Freon, HBC Maintained, Asking $875,000.00

AUSTIN +1-512-530-6900 Phone DETROIT +1-248-666-9800 Phone

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

CHICAGO +1-630-377-6900 Phone FARNBOROUGH +44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Web: www.jetbrokers.com


BusAviationNewsNew 2_Layout 1 24/07/2012 17:06 Page 3

3

BizAv Round-Up Jay Beever – has been named vice president, Interior Design at Melbourne, FL- based Embraer Executive Jets.

Bill Schultz - Cessna has appointed Bill Schultz as its new senior vice president of business development for China. In his new position he will report directly to Cessna president and CEO Scott Ernest and be responsible for leading the aircraft manufacturer’s recently announced joint venture with Avic in Chengdu, China. Terry Clark, Cessna’s general manager at its Independence, Kan. facility, will take over from Schultz as president of CitationAir.

Mike Clarke - Qatar-based private aviation services provider Rizon Jet announced the appointment of Mike Clarke as director of Technical Services, based in Doha. John Hinton - has been appointed to the position of regional sales manager at Aircell. In this role, he is responsible for assisting business aircraft operators and aftermarket installation facilities with their in-flight connectivity needs in the North Eastern United States.

MIKE CLARKE RIZON JET

Fernando Lacerda Da Silva Bombardier has named Fernando Lacerda Da Silva as sales director of new aircraft for Brazil. Lacerda joins Bombardier with 25 years of previous aircraft sales experience, nearly half of which was in Latin America.

Pedro Mercado - Gulfstream recently named Pedro Mercado a national sales manager for Product Support Interior Refurbishment Sales. Mercado’s territory is the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, from South Carolina to Maine. He reports to Matthew Duntz, director, Product Support Interior Refurbishment Sales.

Fabio Sciacca – has joined FlightSafety International as director of sales for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Sciacca will lead the sales team who serves and supports FlightSafety’s Business Aviation Customers in this area of the world. He joins FlightSafety from Piaggio Aero Industries. Velma Wallace - an important figure in Cessna Aircraft Company's success and general aviation history, died last month. She was 95. Wallace was an early Wichita, Kansas, aviation pioneer. She, along with her late husband, Dwane, who died in 1989, helped build Cessna Aircraft Company. Wallace was also a philanthropist of many organizations.

JOHN HINTON AIRCELL

Electronics appointed Olivier as vice president, operations. He will be responsible for operations, supply chain management, master planning, facilities management and IT across all three of the company’s facilities.

LABACE Aug 15 – 17 Sao Paulo, Brazil

AIRCRAFT INTERIORS EXPO Sept 25 – 27 Seattle, WA, USA`

/ www.abag.org.br

/ www.reedexpo.co.uk

CIBAS (BEIJING INT’L BUSINESS AVIATION SHOW) Sept 4 – 7 Beijing, China

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT EXPO Sept 25 – 27 Las Vegas, NV, USA

/ www.cibas-beijing.com

FERNANDO LACERDA DA SILVA BOMBARDIER

Sir Ralph Robins – Gama, the global Business Aviation and services group, recently announced the appointment of Sir Ralph Robins as non-executive chairman. Sir Ralph’s many achievements during his tenure as chief executive officer and latterly executive chairman of Rolls-Royce are well documented.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

ILA BERLIN AIRSHOW Sept 11 – 16 Berlin, Germany

/ www.iaema.org

INTER AIRPORT CHINA Sept 26 – 28 Beijing, China

/ www.ila-berlin.de

/ www.interairportchina.com

BUSINESS AIRCRAFT EUROPE (BAE) Sept 12 – 13 London Biggin Hill Airport, UK

JETEXPO Sept 27 – 29 Moscow, Russia

/ www.miuevents.com

/ www.jetexpo.ru

BUSINESS & GENERAL AVIATION DAY (BGAD) Sept 18 Cambridge, UK

SAFETY STANDDOWN-USA Oct 8 - 11 Wichita, Kansas, USA

/ www.bgad.aero

PEDRO MERCADO GULFSTREAM

38

SIR RALPH ROBINS GAMA

BizAv Events

Christian Olivier - Esterline CMC

Joseph Rivera - Gulfstream has appointed aviation industry veteran Joseph Rivera as director of International Operations. He reports to Barry Russell, vice president, Customer Support. In this new position, which is based in Savannah, Rivera is responsible for oversight of Gulfstream’s three international service centers in Beijing; Luton, England and Sorocaba, Brazil.

JOSEPH RIVERA GULFSTREAM

/ www.safetystanddown.com

NBAA: REGIONAL FORUM Sept 20 Seatlle, WA, USA

AOPA AVIATION SUMMIT Oct 11 – 13 Palm Springs, CA, USA

/ www.nbaa.org

/ www.aopa.org

If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BusAviationNewsNew 2_Layout 1 25/07/2012 08:31 Page 4

Market Indicators Bombardier View

Argus View

Bombardier is confident in the strong, longterm potential of the business aircraft industry and forecasts a total of 24,000 business jet deliveries from 2012 to 2031 in all segments in which Bombardier competes, which represents approximately $648 billion US in industry revenues. The Bombardier Business Aircraft Market Forecast anticipates 9,800 aircraft deliveries, worth $266 billion US, from 2012 to 2021 and 14,200 deliveries, worth $382 billion US, from 2022 to 2031. Deliveries are expected to lag order intake as manufacturers strive to maintain acceptable backlog levels, and business jet industry deliveries for 2012 are expected to be comparable to 2011. Bombardier believes business jet industry deliveries will return to sustained growth starting in 2013, with the Large aircraft category demonstrating the fastest growth. Over the forecast period, Bombardier predicts that North America will receive the greatest number of new business jet deliveries between 2012 and 2031 with 9,500 aircraft, followed by Europe, with 3,920 aircraft. Notably, China will become the third largest market for business jet deliveries, with 2,420 deliveries from 2012 to 2031.

As the summer heats up, ARGUS TRAQPak flight activity for June sees a cool down. TRAQPak data shows that June 2012 business aircraft flight activity decreased 3.2% from May 2012. The results by operational category were all down from the previous month with Part 91 activity recording the largest month-overmonth decline, down 3.7%. Part 135 and fractional flight activity were down 3.4% and 1.2% respectively. Aircraft category results were also negative for the time period led

slight decrease, down 1.4%, while fractional activity saw a decrease of 6.7%. Reviewing activity by aircraft category the turboprop market saw a slight year-over-year increase, up 0.6%. Small cabin jets fell into negative territory, down 1.1%, followed by large cabin and mid-size cabin, which were down 1.6% and 3.5% respectively. Looking at individual market segments the fractional large cabin sector posted a 5.8% increase year-over-year. / More from www.aviationresearch.com

Business Aircraft Activity June 2012 vs. May 2012

TRAQPak

/ More from www.bombardier.com

Part 91

Brifo View

Part 135 Fractional

All

Turbo Prop

-2.9%

0.5%

0.6%

-1.6%

Small Cabin Jet

-4.6%

-4.8%

-1.0%

-4.4%

Mid-Size Cabin Jet

-5.4%

-6.8%

-2.6%

-5.0%

Large Cabin Jet

-1.2%

-5.5%

3.3%

-1.8%

All Aircraft Combined

-3.7%

-3.4%

-1.2%

-3.2%

Source: TRAQPak © 2012 ARGUS International, Inc +1 513.852.1010

Business Aircraft Activity June 2012 vs. June 2011

TRAQPak Part 91

Part 135 Fractional

All

Turbo Prop

-0.3%

3.0%

-2.1%

0.6%

Small Cabin Jet

1.5%

-1.6%

-13.5%

-1.1%

Mid-Size Cabin Jet

1.9%

-7.0%

-8.1%

-3.5%

Large Cabin Jet

-2.7%

-2.2%

5.8%

-1.6%

All Aircraft Combined

0.3%

-1.4%

-6.7%

-1.3%

Source: TRAQPak © 2012 ARGUS International, Inc +1 513.852.1010

Since 2008 the General Aviation industry has been reeling from a downturn that seems to be lasting an eternity. So what’s really going on? "That's probably the most important single question we're being asked these days," notes industry advisor Brian Foley. "We sympathize with those who worry because this has indeed been an epic correction. But historically, the General Aviation industry has averaged five-year cycles, which would normally suggest another year of weakness, more or less. That's not exactly a predictor because these averages, by nature, are highly governed by extremes. This recession is concerning, because it is both deep and prolonged, affecting certain companies and sectors more than others." As an example, Foley cites the fact that large-cabin business jets have been relatively unscathed, but other segments are still a long way from recovery. The high-profile bankruptcy of Hawker Beechcraft, one of the ‘Big Six’ manufacturers competing mainly in small and midsize jets, has caused concern throughout the industry. “Surely the

by mid-size cabin jets, down 5.0%. Looking at individual market segments, the month was not all negative with large-cabin fractional activity posting a 3.3% month-over-month increase. Reviewing year-overyear activity (June 2012 vs June 2011) TRAQPak data shows a 1.3% decrease in business aircraft flights. Results by operational category were mainly negative with the exception of Part 91 flight activity, which finished the month up 0.3%. The Part 135 market posted a

continued on page 42 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

39


PC Aviation August 23/07/2012 14:37 Page 1

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BusAviationNewsNew 2_Layout 1 24/07/2012 17:08 Page 5

2

Market Indicators industry must have other name-brand providers in similar difficulties that we don't know about, because they're not subject to the same reporting obligations,” Foley pondered. Some hail the recent business jet record breaking fleet orders from fractional provider NetJets, a Berkshire Hathaway company, as a sign that the market has finally returned, but Foley is more cautious. “These deliveries are spaced out over the next decade so there’s no quick benefit, and they're principally intended to replace (as opposed to grow) existing fleet aircraft averaging some seven years in age. There’s perhaps a little bit of gaming going on here as well, with NetJets’ ability strike a better bargain in low-market conditions and to have these new jets on line when the economy picks up (while still being able to defer and/or cancel orders if it does not).” Foley believes that, for most General Aviation companies, the safest mindset is to view the current situation as the "new normal" and adapt accordingly. “The pessimist in me says we'll be in something of a steady-state situation for the foreseeable future, with occasional setbacks balanced out by spots of growth…The optimist in me says that companies geared to live through these hard times will invariably have the edge when this recession’s over. Generally speaking, they’re the ones who can spot a welcome uptick as a gift (rather than a given) and profit from it.”

JETNET View JETNET has released its May 2012 and YTD 2012 results for the pre-owned business jet, business turboprop and helicopter markets. Highlighted in the Table below are key worldwide trends across all aircraft market segments comparing May 2012 to May 2011. The Fleet for Sale percentages for all market sectors were down in the May comparisons. Business jet sale transactions was the only market segment to show an increase (5.0%) YTD in May 2012 compared to 2011, and business jets are selling in less time (45 fewer days) on the market. However, business turboprop, turbine and piston helicopters saw declines in sale transactions YTD at -2.4%, -14.6% and -13.8%, respectively. The turbine helicopter market was the only segment to show an increase (9.7%) in average asking price in the

YTD results, while the percentage change in sale transactions declined by 14.6%. Real gross domestic product (GDP)— the output of goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States—increased at an annual rate of 1.9% in the first quarter of 2012 (that is, from the fourth quarter of 2011 to the first quarter of 2012), according to the "third" estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). There is a slight upward trend in the business jet market as a strong month of June and 2nd quarter ending results are anticipated. This optimism may be the result of lower fuel pricing, as it was inching up to another record fuel price level before turning downward. / More from www.jetnet.com

WORLDWIDE TRENDS Business Aircraft

MAY

Helicopters

Jets

Turbos

Turbine

Piston

For Sale

2,540

1,234

1,147

549

Fleet % For Sale 2012

13.7%

9.1%

6.2%

5.9%

/ More from www.BRiFO.com

Fleet % For Sale 2011

14.1%

10.3%

6.7%

6.8%

EBAA View

% Change For Sale

(-0.4)pt

(-1.2)pt

(-0.5)pt

(-0.9)pt

The European Business Aviation Association reports that although the decrease in traffic continued in June (-3.4%), it marked an improvement on May. Generally speaking, however, Business Aviation activity is contracting across the entire continent although the reduction is more pronounced in Western Europe than in the Eastern countries. The traditionally best months of the year in terms of traffic volume (around summer) don't seem to be able to curb the overall negative impact of the general economy's current weakness. / More from www.ebaa.org

January to May 2012 Full Sale Transactions

901

540

493

376

Avg. Days on Market

348

343

398

395

$1.245

$1.429

$0.217

Avg. Asking Price - $USD M $4.122

YTD January to May 2012 vs 2011 Change - Transactions Change - Days on Market Change - Asking Price

5.0%

-2.4%

-14.6%

-13.8%

-45

31

-16

83

-2.0%

-1.6%

9.7%

-5.7%

Find an Aircraft Dealer The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

avbuyer.com/dealers 42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


J Hopkinson August 23/07/2012 14:39 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

Challenger 604 SN 5364, 5903 TTAF, Engines On Condition, Collins ProLine IV, Honeywell EGPWS, Collins TCAS II w/Change 7, Dual Collins FMS-6000 FMS w/Dual GPS4000, DVD, VCR, 9 Pax

Piper JetProp DLX SN 46-8408072, 3443 TTAF, Heated Windshield STC, Ram Engine Cooling STC, Fuel Filler Cap STC, King Yaw Dampener & Altitude Preselect, 4 passenger interior

Astra SPX SN 117, 2908 TTAF, Collins Proline IV, Color weather Radar, TCAS II/w change 7, Airshow 400

Falcon 2000 SN 088, 4702 TTAF, Enrolled on CSP, Collins EFIS 4000 4-Tube, Dual Honeywell Laser REF III Inertial Reference System, Heads-Up Display, 3-Tube EIED, RVSM

Citation S/II SN S550-0036, 8576 TTAF, 6755 Cycles, 1304 SMOH, Cosmetics Refreshed & Perma-guarded (08/2011), GNS-XLS, GPWS, New Windows 2007, RVSM

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


AirCompAnalysisAug12_ACAn 23/07/2012 16:17 Page 1

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHEYENNE II

PIPER CHEYENNE II

TWIN COMMANDER 980

MITSUBISHI MU-2 SOLITAIRE

HAWKER

Piper Cheyenne II by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, information is provided on a selection of pre-owned turboprop aircraft in the $0.5m-1.0m price range for the purpose of valuing the pre-owned Cheyenne II aircraft. We’ll consider the usual productivity parameters - specifically, payload and range, speed and cabin size - and we will consider current and future market values. The turboprops that also feature in this month’s Comparative Analysis are the Twin Commander 980 and Mitsubishi Mu-2 Solitaire.

I

44

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

BRIEF HISTORY The Cheyenne series of turboprop aircraft were manufactured by Piper Aircraft Company. There have been 1,014 Cheyenne-series airplanes built since first flight in May 1979, and 787 are still in operation today (according to JETNET records). The most popular Cheyenne turboprop aircraft built was the Cheyenne II, of which 525 were built from 1974 to 1983. 355 are still in operation today. The Cheyenne II is regarded as an entry-level turboprop that can seat up to www.AvBuyer.com

eight passengers. It shares its fuselage and wing with the Cheyenne I and IA models. However, it differs with its more powerful PT6A-28 engines and its inclusion of standard tip tanks. The Cheyenne IIXL was produced from 1981 to 1984. The Cheyenne III was the first of the large Cheyenne models, and it is about 6 to 8 feet longer and 1,700-2,500 lbs. heavier than the Cheyenne I, II and IIXL models. It is also substantially faster and has superior range as compared to these earlier models. The Cheyenne III and IIIA models were ❯ produced from 1980 until 1993. Aircraft Index see Page 4


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AirCompAnalysisAug12_ACAn 23/07/2012 16:18 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHEYENNE II

PAYLOAD AND RANGE

TABLE A - PAYLOAD & RANGE Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel Range (nm) VFR

MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

9,000

2,452

1,500

898

1,160

1,320

Twin Commander 980 10,325

3,176

1,495

-106

1,370

1,052

10,470

2,700

2,300

420

1,220

1,092

Model

Cheyenne II

Mu-2 Solitaire

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, MA, USA; JETNET: B&CA May 2012 and Aug. 2011 Operations Planning Guide

CHART A - CABIN VOLUME 165

Cheyenne II

151

Mu-2 Solitaire

120 50

CABIN VOLUME According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Cheyenne II (151 cubic feet) is larger than the Solitaire, but smaller than the Twin Commander 980, as shown in Chart A (left).

POWERPLANT DETAILS

Twin Commander 980

0

The data contained in Table A (left) is published in Business & Commercial Aviation’s May 2012 issue, and is also sourced from Conklin & de Decker. A potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. The Cheyenne II ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 898 pounds is more than double that offered by the Solitaire, while the Twin Commander 980 has a negative available payload with maximum fuel.

100

150

200

250

Cubic Feet

TABLE B - FUEL USAGE Fuel Usage (GPH)

Model

Cheyenne II

104

Twin Commander 980

92

Mu-2 Solitaire

92

As noted above, the Cheyenne has two Pratt & Whitney PT6A-28 engines rated at 620 Shaft Horse Power (SHP). By comparison, the Twin Commander 980 and Solitaire both have a pair of Honeywell TPE 331-10 powerplants, rated at 733 SHP and 727 SHP, respectively. Table B (left), sourced from Aircraft Cost Calculator (ACC) shows the hourly fuel usage of each aircraft model in this field of study. The Cheyenne II (104 gallons per hour (GPH)) uses 13% more fuel than either the Twin Commander 980 or the MU-2 Solitaire (both consume 92 gallons of fuel per hour). Using data published in the May 2012 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2011 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet A fuel cost used from the August 2011 edition was $6.04 per gallon, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: Fuel price used from this source does not represent an average price for the year.

Source ACC - www.aircraftcostcalculator.com

COST PER MILE COMPARISONS Chart B (left) details ‘Cost per Mile’ and compares the Cheyenne II to its competition factoring direct costs and with all aircraft flying a 600nm mission with an 800 pound (four passengers) payload. The Cheyenne II has a higher cost per mile at $3.92 per nautical mile, which is more expensive to operate by 9.4% than the Twin Commander, and 19.1% than the Solitaire.

CHART B - COST PER MILE * Cheyenne II

$3.92

Twin Commander 980

$3.58

$3.29

Mu-2 Solitaire

$0.00

$2.00

$4.00

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS $6.00

US $ per nautical mile *600nm, 800lbs PAYLOAD MISSION COSTS

46

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

‘Total Variable Cost’ illustrated in Chart C (top right) is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense and Miscellaneous Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisAug12_ACAn 23/07/2012 16:19 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHEYENNE II

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS The points in Chart D (middle, right) center on the same group of aircraft. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors. 1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The long range cruise speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities. The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the aircraft in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all aircraft are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious business aircraft buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size we can conclude that the Cheyenne II has greater payload capability, offers greater range, and has a lower variable cost per hour. However, it operates at a slower speed, costs considerably more to operate per mile and its fuel burn is greater than the competition. Table C (right) contains the retail prices from the latest Vref edition for each aircraft. The prices shown are for the last year of manufacture. The number of aircraft in-operation, percentage ‘For Sale’ and the number ‘Sold’ over the past 12 months are from JETNET. As shown, the Cheyenne II has 12.7 percent of the in-operation fleet ‘For Sale’. Over the past 12 months the Cheyenne II is showing an average of three sold per month. This sales activity highlights many opportunities for the dealer/broker specializing in the Cheyenne II.

CHART C - VARIABLE COST Twin Commander 980

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

$945

$887

Cheyenne II

$500

$0

$1,000

$1,500

US $ per hour

CHART D - PRODUCTIVITY $1.5

Twin Commander 980 $1.0

Cheyenne II $0.5

Mu-2 Solitaire

$0.0

0.0100

0.0000

0.0300

0.0200

0.0400

0.0500

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE Average sold per month (past 12 months)

Long Range Cruise Speed

Cabin Volume (Cu Ft)

Max P/L w/avail Fuel Range VFR (nm)

Vref Retail Price $m

In Operation

% For Sale

Cheyenne II

192

151

1,320

$730k (1984)

355

12.7%

3

Twin Commander 980

230

165

1,052

$1M (1981)

71

1.4%

<1

Mu-2 Solitaire

270

120

1,092

$540k (1981)

42

16.7%

<1

Model

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker; JETNET; B&CA May 2012 and Aug. 2011 Operations Planning Guide

CHART E - CHEYENNE II IN-OPERATION BY CONTINENT Asia 1% Australia 1%

Africa 3%

Europe 13%

South America 26%

BY CONTINENT The majority of the wholly-owned Cheyenne II aircraft in operation (347) are located in North America (56%), followed by South America (26%) and Europe (13%) for a combined 95% of the fleet (see Chart E (right)). In addition to the 347 airplanes recorded in ❯ Chart E, however, there are eight further

$952

Mu-2 Solitaire

Price (Millions)

trip expense. The total variable cost for the Cheyenne II at $887 per hour, and is less expensive to operate by 6.1% than the Solitaire, and 6.8% than the Twin Commander 980.

North America South America

North America 56%

Europe Africa Asia Australia

SOURCE: JETNET STAR REPORTS

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

47


AirCompAnalysisAug12_ACAn 23/07/2012 16:22 Page 4

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CHEYENNE II TABLE D - CHEYENNE II MARKET STATS Cheyenne II aircraft in operation today operated under shared-ownership.

For Sale

AVERAGE ASKING PRICES Table D offers an eight-year historical perspective of the Cheyenne II aircraft sales activity trends from June 2004 to June 2012. The table is divided between the four years prior to the economic melt-down (2004–2008) and the four years since (2009-2012). In reviewing the four years prior to the economic downturn and after, there does not appear to be any significant change in the number of Cheyenne II for sale, number of retail sale transactions, average asking prices, or number of days on the market. Over the past 12 months the Cheyenne II aircraft has shown an increase in the number of full retail sales transactions at 26 compared to 20 last year in spite of an increase in the average asking price. However, the length of time that the Cheyenne II remains on the market before a sale remains stubbornly high. Nevertheless, it is clear that for those who are selling, and have the patience, the Cheyenne II continues to be popular within the pre-owned market today.

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 4 yr 2009 2010 2011 2012 4 yr

June 62 58 45 40 51 53 55 57 45 53

Avg. Asking $Price (000)

12 Months Avg. Full Retail DOM * Sale Transactions

Year

7/2004 –6/2005 7/2005 –6/2006 7/2006 – 6/2007 7/2007 – 6/2008 Average 7/2008 – 6/2009 7/2009 – 6/2010 7/2010 – 6/2011 7/2011 – 6/2012 Average

37 46 37 42 41 31 28 20 26 26

244 521 517 217 375 214 305 344 574 359

$591 $629 $610 $703 $633 $684 $472 $489 $549 $549

Source: JETNET Evolution program; * DOM = Average Days on the Market

SUMMARY Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that business aircraft operators value in an airplane. There are of course other qualities such as airport performance, terminal area performance, and time to climb performance that might factor in a buying decision, however. The Cheyenne II evidently fares well among its competition, so those operators in this market should find the preceding comparison of

value. Our expectations are that the Cheyenne II will continue to do well in the pre-owned market for the foreseeable future.

❯ For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com

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Wiley Rein LLP

Washington, DC

Northern Virginia

www.wileyrein.com/aviation Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wright Brothers November 23/07/2012 14:43 Page 1

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BG 1 Jack_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 14:10 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Governing Specialties Business Aviation and Corporate Governance Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

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Knowing when and where to find help with Business Aviation is a fundamental Board responsibility. So, too, is the necessity to heed the advice of your professionals, notes Jack Olcott. orporate governance is a challenge. Being responsible for the success and reputation of an enterprise, regardless of whether the corporation is publically owned or privately held, is a heavy load for Directors to shoulder. Especially today when Boards are required to establish and oversee policies that encompass complex disciplines, the task is not easy. Furthermore, failures in governance are often significant. As we have read in news coverage of dramatic and costly missteps in the financial sector, failure to understand sophisticated instruments such as derivatives and other exotic investments is no defense for Directors. Nor can a Board’s unfamiliarity with different elements of company activities negate the need for compre-

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hensive policy and oversight. Short-term benefits, such as substantial profits from questionable transactions, also offer no excuse. Neglect and poor judgment can (and usually will) result in loss, including shareholder dollars, company reputation, and employment of senior executives and Board Members. Because safe operation of business aircraft impacts the wellbeing of a company’s employees and associates, failures of governance related to Business Aviation include a dimension far beyond those of other areas of Board responsibility. While blunders in financial governance are usually costly, they rarely (if ever)

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG 1 Jack_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 10:13 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation result in loss of life and limb. Serious miscues in the operation of business aircraft can have catastrophic consequences, however. Board policies that fail to address inappropriate or profligate use of business aircraft also hold significance since Business Aviation impacts company productivity, which like botched financial policy affects the ability of a company to produce profits and remain financially viable.

BUSINESS AVIATION IS SPECIAL Business aircraft provide capabilities that are unique. When used appropriately, they enable a company to expand market penetration, use time more efficiently and leverage the talent of employees. In addition to facilitating greater revenues, no other form of business transportation provides a better record of safety and security. Conversely, business aircraft used inappropriately or managed poorly can consume company resources without generating gains. Not all business trips require Business Aviation when other means of travel, such as frequently scheduled airline flights, are available. Masking a personal trip as business is neither good business nor smart. More significantly, mismanagement can be dangerous. Considering the sophisticated and technical nature of business aircraft, failure to appreciate the need for thoughtful policies and procedures can lead to big problems, including tragedy. In particular, Directors must respect the technical nature of operating business aircraft safely. There can be no compromise or naive amateurism regarding maintenance, comprehensive training and respect for the weather and the challenges of operating miles above the earth’s surface while traveling at hundreds of miles per hour. Business Aviation is safe and effective because skilled pilots and aviation managers are committed to their profession. Good governance requires that Directors insist on staffing the company’s aviation department with knowledgeable experts who possess a record of unquestioned integrity and insightful management. Good governance also demands that Boards pay careful and respectful attention to the advice offered by their aviation manager.

PROFESSIONALISM Business Aviation has grown since companies first engaged in this form of transportation. Traditionally, flying experience as represented by hours flown and ratings earned were the metrics used for hiring and advancement. Management skills were the product of years spent operating business aircraft. Such an approach is changing. Today, there are over 300 two- and four-year colleges offering degrees in aviation, many with flight components that enable graduates to obtain their certification as pilots or maintenance technicians. Thus younger aviators are entering the profession of Business Aviation well prepared academically. The community, however, still demands hands-on experience with business aircraft before an employee is considered for management responsibilities such as Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

chief pilot or Director of Aviation. Thus an aviator pursuing a career in Business Aviation must find a balance between gaining experience in the cockpit or the maintenance shop and learning management skills that prepare him or her to lead an aviation department and communicate effectively with a Board in areas of aviation policy. Fortunately, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) launched an educational program in the late 1990s known as the Professional Development Program (PDP), and has perfected the curriculum in subsequent years to prepare individuals for career advancement in Business Aviation. Through a combination of seminars and online programs, an individual can expand his or her knowledge and skill in the art and science of management as it applies to Business Aviation. As a capstone to such education, NBAA created its Certificated Aviation Manager (CAM) program, which is to Business Aviation what certification is to professionals in other fields such as public accounting and financial planning. Before standing for the CAM examination, applicants must document their completion of numerous courses and years of professional experience. The testing is rigorous, and successful applicants are awarded the Certificated Aviation Manager designation. Board Members are wise to encourage company flight personnel to pursue NBAA’s Professional Development Program and to seek CAM designation. Having qualified personnel transporting your company’s most valuable asset—its personnel—is good governance, as is listening to your aviation professionals and soliciting their input in governing your company’s approach to air transportation.

