Issuu on Google+

FC Jetcraft April 2013_FC December 06 17/04/2013 14:45 Page 1

WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

Business Aviation & The Boardroom: pages 22 - 69

April 2013


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:15 Page 1


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:18 Page 1


AC Index April13 21/03/2013 13:15 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRBUS A310-304. . . . . . 1, 156, A319 . . . . . . . . . . 89,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 11, 27, 36, 52, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58, 59, 737. . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 737-500 VIP . . . . 148, 757-200 Exec . . . 67, MD 87 VIP . . . . . 27, S27-200 . . . . . . . 67,

BOMBARDIER Global 5000 . . . . 1, 39, 41, 53, 156, Global 6000 . . . . 1, Global Express . 1, 18, 24, 25, 59, 81, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89, 123, 156, Global Express XRS.. 1, 13, 18, 25, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 39, 81, 123, 156,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

601-3A ER . . . . . 20, 47, 150, 601 w/3A . . . . . . 155, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 20, 24, 41, 43, 45, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 155, 156, 605 . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 7, 12, 24, 36, 41, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89, 148, 156, 850ER. . . . . . . . . 1, 12, 156,

Learjet 31A . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 60, 77, 113, 31ER . . . . . . . . . . 45, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 113, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 89, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 60, 139, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 75, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 45, 57, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 21, 25, 59, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 60, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 15, 21, 37, 47, 85 . . . . . . . . . . . . 36,

CESSNA

Challenger

Citation

300 . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 19, 28, 41, 113, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115, 155, 156, 600 . . . . . . . . . . . 27, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 76, 601-1A/3A . . . . . 47, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 1, 20, 24, 31, 601-3R . . . . . . . . 1, 20, 39, 140, 156,

ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 76, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 61, 76, 145, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 60, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 61, 63, 76, VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 24, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 5, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 21, 24, 115, 141,

4

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, XLS . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 76, 148, 152, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 76, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 151, CJ1+ . . . . . . . . . . 20, 31, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 33, 47, 60, CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 60, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 27, 33, 39, 76, 89, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 75, 138, 151, Columbia 300 . . 77, Encore .........43, 67, 89, Encore +. . . . . . . 30, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 71, 76, 155, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, Mustang . . . . . . . 20, 76, R-182 Skylane..151, SII . . . . . . . . . . . . 75, Sovereign. . . . . . 21, 27, 29, 30, 33, 37, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57, 60, 63, 71, 75, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 33, 76, 142,

Conquest I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77, II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77,

Grand Caravan 208B. . .. . . . . . . . 150,

DORNIER Dornier 328 . . . . 21,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

EMBRAER Legacy 500 . . . . 1, Legacy 600 . . . . 7, 18, 27, 61, 89,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 3, 7, 28, 57, 154, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156, 20F-5BR . . . . . . . 60, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 19, 24, 30, 43, 60, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146, 154, 50-3D . . . . . . . . . 137, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 30, 39, 60, 154, 155, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 154, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 27, 57, 71, 89, 136, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154, 155, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 19, 154, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 5, 7, 19, 28, 39, 45, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 154, 900EX EASy . . . 19, 154, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 13, 29, 30, 31, 60, 2000EX. . . . . . . . 3, 7, 2000EX EASy . . 1, 3, 156, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 3, 19, 156,

GULFSTREAM IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 60, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 19, 27, 45, 59,156 IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 1, 14, 18, 27, 28, 29,


AC Index April13 21/03/2013 13:25 Page 2

- IN THIS ISSUE

04.13

• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80, 156, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 18, 25, 115, 100 . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 123, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 45, 71, 75, 101, 113, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 39, 43, 45, 113, 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 143, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 15, 18, 28, 43, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 71, 81, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 7, 25, 47, 71, 80, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81, 135, 150,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT Beechcraft 400 . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 37, 57, 77, 101, Premier 1A. . . . . 71, 101,

King Air 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 77, 200XPR . . . . . . . 60, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 61, 71, 77, 89, 113, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 71, 77, C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 61, 71, 89, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 89, 151,

Hawker

PAGE

IAI Astra . . . . . . . . . . 60, Astra 1125SP . . 155, Astra SPX. . . . . . 39, 43,

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

TBM 850. . . . . . . 47, 101, 144, 150,

PIAGGIO Avanti II . . . . . . . 89, 113, Avanti P180 . . . . 41, 57,

PIPER Malibu . . . . . . . . . 33, Navajo CR . . . . . 77, Seneca . . . . . . . . 33, Seneca V . . . . . . 89,

PAGE

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS MD 600N . . . . . . 71,

HELICOPTERS

SIKORSKY

AGUSTAWESTLAND

S-76C+ . . . . . . . . 31, 37, S-92 . . . . . . . . . . 21,

A109 Power . . . . 41, AW 109E. . . . . . . 127, AW 109S Grand. 37, 127, AW 109SP . . . . . 89, AW139 . . . . . . . . 29, Koala. . . . . . . . . . 71,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS Aircraft Engine /Support . 79, 103, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 4, 123, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 99, 111, Avionics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 123, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,

BELL 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 149, 212 . . . . . . . . . . . 149, 230 . . . . . . . . . . . 89, 407 . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 412EMS . . . . . . . 149,

EUROCOPTER

SABRELINER 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 60,

400XP . . . . . . . . . 60, 700A . . . . . . . . . . 45, 750 . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 25, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 47, 800B . . . . . . . . . . 41, 149,

AIRCRAFT

800XP . . . . . . . . . 1, 41, 71, 115, 156, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 1, 25, 71, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 1, 25, 45, 71, 89, 1000B . . . . . . . . . 41, 1900D . . . . . . . . . 149, 1900D . . . . . . . . . 77, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 20,

SOCATA TBM 700A . . . . . 101, TBM 700B . . . . . 61, 101,

AS 350 B3 . . . . . 89, 152, AS 355 F1 . . . . . 151, AS 355 F2 . . . . . 152, AS 355 N . . . . . . 89, EC 130-B4 . . . . . 71, EC 135 P2i . . . . . 127, 152, EC135T2 . . . . . . 21, EC 135T2i . . . . . 89, EC155B1 . . . . . . 127,

The Global Aircraft Market Online

Security. Trust. Confidence. 1985 CITATION 650 | S/N 0079 6770 TSN, –3C, MSP GOLD UNIVERSAL EFIS 890R, SYNTHETIC VISION GARMIN 430AW, PATS INFLIGHT APU DOC 8 c/w APRIL/2010, NEW INTERIOR/IFE MAY/2010

1997 FALCON 900EX S/N 008 5917 TSN, MSP HUD, TAILWIND 500, WIFI SATCOM, SATPHONE, SATAFIS, FULLY WIRED FOR FANS 2C/GEAR OVH c/w NOV/2008, DRY BAY MOD c/w

PHONE FAX

HOUSTON: 1 . 713 . 681 . 0075 1 . 713 . 681 . 0035

sales@paravionltd.com www.paravionltd.com AVION LTD PAR .

Years as

13 1997 - 20

1997 FALCON 900EX | S/N 012 8003 TSN, 2773 TL MSP GOLD, HUD, SATCOM, SATPHONE, FDR EASA/EU OPS 1 APPROVED, 14 PAX FWD/AFT LAV, 2C/GEAR OVH c/w SEPT/2009

1994 CITATION VII S/N 7044 5419 TSN, MSP GOLD NZ 2000, TCAS I, STORMSCOPE DOC 8 C/W MAY/2010 EXCELLENT PAINT/INTERIOR

LEAR 31A S/N 124 6617 TSN, 2416 SCORE, 252 SH -2C MODED ENGINES, JSSI PREMIUM N1 DEECS, TCAS II, KEITH FREON 12 YR c/w BY LEARJET-TUCSON NOV/2008 RAISBECK AFT FUSELAGE LOCKER, ZR LITE MOD

Also Available: C650 S/N 059

AV I AT I O N C O N S U LTA N T S T O T H E W O R L D WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

5


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:21 Page 1


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:22 Page 1


Panel March13 19/03/2013 15:46 Page 1

World Aircraft Sales EDITORIAL

Subscribe Online

Deputy Editor (London Office) Matthew Harris 1- 800 620 8801 editorial@avbuyer.com

Now you can subscribe to the print edition of World Aircraft Sales Magazine online!

Editor - Boardroom Guide J.W. (Jack) Olcott 1- 973 734 9994 Jack@avbuyer.com Editorial Contributor (USA Office) Dave Higdon Dave@avbuyer.com

WORL D The gl obal marke tplace for bu siness aviatio n

www .AvBu yer.co m

Consulting Editor Sean O’Farrell +44 (0)20 8255 4409 Sean@avbuyer.com

™ Januar

y 2013

WORL D The gl obal marke tplace for bu siness aviatio n

www .AvBu yer.co m

ADVERTISING

Karen Price 1- 800 620 8801 Karen@avbuyer.com

Februa ry 20

13

WORL D Intelli

Jet M

arketi

ng: B How y Invitation and W hy It Only Works See Pa

Busine ss Av iation & Th e Bo ardroo m: pa ges 14 - 67

ges 6

The gl obal marke tplace for bu siness aviatio n

www .AvBu yer.co m ™

-7

Falcon Flight Deck See pa ge 5 for fur Transf ormed ther de tails

March 20

13

STUDIO/PRODUCTION Helen Cavalli/ Mark Williams 1- 800 620 8801 Helen@avbuyer.com Mark@avbuyer.com CIRCULATION Lynne Jones 1- 800 620 8801 Lynne@avbuyer.com

Busine ss Av iation & Th e Bo ardroo m: pa ges 28 - 71

1998 proudly presen ts Gulfs tream Se IV-SP See pa rial Numb er 13 ge 27 38 for fur

ther de

tails

Busine ss Av iation & Th e Bo ardroo m: pa ges 22 - 67

AVBUYER.COM Nick Barron Nick@avbuyer.com Emma Davey Emma@avbuyer.com

www.avbuyer.com/worldaircraftsales/print.asp

The global marketplace for business aviation News - Aircraft listings - Editorial WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

8

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

PUBLISHER John Brennan 1- 800 620 8801 John@avbuyer.com

USA OFFICE 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 EUROPEAN OFFICE Cowleaze House, 39 Cowleaze Rd, Kingston, Surrey, KT2 6DZ, UK +44 (0)20 8255 4000 PRINTED BY Fry Communications, Inc. 800 West Church Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055


Panel March13 19/03/2013 17:45 Page 2

Contents

Volume 17, Issue 4 – April 2013

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 22

Sequestration, Governance & Corporate Jets: Sequestration indicates a lack of insightful governance - yet in the midst of such uncertainty, the value of Business Aviation rings true…

26

Governments Also Need Business Aviation: Government and industry have similar needs: public sector employees have the need to be efficient, productive and effective too.

32

A Saga of Success (2 of 3): Featuring a company at a crossroads, this trilogy of articles continues with the company’s initial use of Business Aviation.

40

Entry-Level Business Aviation: For some it provides a first experience with Business Aviation. For others, it’s a means of obtaining supplemental lift. We take a closer look at aircraft charter.

46

Still Stuck in a Down Market: Having previously identified several

22

40

factors that define market conditions, this month we expand to looking at how Buyers and Sellers can best respond.

54

Broker of Record Letters: The Broker of Record (BOR) letter is one of the most powerful and abused documents in the insurance industry. We look at why you must handle it with care!

62

Tax-Free Like-Kind Exchanges (1 of 2): U.S. Tax Code allows for the disposal of a business aircraft, and the acquisition of its replacement without generating a current tax liability. This month we consider ‘Forward Like-Kind Exchanges’…

66

Turboprop Value: A look at the benefits of the Turboprops, and a listing of values for models built over the last 20 years.

62

Main Features 70

Aircraft Comparative Analysis – Gulfstream G550: How does the performance of Gulfstream’s G550 stand up against Bombardier’s Global 6000?

86

Safety Matters – Upset Training: Imagine flying inverted, on a knife-edge, in weightless free-fall or through clouds… Could you recover the jet? Here’s one training solution that can prepare you for just such a nightmare scenario.

Plane Sense On Cabin Avionics: 92

Just Log In: Brian Wilson considers the way that Wi-Fi is changing the way we fly.

100

Forward Planning: Ken Elliott maps out the cabin considerations an operator needs to make.

Regular Features

104

The IFE Screening Process: Steve Watkins considers the cabin display options and their impact on your budget.

106

Embraer Product Overview: From Regional Turboprops and Jets to an impressive array of products for the Business Aviation market. We follow the growth and development of Embraer Executive Jets.

110

Revenue Flights: Some people find great benefit in generating revenue from

16 74 78 82 116 124 130

Viewpoint Aviation Leadership Roundtable Pre-Owned Aircraft Sales Trends Aircraft Performance & Specifications JETNET >>KNOW MORE Market Indicators BizAv Round-Up

their aircraft, but it’s not the right option for everyone. We look in greater detail at some of the considerations to make in this area.

118

G550 – The King is Dead?: Are the G550’s days numbered? Andrew Bradley

Next Month’s Issue

draws his conclusions in light of the newly-delivering G650 and the pre-owned market trends for the Ultra-Long-Range jets generally.

European Aviation Focus

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Business Aviation & The Boardroom WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

9


Freestream 1 March 21/02/2013 09:46 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Boeing BBJ Serial Number: 29273 Registration: VP-BBJ • 18 Passenger

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• One Owner Since New • Pats 9 Tank Configuration • CVR/FDR • SATCOM • Heads Up Display (HUD) • Airshow Network • SFAR88 modification requirements c/w

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

3/12

• Basic Operating Weight: 95,096 lbs • US$31,950,000

Boeing BBJ

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 36714 Registration: VP-BFT • 18 Passenger - Andrew Winch Interior Design • Full Factory Warranties • Very low hours • Pats Gulfstream 6 tank Configuration G450 2Q 2012 (5 aft 1 fwd)

Gulfstream GV/512

• Aft state room with private lavatory and shower • Airshow Network • Five external cameras • Make Offer Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 1 March 21/02/2013 09:46 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Boeing BBJ Serial Number: 28579 Registration: N920DS • 17 Passenger

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• 2008 Paint & Interior • Both aft stateroom's have private lavatory & shower • Six fuel tanks installed (one in storage) • SFAR 88 tank mod c/w 4/09 • Flight Dynamics Heads Up Display (HUD)

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• CMC EFB's with XM Weather • High Speed wireless internet access • Engines on GE MCPH • Fresh 36 Month/2000 Hour Inspections • US$36,950,000

Boeing BBJ

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 30076 Registration: VP-BBW • 19 Passenger • Interior Refurbishment 2010 • Pats 8 Tank Configuration • Recent A1, B1, C1 Checks and SFR88 Mod G450 2Q 2012 Gulfstream

Gulfstream GV/512

• Airshow Network • Basic Operating Weight: 95,096 lbs • Make Offer

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 2 March 21/02/2013 09:48 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Challenger 850ER Serial Number: 8051 Registration: VP-BSD Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • 1260 Hours Total Time

• APU: Time Since New 1861 Hours • Engines enrolled in JSSI/VEST Complete Plus Engine Maintenance Program • Airshow 410 • Two fuel tanks (PATS System) • AERO-H SATCOM Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

• 15 Passenger • US$15,950,000

Challenger 605 Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number 5704 Registration: M-FBVZ • Total Time: 1616 Hours • Total Cycles: 993 • Proline 21 • Collins SRT 2100 Inmarsat SATCOM Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012

• Airshow 410

Gulfstream GV/512

• 10 passenger • Make Offer

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 2 March 21/02/2013 09:48 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

Global XRS Serial Number: 9195 Registration: N4T Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273 • Total Time: 3119.4 hrs

• Landings: 1023 • Aircraft Maintenance Tracking Program: CAMP SYSTEMS • Engines are on Condition • Second GPS (Honeywell GPS550) • Cabin Humidification System • FDR Upgrade – Crew Force Boeing BBJ/36714 Measuring System • High Speed Data • 13 Passenger Interior • In Service May 31, 2007 • US$ 33,950,000

Boeing BBJ/30076

Falcon 2000 Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1 Registration: G-YUMN • Total Time: 6289.27 hrs • Landings: 5614 • Engines and APU on Honeywell MSP Gold • B-RNAV/RVSM/RNP10/RNP5 Compliant Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012 • CVR/FDR • Honeywell Mark V EGPWS • Collins TTR 920 TCAS II • Aero M SCM1000 Honeywell SATCOM • Airshow Genesys 400 • Elegant 10 Passenger Fireblocked Interior • New Paint in April 2007 Hawker 850XP/258812 • US$5,950,000

Gulfstream GV/512

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 3 April 21/03/2013 10:00 Page 1

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

2007 Gulfstream 450 • TTAF: 2480 • Landings: 881 • On JSSI Tip to Tail Maintenance Program

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• Airshow 4000 System • Honeywell AIS-2000 Direct TV • Honeywell High-speed data system • Securaplane 500 Aircraft security system • Forward Galley • 14 Passenger Interior • Make Offer

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

Gulfstream IVSP Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 1468 • TTAF: 4827 • Landings: 2692 • Engines on RRCC • CMP MSG-3 Maintenance Tracking • Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 • EGPWS Gulfstream G450 2Q 2012

Gulfstream GV/512

• 13 Passenger • RVSM Compliant • US$13,950,000

Hawker 850XP/258812

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Freestream 3 April 21/03/2013 10:06 Page 2

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED SALES & ACQUISITIONS

2008 Gulfstream 450 • Total Time: 976 • Landings: 410 • Airshow 4000 System

Boeing BBJ/28579

Boeing BBJ/29273

• Honeywell PRIMUS EPIC II • External Camera System • Forward Galley • 14 Passenger • Available for Showings • Make Offer

Boeing BBJ/36714

Boeing BBJ/30076

Lear 60XR

Global XRS/9195

Gulfstream G550/5025

Serial Number: 328 • Total Time: 1486 hours • Landings: 674 • Collins ProLine 21 with Dual PFD's and MFD's • Dual Fully Electronic Flight Chart System Gulfstream G450Worldwide 2Q 2012 • Airshow 410 with Moving

Gulfstream GV/512

Maps • ICS-100 Iridium Single Channel Telephone • Pulsating Recognition and Landing Lights • Forward Cockpit Pocket Doors Hawker 850XP/258812 • US$6,950,000

Hawker 850XP/258812

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT LIMITED

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT USA LTD

FREESTREAM AIRCRAFT (BERMUDA) LIMITED

London +44 207.584.3800 sales@freestream.com

New York 201.365.6080 aircraftsales@freestream.com

Hamilton, Bermuda +441.505.1062 sales@freestreambermuda.bm

NEW YORK | LAS VEGAS | LONDON | HONG KONG | BEIJING | MEXICO | MOSCOW | BERMUDA

www.freestream.com


Gil WolinApril2013_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 12:28 Page 1

VIEWPOINT

Guns or Butter? by Gil Wolin ack in our school days Econ 101 first introduced a basic theory of macroeconomics, the allocation of a nation’s scarce resources. But the simplistic “guns or butter” model used to illustrate a nation’s decisions as how best to allocate spending between defense and food came back sharply into focus last month, thanks to a relatively new, but now-ubiquitous macroeconomic term: “sequestration”. Sounds like a painful operation lampooned in “Carry On, Nurse”, doesn’t it? But that was satire in the 1950s – this is serious business in 2013 and painful for some – even if the automatic budget cuts are only 2.2% of a $3.7 trillion budget. Half of the mandatory cuts will be taken from military and defense spending, leaving 1.1%, or about $42.7 billion, to come from the discretionary portion of the civilian budget, including the FAA. A bit more than 1% doesn’t sound like much of a cut, unless it’s your budget being cut. And just whose budget gets the brunt of the mandatory cuts was one hot topic last month on Facebook. According to a viral post on that omnipresent app, tax “loopholes” for Business Aviation could now push hundreds of thousands of Americans to the brink of starvation, according to the Center for American Progress

B

(www.americanprogress.org):

By eliminating a loophole that gives special treatment to corporate jets, Congress could avert cuts that would cost thousands of jobs, hurt millions of disadvantaged students, and force hundreds of thousands of vulnerable families to lose critical nutrition and housing supports this year. Congress has some key choices to make in the coming weeks. If they don't close the loophole for corporate jets: • 600,000 women and children will lose the critical nutrition assistance they need • 125,000 families will lose their permanent housing • More than 100,000 formerly homeless people, including veterans, will be at risk to go back on the streets

Students with disabilities will lose critical instruction and support from more than 7,400 teachers and staff 1 million disadvantaged students will lose critical education funding and 10,500 teachers and staff will be at risk for losing their jobs 70,000 poor children will lose their Head Start and Early Head Start slots as the jobs of 14,000 teachers and other staff are put at risk

Huh? The Center seems to be saying that changing the tax laws on one industry – ours – will offset the $42.7 billion cut from social program budgets. That’s pretty amazing, considering that $42.7 billion represents almost a third of our industry’s total annual contribution to the US GDP. While the Center’s assumptions and math might be suspect, their methods of communicating are not. They are using social media to great effect – Facebook has more than 1 billion regular users worldwide, and it’s hard to say how many read and believed their propaganda without bothering to verify it. Fortunately, one Facebook poster had the knowledge – and the good sense – to counter this direct attack in the same medium with facts (reprinted here with permission): Agreed, cuts need to be made from wasteful government spending. However, corporate aviation contributes $150 billion each year to the US economy and supports the families of the 1.2 million workers who fly, maintain, refuel, inspect, insure, finance, clean, and manufacture aircraft, and who otherwise serve this industry. Don't believe me? Just ask the # 1 user of corporate aviation in the US: our president, who used corporate aviation for NON-presidential duties (campaigning) more than 400 hours last year, at a cost to American taxpayers of more than $68 million (again, that figure does not include our subsidy of Air Force One for duties or even vacations connected to the office of president.) In contrast, the average user of corporate aviation flies about 200 hours/year, conducting business. And yes, I voted for our president. But the hypocrisy

promoted by his office in making corporate aviation a symbol of waste is specious at best; harmful to the economy at worst. Let's not trash American jobs. Those 1.2 million American families, including ours, depend on them. Thanks for reading. As you might have expected, the Facebook silence that ensued was deafening. And that’s a good thing. Such was not the case with a later post on this thread, pulled from a Daily Edge Tweet: The Sequester means that 775,000 poor families will lose access to food and baby formula. But good news! They can still get a subsidy for buying a jet! Social media is a wonderful tool in the hands of modern day propagandists, providing an international echo chamber where misinformation spreads faster than a rumor in an FBO pilot lounge, and reverberates among the likeminded. NBAA, GAMA, AOPA and other trade associations can respond to national and international media attacks, but it’s up to all of us to keep social media posters honest, and to post the facts whenever and wherever we can. This race for the truth is not a sprint – it’s a marathon – and the finish line is in the Halls of Honest Government. ❯ Gil Wolin draws on forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. ❯ Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net

The world’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops & Helicopters for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com 16

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Avpro 5th page branding April_Layout 1 19/03/2013 11:05 Page 1

Performance. Integrity. Reputation.

Over 20 Years of Excellence. #FTUHBUF3PBE 4VJUFt"OOBQPMJT .%        JOGP!BWQSPKFUTDPNtXXXBWQSPKFUTDPN 


Avpro April 18/03/2013 14:58 Page 1


Avpro April 18/03/2013 14:58 Page 2


Avpro April 18/03/2013 14:59 Page 3


Avpro April 18/03/2013 14:59 Page 4


BG 1 Jack_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:31 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Sequestration, Governance and Corporate Jets. Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

22

Sequestration was yet another sign that dysfunction and a lack of insightful governance prevail in our nation’s capitol. In the midst of such an atmosphere of uncertainty, the value of Business Aviation rings true, observes Jack Olcott.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

P

resident Obama’s favorite whipping boy is the ‘corporate jet’. He uses that term whenever he reflects on income unbalance or the need to revise our nation’s tax code. For example, often he alludes to the advantage that private owners of business aircraft have because they can fully depreciate such capital equipment in five years as opposed to seven years for aircraft owned by Airlines, charter companies or other providers of air transportation for hire. Advocates of Business Aviation are incensed, and rightly so. When examining means for reducing our nation’s Gross National Debt of over $15,000,000,000,000, even the most objective observers see more significant measures to consider. If depreciation were extended to seven years for all owners of business aircraft, the additional tax revenue ranges from about $300 million annually to considerably less than that figure. To put in perspective the relationship between our Gross National Debt and changing depreciation schedules for business aircraft, the time required to wipe out the nation’s debt at $300 million per year is more than 50,000 years. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell observed that if enacted, “[Lengthening the depreciation schedule] would take 10 years to raise enough money to replace one week’s worth of the sequester.” Clearly the federal government would like another $300 million annually to spend somewhere, but hitting on Business Aviation is very counterproductive. Business aircraft are tools that enable companies to generate more revenues and employ more workers, thereby contributing to the federal treasury. Furthermore, casting doubt on

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BG 1 Jack_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:34 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

depreciation schedules has a negative effect on business investment, and bashing Business Aviation may cause some companies—about 20 percent of those surveyed—to hesitate investing in the advantages of this form of transportation.

HYPOCRISY “Do as I say, not as I do,” is a common refrain in Washington. The federal government, regardless of which party occupies the White House, is an extensive user of Business Aviation. The President travels in Air Force One, with a second Boeing 747 at the ready should it be required. Several Cabinet Members are mandated by law to use government aircraft rather than the scheduled Airlines, and leaders of Congress have access to transportation in public-use (i.e., government-owned) aircraft. More to the point, traveling on the government’s “corporate jets” is most appropriate for our nation’s leaders. President Obama needs the efficiency and security of a traveling Oval Office that is provided by Air Force One. Maintaining the efficiency and security of our nation’s leaders is essential, just as it is vital that the leaders of private industry use their travel time efficiently, without compromising personal or industrial security. The demonstrated value of Business Aviation clearly is the best argument against negative rhetoric. Users of Business Aviation know the significant value of their company aircraft, thus they seem not to be dissuaded by the attempts of the Obama Administration to vilify “corporate jets” in its campaign to cast our nation’s economic challenges as a clash between classes. Class warfare may be the stuff of politics, but it is poor leadership.

address the nation’s growing debt. Its intended purpose was to be so draconian that the Congress and the Administration would compromise on a reasonable approach. In other words, legislators intentionally placed themselves in a box that they felt left no option other than to act, which they have failed to do in the nearly 20 months since President Obama signed the bill into law on August 2, 2011. In the absence of responsible governance by all our elected officials, we entered into a period of automatic budget cuts on March 1, 2013. The immediate question for readers of World Aircraft Sales Magazine is ‘What effect will such abdication of responsibility have on Business Aviation?’ It may be too early to tell, since we can hope that Congress and the Administration will arrive at a reasonable compromise before automatic budget cuts do too much damage to the nation’s economy. But we can rest assured that the flexibility of Business Aviation will enable operators to adapt to changing conditions, such as cutbacks in FAA services. Hours of operation at many of the control towers used by business aircraft may be curtailed, as will be the availability of custom services at airports used primarily for non-Airline activities. Processing of new applications for design changes to aircraft and letters of authorization for operational procedures could be slowed significantly. But safety will not be compromised. Good governance by crews and managers, where the focus is accepting the responsibility of providing safe and efficient service in the pursuit of economic growth, is the essence of Business Aviation.

SEQUESTRATION— LATIN FOR POOR GOVERNANCE?

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Sequestration was included in the Budget Control Act of 2011 as a means of forcing legislators to

Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 26

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

“But we can rest assured that the flexibility of Business Aviation will enable operators to adapt to changing conditions, such as cutbacks in FAA services.”

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

23


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:23 Page 1


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:24 Page 1


BG 2April13_FinanceSept 20/03/2013 14:01 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Governments Also Need Business Aviation. ”Next time you hear the words “Corporate Jets”, think about how useful they are to all levels of government.”

Government and industry have similar needs, outlines Jack Olcott. Like their counterparts in the private sector, public sector employees have the need to be efficient, productive and effective. Thus it is understandable that for certain duties, government at all levels employs business aircraft.

A

ccording to a study completed in 2012 by Nexa Advisors, a Washington, DC consulting firm, the number of aircraft engaged in government operations at federal, state and local levels totals approximately 2,000 (see chart below). Clearly the most visible is Air Force One, a Boeing 747 Jumbo Jet used as a flying White House for the U.S. President. (A standby Boeing 747 also is available in the rare event that a back-up aircraft is required.) Other Airline-sized aircraft as well as corporate jets are used by Cabinet Members and leaders in the Senate and House of Representatives. Most of the ‘public-use aircraft’ (the official name for aircraft owned by various levels of government) are special purpose machines such a helicopters for law enforcement, medevac and patrol function, and smaller business aircraft for special surveillance. Aircraft used by government are similar in function to their counterparts in Business Aviation. They are essential tools that enable public servants do their job efficiently and effectively. Nexa Advisors

concluded its report, Government Use of Aircraft: A Taxpayer Value Perspective, with three main findings: •

• •

“Numerous uses were identified that clearly prove that government aircraft are the best tools for the job.” “There are financial and non-financial benefits provided by government aircraft.” “Government use of aircraft clearly improves taxpayer value.”

Next time you hear the words “Corporate Jets”, think about how useful they are to all levels of government. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 32

GOVERNMENT OPERATORS OF BUSINESS AIRCRAFT 189 213

Federal State

263 1337

County City/Local

Total 2,002 including Jets, Turboprops, Helicopters & Large Piston 26

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

SOURCE: JETNET 2001, GSA 2010

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Corporate Concepts April 20/03/2013 10:24 Page 1

Premium Aircraft With Major Price Reductions

(2) Immediately Available BBJs 1 Like New – 1 Green

SOVEREIGN New Reduced Price

MD-87 VIP New Interior, State Room, 19 seats

File photo

CHALLENGER 600 Must See Exceptional Value

CITATION CJ-3 For Sale or Lease

LEGACY 600 New Reduced Price

GULFSTREAM IV Sale/Lease

GULFSTREAM IV-SP

OFF MARKET FALCON 900B

Forward galley - 16 seats

PURCHASING A JET IN 2013? TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR COMPREHENSIVE AIRCRAFT SEARCH & ACQUSITION SERVICES. TALK TO SOME OF OUR CURRENT CLIENTS AND LEARN HOW WE SAVE YOU MONEY, TIME, AND GURANTEE THE RESULTS. SEE www.flycci.com or contact us for details.

Dennis Blackburn

Fernando Garcia Latin & S. America

+1 832 647 7581

+52 55 54077686

Chris Zarnik +96 65 33316842 +1 919 264 6212

Geoff Kaufman

Larry Wright

+1 203 733 4390

+1 704 906 3755

Austin • Ft. Lauderdale • Charlotte • Winnipeg • New York • Mexico City • Middle East-Northern Africa

Corporate Concepts International, Inc.

