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Two big moments for archery, both take place in the Olympic Capital

Another Archery World Cup Final complete: Lausanne held our blue riband event for the second time in its history in 2014. The Olympic Capital did a fantastic job of hosting 32 of our elite athletes, spectators from Switzerland, France, Italy, Germany, the Netherlands, Turkey, the USA, Russia, Great Britain and some other countries near and far, and our esteemed guests including International Olympic Committee President Dr Thomas BACH. It was the second time this year that President BACH has witnessed archery. He watched the recurve finals in Lausanne and the girls’ competition at the Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing. On both occasions, gold medal finals were decided in a shoot-off, the most exciting possible ending to a match. That the President of the IOC remarked to the media in Nanjing that there simply was not a better finish is evidence of just how far we have come as a sport. Our head-to-head match system is a competition product that archers and non-archers alike can enjoy. But, knowing that we must not stand still but keep moving forward, we can look towards the second of the two big events to have happened in Lausanne in the past two months. The city hosted our World Cup Final for two days but it will host the new World Archery Excellence Centre for far longer. In November, construction machinery moved onto the site, about 10 minutes drive north of Lausanne city centre, to begin levelling the ground.

Building will begin after the winter, when the ground in Switzerland thaws enough for the foundations to be properly set. For now, we can be hugely satisfied that a key project in World Archery’s development plan has begun to take shape. After years of planning, the Excellence Centre will be operational in under two years from now and around the time of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. It will become a place for international athletes to prepare for large archery-specific and multisport events, the hub of our organisation’s development initiatives, a training ground for international judges and top level coaches, and a space fully dedicated to growing the sport of archery. I must take the time to thank the Canton of Vaud, the City of Lausanne, IOC President Dr Thomas BACH, the board of FIDTA and everyone else who has contributed to the Excellence Centre project up until this point. Soon, a full list of supporters will be announced, and at that time there will be many more people to which we must show gratitude. Recently, the IOC’s recommendations for the future of the Olympic Movement – Agenda 2020 – were discussed at the Extraordinary Session in Monaco. We now have the task of assessing what impact the debate will have on archery and how best to progress as a key Olympic federation. It is yet another opportunity to keep World Archery at the forefront of international sport. I wish you an enjoyable winter season, and look forward to seeing you on the archery field in the New Year.

Prof Dr Uğur ERDENER World Archery President


Q&A

World Archery President Prof Dr Uğur ERDENER

A physician and educator by trade, Prof Dr Uğur ERDENER was elected to the presidency of World Archery in 2005. He is currently also President of Turkey’s National Olympic Committee, an IOC Executive Board Member and sits on the Executive Council of ASOIF and Executive Committee of WADA

What is your background in sport? I was a triple jump and basketball athlete in my formative years. I served as President of the Turkish Archery Federation for 23 years before becoming involved with World Archery Europe, eventually assuming position as President of that organisation when it was still named EMAU. What inspired you to stand for the position of World Archery President in 2005? Potential. I assumed my current role at the Congress in Madrid and came into an international federation that had been evolving its competition structure to suit spectators and just delivered a successful Olympics Games in Athens. I had been in archery for some time and been part of the World Archery Executive Board and I could see such potential in continued progress. It was an honour to be elected. I was the first sportsperson from my country, Turkey, to become the President of an International Federation. Over the last two years, you have been elected to a number of other positions in the Olympic sports world. How do these complement your position as President of World Archery? I joined the Executive Board of the International Olympic Committee when the current IOC President, Dr Thomas BACH, was elected and stand on a number of other committees within the organisation. I am very happy to be a member of President BACH’s team. The positions within the IOC grant me a deep insight into the workings of the Olympic Movement and its impact on our federation. With ASOIF, the body that represents the Summer Olympic international federations to the IOC, I am working on behalf of

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© 2014 IOC/MORATAL, Christophe

Pointing out aspects of the archery competition to the IOC President at the Youth Olympic Games

Prof Dr ERDENER at his seat during an IOC Excecutive Board meeting in Montreux, Switzerland in October 2014

World Archery – and ASOIF’s other 27 members, of course. It provides another perspective, but ultimately it is the goal of the organisation to deliver an exceptional Olympic Games. Our work at World Archery certainly echoes that. My background is in medicine so working with WADA is a logical marriage. It is a great advantage to understand the more technical language when on laboratory visits! Archery is a clean sport, has historically been a clean sport and we will drive for it to remain a clean sport. That commitment I can make personally, as President of World Archery and take from the principle mission of WADA. How do you juggle your commitments to each organisation? I have excellent and very dynamic people supporting me. I am totally committed to all my roles and we have built a staff, particularly at World Archery, that operates exceptionally for the good of the sport. I thank my team for its great efforts. It is our role in executive positions to offer visions and goals, but the hard day-in, day-out work happens in the offices. The challenge for me is one of scheduling. I am travelling so many days of the year now that I am very thankful for my well-organised calendar and the days I do get to sit and watch some of our events live. What work is key for archery to succeed now? We are in the process of defining our next World Plan. The first was completed in 2012 and was designed to make archery an important Olympic sport. That was achieved through effective collaborations, both internationally and externally, that exceptional team work I mentioned. It will be imperative to continue this approach as we embark on the second World Plan – with the vision of