“Good governance requires that Directors insist on staffing the company’s aviation department with knowledgeable experts...”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Managing Business Aviation As more corporations are accepting Business Aviation as a normal travel option, aviation professionals have responded by expanding their management skills and integrating their flight departments into the firm’s organizational structure, observes Jack Olcott. bout a decade ago, an associate and I queried a group of aviation professionals about their basic approach to managing the company’s business aircraft. One Aviation Director insisted that he spends a fair amount of his time actively avoiding involvement with corporate management. “We keep our airport activities to ourselves,” he proudly asserted. “Those folks downtown just don’t understand us, so we keep to ourselves and just do our jobs—flying aircraft safely and catering to the boss’s needs.” Another participant in our discussion took the opposite approach. “I work overtime educating the managers at various levels within the company about the value of the company’s aircraft,” he outlined. “Our aviation department is a business unit within the corporation, and as such we are expected to embrace the same business practices, such as budgeting, reporting and administering to personnel issues, as do other business units. I find that this approach, which applies to all the company’s managers, works well.” Several months following the discussion, my associate and I learned that one of these Aviation Directors had relocated and the other continued to hold his position within his corporation. You can guess which person stayed with his

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employer and which one moved on. Independence might have been an important— possibly necessary—attribute for leading a flight department in earlier times, before companies fully appreciated the value of managing their travel needs holistically and a company aircraft was the boss’s special carriage. Today’s Aviation Directors, and those who aspire for a role in flight department management, are expected to be trained managers as well as competent aviators. While colleges now offer programs in aviation management and numerous Executive MBA programs exist, professionals engaged in Business Aviation often have neither the time nor the funds to return to academe. To address the need for relevant education in management, the National Business Aviation Association offers a comprehensive set of courses within its Professional Development Program, better known as PDP. Courses address business and management subjects that an aspiring Aviation Director is expected to understand as Business Aviation blends into a corporation’s infrastructure. Board Members should examine hiring policy for their company’s flight departments, seeking, wherever possible, those personnel with the best balance of aviation and management skills.

PARTICIPANTS IN NBAA’S PROGRAM OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 160

Aviators seeking recognition as Certified Aviation Managers, which is designation issued by NBAA, are required to pass an examination. NBAA’s Professional Development Program is designed to cover subjects tested during the CAM examination. NBAA lists 191 aviators as Certified Aviation Managers.

140 120 100

CAM Exams

80

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PDP Study Guides

40 20 0 FY12

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FY11

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FY07

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Bombardier Pre-Owned Except the Price World Aircraft Sales Bleed: 10.25”w x 12.5”h Trim: 8.125” w 10.625” d

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LEARJET • CHALLENGER • GLOBAL


BG 3 Aug_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 10:54 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

King Rat: The Metrics of Business Aviation Safety Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

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Operating 20,000 hours without an incident and having a zero accident rate are not safety metrics. Did you fly accident-free during the past 20,000 hours because you were incredibly lucky or because you were doing the right things correctly, questions Pete Agur.

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ffective safety metrics describe activities and behaviors that create the results you intend. The tools for calculating that reality are emerging today. They are not based on rates of historic failure but on measurable anticipated risks, probabilities and mitigations. In other words, the metrics of safety are shifting from hindsight to forward looking.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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That is the good news. The not-so-good news is that the development and use of the Risk Assessment Tool (RAT) is in its infancy. Fully developed and implemented, the RAT will be one of the most effective advances in aviation safety to date. In concept, a RAT is a comprehensive list of risk arenas and their elements. For instance, one major risk source is weather. A portion of the RAT assesses all the weather conditions for a trip leg. Departure airport, route, destination and alternates are all looked at for conditions that create risk, such as icing, high winds, turbulence, thunderstorms, etc. The aviation department staff identifies specific risk elements and determines whether they should be mitigated. This assessment is done by a scoring process. When a risk and its probability are deemed high enough to be mitigated, lower risk options are considered and selected. For instance, if thunderstorms are forecast en route, is it better to circumnavigate them or depart at a time that precedes U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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BG 3 Aug_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 15:13 Page 2

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

RAT SAMPLE

Foundation’s Business Aviation Safety Seminar this past April. Our observation is that the current crop of FRATs is better than nothing, but are not nearly as good as they will be in an iteration or two.* From your perspective, there are several things you need to consider in the selection and use of a RAT:

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or follows their development? With the selected mitigation implemented, the leg is re-scored to confirm that the resulting plan is acceptable. In its most basic form, a RAT is a score card that has five-by-five blocks (as illustrated here). One scale of reference is event “Probability” ranging from ‘Unlikely’ to ‘Certainly’. The other scale is severity of “Impact” ranging from ‘No Impact’ to ‘Catastrophic’. These cards are easy to use as guidelines for trip planning. Unfortunately, they are inadequate as effective management tools because they are neither comprehensive nor sufficiently detailed to provide management information. There are a number of commercial RATs being offered. Some have as few as a couple-dozen data points, and others boast hundreds. How good are they? Our firm recently conducted a Flight Risk Assessment Tool (FRAT) research project. The findings were presented at the Flight Safety

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Most RATs include a number of basic data points that are relatively easy to acquire. Aircraft performance, weather, airport information, etc., are routinely included. The better ones include some crew data points. This is a good start, because studies by the National Transportation Safety Board tell us human performance (error) is a major contributor in about 70% of all professionally-flown aircraft accidents. But none of the RATs we have seen have sufficient crew data. Your Flight RAT should gauge the competence of each crew member as well as the collective competence of the crew as a team. Are they highly experienced in the aircraft? What is the crew’s chronic and acute fatigue status prior to the trip and at the end of each leg? These and many more factors should be identified, measured and scored.

RISK WEIGHT AND ACCRUAL Most Flight RATs use a simple, linear scoring system. Unfortunately, linear calculations are not reflective of the real potential of a Risk/Probability impact. Therefore, there should be a weighting and accrual algorithm at the heart of the tool. For instance, operating into international airspace Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG 3 Aug_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 12:21 Page 3

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation includes some communication challenges. If your crew has been to a remote location a number of times, the risk goes down as crew members gain familiarity. But if the trip is a first time arrival into a foreign airport in the mountains at night in low weather, the algorithm must adjust the score for the compounded and accrued risks.

are being moved or while they are parked than when they are in motion for flight. Additionally, more people are injured around aircraft on the ground than while they are in flight. Even so, the development of a Ground RAT for Business Aviation is way behind the Flight RAT.

IN CLOSING USE THE RAT WIDELY Most RATs are used only once - as a pre-flight or pre-trip information device. Our study found substantial benefit was gained by scoring the Flight RAT three times, including: 1. Initial trip request (creating a baseline score, and allowing the scheduling team to measure the impact of their contribution to reducing trip risks, and promoting inter-team collaboration scheduling, maintenance, flight and management). 2. Pre-flight briefing (to provide a guide for the crew’s communications and preparation). 3. Post-flight debriefing (actual trip score changes are identified and trends are noted for future consideration). You may have noticed I have distinguished between the term RAT and Flight RAT. That is because the vast majority of safety measurement effort thus far has been on the flight side. However, the greatest risk of damage to your aircraft is on the ground. More damage is done to aircraft while they

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

You may have read the above information and be wondering, “as a Board Member, what do you suggest I do?” You need to confirm that: 1. Your Business Aviation department is using the most advanced Flight RAT available. 2. The Flight RAT is being scored three key times trip request, pre-flight and post-flight. 3. Management reports based on Flight RAT data are developed and used effectively. 4. Your ground operations will be included in a RAT process of their own, ASAP. In Business Aviation, there are many ways to skin a cat. That is why it is rare for me to make a specific recommendation. But, in this case, the RAT is king. *To receive a copy of the FRAT paper, contact the Flight Safety Foundation or our offices. www.vanallen.com or www.flightsafety.org

“The vast majority of safety measurement effort thus far has been on the flight side. However, the greatest risk of damage to your aircraft is on the ground.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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BGuide 4 Aug12_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 10:41 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

After The Parade Passes By Quantifying value amid enthusiasm and emotion. Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Additionally, Jay is a Member of the Board of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the Chairman of the Associate Member Advisory Council (AMAC). He also sits on the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Mr. Mesinger can be contacted at jay@jetsales.com

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Enthusiasm and emotion can distort how you quantify value, explains Jay Mesinger. The Boardroom is not immune. With this in mind, how can you ensure you enjoy the value of Business Aviation long after the newness of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s asset has worn off ?

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hile watching your hometown 4th of July parade with its colorful floats, loud bands, clowns and laughter it is easy to be enthused. Once the parade winds its way through town and the excitement dies down, how do you rate the experience? Last month we talked about the value of the business aircraft to the company. We mentioned the need for the Board to shout the value proposition to the shareholders and the stakeholders. We urged Directors to spread the message that aviation

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 2012

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assets enable key employees to get out ahead of the competition and in front of customers. No doubt such interaction is mission critical to increasing the core business of the company. We agree that Business Aviation is great, but is there a way to quantify the value proposition other than being a vocal advocate? Rather than simply being caught up in the excitement of Business Aviation, is there a way to monetize the value U proposition?

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Charlie Bravo August 23/07/2012 14:49 Page 1

2007 Legacy 600 S/N 14500998, 2379 Hou Hours rs

2010 Phenom 100

1998 LLearjet j 600 4819 TT, 3123 Cycles, Belted Lav, Recent 12-Year Inspection

1983 GIII S/N 391, 11,483 T TT, T, 6332 C Cycles, ycles, G-CMP, G-CMP, 10 P Pax ax

Also Available Available 2001 Citation Citation C CJ2 J2 1990 King King Air Air B200 1999 Citation Citation X 1979 Citation Citation I/SP 1998 Cessna Cessna Citation Citation Jet

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SSALE SA SALES AALE AL LESS AND LES LE AAN ND N D ACQUISITIONS AAC ACQ ACQU CQ CQU QUISI QU QUI UIS ISSIT ISI ISIT SIT ITI TIO IO ON NSS N


BGuide 4 Aug12_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 10:46 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation QUANTIFYING THE VALUE If there is no question that the aircraft enabled you to close a seemingly impossible sale, you could place a value of that situation. Or perhaps you know absolutely that customers were retained because you were able to get a service team to their locations quickly using the business aircraft. Monetizing those events would give you a dollar amount to use. However, the real question is this: Can the value proposition be better estimated by measuring the increased number of customers called on and the number of sales calls made when your company has access to a business aircraft? I believe that rather than being conceptual or focusing on just a few special situations, you can place an identifiable value on having a business aircraft by considering routine business activities. If you are in a small or rural area not serviced by commercial aviation there is no doubt that a business aircraft can save days of a sales person’s or executive’s time. Even if you are located in a city with well-established airline service, days can be saved by using a business aircraft to call on clients and move executives around the country (or world). Comparing commercial service to business aircraft use, a company employee can easily call on three customers in three different cities in one day, rather than calling on one customer in three days. The ability to conduct business onboard a business aircraft while the executive is traveling to offsite meetings adds enormous productivity to the work day. Using state of the art technology in the area of connectivity for business aircraft creates the modern office in the sky. This means that when the cabin door shuts and the flight takes off, the work day is not interrupted. Most commercial airliners are not equipped to enable continued use of PDAs when you are airborne, thus forcing the executive to use the precious minutes while taxiing into the terminal to read what could be twenty or thirty emails and make snap decisions regarding which warrants an immediate response, prior to reaching the gate. Such work compression leaves no time to think, respond and act presidential! The value of using time productively and effectively is by no means conceptual. It is real. Moving through the world of business using a business aircraft allows you to move at the speed of business. This capability is a real tie-breaker when competing against someone who is calling on one customer in three days, answering emails late with shoot-fromthe-hip information, or delaying important responses until the next business day. Rather than simply expressing the excitement of

using a business aircraft in general terms, take time to observe and quantify how your company, your executives, your sales and service team use Business Aviation by calling on more customers, staying ahead of the competition, and winning and retaining important business. I think you will quickly see that you can validate the value proposition of business aircraft and enjoy the parade well after the roar subsides. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Find an Aircraft Dealer The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

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avbuyer.com/dealers

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AL NG DE DI N PE

CHALLENGER 605 SN: TBA; Year: 2010; Total Time: 431Hrs; Cycles: 296; Programs: CAMP, JSSI; Location: Middle East Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 604 SN: 5641; Year: 2006; Total Time: 1,998 Hrs; Cycles: 679; Programs: TBA; Location: Dubai Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 604 SN: 5318; Year: 1996; Total Time: 7,613 Hrs; Cycles: 3,266; Programs: CAMP, JSSI; Location: South Africa Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 300 SN: TBA; Year: 2009; Total Time: 1,450 Hrs; Cycles: 690; Programs: CAMP, SmartParts, MSP; Location: Europe Price: $16,500,000

File Photo

File Photo

CHALLENGER 300 SN: TBA; Year: 2007; Total Time: 980 Hrs; Cycles: 779; Programs: CAMP; Jet Care Program; Location: Europe Price: $15,250,000

LEARJET 45 SN: 195; Year: 2001; Total Time: 7,990 Hrs; Programs: CAMP, SmartParts, JSSI; Location: Australia Price: Make Offer

2 X LEARJET 45s SN: 033; Total Time: 8,750 Hrs; Year: 1999; SN: 035; Total Time: 9,610 Hrs; Year: 1999; Programs: CAMP, SmartParts, JSSI; Location: Australia Price: Make Offer

LEARJET 35A SN: 653; Year: 1989; Total Time: 15,342 Hrs; Cycles: 11,292; Programs: MSP; Location: Luxembourg Price: Make Offer

LEGACY 600 SN: 145-1017; Year: 2007; Total Time: 1,725 Hrs; Cycles: 667; Programs: JSSI Select Plus; Location: United Kingdom Price: US$ 14,250,000

HAWKER 800B SN: 258130; Year: 1989; Total Time: 6,432 Hrs; Cycles: 5,237; Programs: MSP; Location: Palma De Mallorca Price: Make Offer


BGuide 5 Aug12_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 10:27 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Defensive Oversight: (Part 1) Preparing for federal tax challenges Chris Younger is a partner at GKG Law, P.C. practicing in the firm’s Business Aircraft Group. He focuses his legal practice on business aircraft transactions as well as issues relating to federal and state taxation and regulation of business aircraft ownership and operations. Mr. Younger can be contacted at cyounger@gkglaw.com

Boards are well advised to structure aircraft acquisition and operations with a sharp eye toward what tax auditors want to see, cautions attorney Chris Younger.

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s those of you who have hiked on rugged mountain trails can appreciate, a clearly marked, well-constructed and unobstructed path makes your trek easier and more enjoyable. Similarly, it is essential for companies that own and operate business aircraft to create a clear and unambiguous path that will lead a tax auditor to the simple conclusion that all tax consequences of such aircraft ownership and operation have been accurately addressed. Board Members must recognize the need to construct such a path at the inception of (and throughout) the business aircraft acquisition process, and to maintain that path during the entire time the aircraft is owned and operated.

CREATING YOUR TRAIL

“The path to be followed must be clear and unambiguous.”

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First, a Board must ensure that aircraft ownership and operations are structured in a manner such that any losses relating to the aircraft are currently deductible for Federal income tax purposes. Additionally, such a structure should be designed to eliminate or minimize the risk of any Federal Excise Tax liability with respect to such operations. The path to be followed must be clear and unambiguous. Next, Board Members should require a detailed business plan setting forth the purpose for acquiring a business aircraft and the business goals to be accomplished. Such a plan should be carefully written and well thought out, taking into account any tax objectives relating to aircraft ownership and use. Following these two steps, the Board should work with its expert professional advisors to create a tax-efficient structure in which the aircraft will be owned and operated. This part of the process is completed by preparing a comprehensive set of documents relating to the ownership and operation, such as an aircraft usage policy, aircraft dry leases, charter and administrative services agreements, and agreements relating to joint aircraft ownership and usage. U

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AIC August 23/07/2012 14:52 Page 1


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What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation Documents relating to financing must also be drafted with care and analyzed to ensure that they take into account all Federal Income Tax objectives and do not create any impediments to the realization of those objectives.

THE BOARD CAN HELP AN IRS AGENT WHO NEEDS TO FOLLOW THE PATH TO STAY ON COURSE TO A CORRECT CONCLUSION

CLEARING AND SIGNPOSTING YOUR TRAIL In an IRS tax audit, the Board wants an IRS agent to be able to see the desired objectives as clearly as possible. The structure described must document that all costs are ordinary, necessary and reasonable and show that all cost-related activities are pursued to generate profit. Furthermore, the Board should ensure that the structure addresses all potential limitations on the deduction of any losses from the aircraft activity such as “passive activity” and “at-risk” loss limitations, and also limitations due to personal entertainment use or non-qualified business use of aircraft. In this way, the path that is designed and built by the Board will serve its intended purpose. Another key component in this process is the continued maintenance of the path so that an IRS agent has no trouble following its trajectory. In the context of an aircraft, the Board must ensure that detailed records are maintained. These records should clearly identify the purpose for each flight and the reason why each passenger is on board the aircraft. The path must be clear of all obstructions so that it is easily traversed. The Board should ensure that no extraneous and possibly distracting information is created or preserved. In this way, the Board can help an IRS agent or anyone else who needs to follow the path stay on course and not be led inadvertently to an unknown or unintended destination. For example, if aircraft related depreciation shows up as a line item on a tax return, the Board should have very clear and easily retrieved records supporting the allowance. Again, this relates to maintaining a clearly marked path, free of obstructions, that is very easy to follow. The use of the concepts described above can enable a Board to support the validity of any tax deductions relating to a business aircraft and to avoid the possibility of unwanted liability for income and excise taxes emanating from such ownership and operations. The need for the Board to assemble a team of expert professional advisors to assist cannot be understated. Such a team can be an invaluable resource that enables a Board to proactively anticipate and oversee a review of tax effects emanating from the ownership and operation of a business aircraft.

Note: This article should not be construed as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The reader is urged to consult legal counsel or other advisors concerning his/her own situation and specific legal questions. Please be advised that, to ensure compliance with requirements imposed by the IRS, any U.S. tax advice contained in this communication is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Find an Aircraft Dealer The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

64

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

“Another key component... is the continued maintenance of the path so that an IRS agent has no trouble following its trajectory.”

avbuyer.com/dealers Aircraft Index see Page 4


Eagle August 25/07/2012 09:48 Page 1

Eagle Aviation, Inc. 2861 Aviation Way, West Columbia, SC 29170 Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

1997 CITATION JET, S/N 525-0206

2002 CJ2, S/N 525A-0064

1982 CITATION II, S/N 550-0416

1982 CITATION I/SP, S/N 501-0242

1981 CONQUEST I, S/N 425-0140

2006 MALIBU MIRAGE, S/N 4636394

2008 CESSNA T206H STATIONAIR, S/N T20608805

2007 CIRRUS SR22, S/N 2470

After hours contact • Jet Sales: Dennis Dabbs +1 803 822-5533 • Lee Thomas +1 803 822-5526 • Piston Sales: Ralph Lacomba +1 803 822 5578

Aircraft Sales, Maintenance, Avionics, Completions, Executive Charter, 24/7 Line Service


BG 6 Aug12_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 10:31 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

PUNC Your Checklist for Insurance Coverage Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

66

‘PUNC’ (Pilots, Use, Named Insured and Contracts) is an acronym capturing the four most important areas of aviation insurance that result in the largest percentage of claims denials, asserts Stuart Hope. This month, we consider the vitality of reviewing all Contracts related to your aircraft.

M

any of us routinely sign rental car agreements, bank loan documents and internet use clauses without even a cursory review. Why? Because we know we won’t get the car, the loan or access to the internet site if we don’t. Don’t take the same approach when addressing contracts relating to your aircraft, however. The financial consequences are exponentially higher. Contracts related to your aircraft can, and should be negotiated. By definition, a contract is a binding (i.e., legally enforceable) agreement between two or more persons or parties. This means, like it or not, that providing your

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

insurance broker and attorney a copy of any aviation contract prior to execution is not an option. It is a requirement for any well-run flight department. Following are some common agreements an aircraft owner might encounter: * Purchase agreements * Hangar leases * Bank financing documents * Aircraft leases [dry lease, time share] * Replacement engine or parts leases * Maintenance agreements. Almost without exception, all of these contracts contain clauses requiring you to meet certain insurance conditions. Ignore these or simply fail to take U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BOMBARDIER BUSINESS AIRCRAFT & SIKORSKY REPRESENTATIVE

2012 Global 6000 - s/n 9451

Delivery position available Global Vision Flight Deck w/ SVS, EVS, HUD, CCP Delivery 4Q 2012

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2006 LEARJET 40

Engines enrolled on MSP EU OPS Certified

2002 LEARJET 45

s/n 13

s/n 2053

Fresh 4800 hr inspection EU OPS Certified

2008 HAWKER 900XP

s/n 226

Engines & APU on MSP RVSM Certified

NEW JET INTERNATIONAL for all your aviation needs.

2001 CHALLENGER 604

s/n HA-56

Engines & APU MSP Gold Airframe: 965 hrs (01/12)

APU on MSP Gold prog. Engines on GE on Point

2000 LEARJET 45

s/n 036

Engines enrolles in MSP Gold EU OPS Certified

Collins Pro Line 21 EFIS EU OPS Compliant

AirframeT.T - 2400 hrs Fresh MPI

AirframeT.T - 3553 hrs Landings - 3400

RVSM Compliant Delivery 2Q 2017

1999 LEARJET 45

s/n 5487

Airframe on SmartParts Int. / Ext. redone in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;09

s/n 068

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WAS August 2012.indd 1

17/07/2012 17:03:27


BG 6 Aug12_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 15:19 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation action and you may find yourself in a nasty Breach of Contract lawsuit. In addition, most of these agreements also contain an indemnity clause that, regardless of any insurance coverage you may or may not have in place, makes you responsible for any and all losses. Let’s examine the insurance clause in a typical Time Share Agreement. “At all times during the term of this Lease, Lessor shall cause to be carried and maintained, at Lessor's cost and expense, physical damage insurance with respect to the Aircraft in the amount set forth below: “Aircraft Physical Damage (Not Deductible While In Motion or Not in Motion) -The Greater of Current Market Value or the Minimum Amount Required by Lender. “At all times during the term of this Lease, Lessor shall also cause to be carried and maintained, at lessor's cost and expense, third party aircraft liability insurance, passenger legal liability insurance, property damage liability insurance and medical expense insurance in the amounts set forth below: “Combined Liability Coverage for Bodily Injury and Property Damage Including Passengers Each Occurrence - No Less than $50,000,000.00 Medical Expense Coverage Each Person $5,000.00 “Any policies of insurance carried in accordance with this Lease: (i) shall name lessee as an additional insured; and (ii) shall contain a waiver by the underwriter thereof of any right of subrogation against Lessee. Each liability policy shall be primary without right of contribution from any other insurance which is carried by Lessee or Lessor and shall expressly provide that all of the provisions thereof, except the limits of liability, shall operate in the same manner as if there were a separate policy covering each insured”. Now let’s examine a loss to illustrate the potential impact of not complying with the insurance requirements set out above: An aircraft owner has entered into a time share agreement (TSA) with a local company but fails to forward a copy of the TSA to his insurance broker to endorse the policy as required. An ensuing accident destroys the aircraft and causes critical injuries to some of the passengers. Lawsuits are filed against you as owner of the aircraft and against the lessee. Upon receiving the suit papers the lessee contacts you with a request to forward the lawsuit to your insurance carrier for defense under the additional insured provision. In addition, their pilot was flying the aircraft and they also wanted to make sure the waiver of subrogation clause was activated. Last, they wanted to remind you that your policy is primary without any right of contribution from any insurance they have in place. You vaguely remember reading these requirements in the TSA. If you didn’t comply with the contractual requirements, you could be sued for breach of

68

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

“In short, this

contract. If the agreement also contained an indemnification clause (which is common) you could be exposed to even greater liability. In short, this could be a very messy claim to settle causing you or your company a great deal of pain, both financially and emotionally.

THE INDEMNITY CLAUSE The indemnity clause also merits a close look as it can really work against you in its most onerous form. Careful review of this clause along with the entire contract or agreement in question with a good aviation attorney is worth every penny. He/she can guide you through the process and suggest wording based on fair benchmark language common to the industry. The money you saved not taking this step is obviously never worth it after a loss. Again, if you want to avoid the cost of an attorney, do it on contracts that don’t have as much loss exposure. It just makes sense. Your aviation insurance broker can also be a valuable resource. He/she has seen numerous insurance and indemnity clauses in contracts and can suggest more equitable language where appropriate. In closing, when evaluating any contract related to your aircraft, contact your broker and attorney during the contract review process (if not earlier). The devil IS in the detail, and contract review is an integral part of a well-run flight department’s risk management strategy.

could be a very messy claim to settle causing you or your company a great deal of pain, both financially and emotionally.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aircraft Services Group July 23/07/2012 14:53 Page 1


BG 7 Aug12_FinanceSept 25/07/2012 12:39 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Taxpayer Value Shareholder Value What’s Good for Government is also good for Business. David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

The Nexa Advisors report entitled Government Use of Aircraft provides valuable insights for Board Members considering Business Aviation, advises David Wyndham. In its latest study for the National Business Aviation Association, Nexa Advisors examined Government use of aircraft from a taxpayer perspective. ow more timely and provocative can you get - looking at government use of business aircraft here in the US with unemployment high and budgets tight? Nexa Advisors concluded that properly used, “aircraft provide taxpayer-value by providing public safety and security, more effective government, protecting public health and welfare, facilitating economic growth, improving tax dollar efficiency, promoting good government relations, and improving compliance.’’ While Air Force One is the most visible, and critical, application of air travel by the White House, the report discussed the other 99.9% of aircraft used by Federal, State and Local governments. Conklin & de

H

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Decker, the firm where I am a part owner, has done numerous studies justifying aircraft for individual agencies, and our own experiences mirror those of this report. Of primary significance for Boardroom readers, many of the findings in the Nexa Advisor studies as well as in our own work have relevance for private-sector businesses. Let’s look at a few.

WRITTEN JUSTIFICATION A strategy is needed to determine how an aircraft can support the core mission of the business. There should be a written justification of the need for an aircraft and on the requirements of the aircraft to satisfy that need, and the document should be

Aircraft Index see Page 4

U


FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED Sales & Acquisitions

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

Boeing BBJ/30076

Boeing BBJ/36714

Global XRS/9195

Falcon 900EXy/181

Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012

Gulfstream GV/512

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 800B/258058

freestream aircraft limited

freestream aircraft usa ltd

freestream aircraft (Bermuda) Limited

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

new york | LAS VEGAS | london | hong kong | Beijing | mexico | Moscow | Bermuda

www.freestream.com


BG 7 Aug12_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 15:21 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation reviewed and updated on an as-required basis. The justification should outline the benefits to the organization in having an aircraft - connecting it to the company’s key missions. The users of the aircraft, as well as the Board and those who oversee the aircraft fiscally, need to be aware of this justification, which should also provide the basis for managing the aircraft. Accountability must be identified, such as who is responsible for authorizing the use of the aircraft and who can request its use. Within many government agencies, not only do the high-level officials have aircraft access (governor/CEO), but many teams also use the aircraft when appropriate. Travel costs can actually be reduced using a business aircraft. The State of Idaho found that for their travel, air transportation became less costly to the taxpayer over surface travel when there were three or more persons on the same aircraft. Their analysis took into account all of the costs of the trip, but made no allowance for productivity of passengers while en route. Accounting for the ability to use travel time as an extension of office time (since employees can continue to address business issues), the savings could have been magnified. Aircraft enhance employee productivity: Few government agencies have the funds for hiring new employees. The aircraft, when used effectively, allows them to operate more efficiently with the employees that they have, thereby reducing staffing and saving money.