Member NBAA, NAFA, ISTAT, AOPA


Guardian Jet 4 page April 18/03/2013 15:07 Page 1

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2009 Dassault Falcon 7X SN 35 Airframe TT - 1397.9 $35,995,000

Photos by FGL & Associates

* One Fortune 100 Owner Since New * Engines enrolled in ESP Gold * Honeywell Primus Epic Avionics System * Triple FMS * Rockwell Collins Enhanced Flight Vision System * Airshow 4000 * Thrane & Thrane Aero HAD+ Swift Broadband

2005 Gulfstream G450 SN 4036 Airframe TT - 3377.2 $21,495,000 * One Fortune 100 Owner Since New * Honeywell Primus Epic PlaneView * Honeywell SATCOM & Swift Broadband * Iridium Satellite Phone System * Enhanced Vision System * Heads Up Display Photos by FGL & Associates

2002 Falcon 900EX SN 110 Airframe TT - 6256.3 $17,250,000 * Honeywell Primus 2000 * Pilot & Co-Pilot EVAS Systems * Aircell ATG4000 High Speed Internet Broadband System * New carpet installed July 2012 * One Fortune Owner Since New Photos by FGL & Associates

2001 Gulfstream GIVSP SN 1439 Airframe TT - 3920.7 Price: Make Offer * One Fortune Owner Since New * Honeywelll MCS 6000 SATCOM * Airshow Network * Magnastar C-2000 * Projected calendar maintenance items completed through 2013 * Triple Honeywell Laseref II Photos by FGL & Associates

2005 Bombardier Challenger 300 SN 20059 Airframe TT - 1786.7 $12,800,000 * One Owner Since New * Operated Part 135 * Engines and APU enrolled in Honeywell MSP * Gogo Biz ATG-5000 HS Internet with Wi-Fi * XM Weather w/Enhanced Maps * Airshow 4000 Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 4 page April 18/03/2013 15:10 Page 2

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

1996 Gulfstream G-IVSP SN 1301 Airframe TT - 7971.5 $9,400,000 * Honeywell SPZ-8400 system * Engines enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care * Securaplane 450 Security System * Magnastar C2000 * Single Fortune 100 Owner Since New Photos by FGL & Associates

2004 Falcon 2000 SN 218 Airframe TT - 1638.4 $10,950,000 * Enrolled in CAMP Maintenance Tracking Program * One Owner Since New * Collins Proline IV (4 tube) Avioncs Suite with 6.1 Software Upgrade * Third Flightdeck Seat * Airshow Genesys Photos by FGL & Associates

1996 Gulfstream GIVSP SN 1283 Airframe TT - 9777.4 $9,995,000 * MSG-3 192 Month Inspection Accomplished September 2012 * Forward Crew Lav * Collins SAT-906 SATCOM * 88 Parameter FDR * EVAS * Honeywell SPZ-8400 Six Tube EFIS Avionics System Photos by FGL & Associates

2006 Agusta AW139 SN 31061 Airframe TT - 517.4 $8,495,000 * Honeywell Primus Epic System/FMS * XM Weather System * Emergency Flotation System with Rigid Covers * One Owner since New * Engines enrolled in MSP Gold Photos by FGL & Associates

2005 Citation Sovereign SN 680-0046 Airframe TT - 3618 $8,295,000 * One Fortune Owner Since New * Airshow 400 & XM Radio 400 * GoGo Biz ATG-4000 High Speed Data * Engines enrolled in P&W ESP Gold * Honeywell WU-880 radar receiver/transmitter * Dual Honeywell GPS modules for Epic System Photo by Charles Tack

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 4 page April 18/03/2013 15:23 Page 3

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2005 Citation Sovereign SN 680-0054 Airframe TT - 3623.6 $8,295,000 * Aircell Axxess II * GoGo Biz ATG-4000 High Speed Data * Engines enrolled in P&W ESP Gold * Honeywell WU-880 radar receiver/transmitter * Dual Honeywell GPS modules for Epic System * One Fortune Owner Since New Photos by FGL & Associates

1999 Falcon 2000 SN 86 Airframe TT - 6528.6 $8,200,000 * Engines enrolled in CSP * Collins EFIS-4000/ Pro Line 4/ Version 6.1 * Collins TWR-850 Weather Radar System * HUD * Wireless Broadband (GoGo Biz) – ATG-4000 Photos by FGL & Associates

2001 Dassault Falcon 50EX SN 313 Airframe TT - 4145.12 $6,995,000 * Engines enrolled on MSP * 2C Check and Gear Overhaul Completed December 2012 * WX-1000E Stormscope * Airshow 400 * Aircell ST-3100 Phone System * Honeywell Flight Data Recorder Photos by FGL & Associates

2010 Citation Encore+ SN 815 Airframe TT - 899 $5,995,000 * One Fortune 500 Owner Since New * Engines enrolled in Williams TAP Elite * Collins ProLine 21 Avionics System w/3-Tube EFIS * Collins IFIS 5000 * ATG-5000 Aircell High Speed Data for Gogo Biz * Aircell ST-3100 Iridium Phone Photos by FGL & Associates

1982 Dassault Falcon 50 SN 127 Airframe TT - 9823.4 $3,250,000 * ProLine 21 Avionics System w/4-Tube EFIS * IFIS: Dual File Servers * XM Weather Radar * Aircell ST-3100 SatCom * Maintenance Tracking by AVTRAK * Aircraft is operated under OCIP Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


Guardian Jet 4 page April 18/03/2013 15:25 Page 4

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.GUARDIANJET.COM OR CALL 203-453-0800

2006 Cessna CJ1+ SN 0610 Airframe TT - 678 $2,850,000 * Collins Pro Line 21 Avionics System * Engines enrolled in Williams TAP Elite * WX-1000E Lightning Detection * Mode S Diversity Transponders with Enhanced Surveillance capability * One Owner Since New

Photos by FGL & Associates

1999 Sikorsky S76C+ SN 760499 Airframe TT - 2865 $3,495,000 * Honeywell SPZ 7600 System * Aircell ST3100 Iridium SATCOM * Enrolled in CALM Maintenance Tracking * Moving Map – ARGUS 7000/CE * Single Honeywell Primus 800 Weather Radar

Photos by FGL & Associates

1991 Challenger 601 3A SN 5084 Airframe TT - 8158.4 $2,295,000 * Honeywell SPZ-800 five-tube Avionics Suite * Satellite AFIS * Additional Refueling Panel * Pulselight System * APU Enrolled on MSP * Honeywell Primus-880 Weather Radar with 18 inch dish

Photos by FGL & Associates

1999 Dassault Falcon 2000 SN 96 Airframe TT - 4427.1 Price: For LEASE * Engines enrolled in JSSI 100% Engine Program * APU enrolled in JSSI 100% * Increased Gross Takeoff Mod accomplished * Collins EFIS-4000 / Pro Line 4 * Airshow Genesys * Meggitt Secondary Flight Display System

Photos by FGL & Associates

Tel: 203-453-0800

Fax: 203-453-4527

Email: Guardian@guardianjet.com

www.guardianjet.com


BG 3 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:38 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

A Saga Of Success: A company implements its use of Business Aviation. (Part 2 of 3) Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

Pete Agur continues a three-part series that tracks a company’s use of Business Aviation.

T

his is the second in a series of three articles chronicling the real results of one company’s use of Business Aviation from launch 18 years ago to today. The topics covered include the company’s decision to embrace Business Aviation, its early activities as it started to use business aircraft, and the results they have achieved. The case is de-identified to maintain privacy.

POLICY CASE STATUS To recap from last month’s article, the Board has tendered its decision to approve the acquisition of a light jet in support of the business plan of their new CEO, Phil. They hired him to transform the company from a mid-level player to an industry leader with revenues in the multiples of its historic highs. Traditionally, the quickest way to grow any business is to acquire competitors. But Phil knew such a strategy would be culturally damaging. Furthermore, profits of the

32

combined companies routinely failed to achieve expectations. Instead, he intended to implement a different strategy: grow the business by entering new territories. That is where the airplane came in. Small teams of corporate executives and sales folk could conduct concentrated and highly effective roadshows in first- and second-tier markets.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Several Board Members voiced concerns about safety—specifically the risk of carrying too many top people in the same aircraft, and the real and perceived costs of a company jet. Phil asked our firm to recommend a set of approaches and policies to address these issues. He provided the following parameters: • The aircraft must be pre-owned to reduce the capital costs but sufficiently new to include the latest technology and have some remaining manufacturer’s warranty. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Eagle April 20/03/2013 10:26 Page 1

Eagle Aviation, Inc. 2861 Aviation Way, West Columbia, SC 29170 Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

st i l a ci e p S n o i at Cit

Since 1967 Aircraft Sales, Brokerage, & Acquisitions

Want Your Aircraft Sold? Put It Here. Call Today!

Cit atio nS pec iali st New Paint & Interior

2005 SOVEREIGN, S/N 680-0019

1998 CITATION ULTRA, S/N 560-0463

2007 CITATION CJ3, S/N 525B-0162

2002 CITATION CJ2, S/N 525A-0064

Price Reduced

1983 CITATION ISP, S/N 501-0322

1982 CITATION I/SP, S/N 501-0242

1992 PIPER MALIBU, S/N 4622124

1976 PIPER SENECA, S/N 34-7670073

After hours contact • Jet Sales: Dennis Dabbs +1 803 822-5533 • Lee Thomas +1 803 822-5526 Matt Fullerton +1 316 722-4375 • Piston Sales: Ralph Lacomba +1 803 822-5578

Aircraft Sales, Maintenance, Avionics, Paint & Interior, Executive Charter, 24/7 Line Service


BG 3 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:39 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation • o o

o •

The aircraft should be placed on a charter certificate, which would create three benefits: Outside charter revenue will defray some of the costs of the operation. Additionally, charter revenue would alter the perception that the aircraft was strictly an expense. Commercial standards are perceived to be higher than those of private aviation. It was not realistic to restrict who could fly with whom. The risk to the company must be miti gated by raising operational safety standards.

Business Aviation has a superb safety record that parallels that of the major Airlines. To match or exceed that level of performance, we made numerous recommendations. (Note: To assure one high standard of performance, all flights (internal and outside charter flights) were to adhere to a single set of policies.) The following were among the most important recommendations we made: • Aviation services should report to someone in the C-Suite to provide the authority needed. That reporting point should not be the CEO so that there would be sufficient executive time for effective oversight. This also assures a point of appeal - the CEO - for critical impasses between the aviation manager and the responsible executive. • The aircraft must contain current safety technology. This included the latest anti-collision and terrain avoidance devices. • The aircraft must have at least two turbine engines. • All flights must be flown by two qualified cap tains. Each pilot must have over 4,000 hours total flight experience, at least half of that time in jets, and at least 500 hours in that type of jet. This assured at least eight years of flight experience and exposure to all seasonal conditions in that type of aircraft. (Note: The accident rate for pilots during the first 100 hours in a new aircraft is dramatically higher than after that period of experience.) • Training for the pilots must be done as a crew in a full-motion simulator every six months to enhance the development of teamwork. • Frequent passengers must attend cabin safety training annually. This training goes far beyond a normal pre-departure safety briefing. • The aircraft will be maintained to commercial standards. • The first passenger trip would not be undertaken until the crew had completed a series of familiarization flights to assure complete readiness to go “prime time”.

IMPLEMENTATION Phil and the Board signed off on the aircraft operational policies. The next question was whether aviation services would be internal or outsourced. Our analysis showed there was little economic advantage to either (less than 4% of the annual budget). Of greatest importance to the company was a desire

34

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

for confidentiality and operational control. Therefore, they opted for an internal aviation department. With that decision made, the Board assigned the aviation start-up project to the executive to whom the department would report. He put a team in motion to tackle various parallel activities which included: • An aviation consulting firm (ours) to assist with: o Identification and selection of the staff. o Search for the aircraft, negotiation for the terms and conditions of purchase. o Oversight of the pre-purchase inspection. o Development of the operational and business processes and systems for the department (business management, financial, scheduling/ dispatch, maintenance and flight operations). • An aviation attorney with specific expertise to support: o Aircraft purchase agreements o Hangar and office leases. • Corporate managers to support the process, including: o Human Resources o Finance. o Accounting. o Legal. The project was given high priority and was executed at all deliberate speed. Even so, due to the complexity of the effort it was about four months from the time the company made the commitment to proceed until their first flight. And so it went. 18 years ago they began the use of Business Aviation in pursuit of their goals. Next month I will chronicle the remainder of the saga. I will describe the evolution of their flight operations as well as the corporate impact of Phil’s strategic choices, as they were supported by Business Aviation.

“Business Aviation has a superb safety record that parallels that of the major Airlines. To match or exceed that level of performance, we made numerous recommendations.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 40

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


The World’s Best Massage Chair

REACH YOUR LUXURY DESTINATION (PRIVATE JET OPTIONAL) Experience the perfect escape every day, any time, in your own home or office. The Inada Sogno DreamWave™ massage chair combines centuries of shiatsu healing techniques with decades of innovation in massage chair technology. The result is a transcendent massage experience that melts away stress and promotes deep relaxation. Unrivaled in quality craftsmanship and therapeutic effects, the Sogno DreamWave by Inada is the best full-body massage chair in the world. Call for an information kit, and ask about a special offer for World Aircraft Sales readers: Free Delivery and White Glove Installation—A $450 Value + 3 Year In-Home Warranty and 30-Day Home Trial.

TM

The World’s Best Massage Chair

888.835.8847 www.DreamWaveChair.com Offer Code: WAS0413

Expiration: April 30, 2013

TM


The Jet Collection April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 15:37 Page 1


The Jet Collection April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 15:37 Page 2


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:26 Page 1


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:27 Page 1


BG 4 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:41 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Aircraft Charter: Entry-level Business Aviation, and so much more. David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

For many companies, chartering a business aircraft is their first experience with Business Aviation. For experienced flight departments, charter is also a means for obtaining supplemental lift, explains David Wyndham.

C

hartering is a highly advantageous and multi-dimensional form of Business Aviation. It is a way to access the benefits of business air travel without any long-term commitments. Booking a charter flight can be

done with a single phone call, or by visiting a web site specializing in booking on-demand air travel. Charter is safe, efficient, and when used appropriately, is cost-effective. Let’s take a closer look… Traditionally, the user pays for the charter aircraft on a per-flight or per-trip basis. This form of Business Aviation may also be pre-paid via a contract for a given number of flight hours with a specific provider, or by purchasing a jet card (which is in fact a variety of pre-paid charter). Jet card programs have set prices, a set number of hours (usually 25), and a set category of aircraft such as a midsize business jet.

CHARTER IS SAFE Charter operators are licensed by the FAA in the US under a regulation referred to as FAR Part 135, which covers on-demand charter for aircraft that generally have 30 or fewer passenger seats. Part 135 governs how chartered aircraft are operated, maintained and staffed. Crew duty and rest time and other safety-of-flight items that range from bookkeeping to weather are also addressed in government regulations. Charter operators can be licensed for a specific region, such as the US, Canada, Europe, etc., and some have worldwide operating authority. In addition, many charter operators, especially those with turbine-powered aircraft, have independent safety audits performed periodically. While the FAA (or other aviation regulatory authority) sets the minimum standards, external safety audits by nongovernment specialists encourage a higher standard of safety. Many of these programs offer varying levels of certification. Some of the best-known commercial firms doing these audit surveys are ARG/US and Wyvern. A designation of ‘Platinum’ is the highest level of audit by the former, whereas Wyvern’s highest level is called Wingman. Several not-for-profit associations such as the Flight Safety Foundation and the Air Charter Safety Foundation U certify safety audit companies.

40

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


ExecuJet Aircraft Trading’s dedicated sales directors are global, local, impartial, professional and transparent offering new and pre-owned aircraft across all manufacturers to clients world wide. With an inventory of mandated aircraft and acquisition agreements from qualified buyers, ExecuJet is your answer should you wish to market your aircraft for sale or consider an acquisition. ExecuJet is also a member of the National Aircraft Resale Association.

GLOBAL 5000 SN: 9186; Year: 2006; Total Time: 2,465 Hrs; Cycles: 858; Programs: SmartParts, Rolls Royce Corporate Care; Location: Roskilde, Denmark Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 605 SN: 5865; Year: 2011; Total Time: 330 Hrs; Cycles: 159; Programs: CAMP, SmartParts, MSP; Location: Paris, France Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 604 SN: 5548; Year: 2002; Total Time: 2,952 Hrs; Cycles: 1,019; Programs: GE On Point at delivery; Location: Dallas, USA Price: $11,300,000

CHALLENGER 604 SN: 5318; Year: 1996; Total Time: 7,632 Hrs; Cycles: 3,273; Programs: CAMP, JSSI; Location: South Africa Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 300 SN: 20295; Year: 2010; Total Time: 2,109 Hrs; Cycles: 1,048; Programs: SmartParts; Honeywell MSP; Location: Poland Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 300 SN: TBA; Year: 2007; Total Time: 1,031 Hrs; Cycles: 836; Programs: CAMP, Jet Care Program; Location: Europe Price: $14,750,000

HAWKER 1000B SN: 259004; Year: 1991; Total Time: 3,988 Hrs; Cycles: 2,353; Programs: Pratt & Whitney ESP Silver; Location: Biggin Hill Price: Make Offer

HAWKER 800XP SN: 258439; Year: 1999; Total Time: 7,617 Hrs; Cycles: 5,074; Programs: Honeywell MSP Gold; Location: Moscow, Russia Price: Make Offer

HAWKER 800B SN: 258130; Year: 1989; Total Time: 6,535 Hrs; Cycles: 5,306; Programs: MSP Gold; Location: Palma De Mallorca Price: Make Offer

PIAGGIO AVANTI P-180 SN: TBA; Year: 2002; Total Time: 2,923 Hrs; Programs: CAMP, ESP Gold; Location: Switzerland Price: Make Offer

AGUSTA A109 POWER SN: 11780; Year: 2010; Total Time: 142 Hrs; Programs: TBA; Location: Switzerland Price: Make Offer

CHALLENGER 605 SN: 5781; Year: 2009; Total Time: 896 Hrs; Cycles: 511; Programs: SmartParts; Location: Cannes, France Price: $18,950,000

ng dealdi pen


BG 4 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:42 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation The International Business Aviation Council, Ltd. (IBAC) promotes its International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO), which is a code of best practices designed to help flight departments worldwide achieve a high level of safety and professionalism. Many air charter operators also conform to this standard.

CHARTER IS EFFICIENT With charter, you have the flexibility to tailor the business aircraft to each mission. Whether you need to carry two people 300 miles or 12 people 4,000 miles, there is a charter aircraft suited to your trip. The ability to right-size the aircraft means that companies requiring shorter trips with few people do not need to pay the higher cost for the larger, longrange aircraft. Charter trips are flown to your schedule from public-use airports that are likely within 30 minutes of your ground destination. The number of such airports exceeds by a factor of 10 the number of locations with scheduled Airline flights, and by nearly 100 times the number of airports with convenient Airline departures. The time spent at the airport is minimized, too, using private air terminals. The crew knows who the passengers are in advance, so security is assured with a minimum of fuss and no embarrassment. Within the confines of the crew duty and rest regulations, a trip that might take two or three days via the Airlines can often be accomplished without an overnight stay. When adding up the time spent not traveling via the Airlines (and the money saved by not spending nights in hotels, plus the fact that as many passengers as the aircraft can carry may be transported for the price of the charter), the total cost of travel can be particularly attractive.

CHARTER IS COST EFFECTIVE To elaborate, a trip for four people via the scheduled Airlines might cost $3,200 for airfare, plus an additional $1,000 for lodging, ground transport from Airline airport to ultimate destination, and meals. Chartering a twin-engine turboprop for four hours costs about the same amount, which is a fair trade when considering the reduced wear and tear on your business executives, as well as the more productive use of their time while traveling (e.g., holding company-sensitive conversations or working on proprietary documents without concern for who is sitting in the next seat). Charter is also a cost-effective means of adding an aircraft to your existing business aircraft operation. There may be times when your own aircraft is unavailable due to maintenance, or it is already scheduled for a trip. The charter option can add another aircraft to your flight schedule without having to add another aircraft in your hangar.

CHARTER AIRCRAFT BEST PRACTICES There needs to be clear guidance regarding the use of charter aircraft. In general, a company’s charter policy should cover the following major areas:

42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

THE PAY-BACK FROM CHARTER CAN BE VERY MEASURABLE

When is charter justified? There is no denying that Business Aviation is a preferred method of travel. Even if you don’t own an aircraft, you still need clear direction regarding who is authorized to use air charter and when it may be authorized. The rationale for authorization may be a combination of cost, travel time avoided, and urgency of the trip. • Who needs to schedule the service? If you have an in-house flight department, then the department’s leadership is the best means for managing the charter. If there is an in-house travel group, then they may be tasked with this duty. Regardless, the persons scheduling air charter must be familiar with the corporate rules and requirements for using the service. • What are the safety requirements? The charter operator should exceed the FAA’s minimum regulatory requirements. This is best confirmed by the operator providing proof of a third-party safety audit and proof of insurance. Your inhouse risk management may have specific liability coverage requirements as well. Levels of training and experience of the crews should be available, and letters of recommendation are a big plus. The latter also can help to confirm that the advertised level of service matches the provider’s documented experience. Charter is an excellent way to experience the benefits of Business Aviation. There are thousands of non-airline airports in the US, thousands more across the globe. Business aircraft, chartered according to your company’s needs, enables an efficient use of your executives’ time.

“Chartering a twin-engine turboprop for four hours costs about the same amount (as flying the Airlines), which is a fair trade when considering the reduced wear and tear on your business executives...”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 46

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


A I R C R A F T SA L E S & ACQ U I S I T I O N S 2 0 0 8 G u l f st re a m 2 0 0 s /n 1 8 2

Low Total Time. Excellently Equipped. Beautiful Interior Cosmetics. Meticulous Care. Iridium SATCOM Phone. Airshow 4000. Two 17-inch Monitors. Two DVD Players. Espresso Maker. Microwave Oven.

2008 Gulfstream G450

s/n 4116

1,406 Total Time. 675 Landings. Honeywell Primus Epic Avionics Suite. HUD/EVS.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 145

9,225 Total Time. MSP. 3D Engines. Collins EFIS 86. Dual UNS-1K.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 153

13,196 Total Time. Two U.S. Corporate Owners Since New. JSSI Engine Program.

1996 Challenger 604

s/n 5307

7,500 Total Time. 3,400 Landings. Excellent Paint and Interior by Duncan Aviation.

2002 Citation Encore

s/n 593

2,344 Total Time. Honeywell Primus 1000 EFIS System. Paint by Duncan Aviation 2011.

2001 Astra SPX

s/n 135

4,356 Total Time. TFE731-40R-200G Engines on MSP. Collins FCC 4000 Dual Flight Director, 4 Display EFIS.

+1 402.475.2611 路 www.DuncanAviation.aero/aircraftsales 路 800.228.4277 World Aircraft Sales Ad 2_13_13.indd 2

2/13/2013 12:32:58 PM


O'Gara April 18/03/2013 15:44 Page 1

O’Gara Aviation Company—a name synonymous with expertise and professionalism—is now OGARAJETS. While the name is new, the mission endures. We continue to prove time and again that the most important elements in any aircraft transaction are integrity and trust.

FOSTERING CONFIDENCE IN AIRCRAFT TRANSACTIONS As the company enters its 33rd year under the leadership of the second generation of the Foster family, we invite you to learn more about the competitive advantages aircraft buyers and sellers enjoy as our clients. OGARAJETS is uniquely structured to deliver highly personalized service experiences augmented by our renowned technical knowledge and market insight. A pioneer in the collection and analysis of aircraft market data, the OGARAJETS team offers investment grade advice, stemming not only from buying and selling aircraft, but owning and operating them as well. Interested in learning more? Contact us today at +1 770 955 3554 or ogarajets@ogarajets.com.


O'Gara April 18/03/2013 15:46 Page 2

F E A T U R E D

I N V E N T O R Y

2009 G GULFSTREAM ULFSTREAM G200, G200 0, S/N 221 FRESH AR ARCS CS S INSPE INSPECTION CTION ARRANTIES REMAIN 5-YEAR FACTORY ACTTORY W WARRANTIES 5YEAR F SERVICE PLAN GULFSTREAM PLANEPARTS E SER VICE PL AN - GULF STREA AM PL ANEPARTS - APU MSP ESP ENGINE LLOW OW TIME - LLATE ATE VINT TAGE A VINTAGE ‘LIKE NEW’ INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR CO CONDITION ONDITION

S/N 1062

S/N 22

S/N 25

1998 F FALCON ALCON A 900EX 900 0EX

S/N 265

1998 998 FALCON FALCON A 900EX 19

1988 GULFSTREAM M IV

S/N 5587

S/N 289

2006 LEARJET 45 45XR 5XR

2005 05 CHALLENGER 604 200

2008 GULFSTREAM G150

S/N 257208

S/N HA-12

S/N 10

1984 HA HAWKER AW WKER 700A 70 00A

2008 20 008 HAWKER HA AWKER W 900XP

31ER 1ER 1989 LEARJET 31

www.

.com

+1 770 955 3554 ogarajets@ogarajets.com


BG5 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:45 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Still Stuck In A Down Market Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Additionally, Jay is a Member of the Board of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the Chairman of the Associate Member Advisory Council (AMAC). He also sits on the Jet Aviation Customer and the Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Boards. Mr. Mesinger can be contacted at jay@jetsales.com

Last month Jay Mesinger identified several factors that define market conditions and outlined that recovery was still sluggish. This month he expands upon that thesis.

H

istorically, market recovery is characterized by several trends. In down-markets, the best aircraft sell and what remains are the less-than-perfect offerings. In fact, during downturns there is typically no difference in the price of a great aircraft versus one that is less than great. They are all cheap. Differentiation between aircraft

GOING NOWHERE FAST

46

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

based on airframe time, cosmetics, damage and extra equipment occurs only when the market becomes more balanced. As recovery emerges, subtly the cream gets sold first. Prices remain down but choice is dramatically reduced. As new aircraft enter the market, the price of better offerings firm and then inch upward. The next phenomenon that occurs in a recovering market is the sheer number of aircraft within each segment becomes less, so there is less choice as well as a clear delineation in price between the great ones and the mediocre. More demand leads to less supply, which leads to the recovery we are all anticipating so vigorously. But as I cautioned last month, not even the most subtle signs of the recovery are occurring. The latest editions of Aircraft Bluebook and VREF, two popular guides for reporting industry valuations, were updated recently. Both respected sources of information continue to show a majority of aircraft trending down in retail and wholesale price. Both continue to characterize the current conditions with very guarded outlooks, such as “While activity is good in most segments, prices continue to slide,” and “Incredibly, after more than twenty quarters of eroding prices, we see yet another downward correction.” These quotes came directly from one of the books’ quarterly newsletter while the other used words like, “Prices for pre-owned aircraft continue to decrease quarter-to-quarter in the jet and U turboprop category.” Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aviation Advisors April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 15:56 Page 1


BG5 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:47 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation THIS IS AN IMPORTANT TIME TO LISTEN TO THE SALES PROFESSIONALS

TIMELY ADVICE To the Seller, never before has it been more important to listen to your aircraft sales professionals. Those of us who talk daily to sellers, buyers and fellow sales professionals, tracking activity, following prices and embracing realities of the markets, are instructing our clients to set “ask” prices far closer to the expected “take” price. No longer is it wise to leave big gaps between the two. By setting a realistic “ask” price, buyers perceive that we are realistic sellers. Since there are so few sales compared to available inventory, we must not discourage any buyer in their quest to discuss an aircraft in which they may be interested. The second outcome of the closer numbers is less clear cut. If there is not much room between the “ask” price and the “take” price, the buyer may treat negotiations less as a sport and more like a business deal. The right price will generate more calls and open the dialogue to work through the process with less sport involved. The end to our sluggish market is not yet around the corner. In fact, from this observer’s perspective, it is not even in view. Given the lack of financing availability on a grand level and the sheer supply of inventory, as well as a still shaky global economy, I think it could be another 24 to 36 months before this market levels out across the board. So if you want to sell, price right and be open to offers!

BUYING OPPORTUNITY As a buyer the current and future market conditions

play right into your hands, with the caveat that financing may not be readily available. This situation keeps many well-intentioned buyers sidelined. If you can get a loan on an aircraft or can generate the funds from other credit facilities, you have a wonderful path ahead of you. Just remember not to be blinded by price. Even as a buyer, it is imperative to work closely with your aircraft sales professional to be sure that you do not buy a cheap aircraft cheap. Rather, you want to buy a great aircraft cheap, which is a fully attainable goal. From my perspective our business is strong, albeit with low and continuing falling and unstabilized pricing. We are seeing more players coming into the market to buy—not in the numbers of yesteryear and not enough to turn this market around, but at least there are buyers today who will step up if the price is right. We are also beginning to see an emergence of first-time buyers again, still not in big numbers but a positive trend nonetheless. The notion of negative optics is less apparent, replaced by a greater understanding that Business Aviation is a powerful business tool. Using this tool to get out ahead of the competition and in front of customers are benefits that more companies now appreciate.

“ If there is not much room between the “ask” price and the “take” price, the buyer may treat negotiations less as a sport and more like a business deal.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 54

Compare aircraft performance using our

Aircraft Performance Guide at www.AvBuyer.com And select from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 48

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


World Aircraft Sales | Second Chance Ad | Full page bleed 276mm H x 211mm W | Trims to 270mm H x 205mm W

WE GIVE AIRPLANES A SECOND CHANCE TO MAKE A FIRST IMPRESSION

It’s not merely a pre-owned jet. It’s a high-performance platform, available now and waiting for you to make your mark. We’ve inspected it, ensuring that it meets or exceeds original manufacturer standards. Now it’s ready – complete with field service support – for you to make it yours. Take it as is. Or tailor it to your specifications. Design a new livery. Customize the interior. Upgrade the avionics. All to factory standards. Our OEM experience with first-in-type and export-import procedures is unmatched in the industry. You simply fly away in an aircraft that’s uniquely yours at a substantial savings over a new jet. bombardierpre-ownedaircraft.com • 972-960-3810

AVAILABLE CUSTOM UPGRADES FACTORY RE-DELIVERY WARRANTY • REFURBISHMENT • TRAINING • CARBON OFFSET SMART PARTS • PLUS ADDITIONAL REQUIRED INSPECTIONS


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:28 Page 1


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:35 Page 1


Bloomer deVere April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 16:19 Page 1

OFFICE 805 . 484 . 6605 | USA 800 . 848 . 6600 | E-MAIL: info@bloomerdevere.com

www.bloomerdevere.com

BOEING BUSINESS JET

S/N 30327

Fresh 12 Year Inspection & Fresh Gear Overhaul at BizJet Tulsa, OK • Partial Interior Soft-goods Refurb • 18 Passenger Executive Configuration • 42-inch Plasma in Forward Lounge • Two Lavatories with Showers, plus Forward Crew Lavatory • 331 cu. ft. (9.37 cu. m.) of Cargo Space


Bloomer deVere April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 16:20 Page 2

OFFICE 805 . 484 . 6605 | USA 800 . 848 . 6600 | E-MAIL: info@bloomerdevere.com

www.bloomerdevere.com

GLOBAL 5000

S/N 9245

LONG RANGE FUEL TANK • 15 Pax Configuration • Fresh 1C, 2C & 4C Inspections • Wireless High Speed Data • SATCOM • Smart Parts Plus • Soundproofing • Enhanced Vision System • Batch 3 Avionics upgrade: HUD, LNAV, VNAV, FMS, IAC, FANS 1A, RNP4 30/30, Windshear, Cockpit Voice Recorder • TCAS upgraded to 7.1


BG 6 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:49 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Broker Of Record Letters: Handle them with care! Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

54

The Broker of Record (BOR) letter is one of the most powerful and abused documents in the insurance industry. Unfortunately, many less-than-scrupulous brokers convince lay insurance buyers to sign this document without explaining exactly what it accomplishes, cautions Stuart Hope.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

L

et’s look at a typical scenario where the BOR letter might come into play. Your insurance policy is due for renewal and you decided to seek a competing proposal from another insurance broker. You provide the competing broker with all the pertinent underwriting information and then wait to receive his or her quote at a later date. Instead the competing broker calls you back and complains that competing quotes are unattainable because your current broker has already contacted all available insurance markets, therefore blocking any further quotes. This seems unfair; even anti- competitive. The competing broker then suggests a way to “fix it”. Simply sign a BOR letter appointing him or her as broker, which allows access to the insurance market to obtain a quote. The fact the competing broker is asking you to sign an ominous lookwww.AvBuyer.com

ing letter should be a huge red flag! Be careful and give thoughtful evaluation before signing! The Broker of Record letter is a very powerful document. Here is what is going to happen as soon as you sign it. •

• •

The competing broker will forward it to the insurance companies that were “blocked”, informing them you have fired your current broker and hired the competing broker to represent you in the market. The insurance company will then notify your current broker by sending a copy of the signed BOR letter confirming same. The insurer will give your current broker five days to obtain a rescinding BOR letter. Your current broker is going to contact you and ask why they have been fired.

A call from your broker can be uncomfortable if you don’t know it is coming. To ensure that there are no surprises, a responsible broker will have carefully explained exactly what will happen if you sign a BOR letter. If it is not explained, the broker is being unscrupulous and you should run, not walk, away from dealing with them. Keep in mind if the competing broker cannot contact any markets it means your current broker already has made inquiries on your behalf, which is proof positive (in most cases) that the agent is doing his or her job.

WHAT EXACTLY IS A BOR LETTER, AND WHY IS IT NECESSARY? Insurance companies rely on insurance brokers to bring accounts to them for evaluation. There are a small number of aviation insurance companies, each with limited staff, and they do not want to tie up their underwriters by quoting the same risk to numerous different brokers. Therefore, each will recognize only one broker on any given risk on a first-come, firstserved basis. U Aircraft Index see Page 4


Charlie Bravo April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 16:40 Page 1


BG 6 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:50 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation The first broker who submits a risk to an aviation insurance underwriter is the official "broker (or agent) of record", and the insurance carrier will assume this person is the customer’s first choice. The choice of broker belongs entirely to you, the customer, so the broker can be changed later if that is the wish of the customer via a Broker of Record Letter. It is a serious document that accomplishes the following: •

Terminates the relationship between you and your current broker. Suspends your current broker's ability to negotiate on your behalf with the insurance company. Affirms the appointment of a new broker, giving that broker the sole ability to negotiate with the insurance company for you. Grants access to any underwriting information or proposals that are currently "on the table". (Without a significant change in the basic underwriting information, if the insurance company has already made a firm commitment to the first broker to either decline or provide a quote, the new broker "inherits" that decision – whether it is a declination or a specific premium proposal.) Provides a relief mechanism or transition period from one broker to another, expressed in number of days, to allow full disclosure of the letter to all parties involved, thereby granting the former broker the opportunity to review the implications of the letter with you and to confirm your desire to change brokers.

• •

REASONS FOR SIGNING YOUR BOR LETTER •

You are simply unhappy with the service or performance of your current agent/broker. The competing broker convinces you he or she brings more benefits to the table including possible expertise in areas such as experience in your class of business, claims, or loss control unique to your risk. You want to assign a competing broker access to a particular insurance company while leaving the other insurers open for your current broker to work with.

IN CLOSING... Be certain you understand the ramifications of this document. Have your broker (either your current broker or the candidate broker) explain its intent before you sign it! You are generally best served by selecting, up front, one competent aviation insurance broker who has access to all the markets and will consult with you on the resulting proposals. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 62

UNDERSTAND THOROUGHLY THE BOR LETTER BEFORE SIGNING IT

THE WORLD’S FINEST BUSINESS JETS, TURBOPROPS & HELICOPTERS FOR SALE AT 56

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


General Aviation April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 16:45 Page 1


Avjet April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 16:50 Page 1


Avjet April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 16:51 Page 2

EXCLUSIVELY OFFERED BY AVJET CORPORATION

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE

2000 Global Express, S/N 9010

1999 Global Express, S/N 9031

2003 Global Express, S/N 9116

2009 Green Boeing Business Jet, S/N 37700

2006 Gulfstream G450, S/N 4044

1987 Gulfstream GIV, S/N 1022

1987 Gulfstream GIV, S/N 1029

1999 Learjet 60, S/N 172

Avjet is pleased to offer these unique aircraft on behalf of its clients. We invite inquiries from serious buyers looking to invest in an aviation asset of great beauty and enduring value.

+1 (410) 626-6162 | sales@avjet.com | avjet.com


JetBrokers April 18/03/2013 16:54 Page 1

1980 Falcon 50, S/N 010, 8179 TT, JSSI, Collins FDS-2000 EFIS, TCAS II, Dual UNS-1F w/ WAAS, C&CPCP c/w 3/09, Gear O/H in 2/12, Asking $1,995,000.00

2009 Citation Sovereign, S/N 680-0276, 604 TT, Pro Parts, Aircell Axxess II, JAR Ops, Airshow 4000, Ten Passenger Interior, Make Offer!