Aircraft use enables the better management of facilities: Whether it is a State Wildlife Refuge or your company’s factory, the management of the facility often requires direct involvement of senior management. Business aircraft enable more timely visits as well as less total time allocated to facility oversight. Aircraft can boost economic development: If you are evaluating a location for a new or greatly expanded facility, there are many factors involved. One of Conklin & de Decker’s state clients reported that a tour of the proposed factory site was key in the company’s decision to locate to that community. By linking relevant parties, business aircraft can help facilitate the collection of information needed for a major financial decision. Aircraft ensure the security of employees: Business aircraft provide a safe environment for sensitive conversions, as well as a productive work environment. While the Nexa analysis stated that there is no universal definition of taxpayer value, any publiclytraded company has clear metrics for shareholder value. The aircraft is a tool that - properly employed - enhances the ability for you to be more personally involved in the success of your company, and that effectiveness translates to a better bottom line. Aircraft work for governments; aircraft work for businesses. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Find an Aircraft Dealer The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

72

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

“The aircraft, when used effectively, allows them to operate more efficiently with the employees that they have.”

www.AvBuyer.com

avbuyer.com/dealers Aircraft Index see Page 4


Boutsen August 23/07/2012 14:57 Page 1


BG 8Aug12_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 15:22 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Medium Jets Value Not too big, not too small and not too expensive “Of all the business jet categories, none does more to balance capability with utility than the Medium Jet segment”.

74

Among the genius aspects of private aviation, the broad spectrum of solution options stands as a remarkable achievement. Neither too big, nor too small (and not too expensive), Medium Jets can be just the right fit for many an operator.

F

rom Entry Level Jets (under 10,000 lbs takeoff weight) through Light Jets and on to the heady realm of the VIP-configured airliners, something undoubtedly exists that will accommodate your requirement for speed, range and capacity – especially for capacity. Of all the business jet categories, none does more to balance capability with utility than the Medium Jet segment (loosely defined by aircraft with a maximum take-off weight between 20,001-40,000 lbs); no segment provides more options, either. Medium Jets, as their label indicates, fall between the Light Jet and Large-Cabin Jet segments in numerous ways, while leaning closer to the Large-

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Cabin segment in several specific areas. Not too big, not too small, or expensive: Medium Jets can be just the right fit for many operators.

CABIN VALUE A smaller Medium Jet can only improve incrementally on the cabin space of the largest Light Jets, while the largest Medium Jet could dwarf the volume of that same Light Jet model. Medium Jets also tend to cruise at the upperend of the private jet speed range – between Mach 0.78 and Mach 0.85 - with one Medium Jet, Cessna’s still best-in-civil-aviation Citation X capable of cruising at Mach 0.92. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wentworth July 21/06/2012 10:06 Page 1

Executive BOEING 757 757--200 SERIAL NUMBER 24923

UNDERGOING FRESH C CHECK! 7220 H / 2554 C, Rolls Royce Engines, Winglets, Exec SNEW, 40-Pass. Executive Interior.

VVIP BOEING Super 27 27--100 SERIAL NUMBER 20533

VVIP BOEING Super 27 27--200REW SERIAL NUMBER 22825

NEW PRICE! Last -100 Built, - 200 Landing Gear with 0 SMOH, Fresh C, EFIS, Winglets, -200 Wing/Fuel Tanks, Re-Eng Mod.

5400H / 3300C, Valsan –217C Engine Retrofit with Winglets, Fresh C & LG Overhaul, 45-Pass. VIP Interior with Stateroom.

VIP BOEING 727 727--100 SERIAL NUMBER 20371

HAWKER 800SP SERIAL NUMBER 258050

Fresh C of A, -9A Engines 31-Pass. Interior, Great Layout. Master Stateroom + Convertible Sitting Room/2nd Bedroom.

Phone 1.301.869.4600 Sales@Wentworth.Aero

7134 H, MSP Gold, Blended Winglets, Paint and 10-Pass. Interior New 2010 with New CMS/Entertainment/Sat Phone.

• •

Fax 1.301.869.2700 www.Wentworth.Aero


BG 8Aug12_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 15:23 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation If there’s a contest to identify a give-back element to the Medium Jet segment, most would opt for runway flexibility. And that’s only fair. Runway requirements for Medium Jets are generally longer than the average length needed by a Light Jet. But Medium Jets typically can use a significant percentage of the secondary airports serving most of the 150 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. In general the average Medium Jet can reach most of the U.S. non-stop from almost anywhere in the U.S., thanks to their legs-capability. Medium Jets typically can fly from several hundred miles to more than 1,000 miles farther than the Light Jet average. That range capability also gives the crew the flexibility to string together a sequence of stops that total the same distance. Using the latter approach makes it possible for a Medium Jet to cover multiple stops and get home at the days’ end – without buying fuel along the way.

longer trips. That is ultimately where the Medium Jet’s basic advantage comes into play. Medium Jets deliver plenty of added space and comfort over the typical Light Jet – but at costs still significantly below those of the Large Cabin segment. Indeed, Medium Jets generally can match their Large Cabin kin in terms of speed and, to a point, range - while providing reasonable office amenities that are competitive with most larger aircraft. It is little wonder that the Medium Jet segment is the biggest selling, deepest segment across the business aircraft market.

CONSIDER A MEDIUM JET IF…

Each rep o rting p o int rep resents the current retail value p ublished in the Aircraft Bluebo o k by its co rresp o nd ing calend ar year. Fo r exam p le, the Learjet 45XR values rep o rted in the Sum m er 2012 ed itio n o f Bluebo o k sho w $4.9m USD fo r a 2004 m o d el, $5.4m USD fo r a 2005 m o d el and so fo rth.

This capability to avoid refueling on a multi-leg trip is called “tankering”, and it makes the Medium Jet a more-suitable solution than a Light Jet for the operator who regularly needs to fly 2,000 nautical miles or more on a leg – or who may cover that much in a day or two flying multiple legs. While on average faster than the Light Jet average, a Medium Jet’s superior speed generally provides only a few minutes of gain on the typical Business Aviation trip of 350 to 500 miles, but the difference will be notable on legs as long as the average Light Jet’s typical maximum range. There’s no disputing the advantages of space in the comfort equation, particularly when applied to

76

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

MEDIUM JET PRICE GUIDE The fo llo w ing Med ium Jets Retail Price Guid e rep resents current values p ublished in the Aircraft Bluebo o k – Price Digest. The stud y sp ans m o d el years fro m 1993 thro ugh 2012. Values rep o rted are in USD m illio ns.

“There’s no disputing the advantages of space in the comfort equation, particularly when applied to longer trips”.

Aircraft are listed alp habetically. With the read er’s k no w led ge o f aircraft, equip m ent, range and p erfo rm ance, the fo llo w ing Guid e allo w s the read er to d eterm ine the best value range fo r co nsid eratio n. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aradian July 23/07/2012 14:59 Page 1

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2007 Hawker 850XP

2007. 1200TT. Support Plus 2008. 540TT. TAP Elite. Support Plus

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1550TT. Recent paint. Air Con. Very well equipped

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Retail Price Guide Aug12_PerfspecDecember06 24/07/2012 15:31 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

MEDIUM JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE SUMMER 2012 YEAR OF MANUFACTURE MODEL

2012 US$M

BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

24.326

21.0

20.0

17.658

16.0

CESSNA CITATION X 750

21.745

CESSNA CITATION XLS+ 560

12.714

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

2003 US$M 11.5

17.7

15.8

14.5

13.4

12.5

12.0

14.2

12.5

10.5

10.0

9.5

9.0

8.3

18.8

17.0

14.5

12.3

11.3

10.4

9.3

8.5

11.7

10.1

9.4

8.4 6.6

6.1

5.9

5.5

CESSNA CITATION V1 650 CESSNA CITATION V11 650 CESSNA CITATION SOVEREIGN 680

CESSNA CITATION XLS 560

7.4

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560 DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX

4.7 32.3

28.0

DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASY

25.2

23.0

21.0

21.0

17.5

16.0

22.0

19.5

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASY

7.8

4.3

19.5

18.5

17.0

16.5

DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX

16.0 15.0

14.0

DASSAULT FALCON 2000

13.5

13.0

12.5

12.0

11.0

DASSAULT FALCON 50EX

10.3

9.7

9.2

8.7

8.2

9.0

8.3

7.8

5.1

4.8

4.6

4.6

4.2

DASSAULT FALCON 50 GULFSTREAM G280

24.0

GULFSTREAM G200 GULFSTREAM G150

15.550

18.0

15.0

12.0

10.5

10.0

9.5

12.9

11.6

9.7

9.0

8.3

7.5

GULFSTREAM G100

5.5

GULFSTREAM/ ASTRA 1125 SPX GULFSTREAM /ASTRA 1125 SP HAWKER 4000

22.9

20.0

17.5

16.1

13.0

10.5

15.5

13.5

HAWKER 1000 HAWKER 900XP HAWKER 850XP PRO LINE

9.5

8.8

8.3

7.2

6.3

5.6

HAWKER 800XP PRO LINE

4.8

HAWKER 800XP HAWKER 800 HAWKER 750 LEARJET 60XR

13.7

11.0

9.0

7.8

6.8

11.0

9.5

8.0

7.1

LEARJET 60SE/XR

6.4

LEARJET 60SE

5.2

4.6

4.1

LEARJET 60 LEARJET 45XR

3.8 13.209

12.0

9.3

7.8

7.0

LEARJET 45 LEARJET 40XR

10.838

9.5

7.3

5.6

LEARJET 40

5.1

6.4

5.7

5.4

4.9

4.3

5.3

4.8

4.5

4.2

3.8

4.5

4.1

3.7

4.0

3.7

3.3

3.0

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


E

Retail Price Guide Aug12_PerfspecDecember06 24/07/2012 15:28 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

What your money buys today 2002 US$M

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

1993 US$M

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE MODEL BOMBARDIER CHALLENGER 300

3.7

3.3

3.2

2.9

2.7

2.0

1.9

1.8

CESSNA CITATION V1 650

2.5

2.3

2.1

CESSNA CITATION V11 650 CESSNA CITATION SOVEREIGN 680

7.4

6.9

6.6

5.9

5.5

5.0

4.6

CESSNA CITATION X 750 CESSNA CITATION XLS+ 560 CESSNA CITATION XLS 560

4.1

3.8

3.5

3.2

2.9

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560 DASSAULT FALCON 2000LX DASSAULT FALCON 2000DX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX EASY DASSAULT FALCON 2000EX

10.5

10.0

9.5

9.0

8.5

8.0

7.7

7.4

6.9

6.5

6.2

6.0

7.5

7.0

DASSAULT FALCON 2000 DASSAULT FALCON 50EX

4.2

4.1

4.0

3.8

DASSAULT FALCON 50 GULFSTREAM G280

7.4

6.8

6.4

6.2

GULFSTREAM G200 GULFSTREAM G150

4.4

GULFSTREAM G100 4.0

3.7

3.5

3.3

3.2

3.1

GULFSTREAM/ ASTRA 1125 SPX 2.550

2.450

2.350

GULFSTREAM/ ASTRA 1125 SP HAWKER 4000

3.5

3.4

3.3

3.2

HAWKER 1000 HAWKER 900XP HAWKER 850XP PRO LINE HAWKER 800XP PRO LINE

3.6

3.4

3.2

3.1

3.0

2.9

2.8

2.5 2.4

HAWKER 800XP 2.3

2.2

HAWKER 800 HAWKER 750 LEARJET 60XR LEARJET 60SE/XR LEARJET 60SE

3.6

3.4

3.2

3.1

2.9

3.4

3.2

3.1

3.0

2.9

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.4

2.3

LEARJET 60 LEARJET 45XR LEARJET 45 LEARJET 40XR LEARJET 40

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

79


JMesingerAugust12_JMesingerNov06 24/07/2012 15:57 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

Leadership In A Transaction ver the course of my career it seems that in any given year probably 95% of the transactions I am involved with include representation on both the buying and the selling side. This is a good thing. The leadership that is employed by both sides keeps deals on track and facilitates the process from start to finish. I was recently reminded how pivotal this representation is for the health and wellbeing of both sides of a successful experience courtesy of a transaction where the buying side did not employ the services of a broker. The rationale escaped me, but the consequences did not. While it is not impossible for deals to get done without the help of a broker, it is certainly true that without the aid of a professional, they get done with less manufactured tension and the chance that a deal won’t get done, or gets done for the wrong reasons reduces drastically. Let me explain. Typically, when one side or the other does not feel the need for hiring a professional, it is for one of a few reasons. One may be a bad experience in the past with a broker. I get the fact that not all brokers deliver the same experience, after all this is a people business. But I must say that in many outcomes that are not as initially hoped for, the ingredients for the eventual outcome were clearer than one might like to admit from the inception of the relationship. One should not forget that the mandate to find the cheapest broker may flag up warnings when they do not have the experience or capability to complete the job as required. Another mistake when buying is the perception that there is so much available inventory all you need to do is let the market know you are looking, thus nullifying the need to pay someone to find an aircraft. In better-selling markets, the reverse is true and a seller may think they need only let the world know they have an airplane for sale one morning and it will be sold by the afternoon. None of these examples are good enough reasons to decide to go it alone. There is an industry full of wonderful hard-working and capable brokers, even in an environment rich with supply. If you are out there alone, how can you possibly differentiate between the

O

80

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

good ones and the bad ones? Or when the supply is lean, how do you know you aren’t leaving something on the table when accepting an offer to sell? The transactions we are involved in affect the bottom line of our clients in a very positive way, including the cost of our services. Most people who employ a broker to facilitate their transaction would have the same positive feelings about the outcome. Let us look at the myriad areas in which the broker will bring value. First and foremost is leadership. Without the broker, who will take on that task and really be available when needed? In the very few cases where the role is not filled professionally it may be filled by an internal attorney or a flight department

Most people who employ a broker to facilitate their transaction would have the same positive feelings about the outcome. manager. They may be highly talented at what they do, but buying and selling aircraft is a skillset of its own. In this case of the transaction I mentioned above, I had the privilege to work with the flight department’s Director of Maintenance. The only problem for him and the deal is that he was still trying to do his day job while simultaneously trying to communicate all the needed input to make the deal happen! The other critical element in a transaction is the aviation attorney. In this same transaction the aviation attorney was very capable, but not necessarily so at carrying out the role of a ‘team leader’. The deal did get done in the end, but not without milestones and deadlines continually needing to be extended and raised, and with much more bravado than if the leader was www.AvBuyer.com

just watching the timelines and anticipating the need for decisions or signatures. It seemed that at every event was a mini crisis. If there had been a designated leader whose job it was to have read and understood the contract, and charted the timelines then no one would have been troubled at 5pm the afternoon the signature was needed to get the deal done (with only minutes to spare). Ultimately, when the other side is making all of the noise, it can seem like that side is the one pushing and pushing. If the contract allows for there to be an implied outcome of rejection if no acceptance is made in the time allotted, then the selling side has no idea if the silence emanating from your team is a rejection, or simply that no one realizes the immediate need of acceptance. This misjudgment can have horrible consequences. The bottom line is that you should take time to get to know the broker community in advance of your need for them. Get to appreciate their value, and then employ a leader when the transaction is upon you. Next time a broker calls to introduce themselves to you by way of a cold call, it is worth taking a few minutes to speak with them. After all, you may very well be talking to your next team leader. ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He served on the Duncan Aviation Customer Advisory Board for two terms and is now on the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. More information visit www.jetsales.com Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


A I R C R A F T SA L E S & ACQ U I S I T I O N S Duncan Aviation has been assisting companies around the world with the sales and acquisition of aircraft for over 50 years.

2008 Falcon 7X

s /n 0 3 3

620 Total Time. 240 Landings. ESP Gold. 13 Passenger Interior.

1996 Challenger 604

s/n 5307

7,500 Total Time. 3,400 Landings. Excellent Paint and Interior by Duncan Aviation.

1984 Falcon 50

s/n 146

9,560 Total Time. Dash 3D. MSP. 9 Passenger. 2011 Paint by Duncan Aviation.

1996 Astra SPX

s/n 85

4,600 Total Time. 2,900 Landings. (2) UNS-1C+ FMS. Eight Passenger Interior.

2004 Citation X

s /n 2 3 6

2,500 Total Time. Engines on Corporate Care.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 145

9,225 Total Time. MSP. 3D Engines. Collins EFIS 86. Dual UNS-1K.

1992 Learjet 31A

s/n 051

Low Total Time. Bendix 5-Tube EFIS. MSP. Universal UNS-1LW. NDH.

1999 Citation Jet

s/n 525-0302

3,900 Total Time. Tap Elite. One U.S. Owner Since New.

402.475.2611 路 www.DuncanAviation.aero/aircraftsales 路 800.228.4277 World Aircraft Sales Ad 7_18_12.indd 1

7/12/2012 2:35:37 PM


ACSpecs IntroAug12_AC Specs Intronov06 24/07/2012 15:40 Page 1

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: LIGHT JETS

SEPTEMBER ISSUE: Turboprops OCTOBER ISSUE: Ultra Long Range & Large Cabin NOVEMBER ISSUE: Large Jets DECEMBER ISSUE: Medium Jets

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Description of Cost Elements he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Light Jets – appears overleaf, to be followed by Turboprops next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only, but Conklin & de Decker provides details of older airplanes too. If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know.

T

❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

82

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs. VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door. BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.). CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.). WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight. SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alter-

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nate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For single-engine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing distance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL, INC. PHONE: +1 (561) 433-3510 | www.caijets.com

2008 GULFSTREAM G150

1981 KING AIR F90

This Gulfstream G150 has only 299 Hrs TTSN. Offers a Wide Cabin with Maximum Range of 2,950 nm with 4 Passengers, 2 Crew, NBAA IFR Reserves at 430 KTAS (Mach .75) or Normal Cruise of 459 KTAS (Mach .80). Universal 7 Passenger Interior.

S/N LA-121 6,893 Total Time Since New, 3404/3404 SMOH, 231/231 SHS by Pratt & Whitney, 428/428 SPOH, EFIS-50, Dual Raisbeck Lower Aft Body Strakes, Frakes Exhaust Stacks, and No Damage History. Owner Motivated!!!

2006 TBM 850

2002 TBM 700B

S/N 351

Only 695 Hours TTSN. Equipped with RVSM, 2-Tube Bendix EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s with WAAS, Garmin GMX-200 MFD with Chartview, TAS/TAWS, WX-500, Garmin GDL-69A Real Time Weather, and Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 Transponders.

2001 TBM 700B

PRESIDENT, CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL

jp@caijets.com PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

1,705 Hours TTSN. Equipped with 2-Tube Bendix EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s with WAAS, Garmin GMX-200 MFD with Chartview, Skywatch HP, Garmin GDL-69 Real Time Weather, and No Damage History. Aircraft located in Europe.

1991 TBM 700A

S/N 200 1,595 TTSN, 718 SHS, 405 SPOH, Honeywell/Garmin Avionics incl. 2-Tube EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s, KGP-560 EGPWS, Sandel SN 3308 EHSI, WX-1000E Stormscope, Annual and 10-Year Inspection c/w January 2012 and NDH.

CONTACT J.P. HANLEY

S/N 239

S/N 003 Only Two Owners and 3430 hours Total Time Since New, 350 Hours SMOH, Garmin 530/430, Sandel EHSI, Gear on Long Life Program, NEW Windshields and De-ice Boots Fitted March 2012, Gear Actuators Overhauled March 2012, Located in Belgium, always Hangared, and No Damage History.

LIST YOUR AIRCRAFT WITH CAI CALL US FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PROVEN SUCCESS RECORD.

PHONE: +1(561) 433-3510

www.caijets.com


AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

BO MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T3 BO 1A MB AR DIE RL EA RJE T3 BO 1A MB /ER AR DIE RL EA RJE T3 CE 5A SSN AC ITA TIO NB RA VO CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J1 CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J1+ CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J2 CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J2+ CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J3

AircraftPer&SpecAug12_PerfspecDecember06 24/07/2012 14:23 Page 1

LIGHT JETS $2,346.54

$2,347.07

$2,709.11

$1,782.74

$1,461.18

$1,490.63

$1,546.22

$1,650.20

$1,755.44

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.35

4.35

4.3

4.7

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.75

4.75

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.95

4.95

4.9

4.8

4.83

4.83

4.83

4.83

4.83

CABIN LENGTH FT.

12.9

12.9

12.9

15.75

11

11

13.58

13.58

15.67

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

271

261

268

278

198

198

248

248

283

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.16

3.75

4.16

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

DOOR WIDTH FT.

3

3

3

2

2

2

2

2

2

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

40

30

40

28

8

-

4

-

-

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

46

51

45

70

65

65

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

6

6

6

7

5

5

6

6

6

MTOW LBS

17200

17700

18300

14800

10600

10700

12375

12500

13870

MLW LBS

16000

16000

15300

13500

9800

9900

11500

11525

12750

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

11203

11247

10310

9375

7050

7035

7900

8000

8585

USEABLE FUEL LBS

4124

4653

6198

4824

3220

3220

3932

3930

4710

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1873

2000

1992

801

430

545

668

695

775

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2297

2253

3190

1925

1350

1365

1400

1700

1925

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1211

1480

1930

1290

775

895

1075

1192

1374

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1337

1600

2125

1720

1161

1245

1530

1626

1891

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3800

3800

6300

4160

4220

3990

3820

3810

3440

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4200

4200

4333

4295

4407

4135

4628

4702

4203

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

5110

4890

4340

3190

3230

3290

3870

4120

4478

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1610

1515

1280

845

850

906

1160

1004

1090

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

462

462

470

405

381

389

413

413

417

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

441

441

436

405

381

389

413

413

417

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

417

417

424

335

307

307

344

351

348

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TFE 731-2

TFE 731-2

TFE 731-2

PW530A

FJ44-1A

FJ44-1AP

FJ44-2C

FJ44-3A-24

FJ44-3A

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

84

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Rolls Royce October 23/07/2012 15:02 Page 1

A clear reflection of value with CorporateCare®

Delivering the highest quality engine care and service is our

values, so while you are enjoying peace of mind today, you are also

business, and has made CorporateCare® the world leader of business

investing in tomorrow. For more on CorporateCare, contact Steve

jet engine maintenance programs. A fact recognised in more than

Friedrich, Vice President – Sales & Marketing, at +1 (703) 834-1700,

just words. Aircraft enrolled in CorporateCare have higher asset

corporate.care@rolls-royce.com.

www.rolls-royce.com

Trusted to deliver excellence


AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

CE SSN AC ITA TIO NC J4 CE SSN AC ITA TIO NE NC CE OR SSN E AC ITA TIO NE NC CE OR SSN E+ AC ITA TIO NI I/II SP CE SSN AC ITA TIO NJ ET CE SSN AC ITA TIO NS /II CE SSN AC ITA TIO NU LTR CE A SSN AC ITA TIO NV CLI FFO RD FJ4 4C IT I I5 50

AircraftPer&SpecAug12_PerfspecDecember06 24/07/2012 14:25 Page 2

LIGHT JETS $1,999.25

$2,121.60

$2,082.01

$2,120.06

$1,547.74

$2,280.68

$2,333.24

$2,310.23

$1,852.35

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.8

4.75

4.75

4.7

4.8

4.7

4.8

4.8

4.7

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.8

4.83

4.83

4.8

4.83

4.8

4.83

4.83

4.8

CABIN LENGTH FT.

17.3

17.33

17.33

15.75

11

15.75

17.33

17.33

15.75

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

311

307

307

263

186

263

292

292

263

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

6

28

28

36

4

36

26

26

36

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

71

43

43

41

51

41

41

41

41

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

7

7

7

7

5

7

7

7

7

MTOW LBS

16950

16630

16830

14100

10400

15100

16300

15900

14100

MLW LBS

15500

15200

15200

13500

9700

14000

15200

15200

13500

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

10242

10525

10460

8650

6950

9000

9950

9400

8650

USEABLE FUEL LBS

5828

5400

5400

4970

3220

5603

5771

5770

4970

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1000

905

1170

680

330

697

779

930

580

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2118

2075

2390

2350

1450

2200

2250

1800

2350

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1802

1410

1494

1220

750

1430

1259

1220

1622

MAX. RANGE N.M.

2142

1736

1792

1520

1130

1840

1651

1644

2480

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3430

3920

3920

4580

4010

4150

3510

3740

4580

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3957

4195

4182

3583

4333

4500

3833

3750

3583

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3945

4740

4620

3130

3311

3000

4230

3684

-

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1270

1440

1400

930

868

906

728

1139

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

454

430

430

355

377

386

400

397

415

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

454

430

430

355

364

386

400

397

400

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

373

372

372

321

302

312

372

350

370

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

FJ44-4A

PW535A

PW535B

JT15D-4

FJ44-1A

JT15D-4B

JT15D-5D

JT15D-5A

FJ44-3A

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

86

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Kaiser Air August 23/07/2012 15:03 Page 1

1989 GULFSTREAM GIV N619A (S/N 1123) Make offer

AVIONICS

STATUS AS OF MAY 24, 2012 Registered Operator: KaiserAir, Inc. Aircraft Home Base: Oakland Intâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Airport (KOAK) Tail Number: N619A Serial Number: 1123 Total Time on Aircraft: 8,544 Hours Total Cycles: 6,221 Landings Date of Manufacture: 1989 Maintained on MSG-3 Schedule

ROLLS-ROYCE TAY ENGINES 611-SER Total Time Total Cycles Overhaul Completed 10 Year Due Total Time Since Overhaul

Left 8267 hours 6119 May 2008 May 2018 212.4 hours

Right 8450 hours 6193 Dec. 2007 Dec. 2017 479.7 hours

INTERIOR Newly Remodeled 2006: Beige interior with European Beach Wood with Gold Trim

EXTERIOR Newly painted 2006: Basic White with Blue Stripes

Contact: Sandy Waters. E-mail: sandy@kaiserair.com Tel: +1 510 553-8437. Fax: +1 510.635.3173 P.O. BOX 2626, Airport Station, Oakland, CA, 94614 www.kaiserair.com

Honeywell FZ-820 Flight Director 3 Collins VHF-422C VHF Comms Dual Collins VIR-432 Navs Dual Collins ADF-462 ADF Dual Collins TDR-94D Transponders Dual HF Comm Motorola Selcal Three Honeywell NZ-2000 Two Honeywell FMS CDU Model 820 Honeywell FMS Data Loader 950 Dual Honeywell Radio Altimeter Heads-Up Display HUD 2020 Dual Honeywell 12 Channel GPS Iridium SAT Phone (Wireless Handset Cabin and Cockpit) ICS 200 Dual Collins DME-442 Allied Signal EGPWS Honeywell SATCOM MCS 3000 Fairchild A 100 CVR Honeywell TCAS w/Change 7 Honeywell Cabin Management System CMS Three Honeywell IRU Laserefs Honeywell GP-820 Autopilot Honeywell 880 Radar RVSM Certified Honeywell ISDU Flight Data Recorder

MISCELLANEOUS 16 Pax Custom Executive Interior. Forward Galley. Fwd Cabin Conference Table. Mid Cabin Divan and Two Chairs Aft Cabin. Forward and AFT Lavatory. Airshow w/Color Monitor. Full Entertainment Center. Apple Mini Mac Computer w/Wireless Mouse & Keyboard. Dual Coffee Makers. Toaster. High Temp Oven. Microwave. Apple iPod. Dual Honeywell DVD Players. Single Honeywell CD Player Specifications subject to verification upon inspection. Subject to prior sale or removal from the market without notice.


FJ4 4C ITA TIO EM NS BR II S AE 55 RP 0 HE NO M 30 EM 0 IVE ST AE RO SPA CE HA SJ3 WK 0 ER BEE CH CR AF TB HA EEC WK HJE ER T4 BEE 00 CH A CR AF TH HA WK AW ER KE R4 BEE 00 CH XP CR AF TH HA AW WK KE ER R4 00 BE XPR EC HC RA FT HA PR WK EM ER IER BE I EC HC RA FT NE PR XTA EM NT IER 40 IA 0X T

AircraftPer&SpecAug12_PerfspecDecember06 24/07/2012 14:28 Page 3

CLI FFO RD

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

LIGHT JETS $1,953.07

$1,745.42

$1,648.00

$2,344.93

$2,220.53

$1,845.33

$1,673.54

$1,649.86

$1,775.63

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.7

4.92

4.3

4.8

4.8

4.8

5.4

5.4

4.8

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.8

5.08

4.7

4.9

4.9

4.9

5.5

5.5

4.9

CABIN LENGTH FT.

15.75

17.17

12.5

15.6

15.6

15.6

13.6

13.6

15.6

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

263

325

191

305

305

305

315

315

305

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.25

4.86

3.9

4.16

4.2

4.2

4.16

4.167

4.2

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2.38

2.6

2.41

2.4

2.4

2.125

2.125

2.4

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

36

11

-

31

31

31

23

23

31

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

41

74

53

25

25

25

55

55

25

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

7

7

5

7

8

7

6

6

7

MTOW LBS

15100

17968

13950

16100

16300

16300

12500

12500

16300

MLW LBS

14400

16865

12725

15700

15700

15700

11600

11600

15700

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

8950

11783

9000

10915

10985

10900

8565

8600

10531

USEABLE FUEL LBS

5800

5353

4850

4912

4912

4912

3611

3670

4912

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

550

942

200

473

603

688

414

320

1057

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2250

2216

1500

2085

2015

2100

1435

1400

2469

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1974

1692

1786

1180

1180

1344

850

850

1852

MAX. RANGE N.M.

2225

1937

2338

1519

1519

1951

1340

1340

2108

-

3474

6117

4600

4600

4180

4650

4650

4600

4500

3741

4583

5083

5025

4045

5208

5208

4045

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

-

4050

3663

4020

4020

5000

4000

4000

5000

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

-

1026

793

560

560

620

948

948

995

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

415

453

476

458

450

450

461

454

471

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

415

453

460

449

450

450

426

426

460

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

383

383

447

410

410

425

370

370

405

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

FJ44-3A

PW535E

FJ44-2A

JT15D-5

JT15D-5R

FJ44-4A-32

FJ44-2A

FJ44-2A

FJ44-3AP

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT. LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

88

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


PremiAir August 23/07/2012 15:04 Page 1

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1996 AS355N, TTAF 3000

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2001 AS355N, TTAF 635

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1992 Bell 206L3 s/n 51562, TTAF 10,861

Aircraft specification is subject to verification by Buyer at inspection. Aircraft offered subject to availability.

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AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

SIE RR AI ND US TRI ES FJ4 4E SIE AG RR LE AI II 5 ND 01S US TRI P ES FJ4 4S SIE TAL RR LIO AI N5 ND 01S US P TRI ES FJ4 4S SIE UP RR AI ER ND II 5 US 50 TRI ES FJ4 4S CE UP SSN ER SII AC S55 ITA 0 TIO NM US TA NG EC LIP SE AE RO SPA CE EC LIP EM SE BR 50 AE 0 RP HE NO M 10 0 HO ND AJE T

AircraftPer&SpecAug12_PerfspecDecember06 24/07/2012 14:30 Page 4

LIGHT JETS

VLJ JETS

$1,806.77

$1,806.77

$1,873.08

$1,945.42

$1,033.00

$871.82

$1,153.33

$1,166.87

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.3

4.3

4.7

4.7

4.5

4.16

4.92

4.94

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.9

4.9

4.8

4.8

4.58

4.66

5.08

5

CABIN LENGTH FT.

12.7

12.7

15.75

15.75

9.8

7.6

11

12

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

205

205

263

263

144

160

208

-

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.25

4.25

4.25

4.25

3.8

3.9

4.86

-

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2

2

2

2

1.96

2.04

-

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

40

40

36

36

6

16

11

-

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

17

17

41

41

57

-

60

66

CREW #

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

5

5

7

7

4

3

5

5

MTOW LBS

12500

12500

14100

14400

8645

6000

10472

9963

MLW LBS

11350

11350

13500

13500

8000

5600

9766

-

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

7400

7400

8650

9000

5550

3834

7132

-

USEABLE FUEL LBS

4580

3780

4970

5603

2580

1698

2804

-

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

910

1670

580

697

600

502

580

-

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2750

2750

2350

2200

1200

1088

1312

-

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1650

1230

1662

1800

716

574

926

1035

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1800

1400

2480

2300

1068

964

1124

1304

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3600

3600

4580

4580

3380

-

4376

-

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3500

3500

3583

4500

3683

5015

4122

-

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

4000

4000

4500

4300

3010

2665

3061

3990

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

1500

1500

1780

1640

870

826

852

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

395

350

415

415

340

-

390

420

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

365

385

400

415

340

370

390

420

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

345

350

365

375

319

-

333

-

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

FJ44-2A

FJ44-2A

FJ44-3A

FJ44-3A

PW615F

PW610F-A

PW617F-E

HF120

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

I

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

90

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jet Black August 24/07/2012 12:46 Page 1

1994 Cessna Citation Ultra

1999 Cessna Citation Ultra

4,512 T/T, 935/935 SMOH, New Paint (2012), Primus 1000 w/ 3-Tube EFIS, TCAS-ll w/ Change 7, RVSM Compliant, CESCOM, Make Offer, Trades Welcome

7,226 T/T, 2,242 SMOH, Primus 1000 3-Tube EFIS, Fresh Phase l-V Completed in 01/2012, Mark Vll EGPWS

Toll Free 866.983.9009 | Local 941.201.1211 info@jetblackaviation.com www.jetblackaviation.com LOS ANGELES | SARASOTA


Teal Briefing_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 08:43 Page 1

TEAL BRIEFING

Dear Fellow Three-Martini Play-Date Enthusiasts... t’s my policy to not endorse products in this letter, but recently I was enjoying some Plymouth gin with a friend, and he told me that this successful brand was actually brought back from the dead a few years ago. Some investors had bought it, revived it, marketed it, and created a success. Apparently, this is common in the consumer product biz. Brands that still have brand equity (and therefore potential value), but are dormant or near death, are called ghost brands. Examples include Brim coffee, Eagle Snacks, and something called Nuprin. You may have thought these products had died, and they may indeed have, but they and others have been put back on the market, sometimes successfully. This got me thinking about ghost brands in the aviation world - a timely discussion because in April, Eclipse Aerospace announced that it had received an FAA production certificate that would let it resume production of its Eclipse 500 VLJ (as the

I

92

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

Eclipse 550). I was rather hoping to spend the rest of my life never discussing Eclipse again, but there is now the intriguing prospect that they become aviation’s first successfully revived ghost brand, more on that later. My key finding is that aviation has no ghost brands. In fact, it’s death on brand revivals. I recently got a letter from“200 Kelsey Associates LLC” claiming ownership of the Air Afrique, BOAC, Pan Am, and People Express trademarks and offering a commission to anyone finding a buyer. If there’s a brand that might have had some residual brand equity, it was Pan Am. It has been revived as a name five times, in a series of increasingly pathetic airline ventures, and its name has also been used for some naugahyde bags and a short-lived retro-nostalgic TV series. Braniff, another airline that might have had some luck under the brand electro-fibrillator, has seen three failed re-boot efforts. Airlines don’t get revived because, to put it gently, most airlines suck. They don’t have www.AvBuyer.com

much brand equity, or consumer goodwill of any kind, to revive. Good airlines, such as Southwest don’t die in the first place, so they don’t need to be revived. But what about aircraft manufacturers? The story is equally grim: exactly zero successes. McDonnell, Douglas, Convair, and Republic, for example, are brands that you’d think would have had value for someone, yet remain stubbornly dead, at least in the aircraft industry. A survey of the aircraft business graveyard yields some quirky corollaries: 1. Reviving aircraft is possible; just don’t revive a dead brand for them. Whether it’s the C-5B or the G.222 (now C-27J) or the many reinventions of the Rockwell Jet Commander (now Gulfstream G150), many aircraft programs have been brought back, with names changed to protect innocent and guilty alike. Most recently, Viking has re-birthed the old De Havilland Twin Otter, and RUAG has re-launched the Dornier 228. Of course, re-branding Aircraft Index see Page 4


Teal Briefing_FinanceSept 24/07/2012 08:49 Page 2

Not just a tug.

It’s a

8700 Series

.

800-535-8767 / 503-861-2288 w w w. l e k t r o. co m / s a l e s @ l e k t r o. co m

doesn’t necessarily help; the SinoSwearingen SJ30 has been given more allnew brand names than I can recall, but after 25 years of trying, it’s clear that the crypt will stay shut. 2. Don’t revive a dead brand for an existing product. Raytheon/Hawker Beechcraft’s Premier 1 did well enough. Then they renamed it the Hawker 200. That grand old brand, along with a horrendous market downturn, killed it. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, BAe made a go of the 146 100-seat quad jet, but then it revived the old Avro name. The product keeled over and died. It would have anyway, but planes can die for more than one reason. Remember, too when BAe applied the old Jetstream name to the ATP regional prop? Instant death. 3. Double the ghost name, double the pain. Fairchild Dornier and Hawker Beechcraft were both new companies (the latter with existing products) that decided to revive not one but two dormant/dead brands. FD suffered arguably the worst implosion of any start up yet. HB lost billions of dollars in the downturn, finally declaring bankruptcy in May, with the loss of some, or all, of its jet product line. Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman weren’t reviving old brands; they were merely merging businesses to help everyone Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

survive. But when Boeing merged with McDonnell Douglas they had the good sense to not append those names to their own (although they did keep some of the top management, which was just as bad). 4. The effect shows up through the supply chain, too. At the component level, no one is reviving the Coltec or Garrett brand names, despite possible appeal to some old timers. Also, there are two big aero structures companies in the US, both carved out of larger entities. One adopted an all-new moniker, Spirit, and did very well. Another revived a dead airframer name, Vought. They did poorly. Once again, there’s no proof that adopting a legacy name hurt them. But looking at all the evidence above, I’d be careful about standing too close to any revived brand legacy chalets at air shows. They tend to self-destruct. Back to Eclipse - this aircraft has its fans, and the new company’s goals sound extremely reasonable, particularly compared with the Ponzi-like numbers offered with the original program. Let bygones be bygones, especially since the company is no longer managed by Vern Raburn (unfortunately for the new owners, “No longer managed by Vern Raburn!” is not a useful marketing slogan, no matter how accurate and appealing it may www.AvBuyer.com

sound). I’m also prepared to look past the market problem. The bottom end jet market is still scraping along the bottom, but it will be back one day. However, there’s a bigger problem on the production side. United Technologies, which builds the vast majority of the Eclipse (engine and airframe) has signaled that it won’t invest more than the $25 million-or-so they’ve already kicked in. So, who will fund this revival? Who will convince all the other suppliers, burned when the company flamed out in the ‘2000s, to invest in resuming production? But most of all, to recap, if Eclipse resumes production, it will be the first revival of a dead brand in the aviation biz (let me know if you can think of another). The aircraft industry has high barriers to entry, low barriers to exit, and seemingly impossible barriers to re-entry. Therefore, we aren’t updating our Eclipse report with a forecast, but I can’t exclude the prospect of having to add one, either.

U Richard Aboulafia can be contacted on (703) 385-1992 ext. 103 (office); raboulafia@tealgroup.com ■ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

93


JetNet August 23/07/2012 16:54 Page 1

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Plane Sense Cover Aug12_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 11:03 Page 1

Plane Sense on Refurbishments UPGRADES RETROFITS REFURBISHMENTS MRO BUSINESS AIRCRAFT World Aircraft Sales/AvBuyer For advertising contact: ks@avbuyer.com

August 2012


Plane Sense August_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 11:56 Page 1

Plane Sense on Refurbishments

96

It’s In The Detail: How to plan a major ‘facelift’ for your aircraft.

102

Refurbishment FAQs: ‘Is it done yet? ‘ and other frequent questions.

110

Surprises that Impact your Refurb Budget.

It’s In The Detail... How to plan a major ‘facelift’ for your aircraft. by Janet Beazley

96

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

P

lanning and managing a major aircraft refurbishment can be an overwhelming chore that can closely parallel the building of a new house. According to Consumer Build, an independent New Zealand organization that provides information to consumers planning a home construction project, there are 10 steps in the process of planning the building of a house. By applying these same steps to the aviation industry, we can get a good idea of how to approach planning major aircraft refurbishment work. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense August_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 11:58 Page 2

STEP 1: DETERMINE THE PROJECT’S SCOPE

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

• •

Are there needs to be met for compliance mandates? Is the aircraft operated as Part 91 or Part 135? www.AvBuyer.com

• • • •

Are there special programs for tracking, maintenance, engines and parts? Do warranty programs apply? Are there service bulletins (SBs) that need to be accomplished? Are there airworthiness directives (ADs) that need to be cleared?

Once these questions are addressed, the operator will want to speak with potential service facilities and personnel because it is very important that they be brought aboard early on for the project for the best results. Mary Lee, Senior Interior Designer with WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

97

In the business aircraft industry today, more and more operators are choosing to refurbish their current aircraft over purchasing a different one. This work is typically completed when the aircraft has a major maintenance event due because downtime and access time can be drastically reduced by combining these events into one. First, the operator will need to identify all upcoming required maintenance items. The operator’s tracking program can assist with this. The operator will also need to consider

time. Most maintenance events are performed on an hourly, monthly or annual basis, which determines the dates needed for aircraft input into a maintenance facility. In addition to setting the input timeline, the operator needs to decide what other work will be done, looking at the potential of new paint, interior updating and avionics upgrades. They will also need to consider:


Plane Sense August_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 11:59 Page 3

Duncan Aviation’s Lincoln, Nebraska, location explains, “Our involvement occurs very early, when the project is in the sales phase. We need to assist in finding solutions for a customer in a timely fashion. The customer may need illustrations, a floor plan, cabinet drawings, material specifications, visual aids and color boards to present to their Principals.” Lee adds that the extent of the project, the materials used and the design are all important planning aspects that often take place before an operator chooses their completions facility. The considerations include things like whether the interior will be re-configured, if the operator wants to include new lighting, new entertainment, or a new soundproofing package, and more. Pre-planning for a large refurbishment often starts as much as a year or more in advance, depending on the project’s scope. Certification can play an important role in the pre-planning time necessary. “It is important to know if, and how the existing interior is certified,” Lee notes. “This will help tremendously in certifying any new modifications that may be done.”

STEP 2: ORGANIZE FINANCES Organization of finances is an obvious and very important step for operators. Once the operator has determined the scope of the project, the next step is to get quotes from different maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) facilities. During this process, the operator should share budget requirements with the MRO, as they can work together to meet needs, schedules and budgets.

During the process, the operator will need to match all of their requirements with the many different capabilities of the MRO. MROs have varied capabilities, dictating that there may only be a few that will match all of the operator’s needs. If this area is new territory, a visit to some different facilities may be in order. A site visit will give the customer the opportunity to see the facilities first-hand, to visit with people from different areas of the company, and to make assessments based on what they have seen rather than what they are told. Some questions to consider during this phase include:

• • • • • •

What are the needs surrounding the project? Is engineering needed? What are the structural needs? Does the MRO have all of the tooling required? What are the certification needs? Can the MRO support all of those needs?

When discussing these needs, the operator should include a detailed work-scope along with photographs, if possible. It may be necessary for MRO representatives to visit the operator’s facility to gain access to the aircraft and ensure that in preparing their quote, they are as accurate as possible. Besides looking at capabilities and requirements needed for the project at hand, an operator will want to consider valueadded services, or intangibles, in their comparisons including a wide variety of items from insurance to hazardous waste disposal. [To help in your facilities comparison, Duncan Aviation has an MRO comparison worksheet that might be useful at http://www.duncanaviation.aero/fieldguides/ promotions/200911mro_comparison_worksheet.php].

STEPS 3, 4 & 5: THE DESIGNER, PROJECT MANAGER & OTHER TRADES PEOPLE

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

The next three steps can be combined for our purposes. As alluded to in Step 2, the key step in a large aircraft refurbishment project is choosing the maintenance facility that will complete the work to the standard you expect. As Mary Lee stated, planning is absolutely essential for major projects and it starts well in advance of aircraft input. Besides determining just what will be done, the shop

Aircraft Index see Page 4


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World Aircraft Sales August 2012_03.indd 1

7/16/12 10:59 AM


© DUNCAN AVIATION

Plane Sense August_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 12:01 Page 4

ALL PHOTOS IN THIS ARTICLE

will need to plan project-flow and set periodic deadlines to keep the project on time. Look to be assigned a Project Manager who will play a key role in managing the planning and day-to-day progress on major projects. Once the MRO is chosen for the project, it should turn the project over to a project manager, who is the one point of contact going forward for the customer. Managing complex projects is where the project managers really shine. Their goals should be to meet the customers’ expectations, to meet interim project milestones and, ultimately, to meet - or better - the promised delivery date of the aircraft.

STEP 6: ORGANIZE CONTRACT The organization of such a large undertaking is a culmination of effort from many parties and disciplines. It takes organizational skills from a management perspective. On a large refurbishment project, there will be a lot of things happening at one time, and a schedule needs to be set and adhered to. The reality is that adjustments will need to be made to the schedule, and as a team you can meet and discuss these to find solutions and alternatives that keep the project on track. A firm grasp of the overall project is required, because in maintenance you never know what may come up or what could be uncovered.

STEP 7: GET BUILDING & RESOURCE CONSENTS (PERMITS) When considering a major aircraft refurbishment project, an operator needs to determine any interior or avionics modifications that will be done, or any major changes that will be made. In an industry as regulated as aviation, this will include discussion about the

approval path for those changes. These can sometimes be complex, but are typically resolved and a solution found. When a Supplemental Type Certificate is required, however, facilities that have Operational Delegated Authority (ODA) with MRA and STC approvals will be helpful. These delegations have allowed the industry more autonomy and efficiency.

STEP 8: BEGIN CONSTRUCTION After all the planning, the day of input finally arrives and “construction” on the project begins. The first few days will be busy and the operator will meet many people. Team members should be encouraged to get to know their customers, and for customers to develop relationships with the team members - not just their project manager. Customers may choose to be an integral part of the project and be on site at the facility during a major event. Doing so allows them to see the progress and maybe see parts of their aircraft that they will not see while

doing daily maintenance or smaller inspections at their own facility. It also can be good to have the customer there to enable them to make decisions and approve work when needed.

STEP 9: FINAL INSPECTION & CODE COMPLIANCE It may seem that on a large project there will never be an end in sight, yet there always comes a point when you can really see things start to come together. It’s exciting to see the new product, from the new woodwork, plating, carpet and seats to a new paint scheme. It’s also reassuring to know what lies beneath all of that is safe and airworthy because you have chosen a facility with a great reputation, and that really knows your aircraft and is confident in their ability to put out a very safe product. Inspections will assure that all supporting data and documentation is prepared and available for the customer.

STEP 10: LOOSE-ENDS & FOLLOW-UP The last step for a large project is to follow up. Feedback - good or bad - is important to all parties; MRO facilities all need to know how we did, otherwise improvements will be difficult to make, and most facilities want to continue to improve! Janet Beazley began her career in aviation with the US Air Force 30 years ago before moving into civilian aviation. She linked up with Duncan Aviation in 1988 as a wiring technician, progressing to team leader and then assistant manager of the installations shop. Today Janet is Project Manager at Duncan Aviation – a post she has held for four years. She can be contacted at email: janet@DuncanAviation.com, Tel: +1 402 479 8125, More from www.duncanaviation.com ■

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Painted by Duncan Aviation. Enough said.

Looking through the descriptive ads of pre-owned aircraft for sale, you can see the implied value of an aircraft painted by Duncan Aviation. The ads proudly list “Painted by Duncan Aviation” as a selling point. The industry knows that a Duncan Aviation paint job means high quality and a long-lasting finish. Even in areas we are already well-known, like paint, Duncan Aviation continues to innovate and grow. Early last year, Duncan Aviation began using a chrome-free paint process. This process is safer and better for the environment, the painters and the airplane, and the company was one of the first in the industry to make the switch. Late last year, Duncan Aviation began offering customers the option to work with three-dimensional renderings while collaborating with Duncan Design on their aircraft exterior paint schemes. This design tool helps clients better visualize how a design will wrap around an aircraft before a paint scheme is actually applied. And this spring, Duncan Aviation added a new 45,000-square-foot paint facility at its Lincoln location. The new facility has the latest down-draft air flow technology, including automatic monitoring and alarms to provide the best paint environment possible for some of the largest business aircraft in use today, including Gulfstream’s 650, Bombardier’s Global Express, Dassault’s Falcon 7X and Embraer’s Legacy. As always, Duncan Aviation looks for inventive and inspiring ways to provide customers with their perfect aircraft, from exterior paint to interior refurbishment and modifications. Find out for yourself the quality a Duncan Aviation project can provide.

800.228.4277 • www.DuncanAviation.aero/paint • 800.525.2376

Planesense Cabin Avionics Ad 7_18_12.indd 1

7/12/2012 10:56:02 AM


Plane Sense 3 Aug_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 12:10 Page 1

Plane Sense on Refurbishments

Refurbishment FAQs: “Is it done yet ? “ and other frequent questions. by Dave Higdon

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

on the answers to still other questions! In the real world single questions rarely draw one single, overarching answer. Exterior work, painting and windows, body work, the interior, powerplants, avionics, and cabin systems – all bring their own set of considerations and questions. With this in mind, we offer as a starting point some of the FAQs gleaned from the top minds in refurb shops, ranging from paint and interior to engines and avionics - a collection of all-encompassing shops, and an array of specialty operations – with the hope Aircraft Index see Page 4

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hops across the country continue to stay busy through the wonders of the aircraft refurbishment business, working with owners to decide what, if anything, to do with the existing jet. Making the decision to refurbish a company airplane, regardless of size, brings with it the need to weigh other issues up while outlining the project. A host of questions need answers – and with so many decisions intertwined, it’s no wonder that operators often find themselves swamped with questions – questions to which the answers often depend


Banyan June 24/07/2012 12:52 Page 1

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Plane Sense 3 Aug_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 12:11 Page 2

that it will help the would-be refurbishment client gain a larger, sharper picture of the project they envision. We’ve gone further, to break them down into the top three arising from pre-refurbishment planning, from the during-refurbishment segment, and from the après-refurb process. Without further ado, here are the popular questions and answers in aircraft refurbishment.

PRE-REFURB With so much riding on the outcome, the smartest operators work with a refurbishment ombudsman - someone charged with tracking the project and reporting back to the operator. Alternatively, the operator chooses someone to oversee and coordinate the entire project and serve as the owner’s eyes and ears on the work being done. Work with a planner to set the scope of the project so you can answer these mostcommon pre-refurbishment questions. How should we set the scope of this job? You can start to set the scope of the job by first examining all you like and dislike about the aircraft in its current form, whether on your own or in coordination with a representative. For example, if the paint and windows remain in top shape – or in good-enough shape for renewal rather than replacement – set the paint and windows outside the scope of the job, or limit work on them to touchingup and renewing the window trim and paint. Conversely, if avionics fall short of letting you fulfill common missions with minimal hassle, include a cockpit makeover to the scope of the job. Next, carefully examine the interior – from the headliner, down the fabrics and trim on sidewalls, to the carpeting underfoot. Check the condition of the upholstery as well as ancillary systems already installed. Finally, inventory the number and age of cabin systems, such as in-flight phones, inflight entertainment options and in-flight office systems – Internet access included. Now you should be able to formulate some answers as to how to set the scope for the job.

How should I set spending limits and plan a budget? Spending limits could well come first if the company budget is tight – or it may not factor at all if the operator enjoys the deepest of pockets; in these cases the answer might well be, “Whatever it costs!” But seldom do operators feel comfortable issuing blank checks, so our best suggestion for answering this question begins with the universal caveat: “It depends…”

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Gulfstream August 24/07/2012 14:49 Page 1

2006 Gulfstream G550 S/N 5086

2052 TT, 662 Landings, Engines and APU enrolled on JSSI Select. Sixteen (16) Passengers with a Forward Galley $36,950,000

2010 Gulfstream G200 S/N 233

519 TT, 244 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP Gold. Auto Throttles. Nine (9) Passenger Configuration. $13,900,000

2007 Gulfstream G200 S/N 164

2006 Gulfstream G450 S/N 4039

2511 TT, 1445 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP Gold. Auto Throttles. Ten (10) Passenger Configuration $9,950,000 2440 TT, 1241 Landings, Fourteen (14) Passengers with an Aft Galley. 26" Club Seats & Enhanced Soundproofing $24,250,000

2003 Gulfstream G200 S/N 063

2002 Gulfstream GV S/N 662

2732 TT, 1547 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP. Nine (9) Passenger Configuration. Fresh 8 year Inspection $7,500,000

2003 Gulfstream G200 S/N 050 4834 TT, 2086 Landings, Engines enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care. Enrolled on PlaneParts. Sixteen (16) Passengers with a Forward Galley and Forward Crew Rest $27,995,000

2001 Gulfstream GV S/N 634 3421 TT, 1497 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP. Ten (10) Passenger Configuration. Interior refurbished in 2010 $7,000,000

2000 Gulfstream G200 S/N 007

5526 TT, 1516 Landings, Fourteen (14) Passengers with Aft Galley and Forward Crew Rest $23,000,000

1998 Gulfstream GV S/N 518

5815 TT, 3936 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP Gold. Ten (10) Passenger Configuration. Fresh 12 year Inspection $6,150,000

2008 Gulfstream G150 S/N 252

7213 TT, 2813 Landings, Fourteen (14) Passengers with Forward Galley and Forward Crew Rest. New Paint February 2012 LEASE ONLY

1308 TT, 565 Landings, Enrolled on MSP, APU - Honeywell GTCP-150 S/N P-371, Time since New – 527 Hours, $8,950,000

Gulfstream Pre-Owned. Contact Lynn Beaudry. lynn.beaudry@gulfstream.com Tel: (912) 965-4000 • Fax: (912) 965-4848


Plane Sense 3 Aug_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 12:11 Page 3

You can set a budget then shop for the work package that adheres to those numbers, or - as too often happens - establish plans and a work package before figuring out how to pay – or how much to pay. Consider the best answer to be the one that renders you at your most comfortable. If budgets are tight, answering that question may require some juggling of the work package; dropping some ideas or swapping original plans for lower-cost approaches. Those budget questions may work only if you spread out the work over a longer period of time. How should I pay for this work? This question is best answered in consultation with the company CFO – or a company’s external accountant. Only by getting solid bids on the work package can an operator be reasonably sure of getting the best deal. But that best deal may require accounting for various tax laws at the local, state and national governments. Tax breaks for investing in business equipment have been quite generous in recent years, but some operators eschewed those short-term breaks because retaining the long-term schedule did more for the company’s bottom line. Other elements to take into account here include the age of the aircraft (finance institutions hesitate to underwrite loans for work on aircraft older than a set age); similarly, if a new aircraft is in your not-too-distant plans, you may decide you don’t want to spend as much as you would were you planning to keep the airplane longer-term. Of course, if the company coffers allow and the tax accountant blesses, paying cash for a refurbishment job eliminates a possible sticking point with the local banker. Don’t discount the prospect of a shop helping with its own finance plan either, though.