1992 Falcon 50, S/N 227, 7072.6 TT, Engines on MSP, C Check c/w 9/10, Gear O/Hed 12/03, Aft Lav, TCAS 2, Nice Paint and Interior, Asking $2,995,000.00

2008 Learjet 40XR, S/N 2102, 2358 TT, Smart Parts, Airshow, Iridium Phone, Steep Approach, Belted Lav, Dual UNS-1E’s, Asking $3,995,000.00

1980 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-36, 10639 TT, Engines in JSSI Premium, TCAS I, Freon Air, Garmin GNS-430, RVSM, Asking $550,000.00

2005 Learjet 60SE, S/N 289, 2203 TT, ESP Gold, 8.33/FM Immunity, UNS-1E, Enh Mode S, On CAMP, Asking $4,400,000.00

1980 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-45, 10229 TT, MSP Gold, RVSM, Freon Air, Garmin 530/430’s, Honeywell KMD850, Asking $625,000.00

1993 Learjet 31A, S/N 65, 6967 TT, Engines on JSSI Plus, TCAS 2, UNS-1C, TRs, Big Door, Single Point Refueling, 12 Yr due 5/17, , Make Offer

Also Available Astra S/N 030 Beechjet 400, S/N RJ-47 Challenger 604, S/N 5422 Citation CJ2+, S/N 525A-0365 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Citation Jet, S/N 525-0301 Citation Jet, S/N 525-0016

Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039 Citation II, S/N 550-0326 Citation II, S/N 550-0216 Citation II, S/N 550-0127 Citation II, S/N 550-0082 Falcon 2000, S/N 8

Falcon 50EX, S/N 268 Falcon 20F-5BR, S/N 430 Gulfstream GIISP, S/N 206 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411 King Air 200XPR, S/N BB-226 King Air C90, S/N LJ-869


JetBrokers April 18/03/2013 16:56 Page 2

2010 King Air 350i, S/N FL-689, 450 TT, Venue Cabin Mgmt – Aircell Axxess II, TCAS 2, Hi-def Video Displays, L3 ESIS, Asking $5,900,000.00

2009 Embraer Legacy 600, S/N 145-1109, 2200 TT, On Corp Care, JAR Ops, Steep Approach, 13 Pax, Premium Sound, Expresso Maker, Make Offer!

2008 King Air C90GTi, S/N LJ-1902, 1356 TT, Pro-line 21 w/ IFIS, One Owner, Engine Fire Ext., Skywatch, Price Reduced to $2,200,000.00

2005 Embraer Legacy 600, S/N 1450-0873, 4400 TT, On Corp Care and EEC Enhanced, Satcom /w WIFI, 13 Pax, Steep Appr., Asking $10,995,000.00

1989 Citation III, S/N 650-0169, 5920 TT, MSP Gold, TCAS 2, PATS In-Flight APU, UNS-1K, Document 8 c/w 12/12, Excellent Records, Asking $1,295,000.00

1981 Citation II, S/N 550-0295, 8441 TT, 1891/2146 SMOH, 87/361 TSHS, TR’s, Freon, Garmin GNS-530/430’s, Skywatch, Phase 5 c/w 12/12, Asking $575,000.00

1999 Socata TBM700B, S/N 151, 2380 TT, 583 TSHS, Dual Garmin 530’s, GMX200 MFD, Skywatch, Freon, US Based, Asking $1,325,000.00

1979 Citation II, S/N 550-0082, 10283TT, 3003/2579 SMOH, TR’s, Garmin 530/430, Freon, RVSM, Exc Paint and Interior, Current 135, Asking $595,000.00

AUSTIN +1-512-530-6900 Phone

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

CHICAGO +1-630-377-6900 Phone

DETROIT +1-248-666-9800 Phone

DENVER +1-303-494-6900 Phone

FARNBOROUGH +44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

Web: www.jetbrokers.com


BG 7 April12_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:52 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Aircraft Transactions: Tax-Free Like-Kind Exchanges of Aircraft (Part 1) Chris Younger is a partner at GKG Law, P.C. practicing in the firm’s Business Aircraft Group. He focuses his legal practice on business aircraft transactions as well as issues relating to federal and state taxation and regulation of business aircraft ownership and operations. Mr. Younger can be contacted at cyounger@gkglaw.com

U.S. Tax Code allows for the disposal of an asset, such as a business aircraft, and the acquisition of its replacement without generating a current tax liability associated with capital gains from selling the first asset. Attorney Chris Younger summarizes the procedures as they apply in practice to Business Aviation. hen a company upgrades from one aircraft to another, the Board must consider whether or not to engage in a tax-free like-kind exchange of the asset. The key benefit to engaging in a like-kind exchange is the deferral of gain recognition and concomitant income tax liability arising from the sale of the relinquished aircraft. Even in an economy where aircraft values are static or declining, the recapture of this depreciation can result in a significant income tax liability to the company and its shareholders. There are, however, many issues - both legal and financial - that a Board must analyze when determining whether to structure the company’s aircraft upgrade as a like-kind exchange.

W

This article is the first in a series of two that will provide a brief primer on (i) the key issues a Board must consider when determining whether to engage in a like-kind exchange, (ii) the basic requirements for implementing a like-kind exchange and the factors influencing the structure of the exchange, and (iii) ancillary issues that a Board must consider when determining whether to implement a like-kind exchange.

62

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

FORWARD LIKE-KIND EXCHANGE A direct exchange of aircraft between two owners is the simplest form of like-kind exchange. However, because a direct exchange of aircraft is not normally practical, the Internal Revenue Service has sanctioned several methods of utilizing a like-kind exchange that allow an aircraft owner to accomplish the exchange and defer its tax gain when the purchaser of a relinquished aircraft and the seller of a replacement aircraft are not identical. Selling an existing aircraft before purchasing its replacement may utilize a forward like-kind exchange structure. In this situation the company creates a fictional aircraft purchaser/seller, referred to in tax parlance as a Qualified Intermediary (QI), who takes title to the aircraft being sold and transfers that title to the purchaser of that aircraft. Thereafter, the QI takes title to the newly acquired aircraft from its seller and transfers it to the company. The direct exchange of aircraft between the company and the QI occurs, thereby allowing the company to defer U

Aircraft Index see Page 4


CAP April 20/03/2013 16:46 Page 1

2007 Sovereign. S/N 680-0120, N621CS. Total Time 3,210 Landings 2,138. Aircraft is enrolled on Pro-Parts, ESP Gold and Aux Advantage. One Owner Aircraft, Impeccably Maintained

Photography by Jay Davis

1984 Citation III. S/N 650-0054, N47AN. Total Time7,994 Landings 5,646. Engines are enrolled on MSP Gold. Three Owner Aircraft, Impeccably Maintained. Paint done by Duncan 2009. Interior Enhancements by Duncan 2009.

Business Aircraft Transaction Specialists William J. Quinn, Managing Director Charleston Aviation Partners LLC, 103 Palm Boulevard, Suite 2-B, Isle of Palms, SC 29451 +1 843 886-3313 (office) +1 843 743-6500 (mobile) +1 843 410-5698 (Fax) billquinn@charlestonaviation.com

About Us...

Charleston Aviation Partners was established to promote a better understanding of the overall needs and requirements of aircraft owners. The services we offer go well beyond the basic concepts of marketing and selling your aircraft or helicopter


BG 7 April12_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 12:53 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

recognition of gain on the sale of the relinquished aircraft. However, the company must follow specific safe-harbor procedures set forth by the IRS to take advantage of a forward like-kind exchange structure. First, prior to selling the relinquished aircraft, the company must engage a QI. The company and the QI enter into an exchange agreement that sets forth each party's rights and responsibilities as they relate to the exchange process. The exchange agreement also provides a roadmap for the implementation of the like-kind exchange. A well drafted exchange agreement will contain provisions ensuring that: •

The QI is properly qualified to act as a qualified intermediary (i.e., that QI is not considered the company’s agent or its “alter ego”); The QI holds proceeds received from the sale of the relinquished aircraft in a qualified escrow until they are used to purchase the replacement aircraft (because the company may not have actual or constructive receipt of the sales proceeds during this period); The company correctly identifies replacement aircraft within 45 days of the sale of the relinquished aircraft and purchases the replacement aircraft within 180 days of the sale of the relinquished aircraft; and Title to both the relinquished aircraft and the replacement aircraft is correctly transferred between the company and the QI and such transfers are documented adequately.

Since the potential tax liability resulting from the incorrect implementation of a like-kind exchange that fails to meet IRS requirements could be large, it is always advisable for the Board to engage aviation tax counsel to review the exchange agreement on behalf of the company. This procedure will give the

company maximum assurance of its rights and responsibilities as well as those of the QI with respect to the implementation and completion of the like-kind exchange.

REVERSE LIKE-KIND EXCHANGE If a company must acquire its replacement aircraft before it is able to sell its existing aircraft, it will need to engage in a reverse like-kind exchange of aircraft. This is typically the case when the company purchases a used aircraft and takes delivery prior to closing on the sale of its existing aircraft. The company may also want to ensure that it has no gap in aircraft availability by acquiring its replacement aircraft before it sells the relinquished aircraft. As is the case with a forward like-kind exchange of aircraft, the company must comply with a set of very specific IRS procedures. It must be noted, however, that these procedures are substantially more complicated than the steps to be followed in a forward like-kind exchange. Next month, we will describe the nature of reverse like-kind exchanges. Note: This article should not be construed as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The reader is urged to consult legal counsel or other advisors concerning his/her own situation and specific legal questions. Please be advised that, to ensure compliance with requirements imposed by the IRS, any U.S. tax advice contained in this communication is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein.

“It is always advisable for the Board to engage aviation tax counsel to review the exchange agreement on behalf of the company.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Business Aviation and the Boardroom continues on Page 66

THE WORLD’S LEADING

AIRCRAFT DEALERS & BROKERS find one today 64

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

www.AvBuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jeteffect Inventory March 18/03/2013 16:58 Page 1

Listed. Sold. and Every SMART MOVE in Between. Astra 1125-015* Astra 1125-018* Astra 1125-024 Astra 1125-032 Astra 1125-034* Astra 1125-041 Astra SP 1125-052 Astra SP 1125-056 Astra SP 1125-067 Astra SPX 1125-082 Astra SPX 1125-083 Astra SPX 1125-102 Astra SPX 1125-124 Astra SPX 1125-125 Astra SPX 1125-128 Astra SPX 1125-132* Astra SPX 1125-136* Beechjet 400A RK-152 Beechjet 400A RK-174 Beechjet 400A RK-281 Beechjet 400A RK-287 Beechcraft Premier I RB-008 Beechcraft Premier I RB-046 Beechcraft Premier I RB-100 Beechcraft Premier I A RB-157 Challenger 300 20028* Challenger 300 20184 Challenger 600 1020 Challenger 601-1A 3007 Challenger 601-1A 3044 Challenger 601-1A 3050* Challenger 601-3A 5076 Challenger 601-3A/ER 5100 Challenger 601-3A/ER 5108* Challenger 601-3A/ER 5126 Challenger 601-3R 5169 Challenger 604 5360 Challenger 604 5451 Challenger 604 5547 Challenger 604 5635 Citation 500 SP 500-0259 Citation Bravo 550-0809* Citation Bravo 550-0823 Citation Bravo 550-0858 Citation Bravo 550-0991 Citation Bravo 550-1000 Citation Bravo 550-1087 Citation CJ 525-0019 Citation CJ 525-0023 Citation CJ 525-0026 Citation CJ 525-0027 Citation CJ 525-0028 Citation CJ 525-0047 Citation CJ 525-0048 Citation CJ 525-0049 Citation CJ 525-0075* Citation CJ 525-0076 Citation CJ 525-0087 Citation CJ 525-0092 Citation CJ 525-0099* Citation CJ 525-0107 Citation CJ 525-0111 Citation CJ 525-0116 Citation CJ 525-0122* Citation CJ 525-0137 Citation CJ 525-0159 Citation CJ 525-0169 Citation CJ 525-0190 Citation CJ 525-0230 Citation CJ 525-0275 Citation CJ 525-0276 Citation CJ 525-0306* Citation CJ 525-0385 Citation CJ1 525-0364 Citation CJ1 525-0365 Citation CJ1 525-0367 Citation CJ1 525-0372 Citation CJ1 525-0385* Citation CJ1 525-0489 Citation CJ1 525-0513

Long Beach 562.989.8800

Citation CJ1+ Citation CJ1+ Citation CJ1+ Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2 Citation CJ2+ Citation CJ2+ Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation CJ3 Citation Encore Citation Encore Citation Encore Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation Excel Citation XLS Citation XLS Citation I/SP Citation I/SP Citation II/SP Citation II Citation II Citation II Citation II Citation II Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation III Citation Mustang Citation Mustang Citation Mustang Citation Mustang Citation Sovereign Citation Sovereign Citation Sovereign Citation Sovereign Citation Ultra Citation Ultra Citation V Citation V Citation V Citation V Citation V Citation VI Citation VI Citation VII Citation VII Citation VII Citation VII Citation VII Citation VII Citation X Citation X

525-0617* 525-0635 525-0678 525A-0006* 525A-0047 525A-0065 525A-0099 525A-0101 525A-0120 525A-0149* 525A-0177 525A-0314* 525A-0325 525B-0009 525B-0013* 525B-0023 525B-0170 525B-0250 525B-0251 560-0541 560-0593* 560-0639 560-5021 560-5023 560-5062 560-5077* 560-5080 560-5095 560-5114 560-5180 560-5186 560-5235 560-5325 560-5560 560-5570 501-0076 501-0225 550-0555 550-0205 550-0364 550-0407 550-0646* 550-0719 650-0017 650-0058 650-0076 650-0077 650-0084 650-0088 650-0116* 650-0119* 650-0139 650-0168* 650-0175 650-0184 510-0103 510-0226 510-0233 510-TBD* 680-0009 680-0015 680-0017 680-0076 560-0285 560-0492 560-0032* 560-0036 560-0057* 560-0168 560-0206 650-0211* 650-0232 650-7014 650-7031* 650-7034* 650-7036* 650-7056 650-7101 750-0021 750-0025

Dallas 214.451.6953

Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation X Citation XLS+ Citation XLS+ Eclipse 500 Eclipse 500 Falcon 10 Falcon 10 Falcon 10 Falcon 20F Falcon 20E-5 Falcon 20F-5 Falcon 20F-5 Falcon 20F-5 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50 Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 50EX Falcon 900 Falcon 900B Falcon 900B Falcon 900B Falcon 900EX EASy Falcon 2000 Falcon 2000 Falcon 2000 Falcon 2000 Falcon 2000EX EASy Falcon 2000EX EASy Falcon 2000EX EASy Global Express Gulfstream G100 Gulfstream G100 Gulfstream G150 Gulfstream G150 Gulfstream G150 Gulfstream G150 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G200 Gulfstream G300 Gulfstream G300 Gulfstream G400 Gulfstream G450 Gulfstream G450 Gulfstream G450 Gulfstream G-IITT Gulfstream GIV Gulfstream GIV Gulfstream GIV Gulfstream GIV Gulfstream GIV

Savannah 912.330.8797

750-0094 750-0097 750-0104 750-0121 750-0185 750-0246 750-0248 TBD TBD EA500-00111 EA500-00174 049 090 144 404 267* 281 324 357 046 079 081 093 139 170 196 205 236 254 276 308 309 331 348 349 010 012 046* 088 167 044 052 075 163 045 053 101 9085 145 146* 205* 214 227* TBD 010* 014 024 029 043 044 054 067* 084 094 110 173* 186 190 1508 1510* 1516 4034 4147 TBD* 238 1007* 1018 1034 1050 1104

Gulfstream GIV 1171 Gulfstream GIV 1192 Gulfstream GIV 1204 Gulfstream GIV/SP 1259 Gulfstream GIV/SP 1279 Gulfstream GIV/SP 1337 Gulfstream GIVSP 1354 Gulfstream GIVSP 1387 Gulfstream GIVSP 1442 Gulfstream GIVSP 1473 Gulfstream GIVSP 1475 Gulfstream G550 5085 Gulfstream GV 660 Gulfstream GV 692 Hawker 400XP RK-363 Hawker 400XP RK-409 Hawker 700A NA0336 Hawker 800A NA0419 Hawker 800A 258238 Hawker 800XP 258283* Hawker 800XP 258293 Hawker 800XP 258313 Hawker 800XP 258327 Hawker 800XP 258336* Hawker 800XP 258369 Hawker 800XP 258386 Hawker 800XP 258414 Hawker 800XP 258531 Hawker 800XP 258591* Hawker 850XP 258861 King Air C90B LJ-1641 King Air 350 FL-393 Learjet 25D 280 Learjet 25D 291 Learjet 31 33D Learjet 31A 105 Learjet 31A 106 Learjet 31A 131 Learjet 31A 143 Learjet 31A 149* Learjet 31A 228 Learjet 31A 229 Learjet 35A 395 Learjet 35A 670 Learjet 40XR 2057 Learjet 45 015 Learjet 45 052 Learjet 45 087 Learjet 45 094* Learjet 45 137 Learjet 45 150 Learjet 45 203 Learjet 45 211 Learjet 45 216 Learjet 45 227 Learjet 55 021 Learjet 55 055 Learjet 55 106 Learjet 60 014 Learjet 60 015 Learjet 60 017 Learjet 60 208 Learjet 60 226 Learjet 60 271 Learjet 60SE 314 Legacy 145-699 Legacy 600 14500965 MD-500E 0180E Phenom 100 50000165 Westwind 1 1124-0416* Westwind 2 1124A-0351 *Multiple Transactions

the power to produce results jeteffect.com

Palm Beach 561.747.2223


BG 8 April13_FinanceSept 19/03/2013 14:52 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Turbo Deliveries: Flat, but encouraging. Why do turboprops seem to periodically enjoy better times than the jet and piston aircraft market segments? Perhaps it has something to do with owner-flying...

“Today’s turboprops offer a broad range of performance, with cabin and cockpit accoutrements that rival the best of the jet strata.”

W

hile exceptions exist anywhere, generally turboprop airplanes offer a common set of attractive attributes. For example, Turboprop engines benefit today from propeller designs far more sophisticated than only a decade ago resulting in lower maintenance costs, longer overhaul cycles, improved climb and cruise performance, and in turn this contributes to reduced noise levels in the cabin. In addition, specific fuel consumption numbers continue to improve, with the practical effect of allowing the use of higher-power levels without suffering a proportionate increase in fuel consumption/costs. That, in turn, contributes to improvements in takeoff, climb and cruise speed. Another advantage is the single-pilot operational simplicity engineered into even the multi-engine turboprops. The only exceptions to the sum total of these benefits exist among the unpressurized models that are available, and form a small, important and dynamic segment of the turboprop market. Today’s turboprops offer a broad range of performance, with cabin and cockpit accoutrements that rival the best of the jet strata. In terms of 2012 turboprop deliveries, Cessna was the leader by a wide margin with 107 deliveries. Hawker Beechcraft was a somewhat distant second with 85, down seven units from the year before. In its press conference at the NBAA Convention last fall, Hawker Beechcraft announced plans to re-

invent itself when it emerges from bankruptcy as a turboprop and piston manufacturer. It will be interesting to see if it can reclaim its historical pole position in the turboprop segment. Third in turboprop sales in 2012 was Pilatus with 67 units, down from 69 the year before. Socata (with 38) and Piper (with 32) both equalled their deliveries from the year before. A comprehensive analysis of all airplane deliveries for 2012 can be found in the March issue of World Aircraft Sales Magazine.

TURBOPROP PRICE GUIDE The following Turboprop Retail Price Guide represents current average values published in The Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1994 through Spring 2013 (20 year period). Values reported are in US$ millions, with each reporting point representing the current average retail value published in the Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, the Socata TBM 850 reported in the Spring 2013 edition of the Bluebook show $1.9 million for a 2006 model, $2.0 million for a 2007 model and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. Aircraft specifications for the following models can be found in the Conklin & de Decker section of this issue beginning at page 82. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get it answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. U Email feedback to Jack@avbuyer.com continues on Page 68

THE WORLD’S FINEST

Business Jets, Turboprops and Helicopters

for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com and lots more...

66

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wentworth April 18/03/2013 17:02 Page 1

B B

OEING

757-200 EXEC S/N 24923

M O T I VA T ED SE L L ER !

The Lowest Timed 757 in the World! Recent C, 7302H / 2363C, Rolls Royce Engines, Winglets, Forward Airstair, 40-Passenger Interior, Exceptional Flight Department, Prestigious Pedigree.

OEING

S27-200 S/N 22825

O U TR I G H T S A L E , L E A S E , O R L EA S E / P U R CH A S E Super 27 Valsan –217 Modification. Only 5500 Hours / 3300 Cycles Since New, Winglets, Recent Landing Gear Overhaul, MSG-3 Maintenance Upgrade, Boeing Aux Tanks, VIP SNEW. Beautiful New Exterior and Interior Designed by Prominent South African Designer in 2008. Currently Undergoing Heavy C Inspection. T R A D E S C O NS ID ER ED .

C

ITATION

ENCORE S/N 579

R E PL A CE M EN T A IR CR A F T O N T H E WA Y . O W N ER W A NT S I T S OL D ! One of the Lowest Timed Encores on the Market with Only 1338 Hours / 681 Cycles, Universal UNS-1Csp with GPS, Center Club Interior, TCAS-II, Freon, Hangared Since New.

F

ALCON WITH

900EX S/N 91

W ING L E T S!

Millions of Dollars Spent at Duncan Aviation in 2012 on Avionic and Cosmetic Upgrades including Full New Designer Interior, Beautiful New Paint Scheme, Primus Elite Upgrade with EVS 1500, Aviator Swift Broadband, and Much, Much More. SCHEDULED FOR A C CHECK AND GEAR OVERHAUL IN APRIL. AN IDEAL TIME FOR A PRE-PURCHASE INSPECTION.


Retail Price Guide April13_PerfspecDecember06 19/03/2013 15:29 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

TURBOPROPS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE 2013 US$M

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL BEECH KING AIR 350I

7.275

2012 US$M

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

6.3

5.5

4.8

2009 US$M

BEECH KING AIR 350

4.1

SPRING 2013 2008 US$M

3.7

2007 US$M

2006 US$M

2005 US$M

2004 US$M

3.5

3.4

3.3

3.2

2.9

2.7

2.6

2.5

2.0

1.9 1.650

1.6

BEECH KING AIR 300LW BEECH KING AIR 250

6.015

BEECH KING AIR B200

5.8 5.0

BEECH KING AIR B200GT BEECH KING AIR C90GTX

5.1

3.834

3.2

4.7

4.0

2.8

2.6

3.5

BEECH KING AIR C90GTI

2.4

3.1

2.2

BEECH KING AIR C90GT BEECH KING AIR C90B BEECH KING AIR C90SE CESSNA 208B SCM–W/G1000

1.9

1.750

1.650

1.550

CESSNA 208B SCM

1.450 1.4

CESSNA 208 CARAVAN-675–W/G1000

2.0

1.725

1.625

1.525

CESSNA 208 CARAVAN 2.1

1.825

1.725

1.625

CESSNA 208B G/CARAVAN

1.125

1.1

1.475

1.375

1.3

1.175

1.125

3.950

3.550

3.150

3.050

2.6

2.5

2.4

2.3

2.2

1.4

1.3

1.2

1.1

1.0

2.4

2.0

1.9 1.750

1.7

1.525

5.8

5.4

4.850

4.050

PILATUS PC-12NG

4.3

3.6

3.3

3.1

2.8

2.0

QUEST KODIAK 100

2.030

1.850

SOCATA TBM 850

3.415

3.1

1.7

1.6

1.650

1.550

2.8

2.6

1.5

1.2

1.225

6.8

PIPER MERIDIAN

1.250

1.275

PIAGGIO AVANTI P180

PILATUS PC-12

1.3

1.425 1.375

CESSNA 208 G/CARAVAN–W/G1000

1.350

1.350 2.5

SOCATA TBM 700C2

1.8

SOCATA TBM 700B SOCATA TBM 700 AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

68

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Retail Price Guide April13_PerfspecDecember06 19/03/2013 15:30 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation

What your money buys today 2003 US$M

2002 US$M

2001 US$M

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE $ MODEL BEECH KING AIR 350I

2.750

2.650

2.550

2.450

2.350

2.250

2.150

2.050

1.950

1.850

BEECH KING AIR 350

1.650

BEECH KING AIR 300LW BEECH KING AIR 250

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.9

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.5

1.450

1.350

BEECH KING AIR B200 BEECH KING AIR B200GT BEECH KING AIR C90GTX BEECH KING AIR C90GTI BEECH KING AIR C90GT

1.550

1.5

1.450

1.4

1.350

1.3

1.250

1.2

1.150

0.925

0.875

0.850

0.825

0.800

0.775

1.1

BEECH KING AIR C90B BEECH KING AIR C90SE CESSNA 208B SCM–W/G1000

1.150

1.1

1.050

1.0

0.950

0.925

0.900

0.875

0.850

0.825

CESSNA 208B SCM CESSNA 208 CARAVAN-675–W/G1000

1.050

1.0

0.950

0.900

0.875

0.850

0.825

0.800

0.775

0.750

CESSNA 208 CARAVAN CESSNA 208 G/CARAVAN-W/G1000

1.1

1.050

1.0

0.950

2.950

2.850

2.750

2.650

0.925

0.900

0.875

2.450

2.350

0.850

0.825

0.800

CESSNA 208B G/CARAVAN

2.150

PIAGGIO AVANTI P180 PILATUS PC-12NG

2.1

2.0

1.9

0.900

0.800

0.700

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.5

1.4

1.3

PILATUS PC-12 PIPER MERIDIAN QUEST KODIAK 100 SOCATA TBM 850

1.650

SOCATA TBM 700C2 1.6

1.550

1.5

1.450

SOCATA TBM 700B 1.4

1.350

1.3

1.250

1.2

SOCATA TBM 700

AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

69


AirCompAnalysisApril13_ACAn 19/03/2013 15:10 Page 1

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS GULFSTREAM G550

GLOBAL 6000 GULFSTREAM G550

Gulfstream G550 by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, we will provide information on the pre-owned large cabin business jets in the $50m-plus price range for the purposes of valuing the Gulfstream G550 aircraft. The G550 has recently relinquished its title as the top-end of Gulfstream’s in-service product line as the G650 has entered service. As of this writing there are nine G650s that have entered service. One of the key questions regularly asked is, “Will the G650 consume demand from the G550?” This will be one question that we will seek to address. The current New/Used percentage split

I

70

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

for the Gulfstream G550 aircraft is 56% ‘New’ and 44% ‘Used’, according to JETNET records. There are 384 G550 aircraft in operation around the world. The majority, 363 units, are wholly-owned, 15 are fractionally owned and six are in shared-ownership. Over the following paragraphs we’ll consider some of the usual productivity parameters - payload/range, speed, and cabin size – and cover current and future market values. The field of study also includes Bombardier’s Global 6000.

BRIEF HISTORY The Gulfstream G550 traces its roots to the Gulfstream GV which was the first ultrawww.AvBuyer.com

long-range large cabin business jet produced. The GV started delivering to customers in 1995. Most notable about the GV is its 6,500nm range, made possible (in part) by the BR710A1-10 engines powering it. The GV’s range makes it capable of non-stop flight from New York to Tokyo. Features on the GV include enhanced weather radar, autopilot and head-up display for the pilot. Safety features include the First Enhanced Vision Systems (EVS) that allows increased visibility in adverse environments. Two new aircraft followed the GV - the Gulfstream G550 in 2003 and the G500 ❯ in 2004. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Aradian April 18/03/2013 17:08 Page 1

2008 Citation XLS

2007 Beech Premier 1A

1600TT EU Ops compliant

2007. 1200TT 2008. 540TT. TAP Elite

2007 Hawker 850XP

2013 Gulfstream 450

1290TT. MSP. Tan leather interior. Satcom

File photo

Gulfstream 550

1992 Falcon 900B

Several aircraft including 2013

9800TT 12 pax interior in Beige. Satcom. EU Ops compliant. MSP Gold

McDonnell Douglas MD 600N

2006 EC130B4

Three MD600N available

650TT Red leather interior

ALSO OFFERING: Beech King Air C90GT/C90/B200/350, Hawker 400XP, Citation XL/XLS/Sovereign, Agusta Koala, Gulfstream G100/G150, Hawker 800XP/850XP/900XP. Call/Email For Details

www.aradian.com UK office Tel. +44 1481 233001 Fax.+44 1481 233002 steverogers@aradian.com

US office: Mesa Tel. +1 480 396 9086 Fax. +1 480 393 7008 rick@aradian.com

US office: Atlanta Tel. +1 770 331 1416 davidb@aradian.com

Also in: South America, South Africa, Russia, Spain, Germany, India & UAE


AirCompAnalysisApril13_ACAn 19/03/2013 11:58 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS GULFSTREAM G550

PAYLOAD AND RANGE

TABLE A - PAYLOAD & RANGE

MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel IFR Range (nm)

Gulfstream G550

91,000

41,000

6,600

2,500

6,950

5,767

Global 6000

99,500

44,716

5,770

2,804

6,080

5,876

Model

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, M.A. USA: JETNET; B&CA May and Aug. 2012 Operations Planning Guide

The data contained in Table A (left) is published in the B&CA May 2012 issue, but is also sourced from Conklin & de Decker. As we regularly state, a potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. The Gulfstream G550 ‘Available payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 2,500 pounds offers less by way of payload capability than the Global 6000 (2,804 lbs). According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the G550 at 1,669 cubic feet is also less than the Global 6000 (2,140 cubic feet) as represented in Chart A (left).

POWERPLANT DETAILS The G550 is powered by two Rolls-Royce BR710-C4-11 engines, each offering 15,385 pounds of thrust. The Global 6000 is also powered by a pair of Rolls-Royce engines, offering 14,750 pounds of thrust each.

CHART A - CABIN VOLUME

COST PER MILE COMPARISONS

2,140

Global 6000 1,669

Gulfstream G550

100

Using data published in the May 2012 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2012 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet-A fuel cost in the August 2012 edition was $6.30 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. Note: Fuel price used from this source does not represent an average price for the year. Chart B (left) details ‘Cost per Mile’ and compares the G550 to the Global 6000 factoring direct costs, and with each aircraft flying a 6,000nm mission with 1,600 pounds (eight passengers) payload. The G550, at $6.59 cost per mile, is lower by 18.4% compared to the Global 6000 ($8.08 cost per mile).

600

1,100

1,600

2,100

Cubic Feet SOURCE: CONKLIN & de DECKER

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS The ‘Total Variable Cost’ as shown in Chart C (right) is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense and Miscellaneous Trip Expense. The total variable cost for the G550 at $2,984 is lower by 22.9% compared to the Global 6000.

CHART B - COST PER MILE*

$6.59

Gulfstream G550

$0.00

$2.00

$4.00

$6.00

$8.00

US $ per nautical mile

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

$10.00

The points in Chart D (right) center on the Gulfstream G550 aircraft. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors. 1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The long-range cruise speed flown to

* 1,600 LBS PAYLOAD, 6,000NM MISSION

72

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS

$8.08

Global 6000

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


AirCompAnalysisApril13_ACAn 19/03/2013 12:02 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS GULFSTREAM G550

The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the aircraft in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all business jets are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious business jet buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed, and Cabin Size, we can conclude that the G550, as shown in our productivity index, is competitive with the Global 6000 largely thanks to its longer mission reach and lower operating costs. In various other aspects shown above, the Global 6000 edges its comparison. Table B (right) contains the average equipped price from Vref for each aircraft. The average speed, cabin volume and maximum payload values are from Conklin & de Decker. The number of aircraft in-operation and percentage ‘For Sale’ are as reported by JETNET.

CHART C - VARIABLE COST $3,872

Global 6000

Gulfstream G550

$2,984

$0

$4,000

$2,000

CHART D - PRODUCTIVITY $60.0

$55.0

Gulfstream G550

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Global 6000

$50.0

$45.0

$40.0 2.0

3.0

4.0

SUMMARY Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the key attributes that business jet operators value. However, there are often other qualities such as service and support that factor in a buying decision, but which are beyond the scope of this article. And so we are left with the question of the effect the G650 will have on the G550. Gulfstream told World Aircraft Sales Magazine that it intends to keep selling the G550. The next available position on the G650 is way out into 2017. This is a long wait for owners and operators with more immediate need for an ultra-long-range, large cabin jet, and there exists a significant price and performance difference between the two models. For example, according to B&CA Equipped Prices for May 2012, the G550 is priced at $56.250 million compared to the G650 at $64.5 million, a difference of $8.250 million or 14.7% more in current-year dollars. We’ll keep watch on what happens with the G550 line, but the jet has its clear advantages and is very popular among private individuals, companies, and charter operators and aircraft management companies alike. Our expectations are that the Gulfstream G550 will continue to do well in the new and pre-owned markets as further deliveries of the G650 aircraft are made.

$6,000

US $ per hour

Price (Millions)

achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities.

5.0

6.0

8.0

7.0

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE B - COMPARISON TABLE Long Range Speed (Kts)

Cabin Volume (Cu Ft)

Max Payload w/avail fuel range(nm)

Vref Retail Prices $m 2012

In Operation

% For Sale

Gulfstream G550

459

1,669

5,767

$51m

384

4.7%

Global 6000

471

2,140

5,876

$50m

39

None

Model

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, MA, USA; JETNET; 2012 Operations Planning Guide B&CA Aug. 2012.