DURING THE REFURB

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“its size, scope and certifications, handle all the work or contract out packages to other shops. For the aircraft owner, knowing the details of who works on what should be considered a must – giving the owner somewhere other than merely a starting point if problems arise after the job. How should the airplane be insured when down for a major work package? No one wants to spend money unnecessarily; continuing to carry full coverage on the company airplane when it won’t fly for weeks or months is not necessary, according to the insurance underwriters. Changing the policy to a ground-only or non-movement policy can save the owner significant amounts of money. This is also a good place to urge owners considering a refurbishment project to get in writing how the airplane will be covered when in the possession of the shop. www.AvBuyer.com

Damage to whatever degree is never welcome; they become supremely frustrating when suffered at the hands of a vendor charged with improving the aircraft. So beyond avoiding the expenditure of money unnecessarily, make sure the shop has your airplane adequately covered when it’s in their possession. Case law from past court decisions put to rest the question of who is liable when the owner surrenders the airplane into the care of an FBO, maintenance or overhaul shop. Be sure you’ve got the knowledge covered. How will the acceptance process work? Once the work is done the owner (or owner’s crew) needs to know how all the new equipment works, about the warranties, the required service intervals and a host of other salient points. Before retrieving the airplane from the shop the owner should insist on an acceptance flight that demonstrates the

How will the work package be accomplished? As a general rule, interior and paint come last in any refurbishment or overhaul situation – after all, it’s better to avoid collateral damage from work being performed on other parts of the plane. The larger the project the more of the airplane needs to come apart; for a tip-to-tail makeover the interior can come out at about the same time as the panel, with work on the panel completed before the cabin refurb work begins; in some large shops separate crews may tackle the cockpit and cabin in parallel. Otherwise, the shop in charge would likely start up front and tackle disassembling the panel at the same time staff on the floor prepare as much as they can to paint. The main contractor may, depending on

“Don’t discount the prospect of a shop helping with its own finance plan either, though”.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Eagle Creek August 24/07/2012 12:56 Page 1

2009 EMBRAER PHENOM 100 N59PW N59PW,, S/ S/N 50000081, Price Just Reduced to $2,790,000! Only 290 Hours Since New, Enrolled on EEC Enhanced Airframe Program, m m, JSSI Premium Engine Program and Still Under Factory Warranty, TCAS I, Garmin Synthetic Vision and Belted Potty

2010 EMBRAER PHENOM 100 201

TWIN COMM COMMANDER MANDER 1000 100

N196EC, S/N N 5000 50000151, 00151, Still Under FFactory actory W Warranty, arranty, On Embraer EEmbraer’ss Airframe EEC EE Enha anced Program and Pra tt’s ESP Gold Eng gine Enhanced Pratt’s Engine Program, m, Garmin GTS-850 G ChartView,, GWX-68 Ra Radar, darr, 2nd TCAS I, ChartView TTransponder ransp sponder and DME D

gle Creek N695EE, S/N 96205, 962005,, Special 695B 69 Model, Fresh Fresh HSI’s HSI’s byy Ea Eagle with 2581 SMOH OH H on Dash Das TTen en Engines, Collins APS-65 Autopilot, APS-65 Garmin GNS S 530, 53 FFreon reo Air reon Air,, Wide Chord Q-T Q-Tip ip Props

2008 CESSNA CITATION CJ3 2

DASH TEN P POWERED POWERED TWIN COMMANDER COMMANDER 900

N711BE, S/N 525 525B-0212, 5B-0212, Price Just Reduced to $5,395,000, $5,3995,000, 575 Hours and One Ow Owner ner Since New, New, TAP TAAP Elite, Collins TCAS-4000 TCAS-44000 TCAS II, Collins HF HF, F, Honeyw Honeywell well Mark VIII EGPWS, AirCell ST-3100 ST-3100 Iridium Irridium Phone and Jeppesen Elec ctronic Charts Electronic

tcch TTraffic, N29GD, S/N 15035 15035, 5, Garmin GNS-530W with W WAAS, AAAS, Skywa Skywatch raffic, Wide Freon Air Conditioning Q-Tip Chord Q-T ip Props and Keith Freon

CESSNA CITATION S/II CE

DASH TEN POWERED TWIN COMMANDER 690B DA 0B

N500ZB, S/N S550S550-0023, -0023, 212 Engine Hours Since Hot Sectio Sectionn Inspections Conditioning, andd 22,046 046 EEngine i H Hours Since Si Overhauls, O h l FFreon reon Air Ai C Conditio ditioning, i Current C t PPart art 135

N690GFF, S/N 11357 N690GF, 11357, 7, Garmin GTN-750 and GTN-650 TTouchscreens, ouchsc o creens, Garmin GTX-330 Garmin GTX 33 andd GTX GTX-33 -330 330 Transponders, Transponders, d G i GMA-340 GMA 340 Audio A di Panel, Panel,l Skywa tch and 6324 6324 AFTT Skywatch

www.eagle-creek.com | 317.293.6935 | 317.297.9341 Eagle Creek Airport | 4101 Dandy Trail | Indianapolis, IN 46254


Plane Sense 3 Aug_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 12:13 Page 4

workings of all new equipment. This is no time to fly away without a complete, detailed briefing by the shop’s experts, accompanied by the transfer of manuals, handbooks, check lists, operating manuals and the like. Avionics are a natural for this sort of paperwork – and training on the new avionics hardware, knowing and understanding database-update cycles and the like must be a part of the discussion before the job starts. Ditto for any engine upgrades – the crew will need the information on starting and operating, any limitations, maintenance intervals and fuel use. Finally, warranty information on the new equipment should be transferred to the owner, along with all information about any upcoming mandatory service items that, absent their completion, might invalidate the warranty.

APRÈS-REFURB Will there be any limits or constraints on how we use the airplane immediately after we retrieve it? Turbine engines don’t usually have break-in cycles on par with reciprocating mills; avionics systems generally work (although maybe with a squawk here and there); and interiors are ready the instant the refitters finish. There may, however, be some limits on the exposure of the paint to the atmosphere and atmospheric conditions until the paint has sufficiently cured and been washed and waxed at least once. Aside from such a constraint, the airplane should be ready to fly at your discretion once you accept it back from the shop. With so many new items in the airplane, what training should I consider a ‘must’? The crew should certainly learn and practice using any new avionics before flying the boss anywhere – as well as the engines and other systems…including any in-flight office equipment like airborne internet and phone service. The last place in the world a pilot would want to learn the intricacies of new cockpit electronics is in the cockpit of the airplane inflight. Park it in a cool, shaded hangar, plug in a ground power unit, fire up the stack and go to work with the manuals. If new engines are installed, take the time to study all the new parameters, to program the flight computers for new speeds and fuel consumption rates, and any new operating data including weights, speeds, altitude limitations and range. What should I do about any minor squawks that don’t immediately surface? If the acceptance flight is akin to the walkaround before a new owner takes possession of a house or business, the follow-up on little

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irritations or major failures should be performed on a cycle that assures you are still under warranty. Unless a problem or issue threatens your access or use of the airplane or creates a safety issue, consider building a “tick list” of the non-threatening irritations to present to the shop at the appropriate time. Sticking drawers, balky lights, irregularly functioning electronics (IFE, in-flight office, etc.) can be dealt with at the same time. Other issues, such as avionics difficulties or powerplant problems fall into a different category and should be dealt with at the earliest safe opportunity. Be prepared for the possibility that issues with equipment not directly handled by the prime contractor may take some extra calls and effort on the part of you or the prime contractor. www.AvBuyer.com

FINALLY… Keep regular tabs on the updates and changes - how well they hold up and how they perform long-term - for when the day arrives that you want to again consider such a project. And don’t neglect to provide plenty of feedback to the vendor(s) who provided the goods and performed the services. If they did a great job you may want to use them again – and ask for a discount as a repeat customer. If things didn’t go completely smoothly, still offer your feedback as this is how a worthwhile vendor will seek to learn to improve. Enjoy the fruits of your decisions, and make good use of your newly improved business tool by putting them to work as frequently as possible. ■ Aircraft Index see Page 4


General Aviation August 24/07/2012 14:39 Page 1


Plane Sense 2 June_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 12:17 Page 1

Plane Sense on Refurbishments ost people faced with a refurbishment project start by consulting with their Director of Maintenance, the industry experts, the facility that will be doing the refurbishment, and of course their accountant to get approval for this expense. Working together with this team, an interior design is created and a budget is set for the entire project. All the materials, fasteners and equipment are then ordered and the aircraft moves into the hands of the crew that is going to make the interior look like a new airplane inside… at which point you can start to feel like you can relax and simply look forward to making that first trip with the new interior that has that new cabin smell. The question is, are you ready for the numerous surprises that can suddenly accumulate and raise their costly and time-consuming heads along the way? The following are just some of the surprises that may occur during a typical interior project and can certainly play havoc with any budget.

Refurbishment M ‘Gotchas’ Surprises that can impact your cabin refurbishment budget. by Steve Watkins

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense 2 June_FinanceNov 24/07/2012 12:18 Page 2

SURPRISE #1 As the aircraft is prepared for the new interior and equipment, the old one has to be removed. The surprises could start here. The shop could find the floor panel screw heads stripped out or maybe the nut plates that the screws go into have come loose and start to spin with the screw adding extra labor, extra parts and extra time to remove the interior.

the wrong color? The designer may insist on the original color that was selected, but it may no longer be available in the exact same material that was originally selected. The choice of procuring the new material, due to different fireproofing requirements, may come with a substantial increase in peryard cost. This is one more surprise that was not budgeted for, and you would be left with the decision to change colors to contain costs or pay the extra charge.

SURPRISE #2 Another surprise sometimes discovered when removing the old interior is that the brackets could be broken or cracked where the interior is attached and need to be replaced. This may sound like only a minor problem that simply requires going to the Illustrated Parts Catalog (IPC) and ordering the new parts at only the added cost of the parts. But what happens if the parts manual is reviewed and the required brackets are not listed in the IPC at all? A subsequent call to the manufacturer of the aircraft could indicate that these parts were made, but never classified as a part for the aircraft and consequently are not in the IPC. There is no inventory to be found and the manufacturer will not start-up production just to provide you with this part. So now what happens? The company doing the refurbishment has to design, get approval for, and make the part(s) from scratch, potentially adding all of the labor costs to your bottom line that was not in the original budget.

SURPRISE #3 Many times a refurbishment design includes relocating the lavatory to another area of the aircraft. The relocation design should be simple enough, but at some point, an avionics or cabin entertainment black box could have been installed and maybe not accounted for. This unit must be moved now to accommodate the new lavatory location. In addition, as the removal of the lavatory continues, it is common to find corrosion. Depending on the extent, it may be enough to require actual replacement of bulkheads, brackets and other structures. The corrosion that is not bad enough to cause replacement still has to be removed and treated. Anything that is questionable may require an OEM’s Engineers or a Designated Engineer to design and approve a repair. All of this could be an additional cost if unplanned for, and require more down time to resolve and repair the issue.

SURPRISE #5 The refurbishment project can continue to unearth little discrepancies throughout the process, each and every one requiring additional labor, additional parts, and possibly extending the aircraft’s down-time. These extra expenses will most likely exceed your budget. Moving towards the end of the refurbishment project, the facility will complete all of the paperwork and submit it to the appropriate authority for approval. You’ve guessed it…this is another area that can be full of surprises…. The data being used may not be complete; the fireproofing or the fire-blocking paperwork could be missing a page; or the electrical diagram could differ from what was actually done in the aircraft. All of these issues require more problem-solving, time and additional delays for the completion. The shop may not charge the customer extra for these paperwork issues, but the regulating agencies in aviation are not known for being especially sensitive to turn-times, so expect additional delays to result.

SURPRISE #6 Finally you reach the point at which everything is completed and the interior looks just like it did in the design pictures! The functional checks and test flights are all that is left to do. During a final test flight, a red failure code could suddenly appear on the panel or maybe on the cold soak flight, another failure code shows up, or something stops working. Troubleshooting will be required to find the problem and if the facility is a completion shop only, they might have to bring in experienced mechanics from another maintenance shop to find and fix the problem. More surprises usually mean more expenses, and then there is the unpleasant task of informing the boss of another delay with the launch date.

REDUCING THE SURPRISES SURPRISE #4 The refurbishment facility usually orders the material for the seats when the quote is signed – but what if the material arrives in Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Fortunately, there are several ways to minimize all of these potential surprises that can happen during an aircraft refurbishment. The first is to make sure that you contract www.AvBuyer.com

“The refurbishment project can continue to unearth little discrepancies throughout the process, each and every one requiring additional labor, additional parts, and possibly extending the aircraft’s down-time.”

a highly regarded industry consultant that will help navigate through all of the “gotchas” that can happen during a complex interior project. In addition, make sure you work with a facility that is very familiar with your aircraft make and model, and then do your research by asking other colleagues for shop references and referrals. The bottom line is that when you take your aircraft in for a new interior and equipment, all quotes include the following statement: “This is an estimated quote only, additional charges may be required.” Just make sure you have room in your refurbishment budget for all of the SURPRISES that can occur!  Steve Watkins is Technical Services Manager, Western Region for Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI). Steve has been an A&P mechanic, IA and Private Pilot for over 35 years and was a Designated Mechanics Examiner in Wichita, KS and Long Beach, CA. He has also spent time as Director of Maintenance and Chief Inspector for various FAR 135 and FAR 145 operations, owned his own maintenance shop as well as instructed at an A&P technical school and is an active member of the AMT Society.  Contact Steve at: SWatkins@jetsupport.com ■ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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RollieVincent_FinanceSept 23/07/2012 16:47 Page 1

NAVIGATING 360°

Current Market Senment “Aviaon industry is passed the low point in the current business cycle”

“Aviaon industry has not yet reached the low point in the current business cycle”

% 24

26

%

50 % “ Aviaon industry is at the low point in the current business cycle”

Q2 2012 Survey

Source: JETNET iQ

Nothing Else Comes Close by Rolland Vincent everal years ago, iconic manufacturer Learjet was building its brand with advertising that included a tag line “Nothing else comes close”. The image was often of a high-performing fighter-jet type aircraft, climbing smartly into the sky, leaving all others - and the distant Earth itself - well behind and below. In many ways, the tag line describes one of the essential customer benefits of Business Aviation. For the most time-pressed entrepreneurs, business and government leaders, and people of means, there is no better way to fly. Intercontinental flights between main business centers are well served by commercial airlines - carriers are the rational mode of transport, even for ultra-high-net-worth individuals (UHNWI). David Leppan, Chairman of Wealth-X and himself an UHNWI, recently described the costs of flying privately from the U.S. to Singapore as “eye watering”. For point-topoint travel with a team of executives, or with family members, including children, the

S

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elderly, and of course the family pet, the convenience and time-saving benefits of flying privately simply cannot be matched. Leppan, who leads a global market intelligence service focused on UHNWIs and their privately held companies, describes himself as “terribly impatient”. For him, the convenience and experience of NetJets Europe for intra-European and North African missions is worthy of storytelling.

WHERE ARE WE, CAPTAIN? As an industry, Business Aviation was clearly on a Learjet-style climb-out trajectory well through 2007 and into 2008. In late 2008 and early 2009, the aircraft had a hard landing reminiscent of the days before trailing link landing gear. Since then, conditions through mid-2012 remain decidedly mixed. Fully 50% of business aircraft owners and operators who responded to JETNET iQ’s Q2 2012 Global Business Aviation Survey indicate that conditions are at the low point in the current business cycle. Those who think the industry is on the way back up are about www.AvBuyer.com

evenly matched with those who think a decline continues (as above chart indicates). In late 2007 and into 2008, it is clear that many people did not see the downturn coming, and most were certainly unprepared for the severity of the industry’s decline. With the exception of Europe, though, we would argue that many will likewise not see the upturn coming (and the good deals going away) until the trend is well underway. Many regions of the world are already experiencing improvements in Business Aviation’s business conditions. Most notably, the situation in the U.S. bears close watch, as the pressure builds to replace aging fleets with the latest, greatest technology. Fully 36% of respondents to the Q2 2012 JETNET iQ Survey indicate that their organizations delayed or deferred their decision to buy a new business aircraft since 2008. The correlation between corporate profits and business jet deliveries (with deliveries typically lagged 18-24 months due to order backlogs) has been strong and consistent for ❯ many years, evolving into almost a law of Aircraft Index see Page 4


Southern Cross August 24/07/2012 14:41 Page 1

 Aircraft Brokerage  Aircraft Acquisitions  Aircraft Sales  Parts Sales  Excess Inventory/ Surplus Sales  MRO Services

Southern Cross Aviation Charlotte, North Carolina Fort Lauderdale, Florida London, England São Paulo, Brazil Contact: Pat Hosmann, Jr. Office: +1 (704) 990 7090 Cell: +1 (954) 591 4490 acsales@scross.com Peter Hosmann Office: +1 (954) 377 0320 Cell: +1 (954) 328 0935 acsales@scross.com

2008 Gulfstream G200 s/n 187 • VP-BPH • 740 TT • 400 TC • Engines on ESP Gold • Autothrottles • FDR • Jumpseat • SATCOM • Airshow • No Damage • One Owner Since New • Motivated Owner Seeks Offers

2000 Hawker 800XP s/n 258464 • N810SC • 4400 TT • MSP • Full Jar Ops • New Paint • New Interior • Fresh 48 Month • X-Rays and Landing Gear c/w 6/2012 • Motivated Owner

2007 Gulfstream G150 s/n 227 • 545 TT • 263 TC • Airframe / Engines / APU enrolled on JSSI Tip to Tail • Stunning Cosmetics • FDR • Loaded w Options • Motivated Owner seeks Offers

2001 Learjet 45 s/n 178 • XA-JMF • 4,100 TT • 3,700 TC • MSP • Dual FMS • FDR • Airshow • No Damage • Motivated Owner Seeks Offers or Trades

www.scross.com www.twitter.com/SCrossAviation www.facebook.com/SCrossAviation

ALSO AVAILABLE: 1996 King Air C90B Blackhawk - 3,500 TT, 2,760 TC, 800/800 Since New - 135A engines, Good Cosmetics & Pedigree 1981 King Air B200 - 6,900 TT, 5,700 TC, 1100 / 1100 SOH -42 engines, HF Gear, Ram Air, Body Strakes, No Damage 1993 Learjet 35A, s/n 674 -7,480 TT, Engines on MSP Gold, No Damage, 12 Year Inspection c/w 2004. Motivated Owner.

2010 King Air 350i s/n FL-726 • N8126L • ONLY 80 Hrs TTS • Raisbeck Wing Lockers & Dual Aft Body Strakes • Collins Proline 21 Avionics Suite • TCAS II • Tracked on CAMP • Warranties Include: Airframe-24 Months or 1200 Hours by Hawker Beech • Full factory warranties and transferable to Buyer

1994 Lear 60 s/n 27 • N271SC • Only 2,980 TT • 2,280 TC • Engines on ESP Silver • One Owner since 1996 • Dual UNS-1B FMS • TCAS II / HF Radio • 12 Yr & D Check due 7/2017 • Asking Price $2,195,000 • Located in Ft. Lauderdale, FL • Motivated Owner Seeks Offers or Trades


RollieVincent_FinanceSept 23/07/2012 16:48 Page 2

NAVIGATING 360° physics in many aerospace analyst’s deck of PowerPoint slides. This tight relationship seems to have unravelled in recent years as companies replenish their cash holdings and build their cushions for the bumpy rides that are always ahead. We expect the industry to collectively deliver 735 new business jets valued at $19.7 Billion in 2012, up 9% in units and 16% in value YOY, respectively. That is healthy growth by any measure. Other than at the entry level price points, order backlogs for many models are clearly on the rise. Dassault reports that it now has about two years of backlog for the flagship Falcon 7X long-range jet, and strong interest in the Falcon 2000S. The Falcon 2000S could prove to be an aircraft of choice for U.S.-based flight departments as their companies realize that it is no longer economical to further delay their fleet renewal. Order activity in the Falcon 900 is less impressive, no doubt reflecting the market’s bet that the long-awaited SMS model, expected to be announced in 2013, will in fact be a twin-engine Falcon 900 replacement.

REACHING AND PASSING THE BOTTOM Bombardier’s recent tour de force in capturing massive NetJets fleet orders for the Challenger 300 and Challenger 605 (after winning the same in March 2011 for the Global family) is in itself an indication that we have reached - and probably passed - the bottom of the current market cycle. The Challenger 300, perhaps the most successful all-new business jet program ever developed by Bombardier, has had a long and healthy production run but is now due for a mid-life upgrade, possibly along the lines of the improvements set out in the new NetJets “Signature Series” design. With an additional NetJets fleet order for 25 Citation Latitudes placed with Cessna, one of the primary challenges facing the successful OEMs will be to value, place into inventory, and remarket flocks of high-time pre-owned jets to customers who have shown little interest in aircraft of this age. We understand that NetJets’ order deposits are typically in the form of pre-owned aircraft rather than cash, suggesting that there will be work to be done to move any of these aircraft at a profit. Let the Hunger Games begin! The OEMs have no doubt performed a complex calculus to prove the business rationale of these large transactions. On the one hand, the deals provide lower prices, higher trade-in values and slimmer margins due to block pricing of aircraft, spares and services, and the need to inventory and remarket older aircraft; on the other hand, the OEMs benefit from lower costs in the form of

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bills-of-material with block purchasing, lower production/interior design/engineering/completion costs with standardization, as well as more buzz for the brand by serving Mr. Buffet and the world’s largest fleet of business aircraft. NetJets’ drive for fewer models from fewer manufacturers makes good economic and business sense. In our experience, and much to the dismay of OEM marketers, we have seen that some fractional and charter customers are rather brand-agnostic, preferring the choice to be as simple as at a drivethrough restaurant: Will that be Small, Medium, or Large…Would you like to ‘Super-Size’ that with a Global 7000? When it comes to economic clout, three regional groupings together account for the vast majority of the world’s economic activity and trade. These are: NAFTA (USA, Canada and Mexico), Europe, and the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). Together, these nations account for about 90% of worldwide business jet deliveries in a given year. NAFTA remains the “Big Kahuna” of the three, representing about 70% of the world market just 10-12 years ago, and about 55% today. NAFTA countries sprang back from a low point in 2010 to account for about 55% of the world’s deliveries so far in 2012. We are quite bullish on NAFTA, and the USA in particular, to lead the Business Aviation industry out of its deepest doldrums. U.S. entrepreneurs and companies are generating solid profits and building their storehouses of cash. Although the large “Fortune 500” firms are looked to for new factory orders, many are public companies that are laser-focused on increasing productivity without adding assets or workers. Heaven knows they have the wherewithal, with margins of more than 7%, ROE of more than 14%, and earnings up 16% in 2011 YOY. Less visible on the radar screen are the many American small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) who collectively own and www.AvBuyer.com

operate about 85% of the country’s business jet fleet, according to NBAA-sponsored research. Speaking at the recent 2012 JETNET iQ Summit in New York City, David Strauss, lead aerospace and defense analyst at UBS Securities, noted that 70% of the 11-20 year old jet fleet is based in North America, and is prime for replacement. The leveraging of existing assets and people is a timeless strategy of corporate value creation. Every smart organization does it, at times more than others. The Bible reminds us that there is a time to reap, and a time to sow. With aging fleets and aging workers (something like 40% of the aerospace workforce in the U.S. is scheduled to retire in the next five years), it is only a matter of time before entrepreneurially-minded leaders invest cash to earn more than marginal returns on capital. In fact, we believe that this trend is already underway. Unlike the people who ride in them, older aircraft become less economical and less productive with age. Entrepreneurs and companies are naturally competitive, and we are confident that they will once again invest in the best tools and technologies to keep themselves ahead of the pack. This is especially true as and when they feel the heat, and the joy, of competition. Build it, and they will fly!

❯ Rolland Vincent is

President of Rolland Vincent Associates. He has more than 25 years of experience in business, regional and international aviation, including with Bombardier, Cessna, Learjet, Flexjet and ICAO. With a background in market research, economics and statistics, he has held senior leadership positions in marketing, strategy, business development and consulting. ❯ More information from www.rollandvincent.com ■ Aircraft Index see Page 4


WAS 'Substance' June 2011 24/07/2012 16:37 Page 1

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Safety Matters August12_Gil WolinNov06 23/07/2012 16:40 Page 1

SAFETY MATTERS - MAN vs MACHINE

Man Versus Machine: Automation lessons for all of aviation. by Dave Higdon ome years ago, working at a major aviation event beset me with a knee injury sufficient to cause a pronounced limp – particularly where maneuvering up and down steps were concerned with the most pronounced discomfort coming with bending that knee. Friends with genuine concern questioned me about my ability to fly myself home. I assured them that the flying part would be relatively easy; that getting in and out of my airplane would be the toughest parts of the flight. “Once you’re in and off the ground, you can just punch up the auto pilot, right?” Perfect, had the airplane been equipped thus, but essentially I had no auto pilot. The subsequent reactions frankly astonished me. “You don’t have an autopilot? How in the world do you fly these long trips?” If the prospect of a long trip without autopilot seems unimaginable to you, then cast your mind to the truly lengthy trips – the trips undertaken by a guy named

S

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Lindbergh, for example, who traversed the North Atlantic to reach Le Bourget, Paris in 33 hours, 30 minutes, 29.8 seconds after takeoff from New York’s Roosevelt Field. When Charles Lindbergh landed he had not slept in 55 hours. He would have undoubtedly loved an autopilot, many excellent types of which have come along in the 85 years since that flight. Somewhere along the way, and with the introduction of increasingly sophisticated machinery, the aviation community has lost something in direct proportion to the level of automation gained: That something is hand-flying skills. Lest we forget that it’s hand-flying skills that serve as the final line of hope and safety defense when aircraft automation fails. The pilot(s) perform the composite functions no primary flight display (PFD) or multifunction display (MFD) can deliver – or any autopilot or flight management system (FMS) for that matter. Worse still, the dependence on such sophisticated computer-driven, softwarewww.AvBuyer.com

based instrumentation adds another risk in today’s cockpit which, when combined with deficient hand-flying skills and mental dexterity (read ‘judgment’) leaves aircraft at dramatically higher risk of disaster. We’ve seen hints of this in incident reports to the Aviation Safety Reporting Service of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as well as in the concrete examples of tragedies like the crash of a Dash 8 de Havilland operating as Colgan Flight 3407, February 12, 2009 at 10:17 pm, and 14 weeks later the loss of Air France 447 on June 1, 2009. One domestic turboprop flight; one transcontinental wide-body jet flight; two instances of challenging weather, individual automation and instrument-systems issues, and – ultimately - failure to resolve these problems. One other common denominator was present in both tragedies: In neither case could the flight crew (each professionally trained to industry and safety-agency stan❯ dards), hand-fly the aircraft. In both Aircraft Index see Page 4


Vebeg August 24/07/2012 14:44 Page 1

On behalf of the Federal German Ministry of Defence, we offer for sale by way of tender bid procedure in September 2012

1 Aircraft DORNIER Do 228 - 212 equipped for Pollution Control S/N: 8185, Model 1990, appr. 19424 TT 2 engines “Garrett AiResearch“ TPE311-10GP-511D with various spare parts and tools

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Safety Matters August12_Gil WolinNov06 23/07/2012 16:41 Page 2

SAFETY MATTERS MAN vs MACHINE instances the inability to fly by hand and know how to react to those cockpit-systems problems resulted in both aircraft descending uncontrollably and crashing. The combined loss of life: 278. Safety authorities and investigative agencies have been discussing these issues for years, so far with no discernible progress. But pilots need not wait to receive the training they need to survive similar challenges. They should be proactive, and work on designing their own training to augment that institutionalized training which they already receive. Such training starts with the simple realization that automation comes at a cost (put differently, it contributes to atrophy in our mental and physical flight muscles). It continues with two new approaches to augment recurrent training requirements and study areas. It ends with the pilot trained to recognize, act on and recover from attitudes and situations where no sane air-transport pilot would ever entertain deliberately flying.