For more information: Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at: 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Email: Mike@avbuyer.com, Web: www.mdchase.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

73


JMesingerApril13_JMesingerNov06 19/03/2013 12:20 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

Interpreting the Updated Valuation Guides... oth Aircraft Bluebook and Vref have published new findings for the quarter. The books differ slightly in many areas, however they do not differ in their nearterm outlook, continuing to trend down in almost all categories. In those remaining categories that are not trending down, book-bybook the answer as to why could lie in different places, depending on the category. In some cases one book or the other may have just felt that a prior period adjustment was too drastic and thus leave the trend-line flat with no adjustment. I doubt in most areas that the contemplation around a level trend is about stabilizing prices. I believe that the best interpretation around the reports is that we are still in for a downward trajectory. One of the publications’ newsletters spoke of 20 consecutive quarters of downward pricing, and that now we are showing yet another downward correction. The other spoke of continuing price sliding for jets and turboprops. So rather than plan for a recovery, let’s plan for a reality of the current market. As aircraft sales professionals we have the greatest access to the buyers and sellers. We are the ones who listen daily to the heartbeat of the market; we’re the ones most likely to help our clients and prospects use the data to their best advantage. If we were going to help shape a game-plan we would of course have to divide it between the offensive game and a defensive game. As there are turnovers as to who has the ball at any given time we must create a game-plan that assumes today’s offense will be tomorrow’s defense. Buyers and sellers will switch positions over the long-game. Let’s start with the view from the seller’s position: The seller is trying to sell their aircraft and struggling to determine what price it will sell for. Will prices go up in the nearterm? What would holding it for better pricing mean? How should the seller price the offering? Is ‘Make Offer’ a better strategy, given what could be a continuing declining market or the uncertainty of a rebounding

B

74

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

market? Bottom line: “Help!” First things first: There are so few sales in so many categories it may seem impossible to show good sales comparisons to derive what the real price of the airplane should be. Since there are so few transactions, it is critical to also look carefully at good, current market research of the other like-kind offerings. Don’t simply rely on the listings around the market. There are too many listings with no real input as to the motivation of the seller, the actual asking price and other critical aircraft data like complete logs or damage history. Far more in-depth research is required. Like many other of our fellow sales professionals, we call daily into the markets, talking regularly with the sellers or their representatives. We gain an understanding of the real condition of the aircraft, the motivation of the sellers, and determine if there is an impending 1031 exchange date or delivery of a replacement plane (or other near-term motivation to sell). This input helps shape the ultimate ‘take’ prices of sellers. Next, work must be done to bring asking prices of the aircraft ‘for sale’ much more in line with the ultimate ‘take’ price. In such a crowded marketplace buyers watch closely to identify real sellers using techniques as simple as correct asking prices. The bottom line is that there are buyers today and they are very focused on price. As I have said during past downturns, when a buyer can create certainty around an offer, don’t think of them as “bottom feeders” or someone trying to “steal” your airplane, just think of them as buyers. And what of the buyers in the market today? I give the same advice that I give to the seller: It will all be about price. Remember, buyers have never had the combination of as much inventory to choose from combined with such attractive pricing. No longer do buyers just look at the manufacturer they would like to buy into; they also look to the left and right of their desired category to see if there are other products that can deliver the same mission fulfillment.

www.AvBuyer.com

Often times the traditional product loyalties fly out the window and price/value become the only driver. So as a buyer, always be sure to shop by mission-fulfillment and not just by product loyalty. It is never too late to create new loyalties. If you think about my suggestion to the seller to look for certainty in a buyer, be sure to supply your aircraft sales professionals with as much information to enable them to help the seller identify you as a real buyer. Usually price is secondary to a seller if they feel confident in a transaction reaching the finish line. It is not unusual for sellers to have experienced more than one failed deal after encountering buyers who were just not as they described themselves to be. Therefore, regardless of the side you are on, play to win. Listen to the market, be proactive and don’t miss a great deal as a buyer or a seller. There is an over-supply of inventory and an under-supply of buyers. This will keep markets unstable and anxiety high for the time being. ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He now serves on the Jet Aviation Customer and Airbus Corporate Jets Business Aviation Advisory Board (BAAB). Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. More information visit www.jetsales.com Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


J Hopkinson April 18/03/2013 17:10 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

Citation Sovereign SN 680-0157, Great Corporate Pedigree, One Owner Since New, Power Advantage +, Aux Advantage, Pro Parts, Over $1M accrued in programs, Motivated Owner, Replacement Aircraft has Arrived

Gulfstream G150 AFTT 423hrs, Long Range Oxygen Bottle, Part 135 Certification, 7 Passenger, New Paint & Interior soft-goods in 2012

Learjet 45 3889 TTAF, Engines Enrolled on MSP, EGPWS, TCAS II, 9 Passenger-Double Club Configuration

Citation Bravo 4191 AFTT, Zero Time Engines, TCAS-1, GNS-XLS FMS, ProParts

Citation S/II SN S550-0036, 8576 TTAF, 6755 Cycles, 1304 SMOH, Cosmetics Refreshed & Perma-guarded (08/2011), GNS-XLS, GPWS, New Windows 2007, RVSM Bring all offers John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 aircraft@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Citation 111

Challenger

1985 Challenger 601-1A | 3044

Citation XLS+

1985 Citation III | 650-0080

Citation XLS

2009 Citation XLS+ | 560-6050

2006 Citation XLS | 560-5631

Citation Ultra / V

Citation Excel

2002 Citation Excel | 560-5288

Citation 11

1993 Citation Ultra | 560-0366 Also Available: 560-0208 (V)

Citation CJ3

1981 Citation II | 550-0286

Citation Mustang

2006 Citation CJ3 | 525B-0073

Citation 1SP

2009 Citation Mustang | 510-0204

1982 Citation ISP | 501-0255

For full specs & additional photos, please visit our website at www.BellAviation.com


Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 aircraft@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

Dallas, Texas 214.904.9800 / 214.952.1050 cell

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Learjet

Beechjet

1992 Learjet 31A | 31A-051

Beech 1900D

1992 Beechjet 400A | RK-36

King Air 350

1992 Beech 1900D | UE-5

King Air B200

1998 King Air 350 | FL-199

King Air 200

1983 King Air B200 | BB-1140

Conquest

1979 King Air 200 | BB-545

Conquest

1980 Conquest II | 441-0116

Navajo CR

1983 Conquest I | 425-0133

Columbia 300

1979 Navajo CR | 31-7912049

2003 Columbia 300 | 40064

For full specs & additional photos, please visit our website at www.BellAviation.com


PreOwned April13_JMesingerNov06 19/03/2013 10:00 Page 1

PRE-OWNED AIRCRAFT SALES TRENDS

Kicking The Can Down The Road. by Fletcher Aldredge epending on the day of the week, the general economic news can be positive, “Housing Prices Rebound,” or, foreboding, “Jobless Claims Point to Slow Hiring”. And, that’s without opening Pandora’s budget box – aka, the sequester. On this day of the week, in General Aviation, there is no such disparity. While activity is good in most segments, prices continue to slide — how much depends on condition, times and whether that type is still in production. Some of the older aircraft are getting close to salvage value, or as some say ‘nearly-free’. If you can start it up, come pick it up. Fortunately, this buyers’ market continues to attract deal hunters on every budget. If you are willing to take on a project, a $30k Piper Cherokee might be about right. Starting a new flight department? Many light jets, and some not-so-light, can be bought for well under $1m.

D

PISTON SINGLES AND TWINS Considering the fact some dealers report nearly half of the airplanes on tie-down at their local airports are for sale and/or have not flown in a year, this segment is pretty good. Virtually any perceived downtrend is related to needy airplanes. There are many airplanes so neglected even MacGyver would have difficulty bringing them back. The up side is what we don’t often see. There are a few airplanes, hangared and pampered, that are in demand. When priced right, they sell quickly. There is no upward pressure on prices, but these pristine and lavishly updated airplanes continue to command a premium.

HELICOPTERS While not as volatile as their fixed-wing turbine counterparts, the helicopter segment is bound by the same rules of supply and demand. Supply in this small market remains under control, but demand fluctuates

78

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

depending on government contracts and special transportation needs. Little change in average price shows the Vref Helicopter Index falling less than 1%. Component times rule. If no scary, expensive event is on the horizon, and it’s priced right, it sells.

TURBOPROPS After more than a year of relative stability, the average turboprop value dropped 3% in the recent quarter. Year-end discounting of leftover new airplanes tended to drive latemodel turboprops down. Dealers in this market attribute the drop to overly-motivated sellers or substandard airplanes. Many are optimistic, since most of the deals are gone, that prices should firm up for future sales. We can all hope.

JETS Incredibly, after more than twenty quarters of eroding prices, we see yet another downward correction. Valiant attempts to hold the line and sell on quality or pedigree can bring activity almost to a standstill. It seems the primary thing that moves buyers from the sidelines and back into the market is price. Price changes might be smaller than in past quarters, but the direction is clear. The Vref Light Jet and Mid-Size Indices shed another 4% during the recent quarter. The Large Jet Index fell 6% in value (see VrefOnline.com). There is a huge difference in the way the current marketplace is perceived. Those at one extreme are representing aircraft that are ‘seriously for sale.’ Owners have instructed brokers to quit chasing the market and get out ahead of it (that means below it). Recent history has taught us the best airplane may not be the next to sell; it’s usually the bestpriced airplane. At the other extreme, a shrinking minority clings to the idea that all the cheap, raggedy airplanes are sold and the market is poised to come back soon. No one can cast a stone at this optimism because many of us thought

www.AvBuyer.com

this in 2010, then again in 2011, and yet again in 2012. The typical buyer is smarter than at any other time in history. Some are willing to pay more for an airplane that is ready to fly today. They want to avoid the hassles of chaperoning a paint shop, or any shop, if possible. However, since 2008 a more common refrain has been price, “Would you take...?” or, “I’m looking for a deal…!”

KICKING THE CAN DOWN THE ROAD We are not the first to notice the industry has changed. Saying, “It’s gone global,” is a bit of an understatement. Not that long ago, in the span of less than a lifetime, selling a Learjet from the Midwest to the Texas oil patch defined much of that market — or, maybe it was a Bonanza from Wichita to a doctor in Topeka. Now, new Skyhawks are crated or ferried to places that weren’t even countries when Cessna conceived the 172 back in the early 1950s. The most you could spend on a new Lear 23 was about $600k. Now $65m Gulfstreams routinely leave Savannah for new owners in Beijing or Dubai almost 7,000 miles away. At points, there and in between, scores of lenders, brokers and maintenance facilities serve the industry. Each one of these vendors has his or her take on the world economy as well as the aviation marketplace. No person, group or organization has any control of the aircraft market. Prices are only what the market will bear. One thing we have learned from the past few years is that we cannot predict the future. No one can. In our vast market, predicting the future requires predicting the future of Europe, China, South America and on, and on. It can’t be done. All we can do at this point is kick the recovery can down the road a bit further. We remain optimistic for the long-term. The marketplace will eventually tell us when it is getting better. ❯ More information from www.vrefonline.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Rolls Royce October 18/03/2013 17:13 Page 1

A clear reflection of value with CorporateCare®

Delivering the highest quality engine care and service is our

values, so while you are enjoying peace of mind today, you are also

business, and has made CorporateCare® the world leader of business

investing in tomorrow. For more on CorporateCare, contact Steve

jet engine maintenance programs. A fact recognised in more than

Friedrich, Vice President – Sales & Marketing, at +1 (703) 834-1700,

just words. Aircraft enrolled in CorporateCare have higher asset

corporate.care@rolls-royce.com.

www.rolls-royce.com

Trusted to deliver excellence


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:42 Page 1


Project1_Layout 1 26/03/2013 11:57 Page 1


ACSpecs IntroApril13_AC Specs Intronov06 19/03/2013 14:34 Page 1

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: TURBOPROPS

MAY ISSUE: Large Cabin Jets JUNE ISSUE: Medium Jets JULY ISSUE: Light Jets

Aircraft Performance & Specifications Description of Cost Elements he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Turboprops – appears opposite, to be followed by Large Cabin Jets next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only, but Conklin & de Decker provides details of older airplanes too. If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know.

T

❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

82

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs. VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door. BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.). CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.). WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight. SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alter-

www.AvBuyer.com

nate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For single-engine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing distance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4


CE SSN A2 08 CA RA VA N CE SSN A2 08 CA RA VA N/C CE AR SSN GO A2 PO D 08 BG ND CA RA CE VA SSN N/C A2 AR 08 GP BG OD RA ND CA DA RA HE VA R-S N OC ATA TBM 70 0C 2 DA HE R-S OC ATA TBM 85 0 HA WK ER BE EC HC RA FT KIN KIN GA GA IR IR C9 C9 0B 0G T

AircraftPer&SpecApril13_PerfspecDecember06 19/03/2013 14:40 Page 1

TURBOPROPS $634.08

$640.93

$648.58

$641.73

$765.73

$891.80

$1,071.25

$1,216.81

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.1

4.1

4.8

4.8

CABIN WIDTH FT.

5.3

5.3

5.3

5.3

4

4

4.5

4.5

CABIN LENGTH FT.

12.8

12.8

16.4

16.4

10

10

12.4

12.4

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

254

254

340

340

120

120

227

227

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.2

4.2

4.2

4.2

3.9

3.9

4.3

4.3

DOOR WIDTH FT.

4.08

4.08

4.08

4.08

3.5

3.5

2.25

2.25

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

32

32

32

32

30

30

48

48

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

84

112

-

5

5

-

-

CREW #

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

9

9

9

9

5

5

5

5

MTOW LBS

8000

8000

8750

8750

7394

7394

10100

10100

MLW LBS

7800

7800

8500

8500

7024

7024

9600

9600

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

4940

5120

5440

5270

4889

4589

7210

7200

USEABLE FUEL LBS

2224

2224

2224

2224

1887

1910

2573

2573

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

871

691

1121

1291

654

931

377

387

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2860

2680

3060

3230

1143

1443

2950

2306

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

325

100

465

529

1000

1102

640

-

MAX. RANGE N.M.

835

768

731

789

1200

1214

940

981

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

2055

2260

2500

2420

3100

3100

4519

4519

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

2508

2508

2625

2625

3750

3750

3692

4007

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

1234

1175

925

975

1570

2005

2010

1953

-

-

-

-

-

-

495

474

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

186

186

186

184

292

320

250

270

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

175

175

182

182

290

316

234

-

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

147

147

156

156

255

255

195

206

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

PT6A-114A

PT6A-114A

PT6A-114A

PT6A-114A

PT6A-64

PT6A-66D

PT6A-21

PT6A-135A

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

83


AircraftPer&SpecApril13_PerfspecDecember06 19/03/2013 14:40 Page 2

KIN GA IR 35 0

KIN GA IR 30 0LW

KIN GA IR 25 0

KIN GA IR B2 00 GT

KIN GA IR B2 00

KIN GA IR C9 0S E

KIN GA IR C9 0G Tx

KIN GA IR C9 0G Ti

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS

TURBOPROPS $1,200.06

$1,198.96

$1,100.13

$1,347.91

$1,481.74

$1,500.21

$1,650.64

$1,508.41

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

4.5

CABIN LENGTH FT.

12.4

12.4

12.4

16.7

16.7

16.7

16.7

19.2

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

227

227

227

303

303

303

303

355

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.23

2.25

2.25

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

48

48

48

54

55

55

54

56

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

5

5

5

6

6

7

6

8

MTOW LBS

10100

10485

10100

12500

12500

12500

12500

15000

MLW LBS

9600

9700

9600

12500

12500

12500

12500

15000

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

7200

7235

6625

8820

8760

8980

8950

9885

USEABLE FUEL LBS

2573

2573

2573

3645

3645

3645

3611

3611

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

387

737

902

125

185

-35

39

1604

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2306

2143

3205

2180

2240

2020

2550

2615

-

903

640

920

960

636

1480

1440

MAX. RANGE N.M.

981

1152

940

1580

1650

1575

1570

1550

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4519

3888

4519

5300

3640

3925

3950

3300

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4007

4002

3692

4417

4437

4625

4133

4140

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

1953

1953

2000

2448

2450

2437

3277

2700

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

474

474

554

745

745

682

1074

622

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

270

274

250

290

305

292

320

320

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

-

274

234

283

298

282

312

310

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

206

204

195

226

226

232

231

234

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

PT6A-135A

PT6A-135A

PT6A-21

PT6A-42

PT6A-52

PT6A-52

PT6A-60A

PT6A-60A

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

84

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


PIP ER ME RID IAN PA 46 TP QU EST AIR CR AF TK OD IAK

PIL AT US PC -12 NG

PIA GG IO AV AN TI P 18 0I I PIL ATU SP C-1 2

PIA GG IO AV AN TI P 18 0

KIN GA IR 3 50 i

AircraftPer&SpecApril13_PerfspecDecember06 19/03/2013 14:41 Page 3

TURBOPROPS $1,505.82

$1,611.02

$1,448.00

$901.63

$902.29

$608.56

$610.18

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.8

5.8

5.8

4.75

4.83

3.9

4.5

CABIN WIDTH FT.

4.5

6.1

6.1

5

5

4.2

4.8

CABIN LENGTH FT.

19.2

14.9

17.5

16.9

16.92

12.3

15.5

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

355

375

375

326

330

120

248

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.3

4.4

4.4

4.5

4.42

3.8

4.1

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.25

2

2

2

2

2

4.1

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

56

16

16

34

40

20

38

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

16

44

44

-

-

-

-

CREW #

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

6

6

7

7

5

5

MTOW LBS

15000

11550

12100

10450

10450

5092

7255

MLW LBS

15000

10945

11500

9920

9921

4850

6690

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

10000

8000

8000

6565

6782

3663

3975

USEABLE FUEL LBS

3611

2802

2802

2704

2704

1140

2110

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1489

798

1348

1226

1009

331

1220

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2500

1800

1800

2475

2257

1187

2515

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1440

980

1370

1340

1309

489

524

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1550

1440

1500

1660

1635

1091

845

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

3300

3100

5750

2450

2450

2000

1720

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4143

4550

5470

2783

2783

1950

1933

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

2700

2950

2950

1680

1920

1556

1338

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

622

756

670

-

-

-

-

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

320

390

402

261

280

267

180

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

310

354

365

261

268

262

154

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

234

310

318

209

209

225

133

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

PT6A-60A

PT6A-66

PT6A-66B

PT6A-67B

PT6A-67P

PT6A-42A

PT6A-34

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

I

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

85


Safety Matters March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:40 Page 1

UAT’S L-39 ALBATROS TRAINER

SAFETY MATTERS: UPSET RECOVERY

Tales From Middle Air From Topsy to Turvy and back again... by Dave Higdon ALL PHOTOS BY PAUL BOWEN

he continual pursuit of air-safety improvements can sometimes seem a bit like the arcade game, ‘Whac-A-Mole’. Succeed in dropping the hammer on one leading problem and another problem pops up tauntingly in another area. The Whac-A-Mole analogy reflects the success of aviation community efforts to dramatically drive down one type of pernicious accident only to see another insidious scenario pop up into dominance. Where 15 years ago concerns focused on Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT), better pilot awareness and especially the proliferation of various terrain-awareness technologies helped render CFIT to lower-tier status. Naturally, in today’s atmosphere of finding and tackling leading-edge safety challenges it stands to reason that another accident causal-factor would rise to the top - but few expected Loss-of-Control (LOC) accidents to actually grow in numbers as they

T

86

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

seem to have done in recent years. Sadly LOC accidents’ emergence as the new dominant accident cause because of their increasing frequency. And turbine pilots seem to be experiencing more than their share of LOC accidents. Last month we addressed the FAA’s recent safety bulletin urging pilots of highly automated airplanes to add hand-flying practice to their training and daily-flight scenarios. The FAA’s wise move recognized a chorus of safety voices sounding the alarm over the atrophy of hand-flying skills accompanying the increased automation and sophistication of modern cockpits. Learning anew how to avoid flying into bad situations is a fundamental flying skill our instructors start stressing on day one of flight training, but staying sharp with regards to hand-flying alone does nothing specific to help right an airplane inverted by turbulence or departing from controlled flight to a degree that “aerobatic” would www.AvBuyer.com

accurately describe the extremity of the aircraft’s attitude. Pitch acts in reverse of normal in inverted flight, putting the aircraft at risk should the pilot respond solely from normal-attitude muscle memory. Inverted, a pull on the yoke pitches the airplane down when the pilot actually wanted to pitch up. Combining muscle-memory rudder movements may also bring on unhappy results in an airplane gone topsy-turvy.

CONFUSED? CONFUSING? CONTRADICTORY? Imagine you’re flying inverted; on a knifeedge; in weightless free-fall; or through clouds. The best hedge against making the wrong moves in a crisis situation is the same as for other forms of unusual situations: knowledge, training and - more importantly here than anywhere else - practice. Today’s finest FAA Level D simulators possess the ability to mimic rain and snow, Aircraft Index see Page 4


Safety Matters March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:41 Page 2

clouds and fog, turbulence and wind shear. The views on the screens improve with each generation of simulators, and the contribution of multiple-axis motion and near-photorealistic moving graphics with accurate control-input programming regularly sends pilots on to their next learning session with palms damp and shirt-backs soaked. A couple of pilots of our acquaintance will even admit to the indignity of needing a flight-deck tradition in real aircraft: an airsick sack. They lost their lunches thanks to the realistic sensations their minds experienced under the combined sensory assault of the sim’s sights, sounds and movements. Sadly, however, even today’s best-in-class multimotion flight-simulator platforms fall short in the ability to reproduce aerobatic flight – particularly inverted and full rolls. Training in aerobatic piston-powered airplanes approved for the necessary maneuvers beats no exposure to the disorienting aspects of upset recovery, but for more realiAdvertising Enquiries see Page 8

ty, nothing beats upset-recovery-training in an aerobatic jet with characteristics and performance comparable to a modern business jet. For maximum relevance, however, the training needs to come in a turbine-powered aerobatic aircraft equipped with a glass panel and capable of completely isolating the trainee from the outside world. After all, upset situations occur in all forms of weather – from the severe clear of a CAVU day to the zero-zero challenge of flying inside the eggshell. When the opportunity exists to train for exactly the type of scenarios in play – in a jet aircraft equipped with a glass panel, take it. Unusual Attitude Training (UAT) of Kissimmee, Florida, offers such a training program tailored specifically to educating aircrew flying business turbine aircraft with glass cockpits. And drilling for workday safety in the corporate cockpit may also let some pilots fulfill many an aviator’s fantasy www.AvBuyer.com

flight: time spent in a P-51 Mustang. “We set out to provide the corporate pilot with the most realistic training possible, to prepare that pilot to recognize and recover from the worst upsets at the worst possible times,” explained Lee Lauderback, head of UAT, and the head instructor for the program.

SPECIALTY SKILLS FOR SPECIALTY TRAINING Lauderback is a veteran of the airshow circuit and a veteran of the world of Corporate Aviation who credits his career to an escape from the routine of Airline flying. Thousands of pilots have fulfilled their fighter-flying fantasies Through Lauderback’s Stallion 51 Corporation and its modified, two-place machines: a pair of TF-51 Mustang fighter veterans originally built by North American Aviation. In their roles with UAT the dual-control ❯ TF-51 Mustangs provide student pilots (all WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

87


Safety Matters March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 15:25 Page 3

SAFETY MATTERS: UPSET RECOVERY in Instrument Meteorological Conditions as in Visual Meteorological Conditions. Upsets experienced in-the-clear leave the pilot with a horizon for reference – even if the pilot needs a few seconds to find that horizon…it can be elusive, depending on the aircraft’s attitude. But in IMC? There can be no getting around the reality that without a visual reference, aerobatics take on a moredangerous dimension. UAT’s L-39 Albatross prepares pilots for upsets in IMC with a full-length cockpit shield that completely blocks the pilot’s outside view, forcing the pilot to fly recovery maneuvering solely by the gauges. This is designed to provide an added level of training to help the student pilot develop skills, abilities and knowledge to de-mystify IMC upsets, and demonstrate that recoveries are not only possible but are indeed likely for the pilot who follows the training.

UAT’S TF-51

veteran corporate aviators) with their initial training in aerobatics and recovery from unusual attitudes, all in VFR conditions. The third training platform also hails from the military world – a Warsaw Pact-era L-39 Albatross trainer from the Czech Republic. It’s in this aircraft that the corporate pilots enrolled in the upset training program become experienced in recovering from upsets in an aircraft closest to the jets the candidates fly. Fitted with Garmin G500 screens fed by aerobatic-capable AHRS sensors, the L-39 closely mimics the panels dominant in today’s modern business jets. “The aerobatic AHRS was crucial to the ability to provide this training in an accurate and meaningful way,” Lauderback explained. “We had to have something that would function accurately throughout the L39’s flight envelop.” That flight envelop is as broad and deep as they come: inverted flight, full rolls, spins and loops are within its approved-flight envelop assuring pilot and instructor of seeing on the screen an exact reflection of the aircraft’s attitude, speed, altitude and motion. “We can put the student into attitudes no simulator can match and let them experience the realities of recovery,” explained Lauderback. “The main point of the training is to de-mystify flight at unusual attitudes; show the student how to recover; and give them the opportunities they need to successfully apply the skills they learn here.”

LEARNING & APPLYING: DAY 1

We can put the student into attitudes no simulator can match and let them experience the realities of recovery... - Lee Lauderback, UAT

Starting with the Day 1 Ground School, UAT students begin an immersion in unusual attitudes and how to handle them – starting with a focus on the human factors in play. UAT’s Dr. William T. Busch leads an introduction into the physical attributes of special disorientation in-flight, along with how to recognize and overcome sensations endured while disoriented. “It’s critical for the pilot to recognize the problem in order to correctly react,” Lauderback explained. Busch comes to the subject with more than the average background as a U.S. Navy Flight Surgeon and board-certified ophthalmologist, who also serves as an FAA Senior Aviation Medical ❯

COME RAIN OR SNOW The corporate pilot’s mantra often seems a close relative of the U.S. Postal Service’s motto. Thanks to the most-weather capabilities of modern business-turbine aircraft a corporate pilot is as likely to suffer an upset

88

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Boutsen April_Layout 1 18/03/2013 17:31 Page 1


Safety Matters March13_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:43 Page 4

SAFETY MATTERS: UPSET RECOVERY

tempus

[Latin ]

In general: time

I. A.

A division, section of time.

B.

A space, period, moment of time.

There is a reason our name means time. With Tempus Aircraft Sales and Service

PANELS DESIGNED TO CLOSELY MIMIC THOSE OF THE MODERN JET

spend your time on what you want,

Examiner. He’s been teaching many of these fundamentals to Stallion 51 pilots for many years. Following Busch’s presentation the rest of the Day 1 brings students under the tutelage of Lauderback and his instruction team who work with students on an in-depth study of aerodynamics as they apply to unusual attitudes, upset recovery and, just as important, upset prevention.

don’t just watch it y by.

GROUND, THEN FLIGHT: DAYS 2 & 3 Among the topics are UAT’s program definitions, flight envelops of the training aircraft, V-G diagrams and the benefits of zero-G states, engine and power management in dealing with unusual-attitude and the recovery techniques themselves. The second and third days are split between the ground-based classroom and the learning environment of the cockpit, where the students go deeper than theoretical details on a wide array of topics such as asymmetrical loading and power management, full- and partial-panel attitude reference, stall recognition and recovery. The Day 2 VFR flying segment includes exercises in eyes-closed unusual attitude recognition in preparation for Day 3’s IFR training in the L-39 hooded cockpit – with no outside references visible. “It’s as close to being inside the clouds as we could make it,� Lauderback explained of the special hood built specifically for the trainer. “For someone flying business turbine aircraft there’s no training closer to the actual business jet.� Given the sign-up rate when we visited the Kissimmee base last fall, it seems apparent that many a savvy pilot and operator sees the wisdom of learning unusual-attitude and upset-flight recovery skills in the most realistic environment possible. When you’re upside-down and falling, experience will certainly help you establish which way is really up. It is training like this that will help pilots better understand how to ‘whack’ one safety mole currently rearing its ugly head back into its hole.

1*-"564%&"-&34)*1t13&08/&%+&54"-&4 563#013014"-&4

 www.TEMPUSAIRCRAFT.com

â?Ż Find out more about UAT at www.jetuat.com 90

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BE THERE TO CHEER HIM

HOME

Tempus Aircraft Sales and Service will help you invest in the assets that guarantee you will not miss those special moments. WE KNOW TIME. IT’S IN OUR NAME.

303.799.9999

P I L AT U S D E A L E R S H I P • P R E - O W N E D J E T S A L E S • T U R B O P R O P S A L E S

w w w .T E M P U S A I R C R A F T. c o m


Plane Sense April_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 16:43 Page 1

Plane Sense on Cabin Avionics

92

Just Log In: Wi-Fi is changing the way we fly.

100

Forward Planning: Some cabin considerations for operators.

104

The IFE Screening Process: In-Flight entertainment in a Wi-Fi world.

Just Log In! Wi-Fi is changing the way we fly. by Brian J. Wilson

92

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

O

n a recent flight to Las Vegas I was overwhelmed with advertisements offering Wi-Fi onboard the aircraft. While purchasing my ticket I encountered a pop-up box informing me that “this aircraft is Wi-Fi equipped”, followed by a link to purchase the service. Standing in the boarding area, the gate agent announced the Wi-Fi service several times and as I entered the cabin door there was a Wi-Fi decal on the fuselage. Arriving at my seat, I found a Wi-Fi brochure in the seat Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense April_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 14:06 Page 2

PHOTO COURTESY OF CESSNA

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

liner or corporate jet is nothing new, of course; but the renewed interest and fascination to offer such services has grabbed the industry by storm. Charter companies market their fleets as Wi-Fi equipped and aircraft brokers advertise the same to gain a competitive advantage. I assume of this readership a basic understanding of how a Wireless Access Point (WAP) operates, and what it provides. But beyond the basics, a WAP provides much more than a “connection” for which Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) can access their email or surf the Internet. Having a WAP

onboard is changing the game for both the flight crew and the passengers. This article will break down the different areas of the aircraft to give you a better understanding of how having a WAP onboard makes life easier for everyone. In its simplest form a WAP onboard an aircraft is no different than someone going down to the coffee shop, ordering their favorite Latte and logging their PED on to the coffee shop ‘hotspot’. The basic technology is the same; there is access to the Internet, which is then connected to a router, which

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

93

pocket, and while the stewardess repeated her normal repertoire, she augmented her ritual by reminding passengers that the aircraft was Wi-Fi equipped. The final and most intrusive reminder shocked me a bit; located right next to the standard illuminated icon of the no smoking and fasten your seatbelts signs was a Wi-Fi symbol. I pondered whether to read the safety briefing or purchase this Wi-Fi service because it must be very important to have during this flight! Having Wi-Fi on board a commercial air-


Plane Sense April_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 14:09 Page 3

WI-FI THROUGHOUT THE AIRPLANE

1. 2. 3. 4.

Remote-mount Transceiver Aircell High Speed Internet Antenna Handsets Wi-Fi Cabin

5. 6. 7. 8.

Iridium satellite Antenna Laptop Computer PDA Inmarsat Antenna

“ An antenna is mounted on top of the aircraft that communicates with a Satellite and sends the information to a router which then connects to a WAP.”

94

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

ply puts their PED on airplane-mode, thus activating the Wi-Fi function, connecting to the service, and enabling email and internet browsing just as would be available on the ground.

WI-FI IN THE CABIN Wi-Fi was first introduced into the Cabin when traditional Satellite voice communications known as “SatCom” transitioned from being voice-only to include data services. The first installations required passengers to plug their laptops into LAN jacks which then connected them to a router. What started the interest in wireless communications was the introduction of the first Wi-Fi enabled smartphone with email capability. The immense popularity with the new smartphone led to an explosion of new devices that offered wireless communications. The public was then exposed to Wi-Fi hotspots which evolved in both retail and communal areas. The public’s fascination to always have access to their email and the internet while on-the-go launched a whole new paradigm of how we communicate. Passengers flying on corporate jets naturally wanted the same freedom to roam the cabin or change seats without having to plug into a jack. Most PEDs didn’t allow for any type of physical connection which created an opportunity for companies to design the first Wi-Fi enabled routers for aviation. Originally www.AvBuyer.com

designed to allow access to email and webbrowsing using PEDs; Wi-Fi; and make available many applications, this has evolved into an array of additional functionality including: • • • • • • • • •

Control of the Cabin Lighting; Setting the Cabin Air Temperature; Selection and control of the In-Flight Entertainment (IFE); Online shopping; Streaming of Movies; Streaming of Moving Maps; Streaming and sharing content stored on your PED; Wireless Handsets; VOIP voice calling.

Streaming content to a PED is another technology the public has been exposed to and it’s only natural that passengers will want the same experience when they are flying. Streaming movies, sporting events and television shows to a PED via a wireless service is quite common, whether you are in a home, a business or just walking through the park - but in an aircraft there are limitations. This starts with the data speed access onboard the aircraft (versus what you get at your home or office). Most people are familiar with the leading online video streaming companies where you sign up for a monthly rate and have access to unlimited movies. These companies allow you to “stream” the

then communicates to your PED via a WAP. The difference starts when explaining how the internet gets to the aircraft as opposed to your home. In your home or business the internet enters through the existing phone and/or cable (TV) infrastructure. Cabling is then run from room to room and you connect your computer to the network by plugging an Ethernet line into the Local Area Network (LAN) jacks. To create a wireless hotspot you simply plug a WAP to a jack and your family or colleagues can use their PEDs. There are some similarities with how an aircraft gets its internet where the place of business or domicile is remotely located and you have to use a ‘dish’ that is strategically positioned on your home or building. The internet is then ‘piped’ in via a network of Satellites hovering over the earth and that are strategically positioned for maximum coverage. In most cases that is how an aircraft both airline and corporate - receives internet. An antenna is mounted on top of the aircraft that communicates with a Satellite and sends the information to a router which then connects to a WAP. So a passenger onboard an aircraft would access the internet in the same way they do at their coffee shop. The technology that makes this happen in an aircraft traveling 560 MPH at an altitude of 37,000 feet makes this truly amazing, but is entirely invisible to the passenger who sim-

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Banyan April_Layout 1 19/03/2013 14:49 Page 1


Plane Sense April_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 14:10 Page 4

CAPTION

“ Now your passengers can roam around the cabin with their portable handsets instead of being attached to a retractable reel. Additionally, by selecting the right service provider, all your voice and data charges will be on one bill.”