IDENTIFYING THE PROBLEM The recommendations and findings of a 2010 NTSB safety study point up two disparate issues, issues which came into play in the Colgan and Air France accidents: •

First, in both accidents the flight crews’ reduced skills at hand-flying highly automated aircraft in unusual circumstances and Of particular salience to the Air France accident, the multiple, complex and complicated challenges flight crews face during multiple systems failures in totally electronic, highly-automated cockpits.

When Air France 447 flew into “don’tgo-there” weather on June 1, 2009, iced-over pitot sensors precipitated a series of cascading failures that rapidly deteriorated. Unable to troubleshoot their multiple problems and failing to decipher obscure failure codes from the EFIS computers the crew flew the jet into, and held, a full-blown stall. As a result, the Airbus A330 fell more than 30,000 feet in a few short minutes until smacking onto the surface of the Atlantic Ocean in a largely level attitude. In the Colgan accident the pilot failed to recognize what instruments and the stickpusher of his de Havilland Dash 8 Q400 was telling him as he, too, held the aircraft at full-stall attitude as it rolled out of control and plunged into the New York countryside. The common indictments of deteriorated hand-flying skills and the associated

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subtleties combined with the complexity and variety of systems to confound the pilots into aggressively violating the very basics of introductory flight instruction: When in a stall, push the nose down – don’t hold it up.

SEEKING IMPROVEMENTS… Manufacturers, operators, the FAA and the NTSB all have been active in working to counter what one would expect to be a continuing deterioration of human/mechanical flight skills through a variety of initiatives. In August 2010 the National Transportation Safety Board updated the NTSB Part 830 requirement for the reporting of accidents and incidents to include the following events affecting aircraft weighing more than 12,500 pounds: • A complete loss of information, excluding flickering, from more than 50 percent of an aircraft's cockpit displays known as: - Electronic Flight Instrument System (EFIS) displays or; - Engine Indication and Crew Alerting System (EICAS) displays or; - Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitor (ECAM) displays; or - Other displays of this type, which generally include a primary flight display (PFD), primary navigation display (PND), and other integrated displays. www.AvBuyer.com

If you think for a moment, you’ll recognize the wisdom of this since today virtually no new business-turbine aircraft comes to the owner with analog panels. Today everything in the cockpit works off digital software running on cockpit processors and driven by various solid-state sensors. Even the simple VHF communications radios are digitally tuned with electronic frequency displays. In 2010 the board also published a safety study titled, ‘Introduction of Glass Cockpit Avionics into Light Aircraft’, noting the following: •

Pilots must be able to demonstrate a minimum knowledge of primary aircraft flight instruments and displays in order to be prepared to safely operate aircraft equipped with those systems, which is necessary for all aircraft but is not currently addressed by Federal Aviation Administration knowledge tests for glass cockpit displays. Pilots are not always provided all of the information necessary to adequately understand the unique operational and functional details of the primary flight instruments in their airplanes. Generalized guidance and training are no longer sufficient to prepare pilots to safely operate glass cockpit avionics; effective pilot instruction and evaluation must be tailored to specific equipment. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Safety Matters August12_Gil WolinNov06 23/07/2012 16:42 Page 3

SAFETY MATTERS MAN vs MACHINE

As a result of this safety study, the NTSB made a number of recommendations to the FAA, among them these five: • •

Revise airman knowledge tests to include questions regarding electronic flight and navigation displays, including normal operations, limitations, and the interpretation of malfunctions and aircraft attitudes (A-10-36). Require all manufacturers of certified electronic primary flight displays to include information in their approved aircraft flight manual and pilot’s operating handbook supplements regarding abnormal equipment operation or malfunction due to subsystem and input malfunctions, including - but not limited to - pitot and/or static system blockages, magnetic sensor malfunctions and attitude-heading reference system alignment failures (A-10-37). Incorporate training elements regarding electronic primary flight displays into your training materials and aeronautical knowledge requirements for all pilots (A-10-38). Incorporate training elements regarding electronic primary flight displays into your initial and recurrent flight proficiency requirements for pilots of 14 Code of Regulations Part 23 certified aircraft equipped with those systems

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

that address variations in equipment design and operation of such displays (A-10-39). Develop and publish guidance for the use of equipment-specific electronic avionics display simulators and procedural trainers that do not meet the definition of flight simulation training devices prescribed in 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 60 to support equipment-specific pilot training requirements. (A-10-40)

COUNTERING COCKPIT SYSTEM CRASHES More than any other element of worry is the community concern about atrophied flying skills. One retired airline pilot asked me recently, “Why couldn’t the 447 crew recognize their situation and just do what they learned in their initial training – push the nose down and add power to exit a stall?” Why, indeed…? Active air-carrier pilots note a couple of issues: First, in the event of a stall at altitude today’s standard-operating procedure teaches the pilot to raise the nose and add full power to climb out of the stall with minimal loss of altitude. One problem surfaces immediately with this approach, safety experts caution: residual engine power at high altitude may be insufficient to affect a climb at an excessively high angle of attack. www.AvBuyer.com

“That high angle of attack works against recovery… you’re miles away from terrain, take the altitude loss and push the nose down,” the active pilot and check-airman advised. “Being mindful of over-speeding the aircraft, this produces the quickest results.” And when the aircraft departs wings-level flight? “That’s when some aerobatic experience is lifesaving.” And that’s the growing consensus among safety authorities: spending some of a command pilot’s recurrent training session in (a) a real airplane (versus a simulator), and (b) focus mostly on teaching the pilot how to exit unusual attitudes – safely, with minimal altitude loss, and no airframe-threatening excess speed. No existing simulators - not even the highly realistic Level D systems - can suitably mimic the forces, control inputs and recovery steps of aerobatic flight. Recovering from a spin, for example, can be closely approximated, but not inverted flight. Few pilots instinctively know that when upside down, pushing forward on the yoke results in a climb – the exact opposite of upright flight; fewer can be expected to instinctively recover safely when presented with the situation…unless they’ve been exposed to the real thing and trained to think backward. Pulling back while inverted serves only to pitch the aircraft straight toward the ground. Even the rudder’s actions change when inverted. Roll, thankfully, remains as always, taking you in the direction of input. The point is that by returning actual flight in real aircraft to recurrent training, the pilot gets renewed exposure to some of the basics not often covered in sim programs and to train for situations the sim can’t prepare the pilot to face. It’s flight training any pilot can acquire at their own pace for their own edification.

THE BIGGER CHALLENGE But the bigger challenge remains untouched by the move back to aircraft-based training: knowing EFIS systems so well, and troubleshooting them so quickly as to preclude a failure occurring that the crew doesn’t understand. Training for these issues means moving deeper into how the computers work, how systems fail, identifying sensor failures versus display failures – and how to quickly move into back-up mode. As Air France 447 tragically demonstrates, even 35,000 feet of air is too little when the aircraft is out of control and falling at more than 10,000 feet a minute. Time will always be the critical factor, and the best way to give the crew the time needed is to first be able to identify aircraft attitude – and keep it upright and in level flight. WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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Dealer Broker Mkt Update August12_Gil WolinNov06 24/07/2012 09:50 Page 1

DEALER BROKER MARKET UPDATE

What is Normal ? Profits soar, equities grow but aircraft sales are comparatively sluggish. by Dave Higdon 120

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

usiness Climate - warm; Profits - hot; Cash Accounts overstuffed; Business Aircraft Sales – soggy… still...! What can an observer say to this? The Wall Street profit reports bear little bad news, and only the occasional report of merely disappointing margins. Profits in most industries and most businesses are strong financially-speaking. Businesses hold record amounts of uncommitted cash – as much as $3 trillion by many accounts. Stock prices remain strong – in a roller-coaster sort of way and largely unrelated to actual American economic conditions. Private-sector jobs (the type business air-

B

www.AvBuyer.com

craft operators create) are growing only slowly, however. Meanwhile, losses of local, state and some federal public-sector jobs act as a drag on employment numbers. The net game: jobs growth remains tepid. With consumer spending the main driving force of the U.S. economy, growth continues to largely reflect the majority population’s spending power. The same goes for businesses which once turned over their business jets on cycles of seven years or less. We are now four years into Business Aviation’s own peculiar downturn and many a company has decided to make do with what they’re flying – to refurbish, upgrade or trade-up to something larger, ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


RSAF WAS August 24/07/2012 14:45 Page 1

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Dealer Broker Mkt Update August12_Gil WolinNov06 24/07/2012 10:02 Page 2

DEALER BROKER MARKET UPDATE NEWER CHALLENGERS, FALCONS, GLOBALS (PICTURED) AND GULFSTREAMS REMAIN IN DEMAND

but pre-owned. Signs point toward some positive years ahead for Business Aviation, but those expecting to see the return of anything like the 2002-2007 jet boom will be waiting a while. According to aviation analyst Brian Foley, what we see – what we’ve got – looks like it may well be the “new normal.” The historical “five-year cycles” of the past seem inapplicable to this particular seismic event in aviation. Foley said he believes that for the most part, the safest mindset for General Aviation companies is to view the current situation as the ‘new normal’ and adapt accordingly. “The pessimist in me says we’ll be in something of a steady-state situation for the foreseeable future, with occasional setbacks balanced out by spots of growth. And the optimist in me says that companies geared to live through these hard times will invariably have the edge when the recession’s over,” he outlined. Meanwhile, the market of today operates with a level of elasticity somewhat different to past decades. India and to a larger extent China both command more market attention and absorb more new aircraft than a decade ago – but far less than they will a decade or two from now; these markets provide some cushion against the cycles of Europe, North and South America. But China and, to a lesser extent, India also appear poised to plunge heavily into manufacturing, air-

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frames and engines, while pursuing domestic policies geared to increase the number and utility of airports, the number of aircraft in use and the population of people engaged in their manufacture, sales, operation and maintenance. There’s even some expectation that China will begin to more greatly influence the pre-owned market as the nation meets its goals for expanding airport numbers and airways access. “Those planes won’t all be new or even mostly new as China’s expansion peaks,” observed one international broker working to bring together buyers in Asia and sellers in North America. “It’s the players that are new.” Here’s how things break down according to a sampling of brokers, dealers, charter players and, of course, an analyst or two.

SIGNS ABOUND Compared with the midpoint of 2011, Business Aviation activity shows some solid, albeit timid, signs of recovery. For example, charter indexes compared to mid-2011 look good. Businesses reporting use of their own aircraft also seem to be flying slightly more. Signs seem to also point toward a continued, slow, decline in the available fleet of aircraft on the pre-owned ‘for sale’ market. Retail orders of new business-turbine aircraft remain far below peak levels while showing some tepid signs of recovery. This observation along with various researcher statements generally discount as a sign of www.AvBuyer.com

recovery the huge order placed recently by fractional-program operator NetJets. “These deliveries are spaced out over the next decade so there’s no quick benefit, and they're principally intended to replace (as opposed to grow) existing fleet aircraft averaging some seven years in age,” Foley noted. Pre-owned sales remain far off the hyperstate of 2006/2007, but are better than at any time since 2009 (from the perspective of a regional selection of dealers and brokers). “Good as they are, they’re a relative thing,” cautioned a West Coast broker already dealing with an increase in interested Asian prospects. “Sales today beat those of three years ago hands down, but they’re short, still, of levels that make paying the bills a given. We’re not so much hand-tomouth as quarter-to-quarter – it feels a lot better with six or nine months of operating reserves.” The pool of available aircraft shrank a bit more in recent months, in part due to airplanes coming off the market – some of which can’t sell outside of a cash deal. “There are nice pieces of flying machinery out there, fairly modern, imminently viable with a little upgrade work…and wholly beyond any chance of normal financing,” our West Coast broker added. “For the operator who doesn’t mind – and who can pay cash for the airplane, the necessary upgrading shouldn’t be prohibitive and can be financed in other ways.” Aircraft Index see Page 4


Dealer Broker Mkt Update August12_Gil WolinNov06 24/07/2012 10:05 Page 3

DEALER BROKER MARKET UPDATE An East Coast dealer noted, “Good turboprops are scarcer than a couple of years ago, thankfully - and even light jets are moving better. But they only move well if they’re under 12 years of age… 12 to 15 years is gray in the eyes of some finance institutions; 10 is viable; and over-15 years will leave you looking for alternative funds, or placing a big down payment… perhaps 40-50 percent.”

Who would have ever thought that the airplanes that saw the dawn of EFIS panels would see their own sunset because of loan restrictions.

BIGGEST SELLERS “You wouldn’t have any friends interested in parting with their late-model Gulfstream, Challenger, Global or Falcon…would you?” [Well, given that few of my circle actually own the airplanes they use on the job, no but they are out there, according to a broker from the Southeast, specializing in largecabin hardware.] “My own business focuses on only two of those, but a couple of friends handle the others…there’s a spiff in it if you refer someone…” The underlying message: stock of those aircraft is not plentiful – and what is available commands good pricing. “Once too often the airplane sells without ever becom-

- West Coast Broker ing ‘available’ to the market,” the broker lamented. “Just let me know if you so much as hear of the owner of a late-model Gulfstream, Challenger, Global or Falcon even kicking tires on something new. Somewhere downstream an airplane will come up for sale,” the broker explained. “I like to land them as clients while they’re still shopping. Even when they have a broker helping them look for the replacement airplane we can be helping them get a better deal on the

departing jet if we’re on our game.” Still the toughest to move: light and medium hardware vintage 1995 and older (the hardest of all, pre-1990). “Who would have ever thought that the airplanes that saw the dawn of EFIS panels would see their own sunset because of loan restrictions,” mused the West Coast broker. “I bet that today’s hot airplanes stay around as long as those from 25 years ago…it’s that much better… Of course, you may need help getting financing on them…unless that angle improves by then.” Given the trillions of dollars tied up in corporate cash accounts, and the availability of money at record-low interest rates that restriction remains somewhat inexplicable and frustrating. It probably will continue to be for another decade, say the consensus of dealers and brokers sampled. “From here on, competition means something all-new, and largely from overseas, where the money comes from,” concluded our East Coast Broker.

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

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JetNet August12_PAMA interview November06 23/07/2012 17:01 Page 1

JETNET >>KNOW MORE

THE CALLENGER 300, WHICH FORMED A LARGE PORTION OF NETJETS’ RECENT RECORD ORDER

The Recovery Continues The lazy, hazy days of Summer 2012 for Business Aviation. by Michael Chase & Marj Rose s record high temperatures were being set around the United States and London prepares to open the summer Olympics, it appears that we have made it half way through 2012. And yes, as we stand at the midway point, we are seeing signs of industry recovery; ever such slow recovery, but positive signs nonetheless. The biggest sign came from NetJets who recently placed the largest business aircraft order on record, tallying 425 mid-range and long-range aircraft orders and options. This was a boost in confidence for Bombardier and Cessna, with the order’s total value exceeding $9.5 billion. In addition, recent optimistic forecasts from the Teal Group, JETNET iQ, and Bombardier indicate that we should be seeing more aircraft orders and improved signs of recovery in the months ahead. But along with the heat and humidity in the US, the summer’s reality sets in when looking at the limited financing options that seem to be a sticking point for the $1m-10m aircraft loans, according to Corporate Jet Investor editor, Alasdair Whyte. In this month’s JETNET >>KNOW MORE, we will take a look at where we are so far in 2012, and investigate just how warm the Business Aviation market is getting while it makes its slow and steady recovery.

A

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CHART A - PRE-OWNED BUSINESS JET FOR SALE VS. PERCENTAGE FOR SALE Months of June 2005 to June 2012

4 yr. avg. 2,640

4 yr. avg. 1,725

Source: JETNET; Analysis & Presentation Chase & Associates

BUSINESS JETS ‘FOR SALE’ The number of business jets for sale has averaged just over 2,500 from January to June 2012. The current percentage for sale is at 13.5% for June 2012. In a comparison of the www.AvBuyer.com

number of business jets for sale, the years 2009 to 2012 (4 year average of 2,640) show an average of 915 more than from the years 2005 to 2008 (1,725), as shown in Chart A ❯ (above). Aircraft Index see Page 4


CIBAS August 25/07/2012 14:35 Page 1


JetNet August12_PAMA interview November06 24/07/2012 17:12 Page 2

JETNET >>KNOW MORE The year 2003 was another period of downturn and the fractional market ‘New’ deliveries dipped below the 100 unit mark. Of course, this was just a minor blip when compared to recent events. Table B illustrates that until the recent NetJet order was announced, the fractional market has been very quiet.

TABLE A FRACTIONAL PROVIDERS’ BUSINESS JET FLEETS Provider Average # of Aircraft Aircraft Age NetJets 375 8.6 yrs NetJets Europe 133 6.4 Flight Options 74 10.1 Flexjet 69 5.7 Citation Air 40 6.9 Others 226 n/c Total 917 8.2

FRACTIONAL MARKET SHARE PERCENTAGE

Source: JETNET

TABLE B FRACTIONAL AIRCRAFT DELIVERY CYCLES Pre-Economic Downturn Year 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 111 82 New 108 139 137 142 142 7 Used 7 13 22 14 13 6

Recovery Period 2009 2010 2011 31 20 16 1 7 5

Total 928 95

% 91% 9%

Source: JETNET; Chase & Associates

CHART B - FRACTIONAL MARKET SHARE PERCENTAGE BASED ON NUMBER OF COMPANIES IN FRACTIONAL PROGRAMS 2005 TO 2012 CitationAir Market Share Percentage

Flexjet

Chart B (bottom left) shows the fractional market share percentage based on the number of companies in the fractional programs. Clearly, NetJets is the market leader and it has continued to increase its market share from 48% in February 2005 to 62% in January 2012. This improvement in share has come about in spite of the general economic decline and (more specifically) a loss in the number of companies that dropped out of the fractional market. The fractional market peaked at 4,650 companies in January 2007 and has steadily decreased to 3,788 companies in January 2012 - a reduction of 862 companies spread between four fractional providers. (These numbers are for the U.S. only and do not include companies that have purchased fractional cards.) Other than NetJets, of the three remaining fractional providers Bombardier Flexjet has captured 14% market share, followed closely by Flight Options (13%) and CitationAir (11%) as of January 2012. Looking to the future, several questions about the fractional market come to mind. •

Flight Options

• •

NetJets

Number of Companies in Fractional Programs •

Will the fractional market continue to decline? Will the large business jet order from NetJets be replacement, growth or both? Will NetJets’ competitors place new orders too? What impact will these replacement aircraft have on the pre-owned market that is already fully loaded with inventory ‘for sale’? What will happen to an already depressed pre-owned market in terms of pricing and future business jet value?

As you can see, there are lots of unanswered questions at this time !

Source: JETNET Fractional Reports

FLIGHT ACTIVITY FRACTIONAL MARKET There are 917 fractional aircraft in operation with an average age of 8.2 years, according to JETNET fractional reports. NetJets’ average aircraft age is 8.6 years as shown in Table A (above). So the recent record order by NetJets will bring down that average age and present opportunities as well as challenges to the pre-

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

owned market inventories in the future. Taking a closer look at the fractional market, Table B (above) shows the number of new and used business jet deliveries into the fractional industry before and since the economic melt-down. The number of new aircraft deliveries averaged 123 per year prior, and just 22 since. www.AvBuyer.com

The good news reported by ARGUS in June was that the aircraft charter market posted its first increase in activity in more than a year during May 2012. Flight activity increased 3.5 percent overall from April 2012. Looking at the various categories, Part 135 charter activity rose by 5.3 percent in May, while Part 91 activity rose by 3.9 percent. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


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JetNet August12_PAMA interview November06 23/07/2012 17:03 Page 3

JETNET >>KNOW MORE

FUEL PRICE The great news is that fuel prices are down 7% (50 cents per gallon of Jet-A fuel) since April 2012. The latest period reported by GlobalAir shows the price of Jet-A fuel is at $6.38 per gallon. June 2008 was the record month for Jet-A when the price reached $7.11 per gallon. Chart C (right) reports Jet-A prices on a quarterly basis, thus it does not represent June 2008’s peak Jet A price of $7.18 (instead reflecting an averaged-out quarterly peak of $6.83), and it does not yet reflect the decline to $6.38 per gallon, but it is coming! What is interesting is to look at the two periods of time when the fuel price peaked. The earlier one was shorter lived (Fuel Bubble #1) compared to the recent one (Fuel Bubble #2) that has slowly increased to nearly the same record level and will now start to decline as we report the 3Q 2012 in a future article. The question will be whether this decline becomes long-lasting or not.

SUMMARY The year 2012 is only half way through, and most of the trends show recovery. It is comforting to learn about the decline of fuel prices and to finally see new aircraft orders from the largest fractional provider. While not reported in this article, toward the end of July the US Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) was scheduled to report the first estimate of the US Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the 2Q 2012. During June the BEA reported the 1Q 2012

CHART C - U.S. JET A FUEL PRICE PER GALLON Chart C

8.00 7.50 7.00

2006 to 2012 By Quarter High = $6.83 Low = $4.61 Avg = $5.46

6.00 5.50 5.00 4.50 4.00

Source: GlobalAir.com; Presentation and Analysis by Chase & Associates

GDP results at 1.9%. We are hopeful that the 2Q 2012 results are much improved over the 1Q results. As has been reported in previous articles, a 3.0%-or-greater level of GDP growth is the percentage level of economic growth at which Business Aviation has shown strong activity historically. We will continue to monitor this slow but steady Business Aviation recovery and hope it continues, even after the summer days of 2012 become history. ❯ For more information:

• JETNET can be contacted at 101 First Street, Utica, NY 13501; Tel: 800-400-2298; Web: www.jetnet.com or www.avdatainc.com * You can now follow JETNET on Twitter at www.twitter.com/JETNETLLC

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

• Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com • Marj Rose is president of MarketLift, Inc. and can be contacted at P.O. Box 595036 Dallas, TX 75359; Mob: 214-862-8992, Web: www.market-lift.com

Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

Business Aviation WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

Fuel Bubble #2

6.50

Find an Aircraft Dealer 128

Fuel Bubble #1

Q2 2007 Q3 2007 Q4 2007 Q1 2008 Q2 2008 Q3 2008 Q4 2008 Q1 2009 Q2 2009 Q3 2009 Q4 2009 Q1 2010 Q2 2010 Q3 2010 Q4 2010 Q1 2011 Q22011 Q3 2011 Q4 2011 Q1 2012 Q2 2012

This sign of recovery was followed by ARGUS’s TRAQPak data showing that June 2012 business aircraft flight activity actually decreased 3.2% from May 2012. Looking at individual market segments, the month was not all negative with large-cabin fractional activity posting a 3.3% month-over-month increase. When comparing June 2012 activity to June 2011, TRAQPak also reported an overall decrease of 1.3% in flight activity. Two words come to mind here – ‘Slow Recovery’!

avbuyer.com/dealers www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


NCT_Gil WolinNov06 25/07/2012 12:53 Page 1

NON-CITIZEN OWNERSHIP TRUSTS

A Matter of Trust: Aircraft Ownership Trusts. by Greg Cirillo n early 2011, the FAA ignited a minor firestorm when it temporarily halted approval of ownership trusts as permitted owners of US-registered aircraft. The FAA’s action froze many aircraft transactions and cast doubt on foreign buyers’ ability to register aircraft in the US. The FAA moratorium was in response to events where the trustee of an aircraft ownership trust seemed unable to provide the FAA with basic information as to the aircraft’s operational status. The FAA quickly “unfroze” the processing of ownership trust applications, and over the past 14 months has worked with interested industry participants on a “policy clarification” for non-citizen aircraft ownership trusts (NCTs). A final position is expected in the Summer of 2012, but the likely outcome is fairly clear. NCTs will continue, but with an enhanced role for trustees.

I

THE ROLE OF AIRCRAFT OWNERSHIP TRUSTS The United States has an “owner registry” system - meaning that the legal owner of an aircraft is tasked with registering it. In contrast, many nations have an “operator registry” requiring the aircraft’s operator to Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

register the aircraft. US law (49 USC 44102) requires that any person or entity registering (owning) a US registered aircraft be a US citizen. Notably, US law does not concern itself with the citizenship of the aircraft operator, so there is no limitation on foreign lessees operating US-registered aircraft. This quirk in the law makes one wonder why there is a US citizenship requirement at all. For decades, foreign buyers seeking to avail themselves of the benefits of US (or “N”) registration have employed ownership trusts to satisfy the US citizenship standard. US registration offers an owner greater resale possibilities, broader financing options, and a positive perception that the aircraft has been operated and maintained under a stringent regulatory regime. In forming a trust, the ownership of the aircraft is changed so that the foreign entity (the “trustor”) owns the beneficial interest in the trust (known as the “trust estate”) while the aircraft’s legal owner is the trust, which is controlled by the trustee. The trustee is generally an affiliate of a major, US financial institution. The trustee, as a US citizen, needs a high degree of autonomy in order to satisfy the US statutory citizenship standard. Typically, a business jet in an ownership www.AvBuyer.com

trust structure is titled in the trust’s name, and possession of the aircraft is returned to the foreign ex-owner by a lease or similar agreement. NCTs are not specifically addressed in US statutes, but the FAA approves of them as aircraft owners via written interpretations and policies. As a result, the FAA’s “fix” to the perceived problem of non-US citizens operating N-registered aircraft through absentee ownership trusts is not regulatory rulemaking, but rather a Proposed Policy Clarification (PPC). In an NCT structure, the trustee is generally passive and uninvolved in day-to-day aircraft operations, unless there is a financing or sale of the aircraft, or other event requiring the aircraft owner to act. This would be the case in any owner/lessee relationship where the owner entrusts complete responsibility to the lessee. Based on the above incidents, the FAA decided that trustees were too passive and uninvolved. The FAA felt that the NCT was too detached from aircraft operations to permit the FAA to do its job of overseeing regulatory compliance. The FAA published the PPC on February 9, 2012 and laid out a series of changes to prior policy on NCTs. In May, 2012, the aircraft industry participants responded. To summarize the key changes (and industry opposition): ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

129


EHS August 25/07/2012 13:00 Page 1

Alex Ayling 0044 208 549 3917 alex avbuyer.com

Astrid Ayling 0044 208 549 5024 astrid avbuyer.com


NCT_Gil WolinNov06 25/07/2012 12:54 Page 2

NON-CITIZEN OWNERSHIP TRUSTS

• FAA Form Trust Agreement: The FAA proposed a “standard non-citizen trust agreement” to capture many of the points described below. In response, the industry represented by the Aviation Working Group, Industry Consultative Group (ICG) asked the FAA to not establish a form agreement, but rather to offer form clauses for inclusion in trust agreements, thus allowing trustors and trustees to vary other agreement provisions to reflect their commercial intent. It is doubtful that the FAA would require trusts to adhere strictly to a single form, as long as deviations do not undermine the PPC’s objectives. • Disclosure of Leases to Foreign Trustors: The FAA acknowledges that foreign trustors are frequently given exclusive possession and physical control over the aircraft by the trust, often reflected in leases or operating agreements. In the past, NCTs often failed to provide copies of these “side agreements” to the FAA for review with the trust agreement, and in some cases these side agreements undermined or contradicted the trust agreement. The PPC proposes to have all side agreements filed with the FAA for review (and if no side agreements are filed, the trustee is to attest that no agreements exist). The ICG accepts this filing requirement, but asks that the FAA discard these documents once they have approved the trust as a US citizen, in order to protect the privacy of the foreign trustors. [It is highly unusual for a federal agency to destroy or return documents used in reaching a regulatory decision, and it will be interesting to see what the FAA does in response to this concern.] • Trustee Autonomy (Removal): The FAA intends to severely restrict the foreign Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

trustor’s ability to influence the trustee, including limiting the trustor’s ability to remove (fire) the trustee unless there is cause to do so. The ICG suggests specific standards for removing the trustee for cause (i.e., “willful misconduct or gross negligence”). • Enhanced Trustee Involvement: In perhaps the one area that truly responds to the problem first identified by the FAA (the “know-nothing” trustee), the FAA proposed that trustees be capable of responding to the FAA’s informational inquiries about the aircraft, its ownership and operations. Specifically, the PPC expects a trustee to be able to identify the operator and principal base of operations for an NCT-owned aircraft within two business days, and to identify crew, future operations and maintenance records within five business days. The ICG is hoping to convince the FAA to back off a specific numeric standard, and instead adopt a descriptive standard for timely responses. NCT owned aircraft are often located in remote locations, and producing crew and maintenance records can be difficult as a practical matter.

by leases or operating agreements in the ordinary course. It is difficult to reconcile the FAA’s implication of continuous trustee control with the acknowledgement of exclusive operating leases to foreign trustors.