96

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

calls to be made to and from the aircraft. The ability to make a voice call using the bandwidth available over the internet connection gives you the advantage of saving money if you plan your next upgrade correctly. Let’s imagine you have a Gulfstream GIV with the standard Magnastar phone system: although a reliable voice and fax solution, it has many limitations and its end-of-life cycle is fast approaching… Your company has a maintenance inspection coming up soon and the goal is to upgrade the cabin for connectivity. By installing a hybrid system that provides both connectivity and VOIP calling you can eliminate the existing voice-only system. Now your passengers can roam around the cabin with their portable handsets instead of being attached to a retractable reel. Additionally, by selecting the right service provider, all your voice and data charges will be on one bill.

COCKPIT AND CREW In 2011, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved the use of the Apple iPad tablet in the cockpit. Airliners and Charter companies followed with requests to replace the current bulky and heavy flight bags with the paperless tablets. Although many operators use flight applications that can be updated with a touch of the icon and don’t neceswww.AvBuyer.com

sarily require Wi-Fi, flight crews can gain a wealth of information to help increase situation awareness and safety while in flight. A good example would be the weather: Although many of the larger airframes have the technology to allow the crew to view the weather while in flight; the majority of the small to mid-sized aircraft don’t have that capability. Even those aircraft outfitted with the technology are limited by the size and detail of the displays in the cockpit. Any pilot will tell you that most cockpit displays take a back-seat to tablets when it comes to resolution, brightness and viewing angle. Now aircraft of all sizes can view the current weather and other flight critical data utilizing a tablet, application, Wi-Fi and an internet connection. In the case where weather prohibits the crew from reaching their scheduled airport, they can use the internet to assist them on which FBO to use, based on services and fuel prices. Most pilots and technicians can remember the days when they had to take upwards of an hour to load five or six floppy disks into their Flight Management System (FMS) every 28 days in order to update the Database. How about situations where your aircraft was on an extended trip, far from the home base, and the crew is reporting the FMS and IFIS databases are soon overdue along with a re-occurring intermittent problem with the Avionics? Aircraft Index see Page 4

data over the internet to view either on a standard TV, computer or PED; hence, the content is technically stored “in the cloud”. Airliners and large-sized corporate aircraft that can afford to purchase a Ku-Band internet service will have some level of ‘cloud’ content access, but for the vast majority of corporate aircraft using the popular SwiftBroadband (SBB) or Air-to-Ground service, the speed of the connection will prohibit any downloading of movies. (I am not saying it’s impossible to do, it’s just not costeffective.) On the other hand, the wireless device onboard an aircraft is technically the same as the one used at the home or office. The new 802.11(n) Wi-Fi models are capable of handling up to 600Mb/s of bandwidth which allows for streaming HD quality shows and movies. Audio Video on Demand (AVOD) media storage units are an excellent, costeffective solution for onboard entertainment systems. These media devices store the content and stream them to your PED as though you were on the ground. Having the content stored onboard the aircraft eliminates the deficiency in the data-rates and precludes a nasty surprise in your monthly bill because a passenger tried to download a movie. Wi-Fi enabled smartphones and handsets allow Voice over Internet Protocol (VOIP)


When it’s late in the evening on a Saturday and you need a part, who can you call? Duncan Aviation has team members who answer calls 24/7/365. They also use their decades-long experience and plethora of connections to get the essential part delivered, regardless of obstacles.

When a customer in Spain had to be up and running in less than 24 hours, her experience led her to believe customs might cause a delay. So she opted to have a courier hand-carry the part to ensure all customs requirements were addressed along the way, reducing the AOG time from days to just hours. For the rest of the story visit www.DuncanAviation.aero/experience.

+1 402.475.4125 | 800.228.1836

Experience. Unlike any other.

Planesense Cabin Avionics Ad 3_13_13.indd 1

2/26/2013 11:33:07 AM


Plane Sense April_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 14:11 Page 5

“ One thing is certain moving forwards: Wi-Fi is here to stay. It is the central nervous system of In-Flight Entertainment and Connectivity (IFEC)...” In the past this could be a very frustrating time for both the crew and the maintenance personnel. Imagine the convenience of knowing that once the aircraft is on the ground, an onboard device makes a secure connection to a Wi-Fi network and automatically transfers all the information. The crew and technician even receive an email or text message that the content was successfully installed onto the aircraft. The possibilities are endless to where this new technology can take today’s modern aircraft. Envision the case where the onboard systems are working normally and the crew see no anomalies in the cockpit; but the Maintenance Diagnostic Computer (MDC) sent a message via the Wi-Fi network that a computer is starting to malfunction. The message could be routed to the manufacturer’s technical operations department who concur a fault is imminent. An email could then be sent to the crew and the home-base identifying the problem with a corrective action plan attached. Parts could be ordered and shipped to the aircraft’s next destination before it even arrives. That would be customer service!

players in our industry. Staying connected has made the transition from email and web browsing, to maintenance diagnostics and database upgrades.

One thing is certain moving forwards: WiFi is here to stay. It is the central nervous system of In-Flight Entertainment and Connectivity (IFEC) and its relationship with other onboard systems continues to grow. Ground-based operations will have to adapt so that they, too, can “stay connected”.

THE WI-FI ROADMAP Given the information outlined above you can start to picture what lies ahead for all the

98

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

Fixed Based Operators will have to enhance their Wi-Fi systems with both bandwidth and security measures to entice aircraft operators to use their facilities over their competitors. Charter companies will outfit their fleets with Wi-Fi networks so passengers can get email and internet access, giving them a competitive advantage. Avionics, Maintenance and Engine manufacturers will design their equipment to communicate with onboard routers and terminals so their systems can be monitored at all times. Aircraft OEMs will certify their new aircraft to be Wi-Fi compliant; external antenna’s will transmit and receive information via a wireless network. New job titles and positions will be created to monitor, decode and transfer information sent over the network. Information technology (IT) specialists and consultants will be needed to ensure proper encryption is used preventing the network from being hacked into. www.AvBuyer.com

Technical schools will change their curriculum to include IT training, and more troubleshooting will be done remotely over the Wi-Fi network.

❯ Brian Wilson oversees all activities related to Banyan Air Services’ avionics department - including sales promotions, aircraft avionics installations, bench and line troubleshooting, engineering and used avionics component sales. His avionics career started 30 years ago, when he joined the U.S. Navy as an Avionics Technician. Wilson has also worked at Midcoast Aviation, Raytheon, Bombardier/Learjet and Jet Aviation in West Palm Beach where he headed the Avionics, Engineering and Interior departments. He also serves on the Rockwell Collins Dealer Board. He can be reached at 954-232-3606 or email bwilson@banyanair.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Wright Brothers November 22/10/2012 17:18 Page 1

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title is a provider of aircraft title management and escrow services for all types of aircraft. Doing business both domestically and around the globe, Wright Brothers offers quick, personalized service from Debbie Mercer, always with the utmost of confidentiality. Available 24.7.365

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title 9075 Harmony Drive Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73130 Telephone: (405) 680-9289 Toll-Free (within the US): (866) 217-5700 Fax: (405) 732-7457 e-mail: dmercer@wbaircraft.com

Title Search Title Clearing Escrow Services Registration Services Accident / Incident searches Preparation of Documents Domestic and International Services


Plane Sense 2 April_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 14:19 Page 1

Plane Sense on Cabin Avionics

Forward Planning Some cabin considerations for operators. by Ken Elliott

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

A

www.AvBuyer.com

today’s passengers expect. Many service bulletins and software upgrades have circulated the world of OEMs and MROs in order to try and stay abreast of change. Map A (overleaf) shows some necessary considerations for cabin outfitting and upgrades. While not exhaustive the decision map highlights the diversity of interrelated factors in cabin options. ‘Management’ pertains to cabin features that are controlled either manually or automatically and often by remote means. Each area of management in itself has many sub parts; for example, environment Aircraft Index see Page 4

100

nyone who has traveled in a business jet knows cabin layout and design are almost as critical for operations as the cockpit and aircraft performance. When evaluating an aircraft for purchase or for lease, a lack of capability or an unsuitable configuration within the passenger compartment can quickly rule a specific model or serial number off the shortlist. Aircraft manufacturers go to great lengths to provide up-to-date cabins. However they can quickly fall behind the trends of style and the ability to stay connected in a way that


CAI_WAS_APRIL13_Layout 1 3/15/13 1:21 PM Page 1

CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL, INC.

2013 1983 –

PHONE: +1 (561) 433-3510 | www.caijets.com 2008 GULFSTREAM G150

1991 BEECHJET 400A

This Gulfstream G150 has only 375 Hours TTSN. Offers a Wide Cabin with Maximum Range of 2,950 nm with 4 Passengers, 2 Crew, NBAA IFR Reserves at 430 KTAS (Mach .75) or Normal Cruise of 459 KTAS (Mach .80). Universal 7 Passenger Interior.

2006 TBM 850

Only 750 Hours TTSN. Equipped with RVSM, 2-Tube Bendix EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s with WAAS, Garmin GMX-200 MFD with Chartview, TAS/TAWS, WX-500, Garmin GDL-69A Real Time Weather, and Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 Transponders.

2001 TBM 700B

jp@caijets.com PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

1,250 TTSN, Collins Proline 21 Avionics, Fresh 1,200 Hour Inspection, ECH-5000 Electronic Charts, TCAS II Change 7, Rosenview LX Passenger Information System with 8.4” Slide Mount LCD Display, RVSM Equipped, Paint & Interior in Excellent Condition and NDH.

1991 TBM 700A

S/N 200 1,875 Hours TTSN, 1,126 SHS, EFIS, Dual Garmin 530's, KMD-850 MFD, EGPWS, Skywatch TCAD, Landing Gear enrolled on Long Life Program, 10-Year Inspection complied with 2012, Freon Air, and No Damage History. Annual Inspection complied with March 2013.

PRESIDENT, CORPORATE AIRSEARCH INTERNATIONAL

9,604 Hours TTSN, 2,728/1,770 SMOH, “0” SHS, Collins Proline IV Avionics, Freon Air, Thrust Reversers, RVSM, New Pant & Interior 2006, On CAMP and No Damage History. Owner is requesting offers.

2008 PREMIER 1A

S/N 351

CONTACT J.P. HANLEY

S/N RK-19

S/N 003 Only Two Owners and 3,534 Hours TTSN, 464 Hours SMOH, Garmin 530/430, Sandel EHSI, Gear on Long Life Program, NEW Windshields and De-ice Boots Fitted March 2012, Gear Actuators Overhauled March 2012, Always Hangared, and No Damage History.

LIST YOUR AIRCRAFT WITH CAI CALL US FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PROVEN SUCCESS RECORD.

OFFICE: +1(561) 433-3510 | CELL: +1(561) 289-3355

www.caijets.com


Plane Sense 2 April_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 14:21 Page 2

relates to soundproofing, temperature, airflow and humidity control. ‘Configuration’ pertains to what you see, the arrangement, and the level of comfort, access and safety. Each area of configuration in itself has subparts; for example Access & Mobility can have different concerns for inthe-air and on-the-ground. The input side to the cabin options map represents the expectations of the operator who could be an individual owner, a corporate team, a management company and anything in between. Together, it’s a complicated process and one that can greatly benefit by taking a higher level perspective. So let’s take the 30,000 ft. view, and look at the aspects of aircraft cabins that really matter to owners, buyers and sellers.

OBSOLESCENCE MAP A: DECISION MAP OF CABIN OPTIONS

“The cabin electronics and IT are the most susceptible to obsolescence. Think modular in your equipment to allow easy upgrades later. Provide easy access to audio visual items for software revisions and adjustments.”

DIAGRAM A: POTENTIAL SPAN OF CMS FUNCTIONALITY

Just like renovating a home in bold colors or customizing a car with a rear spoiler it may suit your own taste but would limit resale potential to a niche market. Choosing neutral blended designs and following the guidelines of aircraft interior design will limit obsolescence. The configuration of the cabin should follow what is standard for the aircraft, or at least what buyers would expect for the model. Most importantly stay at least to the minimum seating capacity, and preferably, provide the ability to seat to the maximum for the type certificate by providing a fully belted couch, for example. The cabin electronics and IT are the most susceptible to obsolescence. Think modular in your equipment to allow easy upgrades later. Provide easy access to audio visual items for software revisions and adjustments. Manufacturers of these technologies are now ‘future proofing’ in an effort to be adaptable to changes as they occur. ‘Commercial off the shelf’ (COTS) products are renewed almost as often as seasonal clothing and appear dated quicker than you could imagine. Bear in mind support for COTS products is not what you have come to expect with equipment specifically designed and developed for aircraft. If an aircraft has any COTS cabin equipment it is recommended to purchase back-up units.

BUYER AND SELLER EXPECTATIONS Jetcraft Corporation, trades corporate jets as its core business. When asked what today’s buyers and sellers mostly focused on regarding the cabin, Sales Director Chris Brenner said that external communication and connectivity in general were key expectations. “Most of today’s business jet transactions are of an international nature and many aircraft must be able to perform across different geographic regions including land, sea and polar.”

102

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense 2 April_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 14:21 Page 3

Connectivity involves voice, data and video with a service provider to enable your link to satellites. In-Flight Entertainment (IFE) and ‘office in the sky’ are the two big hits for initial configuration and upgrade costs, so there is a tendency to look for ways to save. Technology that uses Iridium satellites and is globalized for full international and polar coverage will typically cost less in both initial equipage and operating costs. Inmarsat satellites however have good data capability for international use. Make sure that cockpit needs such as FANS, weather and other operational services are considered when it comes to the selection of external communication equipment. Both the cabin and the cockpit may be using the same system(s). Regarding the cabin appearance, Chris Brenner pointed out that, as with any depreciating asset, the return on investment for an upgrade may appear negative to both a seller and a buyer of a business jet. However the need to add, generate or ‘clean up’ an interior in order to sell may be necessary. Sales professionals can advise on the need to make cabin changes in order to sell. Buyers may negotiate pricing on aircraft to offset their own cost to add necessary or desired cabin changes as an alternative approach.

single seat manual control of lights with a monitor to icon-based individual remotes controlling a host of cabin variables. Diagram A (bottom left) shows the potential span of cabin management functionality.

A FEW LAST MINUTE CABIN TIPS With so many factors to consider regarding cabin design, it helps to have a few good places to start: •

• •

CABIN MANAGEMENT Business jet cabin management varies from Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

When working on connectivity for initial and upgrade cabin design, be sure to involve the company IT department. Have the IT representative work closely with the aircraft technology OEM and the MRO to test communications protocol, especially where secure IP and firewall protections are involved. Dedicate a laptop and tablet computer for aircraft use to secure set up, capability, reliability and protection from unsecure internet use out of the aircraft. Make sure the CEO and other leaders are familiar with them. Whether you have one or multiple aircraft, use only one Service Set ID (SSID) or network name for the whole fleet, by design. Think closets, storage and access during cabin selection. Where does the CEO sit? Use neutral and coordinated colors and tones during cabin design. You may regret bold choices, especially when it www.AvBuyer.com

comes to selling the aircraft. Interview those who will be flying in the cabin before finalizing interior designs. You may have thought they needed an office when they only wanted an ‘inflight playroom’ for the teens and those new additions to the family!

Perhaps the most important steps are to find a trusted aircraft interior designer and then an IT service provider who has the most experience with your communications, data and media configuration. This combination will more than pay for itself, ensuring your satisfaction and reliable continuous connectivity as you circumnavigate the world.  Ken Elliott is an avionics veteran of 40 years and more recently focused on NextGen. His work within the NextGen Advisory Council sub-committees brings him close to current and intended development effort. Equally, his specialization in low-vision operations provides a deeper insight into one of the pillars of NextGen. Ken has served the aviation industry on three continents from light GA to large corporate aircraft. His current employer Jetcraft is a leading aircraft brokerage company with worldwide presence. More from www.jetcraft.com, email: kenelliott@jetcraft.com ■ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

103


Plane Sense 3 March_FinanceNov 19/03/2013 14:31 Page 1

Plane Sense on Cabin Avionics

The IFE ‘Screening’ Process In-Flight Entertainment in a Wi-Fi world. by Steve Watkins

104

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

I

t seems that almost every week there is some new entertainment technology that is created for the aircraft cabin. Twenty years ago, In-Flight Entertainment (IFE) consisted of a stereo system playing cassettes for audio, and if you were ‘high-class’ you might have a screen showing the outline of an airplane moving awkwardly over a roadmap on a TV screen. Off to the side was a little box with red letters and numbers informing the passengers of the airspeed and altitude. If you are looking for new IFE equipment today, everything is high-tech – and comes from many different manufacturers. A wide variety of specific equipment exists, designed for particular aircraft makes and models and offering a range of different capabilities. The www.AvBuyer.com

biggest question that comes to mind regarding your own IFE needs is, “How deep are your pockets?” Let’s take a look at a few of the options available, and how they affect the maintenance cost and value of your aircraft. The introduction of Flat Screen Monitors for ultimate visual enjoyment continues to change rapidly. Whatever you have in your home nowadays, you can also have in your aircraft. From six-inch individual seat screens and headrest - mounted screens, to screens up to 60-inches, the initial cost of monitors varies with the amount of DPI, HD, LED, LCD and more.

MONITORING THE COST Deciphering the best value for your ‘monitordollar’ and what it will add to the value of Aircraft Index see Page 4


Plane Sense 3 March_FinanceNov 20/03/2013 13:00 Page 2

the aircraft when you sell it later is extremely difficult, if not almost impossible to know in advance. The price of the monitor is just part of your initial cost however… If you have 10 seats and decide to install swing-up small seat screens, you will have to factor the cost of not only the monitors, but also of the engineering needed to get the screens into the seat; the cost of the system to provide data to the multiple screens; and all of the associated wiring that will be required. The nice thing about these systems is that you can provide different viewing options for each screen – but, as outlined, there are extra costs involved. The cost of monitors comes down with larger quantity purchases. It may also be worth considering buying a couple of extra units so you can have replacements on hand to install while one is sent out for repair, rather than buying an exchange unit at a higher price later. If you decide to utilize the larger, cabinsize screens, these will naturally be more costly to procure per unit, but you won’t Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

purchase as many which may save on installation costs. This lower-cost entertainment system option can work well, but do bear in mind that passengers then have to view the same screen, and the larger screens usually require a bulkhead for installation, which takes up floor space in the cabin. The bulkhead weight, all of the structure required to properly support the screen, and the weight of the screen itself may affect your aircraft’s capacity and range, so do your homework regarding the selection of such a unit. In addition, replacement of these large screens can also be costly, owing to the work involved in gaining access to the unit. And whereas having a few spare seat monitors might be practical, having a spare 60-inch monitor is not something most operators will want to inventory. Therefore the need to exchange units when yours stops working will come at a higher price.

be simpler to have an entertainment system that utilizes multiple Wi-Fi channels – thereby simply providing an iPad or tablet to passengers when they board the aircraft. A quick pre-flight briefing and demonstration for the less technologically savvy would enable everyone to access a personalized entertainment unit for the flight. Having a Wi-Fi system utilizing iPads would allow for streaming TV, Video, or the Airshow, and also provide games, apps, work programs, and books that could be downloaded easily. This option may become very attractive as there would be no need to buy monitors, and you would also save on engineering, installation and maintenance inspection costs; replacement costs, troubleshooting costs and also loss of cabin space (due to bulkheads). Furthermore, the weight of the monitors and related installation structure is eliminated. A further advantage is that when the iPad technology changes, you can simply put your old ones on eBay, recoup some of the initial outlay, and buy the newer model with all of its upgrades and capabilities. Your aircraft may no longer offer the ‘Home Theater Experience’, but in today’s world, who wants to watch what the other guy is watching anyway? I have to admit that the personal entertainment technology option is a big step into the future that makes sense and can save business jet operators substantial costs in cabin IFE, as well as the upgrade costs to keep up with technology. Obviously, there isn’t anything added to the aircraft’s value by using these tablets, but there also is no detriment to its value that a big heavy bulkhead and screen might present. This writer now needs to catch up on his Tweeting, so plans to load his Beach Boys 8 track of surfer music into his Quad 8 track player, grab his iPad and get to it. He’ll return in the June edition when Paperless Cockpits becomes the focus of his attention.  Steve Watkins is

VIEWING THE FUTURE

Technical Services Manager, Western Region for Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI). Steve has been an A&P mechanic, IA and Private Pilot for over 35 years and was a Designated Mechanics Examiner in Wichita, KS and Long Beach, CA. He has also spent time as Director of Maintenance and Chief Inspector for various FAR 135 and FAR 145 operations, owned his own maintenance shop as well as instructed at an A&P technical school and is an active member of the AMT Society.

The future trend for entertainment monitors in aircraft is to not install any at all! It could

 Contact Steve at: SWatkins@jetsupport.com ■

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

105


Embraer April12_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:50 Page 1

EMBRAER PRODUCT OUTLINE

Embraer: From Regional Mainstay To World Power Player in Three Decades. by Dave Higdon

t was December, 1986 and we had just arrived after 1,200 miles of flying along the Amazon River from its main port city, Belem, on the southern shore of the mouth of the great river. This trip had a distinctive aspect to it: It had eight stops in 1,200 miles, and only two of them were on paved runways – the remainder tended to be runways of gravel strewn across clearings carved from the Amazon jungle along the river’s north shore. In flight, one could - peering forward from a seat behind the First Officer – see

I

106

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

the Amazon jungle stretched seamlessly to the western horizon, awakening with soft gold light that etched soft shadow shapes shifting eastward as the summer sun rose behind the EMB-110 Embraer Bandeirante. Each approach and landing was like landing on an aircraft carrier; each departure ended with jungle passing only feet below the gear as we climbed steeply from the 2,000 and 2,500-foot airstrips. It is the aircraft’s success in this environment that helped win the Bandeirante a significant market in a growing U.S. regional airline market – and opened the way for marketing staff that followed, offering the www.AvBuyer.com

EMB-120 Brasilia, a 300-knot airplane in the 30-seat segment (and later, larger airliners and a growing share of the world’s business jet dollars). In 1986, however, the aviation world had barely started becoming aware of a serious new contender from South America. At that time, the company - founded in 1969 - was only in its teen years, and was founded on the licensed manufacture of North American designs – although it was already well into designing its own machines too. The Bandeirante, for example, was earning respect around the world in a realm previously dominated by workhorse airplanes Aircraft Index see Page 4


Embraer April12_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:51 Page 2

“But while ATR struggled to survive and de Havilland survived via absorption by Bombardier Aerospace, Embraer is still a fiercely independent OEM making inroads in business jets to degrees the doubters believed could never happen.”

Embraer Legacy 650

like de Havilland’s DHC-6 Twin Otter. The appeal of these sturdy, simple airplanes was that they were designed to work in harsh, remote and challenging environments – a description that encompasses as much of Brazil as it does of Canada. Both the Bandeirante and the Twin Otter are twin turboprops, both are powered by Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A engines, both seat about 17 to 21 (depending on the configuration), and both offer excellent payload numbers and outstanding runway performance. In essence, both have traits necessary for operating in parts of the world where runways are seldom paved. The biggest differAdvertising Enquiries see Page 8

ence between the two is in the Brazilian airplane’s low-wing design. At about the same time Embraer and de Havilland moved further into the airline world with the EMB-120 Brasilia and the Dash-8 respectively - once again low-wing and high-wing designs. But the EMB-120 moved Embraer into new technologies with pressurized passenger airplanes, built from scratch, with speed and comfort getting an equal billing to utility and durability. Although the Brasilia bettered its competition for speed, it fell out of favor for the same reasons as its competing contemporaries (excepting the Dash-8 and www.AvBuyer.com

the ATR niche airplanes), namely: the regional jetliner. Introduction of the jets brought about the end of all the 19-seat regional airliners, the 35-seat and 50- and 70-seaters – absent the two niche players. But while ATR struggled to survive and de Havilland survived via absorption by Bombardier Aerospace, Embraer is still a fiercely independent OEM making inroads in business jets to degrees the doubters believed could never happen. More than 43 years after formation, more than 5,000 aircraft bearing the name “Embraer” fly in more than 80 countries around the world. ❯ WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

107


Embraer April12_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:52 Page 3

EMBRAER PRODUCT OUTLINE

Embraer Phenom 100

Embraer Phenom 300

FROM VARIANTS TO ORIGINALS Embraer’s early airline roots helped prepare the company for its ultimate move into jets. Initially Embraer built American designs under license before expanding into the design of original General Aviation models for the domestic market. The late 1970s move into the regional airliner field and some measured success building a military trainer for the home air force improved the company’s reputation and won it broader respect too. Today the company’s ERJ regional airliners and E-series twin-jets cover markets from about 35 to 120 seats - and that link to the regional airline business brought the company to the edge of the corporate aircraft market by 2000. The ERJ-135 Regional Airliner underpinned Embraer’s earliest venture into the business jet market – the Legacy 600, a purpose-built variant of the company’s smallest Regional Airliners. From that modest beginning, Embraer began to look further into the Business Aviation market and a second

108

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

Legacy model (the Legacy 650) joined the business jet line in 2009. That was not before the 2005 formation of Embraer Executive Jets and the launch of its first two clean-sheet business jet models: the Phenom 100 and 300. Today Embraer boasts seven business jets in three distinct model lines: the Legacy models (450, 500, 600 and 650); a single Lineage 1000 model (which, like the Legacy line, has its roots in an airliner – in this case the E-190); and the Phenom 100 and 300 – Embraer’s small-jet line. Let’s take a little time to meet the Embraer business jets.

THE PHENOMS It is staggering how quickly Embraer built up deliveries of the Phenom 100 and Phenom 300, the two smallest of its business jets. The Entry-Level category Phenom 100 and the Light Jet-sized Phenom 300 both stand out in their segments. The Phenom 100 boasts the best cruise speed in its class (390 knots) with range that www.AvBuyer.com

covers almost 1,200 nautical miles. The Phenom 300, meanwhile, more than holds its own in the Light Jet segment with a 453-knot high-speed cruise and ability to cover more than 1,950 nautical miles non-stop. It also sports some features that are more common on larger jets - such as an airstair door and single-point refueling/defueling. Runway performance for Embraer’s two smallest jets is at the shorter end of the scale, and is a key to operational flexibility.

THE LEGACY FAMILY As outlined above, Embraer is the source of an excellent line of regional airliners from which the company spun an all-new line of Medium and Large-Cabin business jets under the “Legacy” banner. Ranging from the original Legacy 600, its larger sibling, the Legacy 650, and two newer Legacy 500 and Legacy 450 models that are in development, Embraer has spawned a line that challenges Business Aviation’s largest and most-established names. Aircraft Index see Page 4


Embraer April12_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:53 Page 4

EMBRAER PRODUCT OUTLINE

Embraer Legacy 500

Embraer Lineage 1000

The Legacy 650 boasts a maximum range of 3,900 nautical miles, while the Legacy 600 weighs in at 3,400 nautical. The newest models are no slouches, either, at 3,000 nautical miles for the Legacy 500 and 2,300 for the Legacy 450. Size is the most-obvious differentiator between the four Legacy models. The Legacy 650 and 600 boast main cabins standing 6 feet tall and spanning 6 feet, 11 inches wide; the Legacy 500 and 450 also boast stand-up cabins and plenty of amenities – lavatories and galley facilities among them. Avionics panels differ: The Legacy 650 and 600 come equipped with Honeywell’s sophisticated Primus Elite integrated flight deck system, while Embraer endowed the Legacy 500 and 450 with the latest from Rockwell Collins; the ProLine Fusion integrated cockpit system with three screens in the panel and a fourth in the pedestal. These two also boast full fly-by-wire flight controls, side stick controllers, and support full paperless-cockpit flying. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

LINEAGE 1000 Embraer’s new flagship business jet is a spin-off from its E-190 twin-engine jet airliner and offers an enviable performance envelope and class-leading features and performance. For example, the Lineage boasts a maximum range of 4,500 nautical miles and a high-speed cruise of about 470 knots. With a maximum operating altitude of 41,000 msl, the Lineage can overfly the vast majority of weather challenges en route to its far-flung destinations. Standing 6 feet, 7 inches tall, the Lineage 1000’s cabin boasts a full-length flat floor that ends aft at the door to an in-flight accessible luggage compartment. At 8 feet, 10 inches wide the Lineage 1000 provides ample space for arranging the cabin to suit the operator’s needs. Ultimately, the Lineage 1000 boast a cabin spacious enough to break up into five separate zones of work or relaxation. Up front, the flight crew enjoys the sophistication of Honeywell’s advanced www.AvBuyer.com

Primus Epic avionics suite and a fly-by-wire control system rare among business jets today. Indeed, Embraer claims the Lineage offers “one of the roomiest cockpits in Business Aviation”.

MORE TO COME… If past practice is any indication of future efforts, don’t expect Embraer’s creative team in San Jose dos Campos, Brazil, to be resting on their well-earned laurels. From its modest beginnings of building American airplanes under license the Brazilian planemaker now occupies the slot as one of the globe’s top aircraft OEMs, and a growing contender in Business Aviation, with its variety of models competing at nearly every level. If the company managed to make this much progress into Business Aviation in just a dozen years, it’s enticing to imagine where the company will be when it turns 50 (and its Business Aviation line turns 20).

❯ More information from

www.embraerexecutivejets.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

109


Revenue April13_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:07 Page 1

BIZJETS & REVENUE GENERATION

Revenue Flights Understand the implications and be sure it’s right for you.

evenue generation with the company airplane is a source of aggravation for some, while for others it’s a salvation. For those able to afford going without their company airplane from time to time, it’s an option to be embraced for the financial benefits it brings. Whether or not it’s the right option for you can be a tough call, and demands detailed examination and analysis.

R

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE WORST Not all partnerships, leaseback or aircraft management situations work equally well for

110

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

all operators. Each has its benefits and challenges. For example, when the economy turned south, one owner/operator we know found himself in an untenable financial situation. Only six months before he had confirmed a delivery date for a new light jet after waiting several years for his delivery position to come up. He committed to financial obligations that, post-downturn, strained his company’s cash-flow. After four months of vacillating over a solution he accepted an offer to enter into a limited leaseback agreement with a small aircraft management firm. “This wasn’t in the plan,” he explained, “but there was no exit available that didn’t www.AvBuyer.com

cost more than taking delivery. So we decided to stick with the purchase plan and then find a way to offset the demands on our budget – demands we had covered, pre-downturn.” In this case, the deal made the difference between losing the jet or keeping, using, enjoying, and partly covering the aircraft. It is a solution that is working out for this particular operator, under these specific circumstances. After three years his arrangement preserves most of the flexibility he enjoyed as an owner/operator – with some unavoidable and necessary “accommodations”. “We generate enough revenue to keep us even,” the owner/operator explained recently. In addition, the arrangement helps ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


AIC March_Layout 1 18/02/2013 16:12 Page 1


Revenue April13_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:09 Page 2

BIZJETS & REVENUE GENERATION cover some of the added expenses that factor into the use of an aircraft for-hire by a thirdparty operator – and that’s one of the hurdles operators face in such arrangements. “Those costs kept me out of a lease-back arrangement with the last airplane – that and the higher utilization the operators always insisted they needed,” he explained. Among the give-backs, ‘scheduling’ tops the list. “Before we decided to fly a trip, we called the FBO, told them when we would depart and left for the airport. Now we first have to check with the management company to make sure they have not booked a charter and, if they have, find out how firm the charter clients’ dates are. Sometimes we can squeeze in our trip between the charter’s drop-off and pick-up times and sometimes we can’t.” Sometimes, other arrangements need to be made - whereby the jet owner must also charter; his contract with his operating partner makes that easy and, usually, affordable when viewed in context.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS More considerations are needed than scheduling issues. “There are insurance considerations, which my partnering organization helps to offset,” our jet owner said. “There also are maintenance considerations, additional inspections and, more wear-and-tear.”

Against such issues he negotiated his contract to help minimize the impact. “We limit how much the management company can use the jet for charter,” he explained. “We also have mutually-agreed limits for how long the aircraft can be gone on any one trip. And they’re chartering only to their contract-client base – there are no unknown parties or spot charters to first-time users, which helps limit the chance of getting ‘sloppy people’ who don’t appreciate the value of the aircraft.” He calls it an “aircraft sharing” arrangement that maximizes his use options, helps balance his books and limits the added wear and tear and maintenance and inspection costs. So would he do it again, given the chance? “Well, it does change the equation and adds some complications that don’t exist when you are the sole operator. But if you are asking whether I would rather do without, or keep the airplane and the complications, three years down the line I’d opt to keep the airplane.”

THE ADDED CONSIDERATIONS There is no question the “arrangement” isn’t something that would work for all operators. Costs in insurance, maintenance, wear-andtear on the aircraft, complications in scheduling, the possibility of added downtime or for

the aircraft to get weathered on a charter flight can all kill the advantages of the option for other operators. Consider all the factors. First, FAA inspection requirement changes for aircraft engaged in commercial operations. In place of the annual inspections of a Part 91 airplane, the commercial airplane now faces 100-hour inspections, in addition to any routine items required by the OEM. For our jet owner the added inspection requirement factored into the contract with the operating partner. “My own use ran close to 300 hours a year, before the downturn, but it still needed only an annual inspection.” After the downturn – and with the partner – use stabilized at about 200 hours annually. “We forecast our contract based on 200 hours, so we agreed to a split arrangement – they cover the first 100-hour inspection, I cover the second when it comes up. If utilization hits 300 hours, we split it – unless the records show that one of us logged more than 65 of that added 100 hours.” Insurance costs changed – even though the single-pilot jet flies with two pilots on all its for-hire charters, and those pilots engage in six-month recurrent training paid for by the aircraft management firm. The owner flies with an instructor pilot several hours once a year (about six months out of sync with his annual participation in his own recurrent simulator training once yearly).