CONCLUSIONS As a practical matter, if you currently have an aircraft in an NCT, or if you are putting one into an NCT, this ownership method will remain available to you for the foreseeable future. What remains to be seen is how the role of the trustee will change. If the FAA has its way, then trustees will have a great deal of additional work to do, including regular tracking of NCT aircraft operations. Trust structures are usually priced with a relatively modest start-up and annual fees; and any unusual work required by the trustee is charged to the trustor. The FAA’s proposed changes will greatly increase the burden on trustees, and foreign buyers can expect to see higher start-up and annual fees, and security deposit requirements to secure a trustee’s ability to be paid for extraordinary actions required by the FAA. ❯ For more information,

• Control of the Aircraft: The FAA and the ICG continue to wrestle with the difficult question of how to ensure trustee control of the aircraft operations, while at the same time permitting the foreign trustor to have sole use of the aircraft. The FAA continues to speak in absolutes, implying that the trustee must exercise control of operations continuously; while the ICG asks that the control requirement be conditional, meaning that the trustee have the ability to control the aircraft when necessary to protect the interests of the United States, but allowing for transfers of control

please contact Greg Cirillo, Wiley Rein LLP, 703.905.2808 or gcirillo@wileyrein.com. Mr. Cirillo is a transactional, commercial attorney practicing at Wiley Rein LLP representing businesses, entrepreneurs and high net worth individuals in a wide range of transactions including venture formation, finance, corporate control, licensing, succession planning, mergers and acquisitions.

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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Air Fleet Leasing August 26/07/2012 10:16 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Boeing 727-100REW “Super 27” Serial Number: 20512 Registration: N311AG Airframe TT: 31,783.8 Landings: 17,321 Engines Pratt & Whitney #1, #3: JT8D-217C, #2: JT8D-9A Total Time (hrs) Total Cycles Engine #1 5,534.2 1,661 (S/N: 726125) Engine #2 32,333.6 44,978 (S/N: 674516) Engine #3 5,534.2 1,661 (S/N: 726124) APU Garrett GTCP-85-98C (S/N: P22864) Avionics Communications: (2) Honeywell Primus 2 - VHF (1) Collins VHF-22B – VHF (2) Collins HF-628 with SELCAL (5) Honeywell Audio Panels (Primus 2) (1) Aircell Iridium– phone + ICS (3 phones) (1) Honeywell AFIS Navigation (VHF): (2) Honeywell Primus2: VOR, ILS, DME, ADF, MKR Instrument Panel Display: (5) Tube EFIS – EDZ-805 Autopilot / Flight Director: (2) Honeywell FMS FMZ 2000 (1) Interface: Avionics Engineering Svs Flight Management System: (2) Honeywell Flt Drctr Cmptrs FZ500 Long Range Navigation:

Please contact Dan Boyajian at these coordinates for further details

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

(3) Honeywell IRS Laseref (2) Honeywell GPS (1) Honeywell Laser Trak w/ Display Weather Radar: (1) Honeywell Primus P880 (color) Transponder: (2) Honeywell – Mode S (enhanced) TCAS II (1) Honeywell w/ change 7 Interior This designer interior was featured in Architectural Digest when it was installed and has been continuously maintained in its timeless classic style. Luxurious accommodations are provided for 28 passengers. The forward salon features a combination of divans and individual seating for twelve including a convertible cocktail / dining table between opposite threeplace divans for casual or formal dining. Moving aft and servicing the forward salon is a unique buffet with storage cabinets beneath. Across from the well-equipped gourmet galley is a serving bar with drawer and cabinet storage. A passageway leads further aft to the private stateroom and then on to the aft lounge. Aircraft Condition and Maintenance: This Aircraft is in excellent airworthy condition and is certified for immediate worldwide operation. It completed a heavy maintenance C-check during First Quarter 2012, which included JT8D-217C engine shop visits. There is no scheduled major maintenance for two years. The Long-range Fuel Tank System has been re-certified and is compliant with SFAR-88.

AIR FLEET LEASING AND MANAGEMENT COMPANY, INC. 1209 Ward Avenue - Suite 100, West Chester, PA 19380 (Pennsylvania, USA) www.AvBuyer.com

These specifications are subject to inspection and verification.

Tel: Fax: Mob: E-mail:

+1 (0) 610-436-4875 +1 (0) 610-436-1185 +1 (0) 610-547-2311 DEB@airfleetsales.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


AeroSmith Penny August 24/07/2012 14:59 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Price Reduced

1990 Citation II Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-0636 N50NF 6343 4898

Airframe CESCOM Fresh Phase 1-5 and 10 - July 2011 Engines Pratt & Whitney JT15D-4 Eng. 1: 2659 SMOH 711 SHOT Eng. 2: 2659 SMOH 711 SHOT Avionics Sperry 3 tube EDS-603 3 Tube EFIS Sperry SPZ 500 Autopilot Global GNS XLS w/ GPS KGP 860 MFD Honeywell Primus 650 Color Radar Dual Collins 32A Navs 8.33 Spacing Dual Collins 22A Comms Dual Collins TDR 90 Transponders Dual Collins ADF – 462 Collins ALT-55B Flightphone Honeywell Mark VIII TAWS 406 ELT

Additional Features RVSM Thrust Reverse Fairchild A100 CVR AFT Baggage Freon Air Conditioning No Damage History Gross Take Off Weight Increase Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with blue stripes. New paint in June 1997 Interior Interior has seven passenger center club configuration. Also included is a left hand deluxe refreshment center. Seat belted flushing potty. New leather seats and carpet 2009

AeroSmith Penny 8031 Airport Blvd., Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (713) 649-6100 Fax: +1 (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com www.aerosmithpenny.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

133


2000 Global Express August 24/07/2012 15:05 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Immediately available, make offer! 2000 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9067 N67RX 7,592.4 2,264

• Immediately available • New paint • New soft goods • 8C-Check completed in June 2012 • Landing gear overhauled in June 2012 • Only one owner since new • Complete and clean maintenance records • Engines on Corporate Care • APU on MSP • Airframe on Smart Parts • Contact us for complete details and specifications

Engines and APU Left Right 12235 12246 7,592.4 hrs 7,592.4 hrs 2,264 cycles 2,264 cycles Current On Condition Current On Condition APU RE-220 (GX) on MSP Serial Number P-166 Total Time 3,006 hours Total Cycles 4,253 cycles Weights Last weighed June 2012 Empty 49,970 lbs BOW 51,559 lbs Max Zero Fuel 56,000 lbs Max Landing 78,600 lbs Serial Number Total Time Total Cycles Inspection Status

Max Take-Off 96,000 lbs Max Gross 96,250 lbs Exterior Painted June 2012 Paint Overall white Interior Refurbished June 2012 Cabin Layout 14 Seats • Baker cabin management systems • Electric window shades Forward Cabin • 4 club seats Mid Cabin • 2 club seats plus 4-seat dining group Aft Cabin • 2-seat divan plus 2 club seats Toilets • Fwd and aft Magair toilets Entertainment • 2 x DVD/12 CD Player & VCR • Fwd and aft 18” monitors • 6 x 6.5” seat monitors • Crew rest has built-in PMAT plus 10” monitor • Fax Galley • TIA Oven • Freezer • Chiller • Microwave Avionics EFIS • 6 x DU-870 FMS • 3 x Honeywell Flight Director • Honeywell IC800 Autopilot • Honeywell IC800 GPS • 2 x GPS-550 NAV • 2 x RNZ-850 ADF • 2 x RNZ-850 DME • 2 x RNZ-850 VHF • 2 x RCZ-833K HF • 2 x HF-9000/Selcal Selcal • 1 x Coltech CSD-714 Transponder • 2 x RCZ-833 Mode S Enhanced Japat AG Daniel Stieger

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www.AvBuyer.com

E-mail: daniel.stieger@novartis.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


2001 Global Express March 25/07/2012 14:04 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2001 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9086 M-MNAA 6370 2229

As owner, Japat AG offers for sale its 2001 Bombardier Global Express, Serial Number 9086. This aircraft features: • Honeywell Avionics • 8C-Check and Landing Gear Overhaul in October 2012 • Buyers Choice of new Interior and Paint Colors

Airframe Empty Weight: 49,545 Lbs, Max Gross Weight: 96,000 Lbs, Max. Landing: 78,600 Lbs. Engines BR710A2-20 on Corporate Care. Left: S/N-12287, TT: 6370.19 Hrs, TC: 2,229 Cycles. Right: S/N-12286, TT: 6370.19 Hrs, TC: 2,229. All Inspections Current. APU: RE-220(GX). On MSP Avionics DU-870 EFIS, Honeywell FMS, Honeywell IC800 Flight Director & Autopilot, GPS-550 GPS, RNZ-850 NAV, ADF, & DME, RCZ-833K VHF, HF-9000/Selcal HF, RCZ-833 Mode S Enhanced Transponder, Primus-880 Radad, TCAS, FDR, CVR, ELT. Interior Original, 14 seat interior. Baker Cabin Management System. Electric Window

Shades. 4 Club Seats in Forward Cabin, 2 Club Seats plus 4-Seat Dining Group in Mid Cabin, 2-Seat Divan plus 2 Club Seats in Aft Cabin. Fwd and Aft Magair Toilets. DVD, CD, & VCR. 6-6.5” Seat Monitors. Crew Rest has built-in PMAT plus 10” Monitor. Fax. TIA Oven. Freezer. Chiller. Microwave. Aircraft will be delivered with fresh soft goods in October 2012. Color can still be decided by buyer. Exterior July 2002 Paint. Overall White with Blue and Gold Stripes. Aircraft will be delivered with new, October 2012 Paint. Color can still be decided by buyer. Aircraft Located at Basel-Airport, Switzerland Price: Please Inquire

Japat AG Daniel Stieger

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

E-mail: daniel.stieger@novartis.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

135


Albinati Citationjet 2+ August 24/07/2012 16:15 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Cessna Citationjet 2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

525A-0385 HB-VOP 1529 1510

Engines on TAP Elite Williams International FJ-44- 3A-24 FADEC Controlled LH: S/N 216179 1529 TT / 1510 CSN RH: S/N 216178 1529 TT / 1510 CSN Avionics Collins Proline 21 Avionics System with 3 (8x10 inc) color, active matrix liquid crystal displays. AHRS 2 Collins AHC-3050 ADC 2 Collins ADC-3000 IFIS 1 Collins IFIS-5000 FMS 2 Collins FMS-.3000 (incl. DME II) GPS 1 Collins GPS-4000A w/12-Channel RTU 2 Collins RTU-4200 NAV 2 Collins NAV-4000 and NAV-4500 ADF 1 Collins ADF DME 1 Collins DME-4000 VHF 2 Collins VHF-4000 w/8.33KHz spacing XPDR 2 Collins TDR-94 Mode S TCAS II 1 Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II EGPWS Mark V EGPWS with RAAS Radar 1 Collins WXR-800 ESIS GH-3000 ESIS CVR Provisions for installation of L3 connection FA 2100 CVR ELT 1 Artex C406-N w/3 freq. ELT MDC 1 Collins Maintenance Diagnostic System

Additional Equipment Gnd Com Dispatch Switch (powers 1Radio, 1 RTU and both audio panel) Pulselight System with interface to TCAS II Tail Log Lights Nose Landing Gear in/protection boot Installation Jeppesen Electronic Charts on MFD Crew Seat Sheepskin Slipcovers 110V Ac Universal Electrical Outlet w/500W Inverter Monorail Sunvisors – Entry Step Upgrade to Airstair Style Steep Approach Option Interior Two (2) Cockpit, six (6) Cabin passengers seats. Four executive club chairs with two fold-out executive tables. RH Fwd Refreshment Center. Aft Divider Assembly with sliding door Aft Low Boy storage cabinet with drawer One Aft Potty Belted Seat. Townsend Leather Satin finished wood veneer – Australian Walnut Brushed Aluminium Hardware Finish. Exterior Overall white with dark grey stripes JAR OPS 1

Asking Price: Make Offer

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: Mob: E-mail: Web:

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 +41 (0) 79 2005265 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAI Socata TBM700B August 24/07/2012 15:09 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2002 TBM 700B Serial Number: 239 Airframe TT: 1,705 Engine PRATT & WHITNEY PT6A-64 (3,500 Hr. TBO) 352 Hours Since Hot Section Propeller HARTZELL 230 SPOH - Nov. 2008 Avionics NAV/COMM: GARMIN GNS-530W AP/FD: KING KFC-325 (W/PRESELECT) DME: KING KN-63 XPNDR: DUAL GARMIN GTX-327 ALTIMETER: KING KEA-346 R/ALT: KING KRA-405B EGPWS: KING KGP-560 (ON GMX-200) R/ALT: KING KRA-405B AUDIO: GARMIN GMA-340 GPS: DUAL GARMIN GNS-530W EFIS: TWO-TUBE BENDIX EFS-40 MFD: GARMIN GMX-200 W/CHARTVIEW RADAR: KING RDR-2000 (ON GMX-200) S/SCOPE: WX-500 TCAD: SKYWATCH HP Wx: GARMIN GDL-69 (DOWNLINK) Features THREE OWNERS SINCE NEW, GASEOUS OXYGEN SYSTEM, ROLL STEERING UPGRADE FOR MORE PRECISE AUTOPILOT CONTROL FOR APPROACHES, UPGRADED THE EFIS 40 TO COUPLE WAAS VERTICAL (LPV) APPROACHES, ETM 700 ENGINE TREND MONITOR, FULL COPILOT

INSTRUMENTS: KING KI-525 HSI, AIRSPEED & VERTICAL SPEED INDICATORS, ALTITUDE INDICATOR, ELECTRIC ARTIFICIAL HORIZON, ELECTRIC TRIM CONTROL, ALTIMETER AND AIRSPEED INDICATOR. KEITH FREON AIR, TRI BAND ELT, KNOWN ICING (DE-ICE BOOTS, ELECTRIC PROP, ELECTRICALLY HEATED RIGHT HAND SIDE WINDSHIELD, PITOT/STALL, INERTIAL SEPARATOR), ELT, OAT GAUGE AND NO DAMAGE HISTORY Maintenance ANNUAL INSPECTION COMPLIED WITH FEBRUARY 2012 BY SOCATA AIRCRAFT, LANDING GEAR ON 10 YEAR LONG LIFE INSPECTION PROGRAM WHICH INVOLVED REBUILDING THE ACTUATORS TO 10 YEAR SPECS, REPLACING ALL THE TORQUE LINK PINS AND BUSHINGS IN ALL THREE GEAR AND RESEALING THE GEAR, NEW WING BOOTS NOVEMBER 2008. Interior PLATINUM EDITION, HIGH COMFORT BEIGE LEATHER SEATS, GOLD METAL FINISH FOR READLING LIGHTS, BEIGE ALCANTARA WALLS, WOOD OVERHEAD PANEL, EXECUTIVE WRITING TABLE, AND HIGH GLOSS CHERRY CABINETRY. Exterior WHITE UPPER FUSELAGE AND WINGS, LOWER FUSELAGE BLUE WITH SILVER, BLUE AND RED ACCENTS The aircraft is based in Europe

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com

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Eurojet July 24/07/2012 15:10 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2000 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550B-0917 G-IDAB 2780 2341

• On Power Advantage & ProParts • EU-Ops Compliant • Fresh Phase I through V just completed Engines Eng 1 (L): 2,780 SNEW - 4,000 TBO - 2,341 CSN Eng 2 (R): 2,780 SNEW - 4,000 TBO - 2,341 CSN Avionics Avionics Package: Honeywell P-1000 Flight Director: Primus 1000 Autopilot: Primus 1000 FMS: Honeywell GNS-XLS Communication Radios: Dual King With 8.33 Spacing Navigation Radios: Dual King DME: Dual King ADF: King CNI-5000 Transponder: Honeywell MST-67A Mode S enhanced TCAS: Honeywell CAS-67A TCAS-II TAWS: Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS Hi Frequency: Bendix/King KHF-950 Weather Radar: Collins RTA-800 CVR: Fairchild FDR: Fairchild

Additional Equipment and Options Rosen Monorail sun visors EROS Crew Masks 50 Cubic Foot Oxygen Bottle Large SAFT 43 Amp Battery Overwater Life Vests Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS Artex ELT w/triple channels Camino window inserts Exterior Matterhorn with navy blue & burgundy stripes Interior Attractive lightly appointed interior features grey leather seating with Elite style tailoring and high gloss laminate cabinetry. Full LH Galley with hot liquid and storage cabinet Executive writing tables. Non belted flushing lavatory. Indirect lighting, and an aft divider. Price Reduced

Current owners trading up Excellent aircraft for either private or charter purposes In exceptional condition

Tel: +44 (0) 121 782 1700 Fax: +44 (0) 121 782 1711 Email: aircraftsales@eurojet.eu.com

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Aircraft Index see Page 4


Florida Jet August 24/07/2012 15:12 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1988 Gulfstream IV Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1085 N423TT 8312 3836

Engines Engine Model: Rolls Royce TAY MK611-8 Rolls Royce Corporate Care Program Engine #1: Engine #2: TSOH: 1133 Hours 1133 Hours CSOH: 544 544 APU Model: Garrett GTCP36-100 TSHSI: 1524 Hours: 6246 Maintenance 12, 24, 72 month items complied with May 2012 by General Dynamics PBI Gulfstream Computerized Maintenance Program Additional Features RVMS Allied Signal EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II With Change 7 Honeywell Sat AFIS Baker Audio Control System XM Radio Baker Passenger Briefing System Artex C-406-1 ELT Fairchild A-100 Cockpit Voice Recorder Motorola NA-135 SELCAL

Avionics • Dual Honeywell SPZ-8000 EFIS • Iridium Satphone • Triple Honeywell FMZ-2000 w/5.2 software • Dual Collins HF-190 • Triple Collins VHF-422D Comms • Dual Collins VIR-432 Navs • Dual Collins ADF-462 • Dual Collins DME-442 • Dual Collins TDR-94D Transponders • Honeywell Primus 870 Color Radar • Triple Honeywell Laseref II IRU • Dual Honeywell GPS • Honeywell Lasertrak • 3rd Standby Nav/Comm CTL-23 Exterior White with blue and silver stripes Re-striped January 2007 Interior and Cabin Features Refurbished soft goods and wood January 2007 Replaced carpet & recovered Divan May 2012 13-Passenger Executive Seating Forward crew only & Aft Lavatory Airshow 400 Three 17" LCD Video Monitors Make Offer ~ Owner Financing Available ~ All Trades Considered

Florida Jet Sales, Inc 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

139


Mente Citation VII & Falcon 2000 July 24/07/2012 16:23 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1995 Citation VII Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

650-7059 N14DG 4,456.4 3,504

• LOW TOTAL TIME, 4,456.4 HOURS • MSP • XM RADIO • HERMISTATIC DOOR SEAL TO REDUCE CABIN NOISE LEVEL • 2 LARGE MONITORS & 5 INDIVIDUAL SEAT MONITORS Engines Garrett TFE - 731-4R-2S MSP Gold Left: S/N: P102227. 4,220.5 Hours. 3,337 Cycles Right: S/N: P102228. 4,267 Hours. 3,329 Cycles

Kyle Foddrill Tel: +1 (817) 372-4527 E-mail: kfoddrill@mentegroup.com APU Honeywell S/N: 36-150. 2,459 Hours On MSP Avionics • Honeywell SPZ-8000 Avionics Suite • Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS • Honeywell Primus 670 • Dual Collins VHF 22A • Dual Collins DME 42 • Dual Collins ADF 452 • Collins TDR -94 • Collins ALT-55 • Honeywell TCAS-II • Fairchild GA-100 Cockpit Voice Rec. • Dual Honeywell NZ-2000 • King KTR-953 with SeCal • Honeywell Mark VIII

AirCell 3100T with dual handsets. Airshow 400. RVSM Compliant. VHS and CD player. Hermistatic Door Seal Interior Six passenger configuration features a forward four place club with two fold out executive tables and two forward facing aft seats. The aircraft features a belted aft lavatory. Soft Goods Refurbished November 2008; New Carpet November 2008 Exterior New Paint November 2008, by Jim Miller Additional Features 5 Individual monitors. XM Radio IPod docking station. Camera 14" Monitor in the forward right cabin 10" Monitor in the forward left cabin Hermistatic Door Seal to reduce cabin noise level

Two Corporate Owners Since New

2001 Falcon 2000

Mark Payne Tel: +1 972-897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Interior Eight passenger interior consisting of a four place aft cabin package including left hand dining/coffee table and two sets of dual passenger seats, two individual 18” wide passenger seats. Jumpseat (ERDA). Crew seat sheepskin inserts. Aircraft flight/performance box. Aircraft logbook holder. Forward right hand galley annex (15”). Right hand galley(46”) with pop-out work surface, high temp oven, Tia coffee maker, and Tia microwave oven. Forward left hand entryway closet/entertainment cabinet with 15” LCD monitor on cabin side. Headliner lighting system. Galley pocket/sliding door Exterior Last Painted: January 2011. By: Duncan Aviation White (Jetglo snow white) with blue (Jetglo light blue) and black (Jetglo gloss black) stripes. Dry bay mod complied with prior to repaint

131 N707MM 5,187 3,010

• Exterior Paint in January 2011 • Engine Program: 100% JSSI • One Owner • Fortune 500 Owned & Operated Airframe Camp Maintenance & Tracking Program Engines CFE 738-1-1B 100% JSSI Left: S/N P105379, 5,068 Hours, 3,010 Cycles Right: S/N P105387, 5,066 Hours, 3,010 Cycles APU S/N P-243. 2,679 Hours. APU is not on a Program

Avionics • Four Tube Collins 4000 EFIS • Dual Collins VHF-422C Comm • Dual Collins VIR-432 NAV • Dual Collins ADF-462 ADF • Dual Collins DME-442 DME • Dual Collins TDR-94D Mode S TDR • One Collins TWR-850/2 Cntrls Radar • Dual Collins FMS-6000/CDU-6100 FMS • Dual Collins 4000 GPS • Dual Honeywell Laseref IV • Dual Collins 9000 w/ Selcal HF • Dual Collins ALT-55B Rad Alt • Meggitt LCD Secondary Flight Display • Collins 4000 w/ Chng 7 TCAS II • Collins APS-4000 Autopilot • Socata 97 Tri Band Elt

Mente Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320, Addison, TX 75001

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Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


John Hopkinson Ultras July 24/07/2012 15:16 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation Ultras Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell GNS-XLS FMS Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS Interior Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior Exterior Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior Maintenance Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale Zero Engine Option follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 2012

141


Remo Investments July 24/07/2012 15:17 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1991 Hawker 1000B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

259004 M-ACPT 3946 2328

• 8.33 VHF • FN Immune Navs • RVSM approved • MNPS approved • 3000 nm with 8 Pax • One owner since factory Engine Engines Hours/Cyc: Left: 3374 TTSN. 1968 TCSN. Right: 3109 TTSN. 1809 TCSN Engines – ESP Silver APU Solar T-62T-40C8D-1 Total Hours: 1355 Avionics Dual Honeywell SPZ-8000. Dual Honeywell EDZ818 Dual Honeywell DFZ-800 Nav (RNZ 850/ADZ 810/RCZ 850 Mode S.) Dual Honeywell SRZ-850 Corn. Dual Honeywell Laseref III / with GPS. EGPWS Honeywell Mk V TCAS 2000 Dual Honeywell FMZ-900 FMS Honeywell Primus 870 W/Radar Honeywell AA-300 Rad/Alt. Racal H690/4 Pax/Crew Telephone Fairchild CVR Dual King KHF-950 HF with S/CAL. FDR – Provisions NZ 2000

Interior 8 place with 5 individual chairs, including fwd. club 4, aft 3 place divan all in leather. Dual fwd. galley with cooking oven, 'fridge, hot water/coffee pot and sink unit. Aft toilet. Baggage hold aft of toilet. Aft slimline wardrobe, Fwd wardrobe/baggage with tambour door & 3rd crew jump seat stowage. Light veneers & gold plated fittings. New Head and Window liner to dado in Ultra Leather in 09 Exterior Overall white, silver & red scheme. 2008 Weights Max. Ramp Max. Take off Max. Landing Zero Fuel Op. Empty

31300 lbs 31100 lbs 25000 lbs 20300 lbs 17734 lbs

Options Rohr Thrust reversers Exterior toilet servicing. Exterior access to aft baggage hold. Engines on Pratt & Whitney ESP Notes MNPS approved. Factory Mods have been incorporated to late production aircraft status

Remo Investments

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Tel: Email:

+44 (0) 7860 307638 1peterprescott3@o2.co.uk

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Northern Air N959RP June 24/07/2012 15:21 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

40-2100 N959RP 1895 1538

• Extended Range Fuel Airframe Factory Warranty Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 1907 / Right Engine 1899 MSP Gold Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter

• Cockpit Voice Recorder • Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue and Yellow Stripes Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Imbuia gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Almond Crunch leather with Surfside lower sidewalls and finished Imbuia wood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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Aero-Dienst CJ3 August_Heeren Cit Ultra sep 25/07/2012 12:45 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

On CESSNA ProAdvantage TAP ELITE

2005 Cessna Citation CJ3 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

525B0011 2114 1861

Airframe, Avionics & Engines enrolled on Cessna ProAdvantage TAP ELITE Program - Aircraft enrolled on Cessna Computerized Maintenance Tracking Service CESCOM - EU-OPS 1 Equipped – Steep Approach - RVSM and MNPS Approved – Non Smoking Aircraft - All Maintenance up-to-date - ADs and Mandatory SBs Current – Seven Passengers Seating - No Structural Damage History Engines 2 Williams FJ44-3A L/H: S/N 141025 TSN: 2114 hrs CSN: 1861 R/H: S/N 141026 TSN: 2114 hrs CSN: 1861 Avionics and Other Features Collins Pro Line 21 Integrated Avionics System with 3- Tube EFIS COM: Dual Collins VHF-4000 Transceivers w/ 8.33 kHz spacing HF COM: HF-9000 w/ SELCAL SATCOM: AirCell ST-3100 Iridium Satphone NAV: Dual Collins Navigation Receivers (NAV-4000 & NAV-4500) w/ FM Immunity DME: Dual Collins DME-4000 ADF: Integr. in NAV-4000 ADC: Dual Collins ADC-3000 Air Data Computers AHRS: Dual Collins AHC-3000 AHRS

A/P: Collins APS-3000 Autopilot ALT: Collins ALT-4000 Radio Altimeter FMS1: Collins FMS-3000 w/ Collins GPS4000A and Performance Database FMS2: Garmin GPS-500 GPS XPDNR: Dual Collins TDR-94 Mode-S Diversity Transponders w/ Enhanced Surveillance capability WXR: Collins RTA-800 STORMSCOPE: L3 WX-1000E Stormscope TAWS: Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS (Class A) TCAS: Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II w/ Change 7 FDR/CVR: L-3 Communications FA2100 SSFDR ELT: Artex C406-N ELT w/ 406 MHz and Nav. Interface Additional Equipment RVSM certified Jeppesen Electronic Charts Collins Broadcast Graphical Weather Cockpit Speaker Mute Switch Precise Pulselite System Interior Executive fireblocked interior is configured with 4-place center-club arrangement, two aft fwd facing seats and aft L/H belted flushing toilet. Tastefully finished in Earthtone shades of Beige, Tan, and Oatmeal with high gloss wood veneer cabinetry and trim. Carpet new in 2011

Aero-Dienst GmbH & Co. KG, Flughafenstrasse 100, 90411 Nuernberg, Germany

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Exterior Overall Snow White with Deep Red, Carter Gold, and Arista Blue accent striping Price: Make Offer All Specifications subject to verification upon inspection. Aircraft available subject to prior sale or withdrawal from market.