TAX-MAN CONSIDERATIONS

“More considerations need making than scheduling issues.” 112

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

As with any business engaged in a revenuegenerating arrangement with another business, finances are an important consideration – and this “aircraft-sharing” arrangement has its own, as explained by an accountant with a large base of aircraft-operating clients. “Revenue is revenue, and you’ve got to account for it all if you don’t want the IRS looking at you for failure to report income.” Thus, every penny generated by the leaseback arrangement is counted as income to the aircraft owner’s business. Fortunately, the business also gets to account for all of the added expenses generated by the “arrangement”, and it all helps. Every one of those 100-hour inspections mentioned above is deductible, as are the higher insurance costs, and the cost of chartering replacement lift when the airplane is being used elsewhere. Additionally, in the case of our Light Jet operator, there are the deductions on interest payments on the aircraft loan; fuel; routine and unplanned maintenance. “At the end of the year the goal is to have enough added revenue to cover the costs – and enough added expenses to deduct to help offset the higher tax obligations,” the owner said. ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4


Southern Cross April 19/03/2013 15:01 Page 1

GL GLOBALLY OBALL LY INTIMA INTIMATE. ATE. BROKERAGE | ACQUISITIONS | SALES | MANAGEMENT

Visit our w website: ebsite e: w www.scross.com ww.scr . oss.com o

Email:: acsales@scross.com Email acsa ales@scross.com w www.twitter.com/SCrossAviation ww.twitter.com/SCrossA Av viation www.facebook.com/SCrossAviation www.facebook.com/SCrossA Av viation

2007 Gulfstream G150 s/n 227

2003 G200 UPĂ€0$0  

66Ă€6%Ă€#KTHTCOG'PIKPGU#27GPTQNNGFQP           ,55+6KRVQ6CKNĂ€5VWPPKPI%QUOGVKEUĂ€(&4Ă€.QCFGFY            1RVKQPUĂ€/QVKXCVGF1YPGTUGGMU1HHGTU     

66Ă€'52'PIKPGUĂ€/52#27Ă€#KTHTCOGGPTQNNGFQP          2NCPGRCTVUĂ€/5)OCKPVGPCPEG2TQITCOĂ€'ZEGNNGPV%QOGVKEU       CPF2GFKITGGĂ€0Q&COCIG   

%JCNNGPIGT   s/n 20219

1992 Learjet 31A s/n 56

JQWTU6650Ă€8GT[YGNNGSWKRRGFĂ€(CEVQT[5GTXKEG         %GPVGT/CKPVCKPGFĂ€1PGRTKXCVGQYPGTUKPEGPGY      

66'PIKPGUQP,55+0Q&COCIG705((/5          5CVEQO(TGUJ#%JGEM/QVKXCVGF1YPGT     

2KCIIKQ#XCPVK++    UPĂ€1-2+#  

-KPI#KT    UP(.Ă€040  

1PN[66À6%À2TQ.KPGÀ0QFCOCIG           À4GRNCEGOGPVCKTETCHVCNTGCF[KPUGTXKEG     

66À6%À5*165À0Q&COCIG         À'ZEGNNGPV2GFKITGGÀ4GRNCEGOGPVJCUCTTKXGF       À/QVKXCVGFQYPGT  

ALSO AVAILABLE: 1993 Learjet 35A, s/n 67466'PIKPGUQP/52)QNF0Q&COCIG;GCT+PURGEVKQPEY/QVKXCVGF1YPGT               

FT FT.. LA LAUDERDALE UDERDALE

CHARL CHARLOTTE OTTE

SĂƒO S Ăƒ PAULO ĂƒO PAULO

LONDON LONDON O

1120 NW 51s 51stt C Court ourt F Ft. t. Lauder Lauderdale, dale, FL 33309 US USA A

17718 King’s Poin Pointt Dr Dr., r., S Ste. te. A Cornelius, Cornelius, NC 28031 US USA A

AV A VC Copacabana opacabana 177-Alpha 177-Alphaville ville 06453-041-SĂŁo 064 453-041-SĂŁo Paul Paulo-Brazil o-Brazil

Conway Conway House - CranďŹ el CranďŹ eld d MK43 0FQ 0F FQ - United Kingdom Kingdom

Tel: T el: e +1 (954) 377-0320 F Fax: ax: +1 (954) 377-0300

Tel: T el: e +1 (704) 990-7090 Fax: Fax: +1 (704) 990-7094

Tel: T el: e : +55 (11) 3588-0311

Tel: T el: e +44 (1234) 817-770

(In (Invoicing/Contracting voicing/Contracting A Address) ddress)

OFFICES OFFICES WORLDWIDE WORLDWIDE


Revenue April13_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:10 Page 3

BIZJETS & REVENUE GENERATION MORE WAYS TO SKIN THIS CAT Of course, this is just one fairly common approach to offsetting aircraft costs with aircraft revenue generation. A more-common, and in some ways simpler approach is to put the airplane wholly in the hands of an aircraft management operation and become a client who - as it happens - sometimes gets to charter the owned aircraft. Many an operator creates a separate entity or sub-corporation to own the airplane and contract with the aircraft management company. Then all the revenue is income, the loan payments and insurance are expenses, and the charter costs are fully deductible. Even when it’s the owned airplane being chartered. “Some operators do this as a way to reduce their main company’s liability exposure – as well as to generate an end-of-year profit on their asset,” our accountant explained. “But that means the airplane is no longer under your control – and it’s flying a lot more than it would otherwise.” Then 100-hour inspections and maintenance and upkeep are, usually by contract, expenses the management firm carries. This form of arrangement may also mean that the aircraft owner can’t count on always flying their own aircraft on their own charter flights. If, for example, the owner’s aircraft is already scheduled to go on another flight when the owner calls to book a flight the chartering aircraft management firm works on supplying alternative lift.

THE DIY APPROACH The least-desirable, perhaps riskiest approach is for an owner to try self-chartering the airplane. “The opportunity to run afoul the FARs is enormous here,” explained an aviation attorney who had recently represented an operator investigated for supplying charters off-the-books. “The guy didn’t have a Part 135 certificate, the pilots weren’t commercially rated to fly for-hire, and the operator didn’t seem to understand that he couldn’t simply fly the airplane with others on board and get paid by them ‘under the table’ but ‘on the books’ for tax purposes. “He also didn’t seem to understand the higher maintenance requirements… fortunately, the case wasn’t strong and it went away the guy avoided the worst that could happen.” But he came close, according to the attorney, who also warned that “there are numerous people with ‘theories’ about what they say the FARs mean - but when the rubber hits the runway it’s the FAA’s interpretations that count.” Ways to run afoul of he FARs included issues of control, as well as lack of approvals, operating manuals, maintenance manuals,

114

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

crew training requirements – all of which factor in operating a commercial charter flight business. “And when an owner/operator tries to slip income into the equation while also claiming to fly under Part 91, the potential for a damaging outcome runs high. The FAA takes that kind of violation extremely seriously, and the penalties can have an impact for years beyond the actual event.” The free take-away advice of this attorney is clear. “Don’t try to play the system based on some other operator’s message or claims that he knows someone that is doing this ‘just www.AvBuyer.com

fine and making lots of money’ without ever having an issue with the FAA. Do it right from the start; work with a legitimate charter partner, aircraft management firm or a lawyer who knows what hoops you need to jump through… It’s cheaper and easier in the long run. And you just may make the money you need to keep the airplane affordable.”

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Sojourn Aviation April_Layout 1 19/03/2013 15:03 Page 1

2000 2000 Citation X Gulfstream GV $21,000,000

2000 GV 2004Gulfstream Hawker 800XP $3,950,000

2004 Hawker 800XPX 2000 Citation Call for Pricing

2010 2008 Challenger 300 G550 Gulfstream Call for Pricing

AVIATION VIATION SOLUTIONS AS GLOBAL AS YOUR BUSINESS. Capitalize on a world of opportunity with Sojourn n Aviation. Our acquisition, sales and consulting services – as u to the ideal solution. We can also help you fi finance well as a broad selection of aircraft – will guide you nance your ou broader exposure acquisition at terms that fit your needs. And our international distribution network gives you rom start to finish. whether you’re buying or selling. No matter where your travels lead, we’ll be with you from

For more aircraft listings, visit SojournAviation.com or call 316.733.6500.


JetNet April13_PAMA interview November06 19/03/2013 15:27 Page 1

JETNET >>KNOW MORE

Helicopter Market Continues To Grow by Michael Chase & Marj Rose t this year’s Heli-Expo in Las Vegas, record attendees and more than 230 sales, orders and Letters of Intent reflect an active market. In this column we will review the current climate of the Helicopter industry and update our readers on 2012 ‘New’ and ‘Pre-Owned’ transactions and market conditions.

A

NEW TURBINE/PISTON HELIS The Heli-Expo mood was upbeat and busy this year as the OEMs were very active, and displayed reasons to be optimistic. New Turbine and Piston Helicopter Shipments and Billings were reported for the first time by GAMA in February for the year 2012, compared to 2011, and are shown in Table A (top right). In total, both shipments and billings increased by 21.5% and 21% respectively in the year-over-year comparison. The singleengine turbine market showed the highest percentage growth (23.3%). However, all segments enjoyed double-digit growth percentages. Interestingly, Robinson Helicopter Company had the largest civil shipments at 517 (turbine and piston), followed closely by Eurocopter at 475, and Bell (a distant third with 247 total shipments). While this is all very favorable for the helicopter industry, GAMA’s report did not include new shipments and billings from AgustaWestland, MD and Sikorsky’s from the turbine market, nor Schweizer in the piston market. Another observation concerns Robinson’s successful introduction of the R66 - its first turbine-engined model. A five-place helicopter with increased reserve power, increased altitude performance, and a large baggage compartment as compared to its predecessor (the R44), FAA certification for the R66 was received in October 2010. In 2012 there were 191 new R66 shipments which led all ‘New’ turbine helicopter shipments, and was only three units fewer than the 194 shipments of the new R44 Raven II piston powered helicopter. These two models were the market-leaders with the most shipments of all the OEM

116

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

TABLE A Year-End Shipments of Civil Helicopters Manufactured Worldwide 2 011

2 012

C HANGE

P iston

268

328

22.4%

S ingle-Engine Turbine

407

502

23.3%

M ulti-Engine Turbine

184

214

16.3%

T otal Shipments

8 59

1 ,044

2 1.5%

$ 2.8B

$ 3.4B

2 1.0%

T otal Billings Source: GAMA

TABLE B Worldwide ‘Pre-Owned’ Helicopter Trends H elicopters

D ECEMBER

T urbine

P iston

For Sale

1,145

571

% of Fleet For Sale 2012

6.1%

6.1%

% of Fleet For Sale 2011

6.6%

6.1%

( -0.5) pt

Same

Change - % For Sale

J ANUARY to DECEMBER 2012 Full Sale Transactions Average Days on Market Avg. Asking Prices - $USD mil

1,287

931

433

350

$1.411

$226

J ANUARY to DECEMBER 2012 vs 2011 (YTD) % Change - Sale Transactions

- 1.2%

Change - Avg. Days on Market

23

37

% Change - Avg. Asking Prices

7.3%

- 0.9%

Source: Source: JETNETJETNET iQ

- 6.1%

iQ

models delivered in 2012 as reported by GAMA.

PRE-OWNED TURBINE/PISTON HELIS Table B (above) shows the Pre-Owned worldwide trends for December 2012 and YTD comparison of 2012 to 2011. The ‘For-Sale’ market for Turbine and Piston helicopters finished 2012 with the exact same percentage (6.1%). However, the number of turbine helicopters ‘For Sale’ were at 1,145, doubling the number of piston helicopters ‘For Sale’ at 571. Reviewing the number of Full Retail Sale Transactions in 2012 compared to 2011, both the turbine and piston markets declined. The pre-owned turbine helicopter market declined www.AvBuyer.com

by -1.2% (there was an increase of 7.3% in the average asking prices), and the pre-owned piston helicopter market saw a decline of -6.1% in Full Retail Sale Transactions, and -0.9% in average asking prices. Both the preowned turbine and piston helicopter markets remained on the market for a longer period of days before they sold in 2012 compared to 2011.

FULL SALE TRANSACTIONS BY MONTH The Year-to-Date analysis shows that overall the Pre-Owned turbine helicopter market declined by -1.2% in Full Retail Sale Transactions from 2012, compared to 2011. Examining each month, only February had no Aircraft Index see Page 4


JetNet April13_PAMA interview November06 19/03/2013 11:28 Page 2

JETNET >>KNOW MORE change. However, six months showed increases in 2012 month-over-month (vs 2011), and five months showed decreases (see Chart A (right)). The Year-to-Date analysis shows that overall the Pre-owned piston helicopter market declined by -6.1% in Full Retail Sale Transactions from 2012 compared with 2011. Examining each month, only four months (January, May, September and October) showed increases in 2012 month-over-month, compared against 2011 (Chart B, right).

CHART A - YEAR TO DATE ANALYSIS PRE-OWNED TURBINE HELICOPTERS Full Retail Sale Transactions -1.2%

1,303

28 6 0 Jan

2011

Mar

7

2

Apr

Feb

Jun July

May

-7

WORLDWIDE CIVIL HELICOPTER MARKET BY CONTINENT – 2012 As illustrated in Chart C (right), at year-end 2012 there were 18,228 turbine helicopters and 8,969 piston helicopters in operation. North America’s New and Pre-owned Turbine helicopters market accounts for 44% of all the Turbine helicopters and 41% of all the Piston helicopters in operation. (Here, North America includes Canada and Mexico.) Next, Europe accounted for 23% of the Worldwide total of Turbine helicopters and 25% of the Piston helicopters. Incidentally, there are more Piston helicopters in Australia/Oceania (1,372) than there are turbine helicopters – 1,080.

1,287

11 3

Sep

Aug

-12

❯ For more information: • Michael Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com • Marj Rose is president of MarketLift, Inc. and can be contacted at P.O. Box 595036 Dallas, TX 75359; Mob: 214-862-8992, Web: www.market-lift.com • JETNET can be contacted at 101 First Street, Utica, NY 13501; Tel: 800-400-2298; Web: www.jetnet.com or www.avdatainc.com * You can now follow JETNET on Twitter at www.twitter.com /JETNETLLC Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

Total

Nov

-15

-21

2012

-18 -16

YTD Change by Month Source: JETNET; Whole and Lease Transactions; Analysis and Presentation by Chase & Associates

CHART B - YEAR TO DATE ANALYSIS PRE-OWNED TURBINE HELICOPTERS Full Retail Sale Transactions -6.1% 931

991 39

SUMMARY 2012 was a success for our industry in many ways, and as we have shared with you in this article, the Pre-Owned Helicopter market continues to be very active. Now that 2013 is here and there is renewed optimism, we hope this trend for the Pre-Owned market, along with improvements in the world economy will continue to push more new helicopter purchases. For now, it continues to be a seller’s market environment, with Pre-Owned Helicopter ‘For Sale’ inventories running at around 6.1% of the worldwide fleet.

Dec Oct

4

7 June July

Feb March April 2011

Jan

-20

Nov Sept

May

-10

12

Aug Oct

-8

-11 -26

-19

Dec

Total 2012

-2 -26 -60

YTD Change by Month

Source: JETNET; Whole and Lease Transactions; Analysis and Presentation by Chase & Associates

CHART C - WORLDWIDE CIVIL HELICOPTER MARKET BY CONTINENT - 2012 Worldwide * Turbine Piston

18,228 8,969

Asia (includes Middle East ) Turbine 2,378 Piston 441

Europe Turbine 4,124 Piston 2,213

North America US,Canada & Mexico Turbine 8,020 Piston 3,655

South America Turbine 1,814 Piston 764

* In operation

Africa Turbine 812 Piston 524

Australia/Oceania Turbine 1,080 Piston 1,37 2

wholly owned / Leased (excludes fractional and shared aircraft) Source: JETNET/AvData Star Report – Based at; Presentation and Analysis by Chase & Associates

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

117


Andrew Bradley_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 10:23 Page 1

G550: THE KING IS DEAD?

Has The King Been Dethroned? Assessing the state of the Gulfstream G550 market in 2013. by Andrew C. Bradley ver the past ten years, we believe that the Gulfstream G550 has reigned supreme at the top of the Business Aviation pyramid. With the recent introduction and delivery of its successor the G650, however, the fate of Gulfstream’s G550 comes into question even as demand remains robust, with deliveries lifting off Savannah’s airport daily. “The king is dead, long live the king”? As we prepare for ABACE2013 in Shanghai during April, the success of the G550 and the Asia-Pacific region appear to have run parallel. Over the past decade, the Asia-Pacific region has emerged to play an increasingly important role in the global economy, and nowhere has this vital leadership role been more pronounced as in the Business Aviation sector. When the G550 went into production (coincidentally 10 years ago) it set new benchmarks within the Business Aviation industry which today still stand. The seemingly timeless G550 has enjoyed such a substantial, largely unchallenged run. Most models fade out long before the ten-year mark as newer technology aircraft nip at their heels - even Gulfstream’s prior industry leaders (the GV and the time-tested GIV and GIVSP) never quite made it past the ten-year mark

O

118

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

without requiring significant updates and design alterations. The significance of the G550’s commercial endurance is even more noteworthy when considered in the context of the macro-environment of the last several years. Even in the grip of the worst global financial meltdown in 80 years, the G550 hasn’t missed a beat in sales or popularity. As a matter of fact, much of this postfinancial ‘tsunami’ success is attributable to the emergence of demand in Asia-Pacific, most notably from China, which not only helped Gulfstream’s G550 weather the storm but by some economists’ calculations was instrumental in helping the world economy escape a Depression. Growth in the Pacific Rim rebounded more strongly in 2010 and 2011 than any other geographic region. From smartphones to business aircraft, strong demand from Asia, and particularly China was instrumental in keeping a fragile world economy from severe collapse.

RETAINED DEMAND The G550 and other large cabin jets saw a huge downturn in 2009, but almost as quickly as these markets plunged they rebounded. 2010 and 2011 proved to be fruitful periods for sales of G550s with very scarce pre-owned www.AvBuyer.com

inventories and mostly stable prices—especially for delivery positions. Up until very recently and to the amazement of many industry pundits who had forecast a flood of used G550s hitting the market in early 2012, the king remains untouched, with demand as brisk as ever last year. In fact, pre-owned G550 sales eclipsed all other competitors over the course of 2012, and inventories of G550s confounded the critics who called for “skyrocketing inventories”. The prevailing theme was that the G550, both preowned and new, represented exceptional value in the marketplace, handsomely supported by the sales data that appeared to leave all other high-end aircraft in the dust. In the fourth quarter of 2012, four G550s traded when most competitors showed few, or no trades. The G550s enduring recent success is inextricably linked to the rise of Asia, specifically China. The characteristics of the Chinese buyer are unique in Business Aviation, largely due to the impressive explosion of massive wealth creation that defies comparison in the modern day world. This sudden, yet exceedingly powerful wealth effect precipitated the need (and desire) for business aircraft for powerful first-time owners of corporations, Aircraft Index see Page 4


Andrew Bradley_Gil WolinNov06 19/03/2013 15:21 Page 2

G550: THE KING IS DEAD?

LARGE CABIN INVENTORY 12 MONTHTRENDS TRENDS LARGE CABIN INVENTORY - 12 –MONTH

Mar 12

Aug 12

Dec 12

Mar 13

X RS 9 10 11 14 14 14 15 14 16 17 17 19 19

G 5000 8 8 8 10 11 12 15 19 18 19 17 19 21

G EX 17 16 17 18 18 18 19 21 23 23 21 24 25

7X 7 8 9 9 11 11 10 13 13 12 14 12 14

GV 13 16 18 17 17 17 18 18 20 20 19 19 20

G 450 8 9 9 10 10 10 11 12 12 15 15 16 17

B BJ 15 16 16 18 17 19 19 16 14 16 16 16 16

G 550 16 15 13 11 10 11 9 7 7 14 14 18 19

30

XRS

25

G5000

20

GEX 7X

15

GV 10

G450 BBJ

5

G550

0 March 2012

Aug. 2012

Dec. 2012

March 2013

SOURCE - JETNET

government officials and heads of state, along with ultra-wealthy private individuals. The prevailing theme among all OEMs regarding China and other Asian countries remains the same: They want new, large-cabin jets - and Gulfstream is very much in demand. The numbers are staggering. Nearly 75% of the 300+ business jets sold into China over the past few years were large cabin jets. Gulfstream’s G550 paved the way, outselling competitors by nearly five-to-one and commanding nearly two thirds overall marketshare in China. Last year, twenty-three G550s were added to China’s young fleet during what clearly represented a slowdown in China from the fevered pitch of 2011. The growth in business jets exceeded 40% for 2012 with large cabin jets up nearly 90%. Gulfstream and its G550 all but dominate this region.

TRICKLE-DOWN EFFECT With regard to the unique characteristics of the Asian market, I can vividly remember in early 2010 inquiries from Chinese buyers who would only consider a new G550. When the order backlog with Gulfstream started to swell due to this demand, buyers relented and loosened their requirement for “new”, reaching across to “nearly-new” G550s (1-2 years old with less than 500 hours operating time). To these buyers, a 2005 model G550 with 1,500 hours might as well have been a 1980s vintage-era GIII with 11,000 hours. Slowly as inventory of late-models dried up, those views again relaxed slightly, albeit begrudgingly – and so did the requirement for a Gulfstream as other OEMs made their inroads. The G550s and G450s had significantly saturated demand in China and Asia, however.

THE KING IS DEAD? The two most pressing questions over the past year have centered on the expected flood of G550s that never came to market, and the ‘cannibalization’ of the existing G550s sales from prospects, many of whom plan to move up to the G650. Both concerns have proven inaccurate. As Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

already outlined above, the “flood” of G550s never materialized last year; with inventories going so far as to contract by over 50% midyear 2012 while many other large cabin jets stagnated or doubled in supply. Part of the reason for the initial concern was the inaccurate, yet widely-held belief that the majority of the G650 order book was comprised of current G550 owners. As a matter of fact, many of the initial G650 deliveries slated for this year have gone to Bombardier operators, and all-told nearly 60% of Gulfstream’s G650 order book is comprised of current Bombardier operators. There has now been a nearly 100% rise in Global XRS, Global 5000, Falcon 7X, and G450 aircraft inventory over the past twelve months and a near-50% increase in inventory for “classic” Global Expresses that have seen prices drop nearly 25% over the past six months. Slowly, but surely, some G550s have indeed trickled onto the market - but thus far the anticipated torrent has not materialized, and frankly any G550 inventory growth in the past quarter or two appears to be driven more by a dearth of buyers in any market segment rather than the expected G650 delivery effect. It will eventually take hold but the effect has been delayed. The debate about G650 cannibalization of G550s has not been truly answered yet. It’s simply too early to know and there’s not enough data to anticipate the extent of client/mission overlap. I would argue the stringent “non-assignability” clauses implemented to prevent G650 positions being bidup before they deliver; the large price delta between the two models; and the four-year wait for a new position should collectively conspire to minimize cannibalization of G550 sales for the time being. It may very well emerge that G650 sales spur sales of more G550s. Gulfstream can offer a prospective client a new G550 as interim lift until their G650 delivers in four years’ time. Further, in a time of extreme financial constraints and shareholder focus, a $10 million or $15 million premium is a large stretch to gain added cabin space, increased speed, slightly newer technology and 250 nautical www.AvBuyer.com

miles additional range. And once used G650s hit the market, that delta could swell to $20 million between a new G550 and ‘nearly-new’ G650. These days, flight departments must rationalize every dollar spent.

HUNGER SATISFIED? Getting back to Asia’s—particularly China’s— appetite for the G550 model, 2012 proved to be a challenging year as many Asian countries’ pace of economic expansion dropped off significantly. China’s GDP slowed from nearly 10% annually in 2010 to around 7% last year, and many economists peg the unofficial growth number below 7%. While struggling western economies envy such numbers, for China this represented a significant setback and sparked some fears of a bubble collapse. Sales of Gulfstream in China duly lagged last year, especially G550s, but recent data out of China this month suggest a recovery in economic growth may be brewing. Almost simultaneously with these reports, I’ve personally watched re-emerging interest from the Pacific Rim. While sales of G550s hit a speed bump in China during 2012, sales of the model picked up significantly in the United States – true testimony to the diversity of the model. Today, early model G550s can now be purchased for around $30 million, with latemodel G550s trading just above $40 million. In my opinion, nothing else at these price levels can compete. So while today’s reigning king may be on the verge of ceding the throne to the next generation G650, right now, the G550 remains regal, undiminished and far from dead. ❯ Andrew C. Bradley is senior vice president, Global Sales & Acquisitions at Avjet Corporation, an international provider of aircraft charter and management solutions. The company is headquartered in Burbank, California, and maintains a global presence in Washington D.C., Seoul, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Moscow and other locations around the globe. To learn more about the company, visit www.avjet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

119


DEDICATED TO HELPING BUSINESS ACHIEVE ITS HIGHEST GOALS.

2013

business aviation regional forums

Thursday, February 28 AirFlite Long Beach, CA Thursday, June 6 Panorama Flying Service White Plains, NY Thursday, July 11 TAC Air Denver, CO Thursday, September 12 Landmark Aviation Chicago/Waukegan, IL

Static Display, Exhibits and Education Sessions – One Day Only, In Your Backyard! www.nbaa.org/forums NBAA FORUMS/WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES.indd 1

12/18/12 12:34 PM


JetBlack April 19/03/2013 15:11 Page 1

Listed. Sold. Aircraft Sales, Acquisitions, Consulting, Leasing

AT JETBLACK AVIATION RXUEXVLQHVVLVEULQJLQJTXDOLÀHGEX\HUVDQGVHOOHUVWRJHWKHU,WUHTXLUHV UHDOWLPHGDWDLQGXVWU\NQRZOHGJHLQVLJKWIXOWLPLQJDQGWKHULJKWFRQQHFWLRQV:KHQDOOVDLG DQGGRQHLW·VDQH[KLODUDWLQJH[SHULHQFH)RURXUExclusive ListingsZHSURYLGHcutting edge ZRUOGZLGHPDUNHWLQJH[SRVXUH

SARASOTA 941.201.1211 | LOS ANGELES 909.342.6203 info@jetblackaviation.com

www.jetblackaviation.com


BUSINESS AVIATION –– MAKING THE DIFFERENCE IN EUROPE Nearly 500 Exhibits • 60 Aircraft on Static Display • Over 12,000 Attendees

TUESDAY, MAY 21; WEDNESDAY, MAY 22; & THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 Palexpo and Geneva International Airport Geneva, Switzerland

www.ebace.aero


P123_JMesingerNov06 20/03/2013 13:28 Page 1

Tel: +34 (0) 618 637 666 Email: jmespinosa@aeromarformula.com www.aeromarformula.com

Bombardier Global Express

Not just a tug.

MAKE OFFER

S/N: 9016. Reg: EC-KVU. EU-OPS1, Part 21, and Eurocontrol. Airworthiness Review Certificate issued by ES.MG.070.RA.001, next due December 04th 2012. TAG Aviation España has capability to issue the ARC of any Bombardier Global Express. Aircraft not involved in operational incidents or major repairs. Honeywell Primus 2000 6-Tube. Triple IC-800 Integrated Avionics Computers. Triple NZ-2000 FMS. DL-950 Data Loader. SELLER MOTIVATED

2006 Gulfstream G-100

MAKE OFFER S/N: 158. Low timed aircraft in the market. Latest G100 manufactured. Dedicated maintenance programs Engines & APU. Honeywell 5-tube EFIS. Full dual & triple Collins Avionics. 8 passengers immaculate factory interior. Iridium ICS 200 Satcom. Carefully maintained by Jet Aviation Hannover. RVSM & MNPS Compliant. EASA EU Ops1 Certified SELLER MOTIVATED

Bombardier Express XRS

MAKE OFFER S/N: 9208. Reg: EC-XXX. TTAF: 1,750.50 Date of Completion: June 2007, TTSN: 1.758:50 Hrs, Landings: 731, Fresh 1A; 2A; 1C; 2C & 4C (May 2012), Both ETSN: 1.758:50 Hrs, Both ECSN: 731 Cy. Rolls Royce Corporate Care Enrolled, APU TSN: 1.769 Hrs, CSN: 1.735 Cycles, Honeywell MSP Enrolled, Fresh 500 hrs. inspection (May 2012) Thales-Sextant Head-Up Display System, Bombardier 2nd gen. Enhanced Vision System as per SB 700-34-002/700-34, Six exterior video cameras connected to Airshow Securaplane 500 Option SELLER MOTIVATED

8800 Series

It’s a

.

800-535-8767 / 503-861-2288 w w w. l e k t r o. co m / s a l e s @ l e k t r o. co m

THE WORLD’S FINEST

Business Jets, Turboprops and Helicopters for sale at

www.AvBuyer.com and lots more... Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

123


MarketIndicators Feb13_Layout 1 19/03/2013 15:12 Page 1

Market Indicators JETNET View JETNET has released January 2013 results for the pre-owned business jet, business turboprop, and helicopter markets. Highlighted in the table (opposite) are the ‘For Sale’ worldwide trends across all aircraft market segments. Comparing January 2013 to January 2012 all market sector percentages of fleet ‘For Sale’ were down in the January comparisons, except piston helicopters. Business turboprops moved still lower, well below the 10% mark, clearly moving it into a seller’s market. Business jets are the only market sector showing greater than a 10% ‘For Sale’ percentage. In January 2013: • The business jet sector decreased by 1.8% - only the second time since January 2009 that it showed a decline in full retail sale transactions (Chart A). • The business turboprop sector was the only one to show an increase (5.7%) in January 2013 compared to 2012 (Chart B). • Compared to January 2012, Turbine Helicopter full retail sale transactions fell from 100 to 67, or 33%. This is the lowest number of transactions since January 2007 (Chart C). • Full Retail Sale Transactions for piston helicopters also showed its largest decline since 2007 in the number of transactions, to 51 (Chart D).

WORLDWIDE TRENDS JANUARY

Business Aircraft

Helicopters

Jets

Turbos

Turbine

Piston

Fleet % For Sale 2013

13.2%

7.9%

6.1%

6.1%

Fleet % For Sale 2012

13.7%

9.3%

6.4%

6.0%

% Change For Sale

(-0.5) pt (-1.4) pt

(-0.3) pt

(0.1) pt

CHART A - JANUARY TRANSACTIONS

CHART B - JANUARY TRANSACTIONS

CHART C - JANUARY TRANSACTIONS

CHART D - JANUARY TRANSACTIONS

Market Indicators - April 2013

/ More from www.jetnet.com

Foley View tion analyst Brian Foley. “That is, until they take the defense component of the rotorcraft market into consideration. By adding the value of military helicopters, a diversification that corporate jets by and large don’t have, the yearly delivery value of rotorcraft is comparable to business jets. From this perspective, helicopters are just as economically relevant. “With business jets there are really only

Market Indicators - April 2013 124

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

two primary buyers; corporations and individuals. Civil rotorcraft share that same customer base, but with the added benefit of other buyer segments such as Emergency Medical Services (EMS), police, utility, Search and Rescue (SAR) and offshore oil-and-gas. As a bonus to manufacturers, the same helicopter platform that’s used as a heavily armed scout for the Army can be cross-marketed to the civil side in EMS configuration.” / More from www.brifo.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Business jets seem to get all the headlines. After all, they accounted for close to $18 billion of the $22 billion total value of GA deliveries last year. By contrast, civil rotorcraft came in a distant second contributing $3 billion. Fixed-wing turboprops and pistons made up the remaining sliver. “This may lead some to conclude that helicopters are less significant than business jets in the overall scheme of things,” noted avia-


Project1_Layout 1 20/03/2013 14:07 Page 1


MarketIndicators Feb13_Layout 1 19/03/2013 15:13 Page 2

2

Market Indicators

ARGUS View TRAQPak data shows that February 2013 flight activity levels decreased from January, finishing the month down 2.3% overall. The results by operational category were mostly negative with the exception of fractional activity (up 0.8%) over January. Aircraft category results were also negative for the month with the exception of large cabin aircraft

posting the only month-over-month increase, up 2.8%. Reviewing year-over-year activity (February 2013 vs. February 2012), TRAQPak data indicates an overall decrease of 4.4%. Adjusting the total to account for the 2012 leapyear, TRAQPak saw an overall decrease of 1.0%.

YEAR-OVER-YEAR RESULTS

MONTH-OVER-MONTH RESULTS OPERATIONAL CATEGORIES

0.8%

OPERATIONAL CATEGORIES

AIRCRAFT CATEGORIES UP

UP • Fractional

Results by operational category were mostly negative for the period with the exception of Part 135 activity which posted a year-over-year increase of 5.5%. Looking at the activity by aircraft category, the turboprop segment posted the largest year-overyear decrease, down 9.3%.

• Large Cabin

2.8%

• Part 135

5.5%

DOWN

DOWN

AIRCRAFT CATEGORIES UP

UP • Large Cabin

DOWN

DOWN

• Part 91

1.7%

• Turboprops

5.3%

• Part 91

• Part 135

4.5%

• Small Cabin

1.9%

• Fractional

• Mid-size

1.5%

2.4%

8.0%

• Turboprops

9.3%

10.4%

• Small Cabin

1.7%

• Mid-size

4.1%

/ More from www.argus.aero

Market Indicators - April 2013

JP Morgan View pick-up in orders this year (which, combined with deliveries of new aircraft types, could make 2014 the first year of material delivery growth since 2008.) Used inventories fell 20 bps in January 2013. Used inventory of in-production models was 10.3%, showing some improvement but remaining within the 10.2-10.8% range exhibited throughout 2012. Heavy jet inventories fell 30 bps (a welcome development after the sharp upward trend exhibited in 2H12). Bombardier Challenger 600s may be starting to look better, while inventories of Globals remain near their highs. Medium jets rose 30 bps and Light jets fell 40 bps. “Toddler and pre-K” fleet inventories (0-5 years) fell 20 bps to an estimated 7.7% in December – high, but also the first decline since April 2012. Average asking price declined 2.7% in

/ More from www.jpmorgan.com

Market Indicators - April 2013 126

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

January 2013. After signs of stabilization in 2012, used prices continue to trend down, dropping below $10m on average, a new low in this cycle after remaining in the mid-$10m range for much of last year. Year-over-Year, average asking prices fell 9%. Heavy jet prices fell 4.2% sequentially and Light jet prices fell 0.5%, while Medium jet prices held up, with a 0.6% gain. US flight ops were flattish in December 2012 after showing signs of modest improvement in October and November. For all of 2012, US flight ops grew less than 1%. Sustained improvement should require a more definitive pick-up in activity. European flight ops remain under pressure, starting off the year with a 2.6% year-overyear decline in January 2013 following a 3.4% decline for all of 2012.