Tel: +49-911-9356-120 Fax: +49-911-9356-401 E-mail: armin.hoehnemann@aero-dienst.de

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Welsch Avitaion August 24/07/2012 15:25 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1999 Gulfstream IVSP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1366 N404XT 6,940 4,480

Engine Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 on MSG-3 Schedule #1 - 6,788 Hours Since New - 1,878 Hours Since Midlife in 11/2007 #2 - 6,856 Hours Since New - 3,403 Hours Since Midlife in 01/2005 APU GTCP 36-150G - 2,839 Time Since New - On MSP Avionics Honeywell SPZ-8400 Package Triple Collins VHF-422 Comm w/ 8.33 Spacing Dual Collins VIR-432 Nav w/ FM Immunity Dual Collins ADF-462 ADF Dual Collins DME-442 DME Dual Collins HF-822-0102-001 Dual Collins TDR-94D Transponders w/Mode S Flight ID Triple Honeywell LaserRef II IRS Dual Honeywell NZ-2000 FMS Dual Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters Honeywell Primus WU-880 Color Radar Honeywell LASERTRACK Honeywell TCAS II w/ Change 7 Honeywell EGPWS Honeywell AFIS Iridium Aircell P-12023 Satcom L3 F-1000 Digital FDR S-800-2000-00 Fairchild CVR 2100-1020-00 Airtext ELT-406

Features Honeywell HUD RVSM, RNP-5 & RNP-10 Pulse Landing Lights Wingtip Taxi Lights LED Nav Lights [ASC-466] Entertainment Airshow 400 • Three 14” Monitors • DVD and VCR Players • CD Player/Changer • Cabin Stereo Speakers • Cockpit & Cabin 110V AC Outlets Interior 12 Passenger with Aft Galley and Single Aft Lav • Fwd cabin - 4 place club configuration with dual fold-out tables • Mid cabin - 4 place conference group with opposing credenza w/ non-belted seat • Aft cabin - 4 place club configuration with dual fold-out tables • Aft Full Galley • Aft Full Lav w/ Belted Seat • Original 1999 w/ New Carpet Exterior Oyster White with Blue and Gold stripes • New November 2005 Maintenance Aircraft is maintained under the MSG-3 Schedule 12, 48, 144 month inspections c/w 10/2011 Honeywell Avionics covered under HAPP Program ASC-469 Ribbon Heater c/w 11/2010 ASC-485B APU Thermal Barrier c/w 02/2011 Price $11,950,000

Contact Robert Hart Tel: +1 (0) 912-964-7727 Mob: +1 (0) 912-695-1555 Email: rhart75546@aol.com www.welschaviation.com

Since 1949

WELS WELSCH SCH S CH A V I A T I O N ®

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions A

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

145


ASW Air-Service March 24/07/2012 15:27 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Asking price 12.9Million US$ 1991 Mystere-Falcon 900 B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

101 VP-CAB 3950 3480

• One owner since new (private owner) • No damage history • Maintenance by JetAviation Basel • Perfect condition interior and exterior • CAT II equipped and approved by CAA • Complies with JAR OPS 1 • Cayman Island registration, formerly on German registration • CAMP access can be granted • A/C delivered with fresh A check

Engines Engines TFE731 5BR1C Honeywell (with MSP Gold Serviceplan) Consecutive serial numbers, engines supplied with aircraft upon delivery MPI/CZI due in 300HRS, cost covered by MSP. APU GTCP 36-150 F HSI C/W in 2005 Avionics FDR CVR

Tri- band ELT EGPWS Single Rad Alt Mode S TCAS Dual VHF 8,33khz RVSM BRNAV HF Selcal Single GPS Dual FMS/ IRS Weather Radar with Dual Controller Stormscope CAT II certified. Interior Hot air oven and coffeemaker. 14 Pax config. with fabric (wool) armrest and seatbase leather. Cabin LED lighting. CD Player. Special Equipment Cabin LED lighting Ice detector Battery charger Iridium sat phone Towbar installation USB data loader Third flight deck crew seat N1 DEEC’s Maintenance 3C check C/W 2009 ASW Air-Service Werkflugdienst GmbH & Co.KG Flughafen, Gebäude 347 22335 Hamburg, Germany

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Tel: + 49-(0)40-59 88 46 Fax: + 49-(0)40-59 64 09 Cell: + 49-(0)170-8383330 E-mail: Falcon@bauermedia.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace August12 25/07/2012 14:32 Page 1

Marketplace Boeing 737-300 VIP

European Skybus Ltd Year:

1990

S/N:

24570

TTAF:

53457

Reg:

N470AC

Location: United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 1531 633 000

This Boeing 737-300 has recently undergone extensive maintenance and engineering work and has been converted to a VIP configuration in February 2011. The aircraft has been completely refurbished to the highest standards. The new owner will benefit from the millions of dollars and thousands of man hours that have gone into completing this VIP conversion. Winglets have been fitted to improve the aircraft performance and range. Price: Please call - REDUCED!

Boeing 737-500

European Skybus Ltd Year:

1991

S/N:

24645

TTAF:

36,946

Reg:

EI-EOE

Location: United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 1531 633 000

This Boeing 737-500 has recently undergone extensive maintenance and engineering work including a “D” check and has been converted to a VIP configuration in November 2010. The aircraft has been completely refurbished to the highest standards. The new owner will benefit from the millions of dollars and thousands of man hours that have gone into completing this VIP conversion which can include optional Winglets to improve the aircraft performance and range. Price: Please call

Socata TBM 700B

Avia Source, Inc. Year:

2001

S/N:

208

TTAF:

4050

Reg:

LX-JFE

Location: Switzerland

Total Time as 4050 hours and the Engine Time Since Overhaul is 333 hours. Take advantage of the best value available in the 700Bs. This fine aircraft is one owner since new, has updated Garmin avionics, Socata maintained and Extensive 10 year inspection is completed. The interior and exterior are in excellent condition. Price USD$1,200,000

Avia Source, Inc. Year:

2006

S/N:

732

TTAF:

1600

Reg:

M-ZUMO

Location: United Kingdom

This excellent PC-12/47 is equipped with the Second Battery, Large Oxy System and Additional Air Conditioning. It has the 8 passenger interior with the 6 seat BMW Platinum Upgrade and two additional standard seats. Delivered with: 0 time since Hot Section Inspection, 0 time since Prop Overhaul and we will paint stripes to your specifications. Price USD$2,675,000

EPSN Year:

1998

S/N:

3095

TTAF:

2011

Reg:

PH-EVY

Location: Netherlands

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: jason@aviasource.aero Tel: +31 (0) 629 560 272

Aircraft in Executive lay-out 12 pax. Exceptionally wide corporate cabin arrangement with forward kitchen and aft Wardrobe/Lavatory room (wider then e.g. G V or Falcon 900). Kitchen with oven, coffeemaker, wash bin, ample stowing cabinetry. Cabin with moving map display, video/audio system. Wardrobe / lavatory area with large wardrobe space. With access to the aft baggage compartment. Fresh Phase V inspection, Fresh LG Overhaul. EASA JAR/OPS1 equipped. Dual STransponder. RVSM mod c/w. Price: Please call

✈ Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Email: jason@aviasource.aero Tel: +1 626-584-8170

Dornier 328

Email: trevorw@euroav.com Tel: +1 626-584-8170

Pilatus PC-12/47

Email: trevorw@euroav.com

Email: hwac@kpnmail.nl WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

147


Marketplace August12 26/07/2012 09:55 Page 2

Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

TTAF:

6615.3

Reg:

N337WR

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,975,000.

Location: USA jetphotos.net

Bell 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

TTAF:

1700

Reg: Location: USA

justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners. US $1,975,000.

1981

S/N:

33017

TTAF:

15265

Reg:

N554AL

Location: USA

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’. Fresh annual / Export C of A. Price US $3,875,000 ✈

Bell 212

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not do

Bell 412 EMS

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

S/N: TTAF: Reg: Location: USA

Cessna Citation CJ2

Klaus Union Year:

2001

S/N:

C525A-0043

TTAF:

2237

Reg:

D-IEKU

Location: Germany

Tel: +49 (0) 234 459 5119 Pro Line 21 3 Tube EFIS-Dual DME-CNI5000 Nav-Com-ADF8.33KHz Spacing and FM Immunity-Dual GTX330D diversity XPDRWX-1000E Stormscope-RTA-800 WXRadar-HF Provision-ALT-55B Radio Altimeter-L-3 CVR-Mark VII EGPWS-UNS-1K with Permanent DTU-BF Goodrich TCAS- Garmin 400 WAAS GPS/movingmap interfaced to ProLine 21-RVSM-Belted toilet-N1-Computer-ELT 406MHz-3 110V outlets-B&C15000 cabin display-deluxe refreshment center-Pax advisory system-Iridium SatCom w 2 handsets-on ProParts-Protech-TAP-Elite-Cescom Price: USD 2,750,000

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Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Email: aircraft@klaus-union.de Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace August12 25/07/2012 14:35 Page 3

Marketplace Agusta A109E Power

Aerolineas Ejecutivas Year:

2006

Tel: +5215 5414 05052

Price Make offer

S/N: TTAF:

1250

Reg: Location: Mexico ✈

www.aerolineasejecutivas.com Socata TBM 700B

Email: m.toledo@aerolineasejecutivas.com

JT Air Ltd Year:

2002

S/N:

230

TTAF:

1426

Reg:

N324JS

Location: United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 7957 106 952 An extremely well presented and cared for Example of a Socata TBM 700 B with recent Hot Section Inspection, Socata Service Centre Maintained, Annual Inspection Completed Dec 2011. Complete and Original Logs. No Exceedences. Always Hangared. VAT paid in Europe. Garmin 530, KMD 850 MFD, EFIS-40 EHSI & EADI, Annual 31 Dec 2012, Gear Inspection & Long Life Enrolled, Garmin 330 Mode S, Prop 260SN, Interior Flawless, 2 Drink /Storage Cabinets, 6 Place Bose, Crew/Pac Music. Full Detail www.jtair.net/n324js. Price: Please Call

www.jtair.net/n324js Cessna 208

Email: mail@jtair.net

CAAD Inc. Year:

2008

S/N:

2045

TTAF:

3,656.24

Reg:

Tel: +1 (305) 593 9929 Total Aircraft Cycles: 6,733. Configuration: 12 Pax Seats. Aircraft Status: OPERATIONAL Info. updated to: 31-Jan12. Out of operations 31-Jan-12. Propellers Type & Model: 3GFR34C703-B. Serial Number: 100940. Propeller TBO: 4000. Time Since New: 1063.30. Time Since Overhaul: 1068.30. Price: $1,650,000

Location: Costa Rica ✈

www.caadinc.com Cessna 208

Email: colinward@caadinc.com

CAAD Inc. Year:

2008

S/N:

2050

TTAF:

3,809.54

Reg:

Tel: +1 (305) 593 9929 Total Aircraft Cycles: 7,065. Configuration: 12 Pax Seats. Aircraft Status: OPERATIONAL Info. updated to: 31-Jan-12 Out of operations 31-Jan-12. Propellers Type & Model: 3GFR34C703-B. Serial Number: 110577. Propeller TBO: 4000. Time Since New: 437.14. Time Since Overhaul: 437.14. Price: $1,650,000

Location: Costa Rica ✈

www.caadinc.com Learjet 60 XR

Email: colinward@caadinc.com

Aviation Advisors Int'l, Inc. Year:

2008

S/N:

338

TTAF:

281

Reg:

TBD

Tel: +1 (941) 351-5400

The Learjet* 60 XR easily outpaces the competition in time-to-climb performance and operating altitude without compromising a class-leading low operating cost. With its cutting-edge cockpit technologies and stylishly redefined cabin space, the Learjet 60 XR across distances of up to 2,405 nm. with ease. A value at $7,5000,000

Location: USA ✈ Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: BobD@aaisrq.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

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Marketplace August12 26/07/2012 13:08 Page 4

Marketplace Challenger 601-3A/ER

Aviation Advisors Int'l, Inc. Year:

1992

S/N:

5121

TTAF:

8,949

Reg:

N328AM

Tel: +1 (941) 351-5400

A "no excuses" airplane. With all major inspections just accomplished . Fresh 6/12/24/60 /120 & 240 Month inspection c/w in 2011. Fresh HSI on left engine. Fresh gear overhaul and interior refurbishment. Priced to sell at $3,995,000

Location: USA ✈

Cessna Citation CJ2

Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Aviation Advisors Int'l, Inc. Year:

2003

S/N:

144

TTAF:

4,112

Reg:

N144YD

Tel: +1 (941) 351-5400

Great history and a factory visit to do all inspections and squawks plus new paint and interior mean a great pedigree It is maintained on TAP Elite .The owner is moving up after spending the money to make it perfect. Flown less than 150 hours since this work you get the benefit. Priced at $3,195,000

Location: USA ✈

Bombardier/Challenger 300

EJS Aviation Ltd Year:

2007

S/N:

20216

TTAF:

2424

Reg:

VQ-BMJ

Location: Switzerland

Tel: +44 (0) 203 239 7585 EJS Aviation Ltd London exclusively presents CL 300 S/N 20126 in immaculate condition, over 500K USD spent in July 2011 in complete high end refurbishment including new interior and paint, work completed by Gulfstream. Aircraft only privately used by owner, owner family and executives. Engines/APU/Airframe on MSP, CAMP tracking, Smart Part Plus coverage, No damage history Price: Please call ✈

Beechjet 400A

Email: PaulD@aaisrq.com

Email: info@europeanjetsales.com

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Year:

1990

S/N: TTAF:

6.165

Tel: +49 (0) 821 7003 100 and -145

EU Reg, TSHSI 982 hrs (Engines), 9 Pax (opt.), HF-9000, GPS-4000A, 2x FMC-5000, TWR-850, 2x TDR-94D XPDR (ID), Rohr Thrust Reversers, RVSM + Incr. Weight Modification - Top Deal!

Reg: Location: ✈

Cessna Citation XLS

Email: info@beechcraft.de

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Year:

2007

S/N: TTAF:

2.600

Tel: +49 (0) 821 7003 100 and -145

EU Reg, EU-OPS, CVR (2h), HF-1050, TCAS II, CMS-400 Checklist, Dual FMS UNS-1 ESP, AvVisor+, Aircell ST3100, EASA German commerc. certif., CAMO+, fresh HSI 08/2012!

Reg: Location: ✈

150

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: info@beechcraft.de Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace August12 25/07/2012 14:37 Page 5

Marketplace Bombardier Global Express

AEROMAR Year:

2000

S/N:

9016

TTAF: Reg:

EC-KVU

Location:

EU-OPS1, Part 21, and Eurocontrol. Airworthiness Review Certificate issued by ES.MG.070.RA.001, next due December 04th 2012. TAG Aviation España has capability to issue the ARC of any Bombardier Global Express. Aircraft not involved in operational incidents or major repairs. Honeywell Primus 2000 6-Tube. Triple IC-800 Integrated Avionics Computers. Triple NZ-2000 FMS. DL-950 Data Loader. ✈

www.aeromarformula.com Eclipse 500 Year:

2008

S/N:

000155

TTAF:

785.4

Reg:

EC-LET

Tel: +34 (0) 618 637 666 Engines: P&W PW610F-A. Garmin 1000-1100 mhz GTX 33D GARMIN TRANSPONDER, DIVERSITY Honeywell N/A TAWS COMPUTER. RVSM/BRNAV COMPLIANT. FULL EASA JAR-OPS1 CERTIFIED. DUAL LEAD ACID BATTERIES. ONE 40 CUBIC FEET OXYGEN BOTTLE. FLIGHT INTO KNOWN ICING CONDITION CAPABILITY. Four place interior with aft luggage compartment equipped with coat hangers. Cayenne LX style (leather). Asking Price: Make Offer (all serious offers will be considered)

www.aeromarformula.com

Email: jmespinosa@aeromarformula.com

Galveston Maritime, S.L. Year:

2013

S/N:

TBD

TTAF: Reg: Location: Panama

Gulfstream 200

Tel: +7 (0) 495 222 2022

* Limited Edition * EASA EU-Ops1, BRNav; RVSM; MNPS * Quick Access Recorder * Operations at Airports with Max. Weight Restrictions * Second Data Link * EVAS * 19 inch pop-up monitor in credenza * RCA Jack port * Two iPod Cradle installation * Electronic Floor Tracking * Cabin Crew Seat LH Galley * Main entry door with handrail extension * Enviroclean system * Universal outlets * Bulkheald Deco Panels in Silk * Sideledge Transition cap ✈

Email: galvestonmaritime@gmail.com Tel: +1 770 458 9600

Amjet Year:

2008

S/N:

184

TTAF:

395

Reg: Location:

Total Time Since New 392 Cycles, Pratt & Whitney Canada PW-306A 6,000 Flight Hours Between Overhauls, P&W EMS Gold Engine Maintenance Program, Auxiliary Power Unit Honeywell 36-150 Approved In-flight Operations to 40,000 FT, MSP APU Maintenance Plan, 9 Passenger Executive Interior, EASA / EU OPS Compliant. Description Low Time, Like New Condition, EASA EU-OPS1, ESP Gold Engines, No Damage, Always Hangared, Chance to have like Factory New Condition G200!

Agusta A109C

Email: sales@amjetaviation.com

Tel: +58 (0) 416 608 5929

Abraham Salcedo Year:

1991

S/N:

7659

TTAF:

1836.8

Reg:

N828NN

Location: USA, FL

Fully IFR helicopter with VIP interior. Recently overhauled, painted on white with blue and silver stripes, new avionics(Garmin GNS-430AW,Garmin GNS-430W,Garmin GAD ñ 42, Garmin GMX-200 MFD,Garmin GTX-330 Mode S transponder, RDS-81 Radar, Avidyne TAS-610 Price: Make offer ✈

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Email: jmespinosa@aeromarformula.com

AEROMAR

Location:

Bombardier Global 5000 Vision

Tel: +34 (0) 618 637 666

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: helitradersinternational@gmail.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

151


Marketplace August12 25/07/2012 14:45 Page 6

Marketplace Cessna Conquest I

King Aviation Dallas Year:

1981

S/N: TTAF:

Tel: +1 (214) 352-2401 700 SMOH / 700 SMOH. NEW PAINT & INTERIOR, BRAND NEW GLASS AVIONICS: Dual 750 Touch screens, G 600 Glass, SynVision, Traffic, Sat-Weather, Charts, BonusTax Writeoff, fresh 2, 3 D inspections, SID COMPLIED. Dry Country Based-no corrossion Last owner owned it 14 years-TOP condition and maintenance history-one of the best 425's flying today! ONLY 700 hours on 3600TBO P & W -112 engines! Only 10 hours on new 4 blabe quiet Fan Props with new Hubs! 260 KNOTS FAST (300 MPH) thats 40 KNOTS faster than a C90 and on 20% less fuel per hour than the C90! Lease or purchase

700

Reg: Location: USA

Cessna Citation XLS+

Email: sales@kingaviationdallas.com

James Vancil Year:

2009

S/N:

560-6017

TTAF:

1520

Reg:

N7877D

Tel: +1 (808) 250 1026 Total Landings: 873, Left Engine: 1520 TT/ 873 Cycles, Right Engine: 1520TT / 873 Cycles. APU: 400 Hours, Times as of: July 13, 2012, Warranty Program: JSSI Tip to Tail, Aircell High Speed Wi-Fi Onboard, One Owner Since New, No Damage History, Part 135 Certified, JSSI Tip to Tail Warranty, RVSM Compliant, Hi Speed Wireless Internet on Board, Rockwell Collins Airshow 4000 entertainment package with large 10.4 monitor and 6 individual displays, XM Radio with four channel reciever and dual DVD's. Price: Please call

Location: USA, GA

Bombardier/Challenger 605

Email: Oahuflyer@yahoo.com

TAG Aviation S.A. Year:

2010

S/N:

5827

TTAF:

578

Tel: +41 (0) 22 717 01 35 11 pax + 1 crew jump seat, JAROPS compliant, RVSM certified, No damage history, Well equipped Price: $24,750,000

Reg: Location: Germany ✈

Par Avion Ltd

Email: oalmeida@tagaviation.ch

Alberth Air Parts

+1 832 934 0055

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011

Start selling your aircraft today with ‘Sell My Aircraft’ at AvBuyer.com

Challenger 300

Capital Jet Group Year:

2006

S/N:

20091

TTAF:

832

Reg:

N391W

Location:

USA

Tel: +1 703 917 9000

This low time standout has had one U.S. corporate owner since new delivery Sept. 2006. Tastefully completed tan leather 8 passenger double club interior. Many extras, including over water flight kit, increased baggage capacity, avionics & cabin upgrades, 16G belted lav seat. Engines/APU on MSP, airframe on Smart Parts+, significant warranty remaining. Always hangared, NDH, never chartered. No better maintained 300 for the money. Call or email for additional information.

Your aircraft for sale advert will appear: • on AvBuyer.com IMMEDIATELY • in World Aircraft Sales Magazine (print & digital) • in the next AvBuyer Weekly Aircraft E-mail listing

152

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

Email: sales@capitaljetgroup.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Marketplace August12 25/07/2012 14:20 Page 7

Find an Aircraft Dealer Business Aviation Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today avbuyer.com/dealers World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), August 2012, Vol 16, Issue No 8 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & DVDs submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 15th August Advertiser’s Index 21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................154 Aero-Dienst ...............................................................144 AeroSmith/Penny.....................................................133 AIC Title Services.......................................................63 Air 1st Aviation ..............................................................4 Aircraft Cost Calculator ..............................................8 Aircraft Services Group............................................69 Air Fleet Leasing & Management .........................132 Albinati Aeronautics SA .........................................136 Aradian Aviation ..........................................................77 Aviation Consulting....................................................19 Avjet Corporation.................................................12-15 Avpro ......................................................................16-18 Banyan .......................................................................103 Bauer Verlag .............................................................146 Bell Aviation ..........................................................30-31 Bombardier..................................................................53 Boutsen Aviation ........................................................73 Bristol Associates ......................................................33 Central Business Jets .............................................155 Charleston Aviation Partners ...................................45 Charlie Bravo Aviation...............................................59 CIBAS........................................................................125 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Conklin & de Decker..................................................48 Corporate Aircraft Photography .............................93 Corporate AirSearch Int’l .................................83,137 Corporate Concepts .................................................55 Dassault Falcon Jet Europe....................................2-3 Duncan Aviation .................................................81,101 Eagle Aviation..............................................................65 Eagle Creek Aviation...............................................107 EuroJet .......................................................................138 ExecuJet Aviation........................................................61 Florida Jet Sales ......................................................139 Freestream Aircraft USA ..........................................71 General Aviation Services .....................................109 Guardian Jet..........................................................21-23 Gulfstream Pre-Owned ..........................................105 Heliasset.com ...........................................................127 Intellijet International .................................................6-7 Japat AG ...........................................................134-135 J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ......................24-25 JetBlack Aviation ........................................................91 JetBrokers..............................................................36-37 Jetcraft Corporation.....................................34-35,BC Jeteffect ........................................................................27 JETNET ........................................................................94

www.AvBuyer.com

John Hopkinson & Associates ........................43,141 Kaiser Air ......................................................................87 Lektro ............................................................................93 Mente Group ...........................................................140 New Jet International .................................................67 Northern Air...............................................................143 O’Gara Aviation Company.................................28-29 Par Avion.........................................................................5 PC Aviation ...........................................................40-41 PremiAir Global Aircraft Sales ................................89 Remo Investments ...................................................142 Rolls-Royce .................................................................85 Royal Saudi Air Force.............................................121 Southern Cross Aviation ........................................113 Swiss Aviation Services ................................134-135 The Jet Collection................................................FC,11 Universal Avionics ......................................................99 VEBEG ......................................................................117 VREF Aircraft Values ...................................................4 Welsch Aviation........................................................145 Wentworth & Affilates ...............................................75 Wiley Rein....................................................................48 Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................49 WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – August 2012

153


21st Century May 19/06/2012 15:31 Page 1

Copyright of Leor Yudelowitz

When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet In the sky; and the Federal Aviation Adminstration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope, and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 Series aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter than the Gulfstream IV and provide a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. Furthermore, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN, with eight passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. Revolutionary and the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology. FBW enables a MMO of .90 and enhanced low-speed handling, pitch and roll stability characteristics. The 7X can climb directly to FL 410 at ISA + 10° conditions. Two Hundred (200)+ very high speed, ultra long range Falcon 7X business jets have been ordered!

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ August_CBJ November06 24/07/2012 15:28 Page 1

General Offices

Vienna Office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Austria

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +43 660 549 1099

FAX: (952) 894-8569

FAX: +44 20 7900 2890

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

EMAIL: erich@cbjets.com

2004 FALCON 2000 S/N 217

FALCON 900EX EASy S/N 121

US & EASA Certified, 10 PAX Interior, 100% JSSI, Less than 400 Hours since C Inspection

Former Falcon Demo, Only 2400 Hours TT, Most Systems are Triple, Satcom/HUD, Over $3M worth of Options, US & EASA Certified, Owners New 7X Has Arrived

FALCON 900EX EASY S/N 170

2008 HAWKER 900XP S/N 033

Single US Owner Aircraft, 1175 Hours TT, MSP Gold, Honeywell EVS, Triple IRS and FMS, 13 PAX with Fwd and AFT lav

853.31 Hours, MSP Gold, EASA / JAR Ops / FAA Certified, Standard 8 Place Interior, Dual FMS, Dual GPS, Dual AHRS, Etcâ&#x20AC;Ś

2009/2010 HAWKER 4000 S/N RC-35

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5248

Upgrade and Enhancement Program Already C/W, HBC support plus program pre-paid up to 2000 Hours or 5 Yrs; Fully transferable 5 year warranty expires 12/23/2014, no damage history

Power Advantage Engine Program, Pro-Parts Airframe Program and on Cescom Since New; Stand 8 Place Interior; Aircraft can be delivered anywhere in the world

CITATION ENCORE S/N 646

1125 ASTRA SP S/N 49

Single US Owner Aircraft, Power Advantage with recent Engine Overhauls, Pro Parts, No Damage History

3322.1 TT; Fresh C Check, new paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center 08/11, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod

CITATION ENCORE+ S/N 756

SIKORSKY 76B S/N 344

Single US Owner Aircraft, Power Advantage Plus with Pro Parts, No Damage History

Fortune 100 Owned, 8 Place Executive, Fully Loaded EFIS Cockpit, Freon Air -conditioning


Aiming

Higher

for 50 years, there’s no such thing as cruising altitude. Fifty years ago, a new way of handling aircraft transactions took off— the Jetcraft way. Seeing every customer as unique. Working harder on every deal. Building a global network of expert partners and sales pros. Today, thanks to you, we’re one of the world’s top aircraft resellers. But simply cruising on our success isn’t our style. For the next 50 years, you can bet we’ll treat each deal like our first. Because “Always Ascending” is still the only way we fly. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

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I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

When you keep

7/6/12 2:36 PM


World Aircraft Sales Magazine August-12