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

JP Morgan reports mixed data points so far from 2012 Q4 earnings. Demand remains depressed, but there have been a few bright spots in Q4 results and 2013 guidance. ERJ guided to 25-30 large aircraft deliveries this year, representing solid improvement off a slightly better than expected end to 2012. Bombardier’s Q4 bookto-bill of 1.13x (excluding VistaJet) was another positive sign, and JP Morgan expected more colour with Q4 earnings. Not all Q4 news has been positive. Gulfstream’s backlog declined, and Cessna results were largely in line, while a pick-up in Cessna’s deliveries this year is dependent upon the pace of orders. Used market developments were mixed, flight ops growth remains anaemic, and JP Morgan characterizes overall commentary as cautious, although it still sees potential for a


Heliasset_FullPage-205x270_WAS0313_print.pdf

1

19/03/13

14:56


MarketIndicators Feb13_Layout 1 19/03/2013 15:16 Page 3

3

Market Indicators

Honeywell View The recently released Honeywell deliveries forecast of new civilian-use helicopters increases from 4,900 to 5,600 over the fiveyear period, 2013 to 2017, and shows improved purchase plans for new helicopters in every region of the world. Overall purchase plans for new helicopters for this three-year timeframe are 35 percent higher than last year’s survey. Global five-year demand for new turbine-powered helicopters is split almost 5050 between the Americas and the rest of the world. Latin America and Asia continue to have the highest fleet replacement and expansion expectations among the regions. Drivers for new purchase expectations were aircraft age and condition, contractual requirements, change in operational requirements, expiring warranties, and regulations requiring Twin engines. Light Single-Engine helicopters continue to be the most popular product class for five-year

fleet replacement and expansion. The most frequently mentioned light-single models were Eurocopter EC130/AS350 series, Bell 407 and Robinson R66. Intermediate/Medium Twin-Engine helicopters tied for the second most popular product class mentioned for purchase during the next five years, holding roughly the same market share as in the 2012 Outlook. The Light Twin-Engine helicopter class also garnered 25 percent total operator purchase plans in the 2013 survey. Overall, Heavy Multi-Engine helicopters declined slightly from 2012 levels. This class of helicopter typically garners a small share of overall purchase plans due to the cost and specialized nature of the aircraft. The vast majority of global civil helicopter mentions were concentrated in products manufactured by three OEMs including Eurocopter, Bell Helicopter and AgustaWestland.

Market Indicators - April 2013

.

/ More from www.honeywell.com

FAA View The FAA General Aviation activity forecasts spans the years between 2013 and 2033, and some of its findings indicate that the active GA fleet is projected to increase at an average annual rate of 0.5 percent over the 21-year forecast period, growing from an estimated 220,670 in 2012 to 246,375 aircraft by 2033. The more expensive and sophisticated turbine-powered fleet (including rotorcraft) is projected to grow at an average of 2.8 percent a year over the forecast period, with the turbine jet portion increasing at 3.5 percent a

year, reaching a total of 24,620 by 2033. The number of active piston-powered aircraft (including rotorcraft) is projected to decrease from the 2010 total of 159,007 to 146,615 through 2028, with declines in both single and multi-engine fixed-wing aircraft, but with the smaller category of piston-powered rotorcraft growing. Beyond 2028, new deliveries are expected to exceed retirements, and so active piston-powered aircraft should increase to 148,660 by 2033. Hours flown by turbine aircraft (including

Market Indicators - April 2013

rotorcraft) are forecast to increase 3.3 percent yearly over the forecast period, compared with a slight decline of 0.2 percent for pistonpowered aircraft. Jet aircraft are forecast to account for most of the increase, with hours flown increasing at an average annual rate of 4.3 percent over the forecast period. The large increases in jet hours result mainly from the increasing size of the business jet fleet, along with a measured recovery in utilization rates from recession induced record lows.

/ More from www.FAA.gov

WINGX View According to WINGX’s latest monthly Business Aviation Monitor, European Business Aviation flight departures in February 2013 declined 0.1% year-on-year (YOY) marking the 11th consecutive monthly YOY decline and extending the sector’s double dip recession since 2011. However, the decline was smaller than in previous months, and in terms of hours flown, February showed a

YOY improvement in activity. The major negative was France, where demand fell 4% YOY. The positive elements came from exceptional growth in Ukraine and Turkey, strong growth in Scandinavia, and solid growth in Germany and the UK, compared to February 2012. Ultra Long Range jets extended their run of 14 consecutive months of YOY growth in

/ More from www.wingx-advance.com

Market Indicators - April 2013 128

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

activity - notably, charter flights which grew 19% YOY. Comparing Europe to the US with one month’s hindsight, WINGX illustrates the former’s January 1.4% decline and the latter´s 1.7% growth in terms of much better performance in the VLJ, super-mid and super-light jet segments in the US.

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BUSINESS AVIATION ON FULL DISPLAY IN SHANGHAI — MAKE PLANS TO BE THERE ■

MORE THAN 150 EXHIBITORS ■

OVER 6,500 ATTENDEES

OVER 30 AIRCRAFT ON STATIC DISPLAY

REPRESENTATION BY ALL MAJOR AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURERS EDUCATION SESSIONS FOCUSING ON SAFETY AND OWNING, OPERATING AND MAINTAINING BUSINESS AIRCRAFT

PARTICIPATION BY HIGH-LEVEL GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS FROM FROM CHINA AND THE U.S.

Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport at Shanghai Hawker Pacific Business Aviation Service Centre In Partnership With Shanghai Airport Authority (SAA) and Co-hosted by NBAA, the Asian Business Aviation Association (AsBAA) and the Shanghai Exhibition Centre (SEC)

WWW.ABACE.AERO


BusAviationNewsApril12_Layout 1 19/03/2013 15:09 Page 1

BizAv Round-Up

04.13

NEWS IN BRIEF AgustaWestland has appointed Rotortrade Services Pte Ltd., as its exclusive distributor for used Helicopters Worldwide, further expanding the range of distributorship agreements AgustaWestland has in place globally. Headquartered in Singapore, Rotortrade Services is a global helicopter brokerage, working closely with all the major manufacturers and vendors, and specializing solely in helicopters. / More from www.agustawestland.com

Cessna’s New Citation Sovereign, rolled

/ More from www.cessna.com

DAHER-SOCATA’s 2013 version of its TBM 850 Elite was unveiled recently for customers in the United States. Compared to last year’s model, a cockpit enhancement involving the integration of L-3 Avionics’ Trilogy ESI-2000 Electronic Standby Instrument (ESI) replaces the previous electro-mechanical instrument version. The advanced solid-state Trilogy ESI-2000 has an internal battery and easy-to-read 4 X 3inch active matrix liquid crystal display. Additional safety options in the Elite package are a GPS-linked emergency locator transmitter, and a pulsed light system that alternately flashes the landing, taxi and recognition lights 45 times-per-minute to increase the aircraft’s visibility. / More from www.tbm850.com

Flying Colours Corp continues to bol-

FALCON 2000 ANNIVERSARY 20 YEARS AND SIX VERSIONS ALONG THE ROAD...  The first flight of the ground breaking Dassault Falcon 2000 business jet took place in March 1993 in BordeauxMérignac (France). Since its certification, Dassault has delivered nearly 500 Falcon 2000s worldwide and the global fleet has achieved close to two million flying hours, making it one of the world’s most popular and widely used busi-

will have delivered a total of 15 Challenger 850s to China. All of the aircraft headed for China were delivered to corporate owners or private high-net-worth individuals who have placed them with members of the growing Asia-based aircraft management fraternity. / More from www.flyingcolourscorp.com

ster its position in the Asian market. Since ABACE 2012 it has delivered a further four Bombardier Challenger 850s to the region and has a further five of the same model in the pipeline with completion and delivery to China planned within the next twelve months. In addition, the company has completed two major refurbishments of Global Express models for Chinese-based clients in the last year. By year-end Flying Colours 130

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

ness jets in operation. The original Falcon 2000 was the first business jet in the world to be designed using a fully digital mock-up, its range was a perfect fit for the U.S. ‘coast-tocoast’ market. Since the original design, there have been six versions of the Falcon 2000, including the 2000LXS introduced last October, which inherits the same

qualities as its siblings, including outstanding performance and efficiency, cutting edge technology and exceptional flexibility. According to Dassault, no other aircraft in the 4,000nm range segment can offer the same combination of airport performance, cabin size and efficiency. / More information from www.dassaultfalcon.com

Global Aerospace announced last month that its cumulative financial investment in aviation safety programs since 2010 now totals more than $1.5 million. The company has long been a leading player in the insurance industry in supporting aviation safety initiatives - many funded on behalf of its clients as well as for the aviation industry at large. The company’s financial investment and educational support of aviation safety is administered primarily through two programs - the Vista Elite Program for qualifying Global Aerospace customers and the SM4 Safety Program, offered to the entire aviation community. / More from www.global-aero.com

www.AvBuyer.com

off the production line last month. The aircraft, announced at the National Business Aviation Association show in Orlando last year, is one of six new Cessna aircraft expected to hit the market this year. The Citation Sovereign has been in service since 2004, featuring one of the longest cabins for its class and has a typical seating configuration for nine passengers. Type certification and entry into service for the New Citation Sovereign is slated for the third quarter 2013.

Aircraft Index see Page 4


JetNet April_Layout 1 19/03/2013 15:24 Page 1

[ unearth ]

The W World orld o Leader in Aviation Aviattion Market Intelligence | 800.553.8638 800.553.86338 | +1.315.797.4420 | jetnet.com VISIT VISI IT THE JJETNET ET N ET EXHIBIT EX XHIBIT A AT T THE ABA ABACE ACE C CONVENTION, O NV V E N TIO N , APRIL 16-18 IIN NS SHANGHAI, HA N GHAI, C CHINA, HI N A A, BOOTH #H214


BusAviationNewsApril12_Layout 1 19/03/2013 11:37 Page 2

2

BizAv Round-Up Gulfstream’s G650 recently set another city-pair speed record, this time between Melbourne and Abu Dhabi, becoming the flagship aircraft’s sixth potential record this year. Carrying five crew and two passengers the G650 landed 13 hours and 5 minutes later at Abu Dhabi Al Bateen Executive Airport. The G650 cruised at an average speed of Mach 0.87 for the 6,329nm flight. / More from www.gulfstream.com

Heli-Expo closed last month with record numbers of attendees, exhibit space and exhibitors, according to Helicopter Association International. There were 736 exhibitors, occupying nearly one million square feet at the Las Vegas Convention Center. Heli-Expo 2013 also saw 20,105 attendees walk through the doors, marking the sixth consecutive year of growth in attendance. / More from www.rotor.com

Jet Support Services, Inc. (JSSI) will conduct the annual Aircraft Education Seminar for business aircraft during the 42nd National Aircraft Finance Association’s (NAFA) Conference (April 24-26) in Miami, Florida. JSSI will provide an in-depth look at critical maintenance issues for both airframe and engines and how they directly affect valuation. The program will include topics such as hard-time verses on-condition, low-utilization inspections, chapter five and customized maintenance inspection programs. Potential problems caused by low utilization will be identified, and the types of corrosion found on airframes and engines as a result. Louis C. Seno will preside over the seminar.

NEXTANT 400XT FOR SWITZERLAND TAG AVIATION TO OPERATE REMANUFACTURED AIRPLANE  Nextant Aerospace has marked the delivery of its first aircraft into the Swiss market, and its third into Europe. The aircraft will be operated by TAG Aviation. Since its launch in 2007, the Nextant Aerospace value proposition has proven hugely attractive to the market and the company has secured sales of over $100 million since late 2011. It currently has a sales backlog valued in excess of $175 million. The Nextant 400XT boasts an impressive

2,003 nautical mile (3,709 km) range, which means customers can fly from Geneva to nearly anywhere in Europe or North Africa without refueling. With brand new engines, avionics, wiring, interiors and improved aerodynamics, the aircraft sells for roughly half the price of comparative new aircraft with 30% lower operating costs. The remanufacturing process for the Nextant 400XT results in a fundamentally new aircraft at a price point closer to that

of a pre-owned aircraft, creating the pre-eminent value proposition for purchasers of light jets. Customers have control of the interior completion of their 400XT, and are able to visit Nextant’s stateof-the-art design center to collaborate on every detail. Nextant also offers a two-year, full aircraft warranty on the 400XT that is assured to be honored by its constantly expanding global product support network. / More information from www.nextantaerospace.com

/ More from www.nafa.aero

of 100% of the share capital of FlairJet Ltd, the London Oxford Airport-based aircraft management and charter company. Effective immediately, FlairJet will become part of the Group’s newly formed Aviation Services business unit and will continue to be led by Managing Director and founder, David Fletcher. / More from www.marshalladg.com or www.flair-jet.com

Pilatus Aircraft has added Million Air Houston and Grand Rapids, Micigan-based Northern Air to its roster of authorized service facilities for the PC-12 business turboprop. Million Air Houston will operate as a Satellite Service Center under the sales and service region managed by Tempus Aircraft Sales and Service. / More from www.pilatus-aircraft.com

The Jet Collection is stretching its wings with office openings in Dallas, Tampa and San Francisco, with more openings planned (including several abroad). The Jet Collection’s Dallas office will be headed up by J. Michael Zabkar, Jr., a seasoned Business Aviation executive. David Stone will run the Tampa office, and will focus on helicopter sales, as well as corporate jets and turboprops. The San Francisco office will be led by Bruce Shinneman.

DAVID FLETCHER, FLAIRJET

132

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

Tastefully Yours has launched a range of Short-Flight Catering Boxes in response to the changing demands of executive passengers and crew. The new service offers lighter fare and smaller servings that require no onboard preparation or reheating, and that can be served in a single, specifically designed box. Each menu choice has been planned by award winning Atlanta Chef Dominique Fallings in conjunction with the Tastefully Yours dedicated in-house nutritionist Heather Hibben. / More from www.ty-catering.com

Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group – recently announced the acquisition

/ More from www.thejetcollection.com

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


BusAviationNewsApril12_Layout 1 19/03/2013 11:38 Page 3

3

BizAv Arrivals & Events

Steve Jones - takes on a broader role at Marshall Aerospace as the newly-appointed managing director of a new all-encompassing Aviation Services unit which brings together the management of Cambridge Airport, Business Aviation and the newly-launched ‘one call, one team’ JETability business. Philippe Liénard - has been elected chairman, Central European Guillaume Faury

Steve Jones

Philippe Liénard

Colin Mahoney

Jeffrey Carrithers - president and CEO of Globalair.com has been appointed to the board of the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education (KIAE). The KIAE program caters to high-school students who wish to pursue careers in the aviation industry.

Private Aviation for 2013. Liénard, who took up the position in March, continues the annual rotation of the chairmanship, with Brendan Lodge of JetBrokers Europe staying on as deputy chairman.

Colin Mahoney - has succeeded Greg Churchill, as executive vice president, International and Service Solutions, at Rockwell Collins. Churchill retired at the end of March after more than 30 years of service with the company. Mahoney, 47, joined Rockwell Collins in 1987. A native of the United Kingdom, he previously served as vice president of sales, marketing and support in Commercial Systems.

Guillaume Faury – replaces Lutz Bertling as CEO of Eurocopter. Faury joins Eurocopter from Peugeot S.A., where he has served as executive vice president for Research & Development. Bertling is joining Bombardier’s rail car division as CEO and will be based in Germany.

Jason Weiss – is the new vice president of operations at Flexjet. Weiss replaces David Gross, who is retiring after 13 years in the role.

Craig Fuller - AOPA President has notified the Board of Trustees

Sandy Wirtz – NBAA’s director of seminars retired last month. NBAA has not yet named her successor.

of his intent to step down from his position and from the board. He plans to remain in his current role until a successor is ready to assume the position.

Steve Zinda – has been promoted to the position of vice president, Sales, Marketing & Customer Service at Quest Aircraft.

BizAv Events 2013 NARA SPRING MEETING NBAA: EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING WORKSHOP AIRCRAFT INTERIORS EXPO SUN ‘N FUN FLY-IN NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION SAFETY SEMINAR BALTIC BUSINESS AVIATION SINGAPORE PRIVATE A/C CONFERENCE & EXPO BOMBARDIER SAFETY STANDDOWN ABACE: ASIAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONF. & EX. AEROEXPO 2013 NAFA: (NATIONAL AIRCRAFT FINANCE ASSOC. CONFERENCE AERO FRIEDRICHSHAFEN AEA (AIRCRAFT ELECTRONICS ASSOCIATION MEETING) NBAA: MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION TAXES SEMINAR REG AIRLINE ASSOC., CONVENTION & TRADE SHOW EUROPEAN HELICOPTER SHOW EXPLORING AIRCRAFT OPERATING COSTS SEMINAR HELIRUSSIA 2013 EBACE: (EUROPEAN BUSINESS AVIATION CONVENTION) AIRCRAFT REPOSSESSION CONFERENCE AEROEXPO UK NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION REGIONAL FORUM Events in RED indicate Business Aviation related.

Apr 3 - 5 Apr 8 - 9 Apr 9 – 11 Apr 9 – 14 Apr 10 – 11 Apr 11 Apr 16 - 17 Apr 15 Apr 16 – 18 Apr 18 – 20 Apr 24 - 26 Apr 24 – 27 Apr 29 - 30 Apr 30 – May 2 May 3 May 6 - 9 May 9 – 11 May 14 - 15 May 16 – 18 May 21 – 23 May 31 May 31 – Jun 2 Jun 6

Amelia Island, FL, USA Montreal, Canada Hamburg, Germany Lakeland, FL, USA Montreal, Canada Tallinn, Estonia Singapore Shanghai, China Shanghai, China Toluca, Mexico Miami Beach, FL, USA Friedrichshafen, Germany Munich, Germany Fort Worth, TX, USA Washington, DC, USA Montreal, Canada Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Dallas, TX, USA Crocus Expo Moscow, Russia Geneva, Switzerland London, UK Sywell, Northants, UK White Plains, NY, USA

/ / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

www.nara-dealers.com www.nbaa.org www.reedexpo.co.uk www.sun-n-fun.org www.nbaa.org www.aeropodium.com www.miuevents.com www.safetystanddown.com www.abace.aero www.aeroexpo.com.mx www.nafa.aero www.aero-expo.com.de www.aea.net www.nbaa.org www.nbaa.org www.raa.org www.eurohelishow.com www.conklindd.com www.helirussia.ru www.nbaa.org/www.ebace.aero www.aeropodium.com www.expo.aero/uk www.nbaa.org

If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com

COMPARE AIRCRAFT FOR SALE USING OUR

Aircraft Comparative Facility at www.AvBuyer.com Whilst selecting from the World’s finest Business Jets, Turboprops and Turbine Helicopters for sale 134

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Jet Alliance International April 20/03/2013 10:59 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Make Offer 2007 Gulfstream G550 Serial Number: Airframe TT: Landings:

5129 1920 682

• One owner since new • Always operated privately • Maintained by Gulfstream since new • Very low times and cycles

Engine Type BMW ROLLS-ROYCE ENGINES BR710C411. Serial Numbers 15360 and 15361 LEFT RIGHT Time Since New 1920 1920 Time to overhaul On Condition On Condition Avionics Honeywell Planeview Avionics Suite Four Honeywell DU-1310 Flat Panel Units Two Honeywell DC-884 Display controllers One Honeywell DP-884 Display Brightness Panel One Honeywell Visual Guidance System Three Honeywell MAU-913 Modular Avionics Units Three Honeywell AZ-200 Air Data Modules One Honeywell WU-880 Weather Radar Three Honeywell IR-500 LASEREF V Three Honeywell AV-900 Audio Panels One Honeywell GP-500 Flight Guidance Panel Three Honeywell MC-850 Multi Function Control Display Units One Honeywell MT-860 Third Nav/Com Cabinet Two Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters One L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder

One L3 Flight Data Recorder (88 parameters) Two Davtron Digital Clocks Additional Equipment Enhanced Sound Proofing Full FANS 1 / A Complient 3 external camera system Cert F (Basic) + CPDLC EASA OPS 1 / Part 135 ready Airshow 4000 Interior Cabin Layout: Fwd Cabin: Four Single Club Seats Mid Cabin: Four Pax Conference Group, opposite a Credenza Aft Cabin: Two Berthable Four Place Divans with Aft Cabin veneer bulkhead Galley and Lavatory: Aft Galley. Aft Lavatory This 16 passenger, Part-135 compliant interior features a Forward Crew rest area and crew lavatory and an Aft service galley and galley annex The forward cabin has 4 single executive chairs with integral headrests and footrests. The mid cabin area features a Four place Conference group (with berthable double bed) opposite a cherry wood credenza. Behind a veneer bulkhead, the aft cabin has two four place divans both of which are berthable, providing for a private sleeping area. The aft and mid cabin areas meet the requirements for Part-135 compliance. The passenger lavatory is aft. Exterior The exterior was completely stripped and repainted in February 2013 and is overall Jet Alliance International 2 Rue Honoré Labande 98000 Monaco

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

White with Burgundy and Silver stripes along the fuselage and tail. A protective Teflon coating has been applied. Tel: +377 93 25 36 03 Fax: +377 93 50 02 90 www.jetallianceinternational.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

135


Florida Jet Falcon 900B April 19/03/2013 15:50 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1995 Falcon 900B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

140 N140FJ 6628.7 3078

Engines & APU Garrett TFE 731-5BR-1C Engines enrolled on MSP Gold with DEEC’s Engine 1: Engine 2: Engine 3: S/N: P101218 P101222 P101220 Hours: 6508 5938 6508 Cycles 2998 2736 2998 APU Garrett GTCP 36-150F S/N: P257 Hours: 3370 TT MSP Avionics Autopilot Dual Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS Comm Triple Collins VHF22C with 8.33 spacing Navs Dual Collins VIR 32 with FM immunity ADF Dual Collins ADF 60 DME Dual Collins DME 42 Transponder Dual Collins TDR 94D w/mode S & Enhanced Flight ID HF Dual King KHF 953 with SELCAL EFIS Honeywell EDZ 820 5 tube IRS Triple Honeywell LASEREF II RAD ALT Honeywell RT-300 WX Radar Collins WXR 870 w/2 RCU’s TAWS Allied Signal MK V w/Windshear & Terrain Display Phone Dual Line Aircell Access Iridium Satphone TCAS Collins TTR-920 w/Change 7

FDR CVR FMS

Fairchild F-800 Universal CVR-30A Dual Honeywell NZ 2000 with 5.0 software Data Loader DL-950 ELT Airtex C406-1 GPS Dual 12 Channel WiFi GoGo High Speed Internet Interior/Exterior Interior refurbished – Completion Date: April 2013 A 14 passenger interior features a forward four place club, mid cabin four place conference group with Hi/Lo table w/extension opposite the credenza with a kibitzer, and aft dual three place berthable divans with a privacy bulkhead. Forward galley with bulkhead pocket door, a forward and aft lavatory. The interior was refurbished with new soft goods, wood veneer, and plating, as well as a new single cup coffee maker. In addition, new MCCI switch panels. A state-of-the-art entertainment system includes a 17” HD monitor in the aft cabin and 17” HD monitor in the forward cabin, with a Blue Ray DVD/CD player for each monitor, new speakers and amplifiers, iPod docking station, and audio switches, Airshow 400 Moving Map System. New up wash, down wash, lav indirect, and galley LED Lighting. The iCABIN in-flight entertainment and cabin management system allows you to simultaneously stream movies to up to 16 iPads. A new dual line Aircell Access Iridium satellite phone system with GoGo high speed internet installed to help you get more done in the sky. Exterior paint is in like new condition, repainted by Standard Aero SPI

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406

136

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Florida Jet Falcon 50-3D March 19/03/2013 15:54 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Falcon 50-3D Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

196 N56CL 6758.6 6157

Engines & APU 3D ENGINES: TFE 731-3D-1C W/DEEC ENGINES ENROLLED ON MSP GOLD Avionics • COLLINS APS 85 AUTOPILOT • COLLINS EFIS 86 SYSTEM 5 TUBE • DUAL UNS 1K PLUS • COLLINS TCAS II W/ CHANGE 7 W/ FLT EH ID • DUAL COLLINS RTU 4200 SERIES RADIO TUNING UNITS • HONEYWELL MK V EHGPWS • XM WEATHER PROVISIONS FOR COCKPIT • DUAL HONEYWELL KHF950 SYSTEMS • COLLINS TWR 850 WEATHER RADAR WITH DUAL CONTROL • DUAL COLLINS VHF 22 COMMS 8.33 SPACING • DUAL VIR 32 NAVS FM IMMUNITY • DUAL ADF 60A ADF • DUAL COLLINS DME 42 • DUAL AHC 85 AHRS • GLOBAL AFIS SYSTEM WITH SATCOM UNIT • HONEYWELL LASERTRAK INS WITH CDI • COLLINS ALT 55B RADAR ALTIMETER • ARTEX 406 ELT W/ NAV INTERFACE • FREDRICKSON SELCAL UNIT • FAIRCHILD A100A CVR • FAIRCHILD F1000FDR • RVSM COMPLIANT Exterior BY STANDARD AERO, SPRINGFIELD, IL.

OVERALL – MATTERHORN WHITE TRIM – RED BARON, BLACK DEVORE RECOGNITION LIGHTS (UPPER & LOWER) Interior BY STANDARD AERO, SPRINGFIELD, IL. THIS ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS AND METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED FALCON 50 SN 196 HAS A DESIGNER INSPIRED INTERIOR IN EARTH TONE COLORS AND A CUSTOM PAINT SCHEME. CUSTOM FABRICS, SUPPLE BEIGE LEATHER UPHOLSTERED CHAIRS, AND DARK HIGH GLOSS CABINETRY COMPLIMENT THE 9 PASSENGER EXECUTIVE INTERIOR WITH THE FOLLOWING FEATURES: • EMS WI-FI WIRELESS NETWORK SYSTEM • iPOD DOCKING STATION • AIRSHOW 4000 PASSENGER INFORMATION SYSTEM • HONEYWELL CABIN MANAGEMENT AND ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM • ONE 15” MONITOR AND FOUR 8.4” MONITORS • TWO DVD PLAYERS • ONE 10 DISC CD PLAYER • HONEYWELL PRONTO CABIN ENTERTAINMENT REMOTE • EMS HIGH SPEED DATA 4 CHANNEL SATCOM SYSTEM • AIRCELL AXXESS IRIDIUM PHONE SYSTEM W/2 HANDSETS • LED READING AND WASH LIGHTING SYSTEM Ownership History SONY CORPORATION. SHELL OIL CORPORATION. SEM GROUP. JET SALES OF FLORIDA, INC. AIH II, LLC.

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

137


Northern Air N412ET December 19/03/2013 16:26 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-1134 N412BT 4091 3319

Engines Left Engine 3885 Right Engine 3885 Both engines 0 since overhaul at Pratt Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight Director & Autopilot System • 3-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual 196B Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Dual Nav • ADF • Dual RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Universal UNS1 L FMS • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • N1 Computer Indicator • Radio Altimeter

Exterior Overall Snow White with Black Metallic, Silver Plat Met Interior Fire-blocked Seven passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for an eighth passenger. Left and Right executive tables with Sienna leather inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Willow leather with Mink lower sidewalls, and finished Topaz Kayawood gloss laminate. Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • Ski Tube • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

138

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net Aircraft Index see Page 4


Northern Air N959RP February 19/03/2013 16:29 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

40-2100 N959RP 2408 1949

• Extended Range Fuel • Fresh A-D check at Bombardier Wichita Airframe Factory Warranty Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 1907 / Right Engine 1899 MSP Gold Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660

• ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder • Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue and Yellow Stripes Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Imbuia gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Almond Crunch leather with Surfside lower sidewalls and finished Imbuia wood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

139


DMB Aviation March 19/03/2013 16:34 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Priced to Sell Now - $3,495,000 or make offer

1995 Challenger 601-3R Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

5172 N777YG 5150 2965

Engines GE CF34-3AI JSSI Coverage - prorated Engine 1 (S/N: 807221) 5140 TTSN. 2955 Cycles Engine 2 (S/N: 807220) 5140 TTSN. 2955 Cycles APU Garrett GTCP36 - 100E 5570 Hours SNEW 100% JSSI Coverage APU Maintenance Plan Exterior White over light sand with tan, taupe and maroon accent stripes New paint 2007 Shows rating 9 out of 10 Interior High gloss Burlwood accents with Mother of Pearl inserts Gray leather headliners/sidewalls, mirror bulkheads and bright gold fixtures Comfortable seating for ten (10) passengers plus jumpseat in an executive interior featuring: • One (1) four (4) place divan completed in earthtone fabrics • Six (6) single club chairs upholstered in overstuffed light gray leather Divan pulls out into bed

Storage under divan for two (2) life rafts Entertainment system • Airshow 400 • Dual 18” flat screen monitor • Two (2) remote monitors • Stereo • CD / DVD player Forward galley with: • Convection / Microwave oven • China storage • Hot water plus hot cup • Coffee maker Avionics Honeywell SPZ-8000 EFIS Dual Collins VHF 22B Comms (8.33 MHZ spacing) Dual Collins ADF 462 Dual digital air data computers Dual Honeywell 12 channel GPS Honeywell MCS 300 Satcom Honeywell EDZ 5 tube EFIS/MFD Selcal Honeywell TCZ 810/Change 7 TCAS Triple Honeywell Lasertrak III LRNAV’s Honeywell Lasertrak (NDU) Additional Equipment Long range fuel tank Thrust reversers Steer-by-wire Cockpit refuelling panel Increased gross weight mod Remote engine oil Remote nose door activated switching SAT/COM - Triple handset with Fax wiring External logo lights

DMB Aviation Associates, LLC

140

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 1-702-592-2843 Fax: 1-928-649-0373 Email: Dmarkbrady@aol.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


Hangar 10 April 19/03/2013 16:36 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2001 Cessna Citation X Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Engine Cycles:

750-0167 N721VT 1,775 1,491

1,775 hours total time! Maintained exclusively at the Wichita Citation Service Center. Two owners, the original owner sold it four months after taking delivery. Excellent condition inside and out. Always hangared, no damage history. Exterior Matterhorn White with Artic Blue, Titanium and Nordic Gray Stripes Equipment • Dual four-place club seating in Heron Gray, Townsend Leather, and Quilted Walnut, wood veneer cabinetry. • Magnastar C-2000 Digital Telephone with cockpit handset and headset interface panel • Espresso machine • Sheepskin cockpit seat slipcovers • Extended range oxygen • Airshow 400 with cockpit controller, cabin audio briefing option, and swing down LCD cockpit headliner monitor • Dual DVD unit with remote control, and four (4) 5.6 inch plug-in monitors • Interchangeable microwave oven and shelves • Sliding door cockpit divider • Locking fuel caps

Avionics • Honeywell Primus 2000 with 5-tube EFIS • Honeywell CD-810 FMS • Honeywell LASEREF IV Inertial Nav System • Honeywell GN-SSU GPS Receiver • Dual Honeywell HF with SELCAL • Honeywell RNZ-850 Nav/VOR, ILS, G/S, DME • Honeywell RCZ-833E Integrated Com • Honeywell CD-850 Clearance Delivery Unit • Angle-of-Attack Indicator/Indexer • Honeywell Satellite Com System (Global) • Honeywell TCAS 2000 RT-941 • Honeywell EGPWS • Primus 880 Color Radar • Honeywell Radar Altimeter • RVSM / TAWS-B Certified • DL-900 Data Loader • Honeywell AZ-840 Air Data Computer • Sundstrand FDR (provisions) • Litton ELT • Airshow Cockpit Control Call for price

Hangar Ten Aircraft Sales 1001 NW Lou Holland Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64116 Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport (KMKC) Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Contact: Larry Peet Tel: +1 816-949-8811 Fax: +1 603-828-8522 E-mail: larry@H10mkc.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

141


John Hopkinson Ultras April 19/03/2013 16:39 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation Ultras Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell Primus GNS-XL FMS System Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS Interior Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior Exterior Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior Maintenance Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale Zero Engine Option follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

142

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


Chuck Collins Gulfstream G400 April 19/03/2013 16:41 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2003 Gulfstream G 400 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1504 N902L 3,220.4 1,381

Engines Eng #1: 3.220.4 since New. 18 since Midlife-Jan. 2013 Eng #2: 3,220.4 since New. 18 since Midlife-Jan. 2013 Avionics Collins Pro Line IV Avionics Suite with Honeywell SPZ 8400 Flight Control System w/6-Tube EFIS system, Altitude Alert and Preselect, Dual Honeywell AZ-810 Digital Air Data Computer Triple Collins Pro Line IV VHF 422 Communication Transceivers with 8.33 MHz Dual Collins Pro Line IV VIR 432 VOR/LOC/GLS/MKR Receivers w/FM immunity Triple Honeywell FMZ-2000 FMS w/dual GPS and triple LaserRef II IRU Dual Collins Pro Line IV TDR 94D Xpdr Dual Collins Pro Line IV ADF 462 Dual Collins Pro Line IV DME-442 Dual Honeywell HF-9000 HF Systems Dual Collins AA-300RadioAltimeters Fairchild A-100 Cockpit Voice Recorder Fairchild 1000 FDR Flight Data Recorder Honeywell Primus 880 Radar w/Turbulence Honeywell MCS 7000 SATCOM Honeywell TCAS 2000 TCAS II Honeywell HUD-2020 Heads Up Display AlliedSignal (AFIS) BF Goodrich ADI-335 Attitude Indicator SATCOM MCS 7000

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

EVS Enhanced Visual System Honeywell Heads up Display Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Gold, Orange and Blue with factory horizontal Stripes, Painted in October 2008 by Gulfstream Aerospace, Paint is Excellent Interior Gulfstream Aerospace best selling Executive 14 passenger floor plan. This FAR Part 135 fireblocked interior’s main cabin features forward 4 place club, mid-cabin 4 place divan opposite 2 captain chairs in club and aft 4- place conference group with Hi/Lo table w/extension opposite credenza. All oversized swiveling captain chairs were used in the club arrangements thorough out and are appointed in buckskin glove leather. The 4 – place conference group is appointed with chamois leather chairs. The berthing 4 place divan is finished in a designer walnut fabric. The pilot and copilot seats are gray leather with gray sheepskin. • Forward and aft Lavatories? • Large Aft Cabin Galley • Airshow w/personal monitors a Dual Coffee Makers • Two 17” Video monitors a Microwave Oven • Three 110 V electrical outlets a High Temp Convection Oven • Fax and Printer a Cold Storage Compartment • Jump Seat The interior is exceptionally clean, in excellent condition and shows as new with no defects

CHUCK COLLINS & ASSOCIATES, INC. Premier Jet Complex * McClellan-Palomar Airport, 2100 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 214 Carlsbad, California 92011

Tel: +1 760-929-0302 Cell: +1 760-420-7400 Email: Chuck@CCAJets.com http://www.chuckcollinsassociates.com

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

143


CAI Socata TBM 850 April 20/03/2013 11:01 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2006 Daher Socata TBM 850 Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

351 N351CK 725

• Will be delivered with: • Fresh Annual Inspection • Propeller Overhauled • On Long Life Gear Program • Landing Gear Actuators Overhauled Engine Pratt & Whitney PT6A-66D (3,000 Hr. TBO) 725 TTSN Propeller Hartzell 4-Bladed. 725 TTSN Avionics Garmin/King NAV/COMM: Dual Garmin GNS-530s w/WAAS AP/FD: King KFC-325 w/altitude preselect XPNDR: Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 ALTIMETER: Dual AM 250 Encoding (RVSM) DME: King KN-63 w/output to EHSI R/ALT: King KRA-405B AUDIO: Garmin GMA-340 EFIS: King EFS-40 TWO-TUBE GPS: Dual Garmin GNS-530s w/WAAS RADAR: King RDR-2000 displayed on GMX-200 MFD: Garmin GMX-200 w/Chartview TAS/TAWS: King KMH-880 displays on GMX-200 S/SCOPE: WX-500 displayed on GMX-200 Wx: Garmin GDL-69A XM Wx/Radio

Features RVSM Data Package – Certified to FL 310 Advanced Position and Traffic Package Electric pitch and rudder trims on co-pilot yoke Pulse light anti-collision system Shadin ETM 700 Engine Monitor Full Co-Pilot Instruments Freon Air Conditioning Jeppesen Chart view - Electronic Approach Charts Gaseous oxygen system XM Satellite Entertainment Package Known Icing Co-pilot side map light & approach plate holder Interior Platinum Edition Six Leather Chairs in Beige Leather Adjustable backrests & Folding Armrests Front and rear 24V DC power outlets Upper cabin panels in ultra-suede Lower cabin panels in in leather Wool carpeting Individual fresh-air vents & reading lights Pilot and Co-pilot sunvisors Bose X ship-powered headset jacks Baggage compartment behind aft seats 220 lbs. Executive Writing Table and Storage Cabinet Exterior Overall White Over Platinum Bottom with Burgundy and Metallic Gold Accent Stripes Maintenance Annual Inspection Complied with March 2012 by Image Air

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

144

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Controls Dual flight controls Electrical pitch and rudder trims on pilot control wheel Elevator, rudder, and aileronelectric trim Electrical pre-select flaps with integrated asymmetry detection system

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com Aircraft Index see Page 4


AeroSmith Penny February 19/03/2013 17:39 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Price Reduced

1990 Citation II Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550-0636 N50NF 6343 4898

Airframe CESCOM Fresh Phase 1-5 and 10 - July 2011 Engines Pratt & Whitney JT15D-4 Eng. 1: 2659 SMOH 711 SHOT Eng. 2: 2659 SMOH 711 SHOT Avionics Sperry 3 tube EDS-603 3 Tube EFIS Sperry SPZ 500 Autopilot Global GNS XLS w/ GPS KGP 860 MFD Honeywell Primus 650 Color Radar Dual Collins 32A Navs 8.33 Spacing Dual Collins 22A Comms Dual Collins TDR 90 Transponders Dual Collins ADF – 462 Collins ALT-55B Flightphone Honeywell Mark VIII TAWS 406 ELT

Additional Features RVSM Thrust Reverse Fairchild A100 CVR AFT Baggage Freon Air Conditioning No Damage History Gross Take Off Weight Increase Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with blue stripes. New paint in June 1997 Interior Interior has seven passenger center club configuration. Also included is a left hand deluxe refreshment center. Seat belted flushing potty. New leather seats and carpet 2009

AeroSmith Penny II LLC 8031 Airport Blvd., Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +1 (713) 649-6100 Fax: +1 (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com www.aerosmithpenny.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

145


Welsch Aviation Falcon 50 April 19/03/2013 17:40 Page 1

For details contact:

Edward Vesely phone: 713-644-5100 Email: Evesely@welschaviation.com www.welschaviation.com

1984 Falcon 50

AIRFRAME: 11392 HOURS SINCE NEW LANDINGS: 7742 CAMP MAINTENANCE TRACKING PROGRAM APU: HONEYWELL GTCP 36-100A

S/N 138, N903CS

ENGINES: HONEYWELL TFE-731-3D-1C TIME SINCE NEW: 11134/11047/11187 HOURS TIME SINCE MPI: 413/216/216 HOURS JSSI ENGINE PROGRAM

AVIONICS: COLLINS PROLINE 21 FDS DUAL COLLINS NAV 4000 DUAL COLLINS DME 4000 DUAL COLLINS 4000 WAAS 12 CHANNEL GPS HONEYWELL LASEREF V DUAL COLLINS 618U HF COLLINS WX 1000 STORMSCOPE HONEYWELL MARK V EGPWS FM IMMUNITY MNPS DUAL COLLINS FMS 6100 DUAL COLLINS ADF 462

COLLINS TDR 950 TRANSPONDER DUAL COLLINS ADC 3000 AIR DATA COMPUTER AIRCELL ST-3100 SATCOM COLLINS TWR 850 WEATHER RADAR TCAS 4000 8.33 COMMS RNP 5/10

FEATURES:

EXTERIOR:

-3D ENGINES, RVSM, GTOW MOD, LEAD ACID BATTERY, LIFE VESTS/RAFTS, EMBELLISHER MOD, EAR INSULATION PACKAGE, PART 91 CERTIFICATION, FAIRCHILD FLIGHT DATA RECORDER, UNIVERSAL 30 COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER, UNIVERSAL TT-3000 AIRBORNE PHONE

DUNCAN AVIATION CUSTOM PAINT 2007. OVERALL WHITE WITH RED AND GOLD TRIM

MAINTENANCE: 2A, 4A, 2A+, 4A+ INSPECTIONS AUGUST 2012 NOSE LANDING GEAR INSPECTION AUGUST 2012 MAIN LANDING GEAR OVERHAUL DUE MAY 2019 C CHECK JUNE 2008 BY DUNCAN AVIATION

REMARKS: OWNER WILL CONSIDER TRADE FOR FALCON 50EX,FALCON 900B/C OR FALCON 900EX. OWNER FINANCING IS AVAILABLE FOR QUALIFIED BUYERS.

INTERIOR: 10 PASSENGER EXECUTIVE SEATING REFURBISHED 2005. 4 ERDA CAPTAIN’S CHAIRS IN CLUB CONFIGURATION FORWARD, AFT 6 PLACE CONFERENCE AREA WITH TABLE. FORWARD PRIVATE LAVATORY. CUSTOM GALLEY. DVD/VHS PLAYERS, AIRSHOW MAPS, XM RADIO, BULKHEAD MONITOR. LED LIGHTING. NEW CARPET 2007

Specifications Subject to Verification Upon Inspection

New York

Washington DC

Texas

Georgia


Welsch Aviation GIII April 20/03/2013 16:37 Page 1

For details contact:

Edward Vesely phone: 713-644-5100 Email: Evesely@welschaviation.com www.welschaviation.com

1984 Gulfstream III

AIRFRAME: 6073 HOURS SINCE NEW 2897 LANDINGS ENGINES: TIME SINCE NEW: 5944/5944 HOURS TIME SINCE OVERHAUL: 1309/1309 HOURS CORE SINCE OVERHAUL: 652/652 HOURS CORE SINCE NEW: 2856/2856 HOURS

S/N 450, N36DA

APU: GARRETT GTCP-36-100G 5855 HOURS SINCE NEW 418 HOURS SINCE HOT SECTION

AVIONICS: HONEYWELL EPIC FLIGHT DISPLAY SYSTEM DUAL COLLINS FD-109 FLIGHT DIRECTORS DUAL COLLINS VIR-32 NAVS COLLINS VHF-20 COMM DUAL COLLINS DME-42 DUAL MST-67A (ELS/EHS) TRANSPONDERS HONEYWELL WXR-880 RADAR DUAL COLLINS ALT-55B RADAR ALTIMETERS DUAL UNIVERSAL UNS-1C+ FMS DUAL AXXESS SATCOM (2 HANDSETS) DUAL HONEYWELL AZ-800 AIR DATA COMPUTERS DUAL MOTOROLA SELCAL RVSM, FM IMMUNITY, RNP 5/10, 8.33, MNPS

HONEYWELL PRIMUS EPIC EFIS HONEYWELL MULTI-FUNCTION DISPLAY DUAL COLLINS VHF-21D COMMS DUAL COLLINS ADF-60 LITTON LTN-72 IRS SYSTEM BENDIX/KING TCAS II WITH CHANGE 7 HONEYWELL MARK-VII GPWS WITH RAAS SPERRY SPZ-800 AUTOPILOT

FEATURES:

EXTERIOR:

FAIRCHILD F100A COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER LONG RANGE OXYGEN DUAL ARTEX 406 ELT WITH NAV INTERFACE TAIL LOGO LIGHT SYSTEM DUAL FUJITSU 5110 TABLETS WITH WSI-AV300 LIFE RAFTS FAIRCHILD F1000 FLIGHT DATA RECORDER SINGLE WATER FIRE EXTINGUISHER MOTOROLA 9505 SATCOM IN COCKPIT

PAINT BY DUNCAN AVIATION DECEMBER 2002. OVERALL MATTERHORN WHITE WITH CHARCOAL GREY AND TIBETAN GOLD STRIPES

MAINTENANCE: 72 MONTH INSPECTION JULY 2012 MIDLIFE INSPECTIONS DUE MARCH 2015

REMARKS: HONEYWELL PRIMUS EPIC GLASS COCKPIT QT STAGE III HUSH KITS (VAN NUYS CERTIFIED) GULFSTREAM COMPUTERIZED MAINTENANCE PART 135 CERTIFICATION/EXCELLENT RECORDS

INTERIOR: BEAUTIFUL 11 PASSENGER FIREBLOCKED EXECUTIVE INTERIOR TASTEFULLY REFURBISHED 2012 IN TAN LEATHERS. 4 PLACE FORWARD CLUB, 2 SINGLE CHAIRS MIDCABIN, AFT 3 PLACE DIVAN OPPOSITE 2 SINGLE CHAIRS. FORWARD/AFT JUMP SEATS. FORWARD LAV AND GALLEY. FULL SIZED AFT LAV WITH CHANGING ROOM. GOLD PLATED FIXTURES, WALNUT CABINETRY. AIRSHOW 400

Specifications Subject to Verification Upon Inspection

New York

Washington DC

Texas

Georgia


P148-153 21/03/2013 13:18 Page 3

Marketplace Boeing 737 500 VIP

European Skybus Ltd. Price:

Please call

Year:

1995

S/N:

27425

Reg:

N463AC

TTAF:

31,908

Location: United Kingdom

Boeing 737 500 VIP

$4,250,000

Year:

1992

S/N:

24648

Reg:

VPCAJ

TTAF:

35,418

Location: United Kingdom

Boeing 737

40 Passenger corporate interior. This aircraft has recently undergone a passenger to VIP conversion in October 2011 by European Aviation. Refurbished to the highest standards, this 1995 example is now available for sale or lease. The Cabin area is divided into two sections, the forward section is arranged into a ‘Club 4’ configuration around 4 HI-LO folding tables, which can be converted into 8 sleeping positions. The aft section of the cabin is configured with a further 24 forward facing lie flat business class seats. Contact: Stefan Kondak

European Skybus Ltd. Price:

SCI Asia Limited Price:

Please call

Year:

-

S/N:

TBC

Reg:

TBC

TTAF:

TBC

Location: Asia

Tel: +44 (0) 1202 581 111 Email: sales@europeanskybus.com

Tel: +44 (0) 1202 581 111 Email: sales@europeanskybus.com

40 Passenger corporate interior. This aircraft has recently undergone a passenger to VIP conversion in October 2010 by European Aviation. Refurbished to the highest standards, this 1992 example has been operated by ourselves as a corporate aircraft and is now available for sale or lease. The Cabin area is divided into two sections, the forward section is arranged into a ‘Club 4’ configuration around 4 HI-LO folding tables, which can be converted into 8 sleeping positions.

Tel: +852 39 75 29 59 Email: EdenJET@SCIAsiaLimited.com Boeing 737 Luxury VIP Private Jet available under 10 Million USD - Versatile Interior - 29 pax standard configuration Superb Entertainment and Communications Facilities: incl. 2 iPod docks & 4 40 - Flat TVs - Rockwell-Collins Air Show 4000 - 4 Distinct seating areas & 1 8-person Conference Table - Spacious cabin & Massive storage - Fwd & Aft Galley - Aft VIP Lav & Fwd Crew Lav - State of the Art Engineering - New Personalized Exterior Paint - Customization Available. More details: www.EdenJETglobal.com

www.EdenJETglobal.com

Bombardier Challenger 605

Evgeny Tikhomirov Price:

Make offer

Year:

2011

S/N:

5838

Reg:

OE-IDV

TTAF:

86

Location: Austria

Cessna Citation XLS

AvionMar Price:

$6.4M USD

Year:

2008

S/N:

560-5756

Reg:

OE-GSP

TTAF:

2260

Tel: +43 (0) 676 887 00845 Email: busjetsale@gmail.com BOMBARDIER COMPLETION. 86 Hours 48 Cycles. In Service Date – March 2011. AVIONICS: Rockwell Collins Pro Line 21 with four 10” x 12” LCD screens and integrated minu control. EFIS/IECAS with synoptic. Dual FMS 6000 with coupled lateral and vertical nav & performance calculation. Integrated Flight Information System (IFIS). 3D Map and Long Range Cruise. Lightning Detection System (LDS). Enhanced Maps on MFD. 3rd Inertial Reference System. 2nd Radio Altimeter. Datalink with Iridium interface

Tel: +43 (0) 660 655 6370 Email: erich.engelbrecht@avionmar.com 1 owner, 1 operator since new. Airframe on ProParts, Engines & APU on JSSI Complete. 8+1 seats. Many options including oven and Espresso maker. Financing option possible in Europe. Please call for details +43 (0) 660 655 6370

Location: Austria

148

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P148-153 20/03/2013 14:51 Page 4

Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,975,000

Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

Reg:

N337WR

TTAF:

6615.3

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,375,000 or consider trades for Citation CJ1, CJ2, or Bell 212, 412 or 407.

Location: USA

BELL 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $1,975,000

Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

Reg: TTAF:

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not

do justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners.

1700

Location: USA

BELL 412EMS

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

US $3,875,000

Year:

1981

S/N:

33017

Reg:

N554AL

TTAF:

15265

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’.Fresh annual / Export C of A

Location: USA

BELL 212 (Seven Available)

Leonard Hudson Drilling Price:

Please Call

Year:

Call for details

S/N:

Call for details

Reg:

Call for details

TTAF:

Call for details

Tel: +1 (806) 662 5823 Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

Location: USA

Beechcraft 1900C

SVV Lombrail Price:

Please call

Year:

1991

S/N:

UC-168

Reg:

F-GVLC

TTAF: Location: France

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +33 (0) 143 971 324 Email: ltt@orange.fr PUBLIC AUCTION ON THURSDAY 18 APRIL 2013 AT 12:10 AM. Airframe inspection and documentation on site 09:00 a.m to 12:00 a.m. RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT 1900 C IN MEDEVAC CONFIGURATION 4 stretchers installed. Technical documentations availagble since new. Airplane to be sold "AS IS, WHERE IS" Currently located LYON BRON AIRPORT FRANCE. Auction house : SVV LOMBRAIL TEUCQAM +33 (0) 143 97 13 24 - ltt@orange.fr For technical information : Franck TESTARD +33(0) 686 558 626 - testard.fr@gmail.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

149


P148-153 20/03/2013 10:39 Page 5

Marketplace Gulfstream G550

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

Please Call

Year:

2004

S/N:

5033

Reg:

VP-BNR

TTAF:

1448

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Only 1448 hours, One owner since new, Certification Foxtrot "Basic" System upgrade, Recent 12,24 & 96 Month Inspections, 72 Month Inspection c/w August 2010, 18 passenger custom designer interior in like new condition

Location: USA

Bombardier/Challenger 601-3A/ER

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

Please Call

Year:

1992

S/N:

5121

Reg:

N328AM

TTAF:

9,025

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

A "no excuses" airplane. With all major inspections just accomplished. Fresh 6/12/24/60 /120 & 240 Month inspection c/w in 2011. Fresh HSI on left engine. Fresh gear overhaul and interior refurbishment

Location: USA

Socata TBM 850

Aviation Advisors Int’l, Inc Price:

Please Call

Year:

2006

S/N:

360

Reg:

N874CA

TTAF:

1,542

Location: USA

Cessna Caravan 208B

CAAD Inc. Price:

$1,150,000 USD

Year:

1999

S/N:

208B0781

Reg:

YN-CGS

TTAF:

20,419.65

Tel: +1 (941) 351 5400 Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Jet speeds with single engine turboprop economy. That is what you get with this superbly maintained TBM 850. Climb to 31,000 in 5 minutes and fly 1585 NM in economy cruise. Slip into 2100 foot strips. That is the versatility of this marvelous plane. The panel and maintenance history of this aircraft is proof of exceptional pride of ownership. The panel includes the IHAS 8000 TCAS/TAWS and the WX500 stormscope and RDR Radar displayed on the KMD 850 MFD for utmost safety and comfort. Maintenance has been performed by the book and only by factory authorized technicians.

Tel: +1 (305) 593 9929 Email: info@caadinc.com For delivery in April 2013 with 0 SMOH engine and prop, Total cycles: 19,444, Configuration: PASSENGER, Aircraft status: OPERATIONAL, King IFR, A/P and FD, MFD, APE III, POD, A/C, P&W C. SB 1669 Blades, ADAS +. EGPWS, Rosen Visors, 14 seats, Large Tires

Location: Nicaragua

www.caadinc.com

Cessna Caravan 208B

CAAD Inc. Price:

$1,100,000 USD

Year:

1997

S/N:

208B0607

Reg:

YN-CGU

TTAF:

17,538.03

Tel: +1 (305) 593 9929 Email: info@caadinc.com For delivery in April 2013 with 0 SMOH engine and prop, Cycles: 23,358, Configuration: PASSENGER, Aircraft Status: OPERATIONAL, King IFR, A/P and FD, MFD, APE III, POD, A/C, P&W C. SB 1669 Blades, ADAS +. EGPWS, Rosen Visors, 14 seats, Large Tires

Location: Nicaragua

www.caadinc.com 150

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P148-153 20/03/2013 13:32 Page 6

Marketplace King Air C90B

Tel: +49 (0) 7403 914 04 66 Email: sales@basjets.com

BAS GmbH Price:

US$ 850.000

Year:

1993

S/N:

LJ-1325

Reg:

D-IHMV

TTAF:

3.505

AC will be delivered with Engines enrolled on MORE Program (HSI on Cond. TBO Interval 8.000 hrs); no Damage History, only one Owner since new; all times hangared; 6 Yr Inspection of Gear and Propellers performed Dec/2011; FMS Modification (Garmin/Avydine GPS/MFD); Maintenance done at German Beechcraft Service Center

Location: Stuttgart Germany

www.basjets.com

Citation Bravo

Tel: +49 (0) 7403 914 04 66 Email: sales@basjets.com

BAS GmbH Price:

US$ 2.130.000

Year:

2000

S/N:

550B-0916

Reg:

N555BK

TTAF:

3.951

Fresh Engine Overhaul (only 1 hr SMOH); Airframe and Engines on Power Advantage Program; No Damage History; only one Owner since new; all times hangared; Bravo Steps; EGPWS Mark VIII; TCAS II; Stormscope; UNS FMS with DTU, sliding Toilet Door, CVR, all maintenance performed in Citation Service Center

Location: Germany

www.basjets.com

Cessna R-182 Skylane

Wanda Graham Price:

USD 95,000

Year:

1997

S/N:

18280269

Reg:

N9696F

TTAF:

921

Location: USA, IL

Cessna Citation CJ1

921 HOURS TOTAL TIME SINCE NEW, COMPLETE LOGBOOKS SINCE NEW, ALWAYS CESSNA SERVICE CENTER MAINTAINED, TWO OWNER, NO DAMAGE HISTORY AIRCRAFT. 180 SPOH (2009) 3 BLADE MACCAULEY, 180 HOURS SINCE CRANK A.D. COMPLIED WITH WITH NEW CRANKSHAFT, CAMSHAFT, RINGS ETC. (2009) 04/2013 ANNUAL -09/2014 IFR CERTIFICATION.FULL KING DIGITAL NAV-II PANEL, WITH DUAL KING KX-155A NAV/COMS, KMA 26 AUDIO PANEL WITH 3 LMB AND FOUR PLACE STEREO INTERCOM.

Don Kent Price:

USD 1,650,000

Year:

1998

S/N:

TBD

Reg: TTAF:

1470

Tel: +1 (405) 293 8149 Email: jrbeaver.aviationltd@gmail.com

Email: flightdepartment5@gmail.com Only 1470 TT, TAP Elite and Best avionics! VAT PAID-you save $300,000 on VAT! USA FAA Registered but hangared in Europe. Dual Garmin 530s, Electronic Charts, FMS, Dual Mode S Mint condition. The Best factory installed avionics on any CJ 525! Amazing versatility and the satisfaction of a like new Jet with advanced technology. Obviously not low priced, for the buyer who wants the very best quality he can find, and can afford what he wants. Principles please contact: flightdepartment5@gmail.com

Location: United States

Eurocopter AS 355F-1

HFS Aviation Ltd. Price:

£320,000 excl VAT

Year:

1982

S/N:

5194

Reg:

G-OHMS

TTAF:

14059

Tel: +44 (0)1895 833365 Email: info@helicopterfilm.tv

Lightweight VFR Utility on high skids. Cargo swing, HISL. Priced to sell.

Location: United Kingdom

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

151


P148-153 20/03/2013 13:33 Page 7

Marketplace

Eurocopter AS 355F-2

EIDISEIS NTOT COM SA Price:

Please call

Year:

2000

S/N:

TBD

Reg:

D-IHMV

TTAF:

2220

Location: Greece

Eurocopter EC 135P2i-Executive

The helicopter is well equiped and is used for VFR PAX transport, and ENG missions in Greece.NO accident history. Always hangared and just completed 12y inspection. It is offered with valid C of A and is immediately available. REM TIME OF MAIN COMPONENTS,MR Blades: 16420/17733/17638, STARFLEX: 338, BEVEL RED Gear: 778, Combined GB: 778, Epicyclic: 778, TRGB: 778, TR Blades:1778,MR Servo Control:778/778/2896, TR Servo Control: 1153, ENGINE No I: HSI 1102, Overhaul 1277 ENGINE No II: HSI 438, Overhaul 1277.

Tel: +41 (0) 31 310 41 13 Email: gtsilalidis@europavia.ch

Europavia (Suisse) SA Price: Euro 4,900,000 excl VAT Year:

2011

S/N:

0938

Reg:

HB-ZTJ

TTAF:

10 FH

Tel: +30 (0) 210 6207069 Email: cptpap@otenet.gr

BRAND NEW EC135P2i Executive Only 10FH Ferry Flight, Immediately available by Eurocopter Distribution, First come,first served, Exceptional Fix Price Euro 4,900,000 ex work Switzerland WWW.EUROPAVIA.CH Contact Direct George Tsilalidis gtsilalidis@europavia.ch, sales@europavia.ch

Location: Switzerland

www.europavia.ch

Eurocopter AS 350B-3

Tel: +64 (0) 274 888 431 Email: davepeel@me.com

David Peel Price:

Please call

Year:

1999

S/N:

3178

Reg:

ZK-IDQ

TTAF:

1581

All sensible offers will be considered so please tell us what it is worth in the current market , Avionics: 2x KING KY196A, KING KN53, KING KR87 ADF, KING KLN89 GPS, GARMIN KMA 24 / NAT AA80, CELLPHONE Bluetooth Kit, ELT KANNAD 406 AF-H, KING KT76A Transponder, Optional listing: Float FP (FP installed by ECF), Aero Aire Airconditioning (Original ECF)

Location: New Zealand

Cessna Citation XLS

Beechcraft Vertrieb & Service GmbH Price: Year:

Tel: +49 (0) 821 7003 100/145 Email: info@beechcraft.de

EU Reg, EU-OPS, CVR (2h), HF-1050, TCAS II, CMS400 Checklist, Dual FMS UNS-1 ESP, AvVisor+, Aircell ST-3100, EASA German commerc. certif., CAMO+, fresh HSI 08/2012!

2007

S/N: Reg: TTAF:

3,041

Location:

Par Avion Ltd

Alberth Air Parts

+1 832 934 0055

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011 152

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4


P148-153 20/03/2013 14:29 Page 8

Subscription Order Form To receive your copy of World Aircraft Sales Magazine every month. Please complete this form and fax or send it to us. (Please PRINT clearly)

• Three Years $120 or g100 or £70 • Two Years $95 or g80 or £55 • One Year $70 or g60 or £40 Name

Job Title:

Company Name

Type of Business:

Company Address

Email: Tel No:

Postcode/Zipcode:

Fax No:

State:

Country:

Web:

METHOD OF PAYMENT I Would like to subscribe to World Aircraft Sales Magazine for: Please charge my:

❏ 3 Years ❏ 2 Years ❏ 1 Year

❏ VISA ❏ MASTERCARD ❏ AMERICAN EXPRESS

Name of Cardholder

Expiry Date Security No.

Card Account No Date

Signature

Please return to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine, Email: Lynne@avbuyer.com

• US Office: US Office: 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 • European Office: Cowleaze House, 39 Cowleaze Road, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT2 6DZ, United Kingdom Fax: +44 (0) 20 8255 4300 Tel: +44 (0) 20 8255 4000

April 2013

World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), April 2013, Vol 17, Issue No 4 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & DVDs submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 17th April 2013 Advertiser’s Index 21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................154

Corporate Concepts .................................................27

Jet Support Services (JSSI)..................................103

ABACE-Asian Business Aviation ........................129

Dassault Falcon Jet Europe....................................2-3

JetBlack Aviation ......................................................121

Aeromar .....................................................................123

DMB Aviation Associates......................................140

JetBrokers..............................................................60-61

AeroSmith/Penny.....................................................145

Duncan Aviation....................................................43,97

Jetcraft Corporation ............................FC, 24-25, BC

AIC Title Services ....................................................111

Eagle Aviation..............................................................33

Jeteffect ........................................................................65

Aradian Aviation..........................................................71

EBACE-European Business Aviation..................122

JETNET ......................................................................131

Aviation Advisors ........................................................47

EMBRAER Pre-Flown ........................................50-51

John Hopkinson & Associates.......................75, 142

Avjet Corporation.................................................58-59

European Helicopter Show ...................................133

Lektro..........................................................................123

Avpro.......................................................................17-21

ExecuJet Aviation........................................................41

NBAA Regional Forums.........................................120

Banyan Air Service ....................................................95

Florida Jets .......................................................136-137

Northern Air......................................................138-139

Bell Aviation ...........................................................76-77

Freestream Aircraft USA....................................10-15

O’Gara Aviation Company.................................44-45

Bloomer deVere ..................................................52-53

General Aviation Services ........................................57

Par Avion.........................................................................5

Bombardier..................................................................49

Guardian Jet..........................................................28-31

Rolls-Royce..................................................................79

Boutsen Aviation ........................................................89

Gulfstream Pre-Owned ......................................80-81

Soujourn Aviation ....................................................115

Central Business Jets .............................................155

Hangar 10 .................................................................141

Southern Cross Aviation ........................................113

Charleston Aviation Partners ...................................63

HELI UK Expo ..........................................................125

Tempus Jets ..........................................................90-91

Charlie Bravo Aviation...............................................55

Heliasset.com ...........................................................127

The Jet Collection ................................................36-37

Chuck Collins ...........................................................143

INADA...........................................................................35

VREF Aircraft Values ..............................................123

Conklin & de Decker ....................................................4

Intellijet International .................................................6-7

Welsch Aviation...............................................146-147

Corporate Aircraft Photography................................4

J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ......................38-39

Wentworth & Affiliates...............................................67

Corporate AirSearch Int’l .............................101, 144

Jet Alliance International.........................................135

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................99

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – April 2013

153


21st Century May 24/10/2012 11:01 Page 1

Copyright of Leor Yudelowitz

When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet In the sky; and the Federal Aviation Adminstration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope, and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 Series aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter than the Gulfstream IV and provide a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. Furthermore, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN, with eight passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. Revolutionary and the world’s first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology. FBW enables a MMO of .90 and enhanced low-speed handling, pitch and roll stability characteristics. The 7X can climb directly to FL 410 at ISA + 10° conditions. Two Hundred (200)+ very high speed, ultra long range Falcon 7X business jets have been ordered!

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com


CBJ March_CBJ November06 18/02/2013 16:50 Page 1

General Offices

Mexico office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Enrique A. Ortega Lapham

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +52.55.5211.1505

FAX: (952) 894-8569

CELL: +52.55.3901.1055

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

E-MAIL: Enrique@CBJets.com

ial g t i In erin f Of

ial g t i In erin f Of

CHALLENGER 604 S/N 5577

CHALLENGER 601w/3A ENGINES SN/3024

Aircraft at Duncan Aviation Now for its 96-Month Inspection and Landing Gear Overhaul, 2000 Hours TT, On Smart Parts Plus and MSP Gold Engine Programs, Spectacular Terence Disdale Designed 10 Place Interior

Less than 12-months Since Wallet Numbing 30-Year Heavy Check; JSSI Engines w/ less than 100 Hours Since Mid-Life, Less than 100 Hours on -150 APU, Landing Gear Overhauled, New Paint, Refurbished 12 Place Interior including Airshow 4000 System, EFIS, LaserRef’s, etc

2009 CHALLENGER 300 S/N 20264

FALCON 900B SN/65

1185 TT, Iridium SAT Phone w/ Swift Broadband, MSP GOLD, 2nd IFIS FSU (Paperless Cockpit), Sliding cabin/galley Pocket Door, Deluxe Galley w/ sink, Maintained to Part 135 Standards

Will be Delivered w/ Fresh 4C and Landing Gear OH, MSP Gold Engine Package, Preferred 13 PAX Configuration w/ FWD & AFT Lav; Impeccable US Ownership History

al De ing nd Pe

al De ing nd Pe

FALCON 900B SN/60

FALCON 50 RETROFITTED TO FALCON 50EX (SB280) S/N 171

Will be Delivered w/ Fresh 4C and Landing Gear OH, JSSI Engine Package, Preferred 13 PAX Configuration w/ FWD & AFT Lav; Impeccable US Ownership History

MSP Gold on -40 Engines, Completely New Proline IV Avionics Package, 4C Heavy Check and Landing Gear OH 09/10

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5248

1125 ASTRA SP S/N 49

Power Advantage Engine Program, w/ Fresh Engine Overhauls, Pro-Parts Airframe Program and on Cescom Since New; Dual Universal UNS-1ESP FMS; Aircraft can be delivered anywhere in the world

3597.9 TT; Fresh C Check, new paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center 08/11, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod


As anyone in aviation knows,

TURBULENCE is an art.

Buying and selling aircraft can be a bumpy business. But for over 50 years, we’ve earned a reputation for delivering the smoothest ride, as well as the best deal. We did it by building our business entirely around our customers’ needs. With transaction specialists who really know aircraft and markets, and an unmatched global network of partners. The result? Faster, easier transactions and lots of repeat clients. So call us and relax. You’ve got the best navigator around. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

Download the

Jetcraft App

- Search aircraft listings - Sort listings by manufacturer - Download a listing brochure that includes specs and photos

- R  ead about recent Jetcraft news - View the Jetcraft upcoming event schedule - Notifications about new listings

Scan this QR code to download to your Apple or Android device.

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

FEATURED INVENTORY

1995 Challenger 601-3R - SN 5178 Reasonably Priced - 6,400 Hours Total Time Dual FMS, FDR/CVR, Satcom

2006 global xrs - SN 9181

Recent Multi Million Dollar Price Reduction One Corporate FAA Part Owner Since New

WAS turbulence back 3-26.indd 1

2004 Falcon 2000EX Easy - SN 0029 Engines Enrolled on ESP Gold APU Enrolled on MSP - JAR-OPS Capable 1988 Airbus A310-304 2007 Challenger 300 2002 Challenger 604 2005 Challenger 604 2010 Challenger 605 2012 Challenger 605 2007 Challenger 850ER 2005 Citation X 2009 Falcon 2000LX

2010 Falcon 7X 2011 Global 5000 2013 Global 5000 2002 Global Express 2005 Global Express 2010 Global XRS 1997 Gulfstream GIVSP 1998 Gulfstream GIVSP 1988 Gulfstream IV

2007 global 5000 - SN 9214

13 Passenger Attractively Completed Interior Airframe Enrolled in Bombardier SmartParts

2003 hawker 800xp - SN 258626 Low Hours - 2,230 TTAF Engines and APU on MSP Gold

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

AVOIDING

3/12/13 9:50 AM


World Aircraft Sales Magazine April 2013