making archery an important Olympic sport on a national level, in countries around the world. Next year is the 10th anniversary of the Archery World Cup. The time has passed fast. We launched the international circuit as a platform for sponsors and athletes to reach a wider audience. It worked but there is still plenty to improve, and we continue to make the series better each year. Our social media success is key to reach the younger generations and has been a focus of the IOC for some time. We will shortly eclipse 110,000 followers on Facebook, 50,000 YouTube subscribers and our other platforms are growing fast. There is also the World Archery Excellence Centre. Soon to become the core of our development activities when it is complete in 2016. The sports world runs in Olympic cycles. Will Rio be as much of a success as London? We set a high standard for ourselves as a sport. To constantly evolve, surprise and improve. Topping Lord’s Cricket Ground will not be easy – but if we do not aim for that, then we would not be doing our job as the international federation. Our Olympic and Paralympic venue, the Sambodromo, recently hosted Brazil’s National Archery Championships. It was not an official test event – that will be held at the end of 2015 – but a first chance for athletes to get a look at the venue. It was also an opportunity for our Technical Delegates to get some experience of working on the site. There is a long way to go until Rio, but it will come sooner than we all think. The qualification process begins in 2015.

World Archery President Prof Dr Uğur ERDENER was talking to World Archery Communications staff.

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World Archery @worldarchery World Archery

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Contents

1

Editorial by Prof Dr Uğur ERDENER

2 Question & Answer: World Archery President

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News

13 Archery in the Olympic Capital: Lausanne 2014 World Cup Final 25

Interview: Marcus D’ALMEIDA, Brazil’s Archery World Cup and Youth Olympic silver medallist at 16 years old

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World Archery, worldwide staff: Meet the people working behind the scenes to develop the sport

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Nanjing 2014 Youth Olympic Games: First Olympic medals for India and Brazil as host nation China and Korea impress

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Federation how to: build successful relationships with the media

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Study: measuring brain activity in recurve archers during the phases of the shot cycle

58 Zagreb 2014 World Archery Field Championships: Two out of four returning finalists defend world field titles 63

Development in the Dominican Republic: Engaging universities in PVC bow building

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Archery at the Asian Games: Plus news from other top continental events

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An archery alter-ego: renowned bass player Reggie HAMILTON

76 World Archery Excellence Centre: Construction begins in Lausanne 81 2014/2015 Indoor Archery World Cup: Pieces to the Las Vegas puzzle 87

World Rankings

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Calendar: Competition highlights

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Member Associations

93

Sponsors and Partners

96

Thanks

81 70 25 40

76 5


News

The latest news, press releases and information from World Archery See more at www.worldarchery.org

Swiss watch brand Longines extends partnership with World Archery

“L

ongines is proud to have supported the Archery World Cup as its Official Partner and Timekeeper,” the company published on its website after the Lausanne 2014 Archery World Cup Final drew to a close.

The Swiss watch brand announced the continuation of its partnership with World Archery, which it entered into in 2008.

we feel it is a privilege to continue our partnership with such a prestigious brand.” As a perfect symbol of the precision of Longines, the Official Watch for the event was a steel chronograph from the brand’s Conquest Classic collection.

“We are very pleased to renew our support for an ancient art and discipline which embodies the brand’s long-standing involvement in precision and traditional sports,” said Walter VON KÄNEL, the President of Longines.

At the end of the finals in Lausanne, Longines awarded the Longines Prize for Precision to USA archer Brady ELLISON (top right) and Mexico’s Aida ROMAN (bottom right), the male and female recurve archers who achieved the greatest degree of precision over the 2014 season.

“Moreover, the elegance of this sport, which requires extreme skill, concentration, precision, balance and discipline, is a perfect reflection of our core values, summed up in our slogan ‘Elegance is an attitude’.”

These two exceptional competitors – who also won the individual finals events in Lausanne – scored the highest number of 10s throughout all the stages of the Archery World Cup: 204 and 172 respectively.

World Archery President Prof Dr Uğur ERDENER declared: “We are truly excited that Longines will continue to support the elegant sports of archery, our events and our archers. Longines has such a tradition in sports, and such an extensive sports portfolio nowadays. At World Archery,

Aida and Brady were each presented with a trophy, a Longines watch and a cheque for CHF 5,000.

Prize for Precision: men 204 Brady ELLISON 193 Rick VAN DER VEN 190 Marcus D’ALMEIDA 175 Florian KAHLLUND 175 Pierre PLIHON

The Swiss watch brand plays a key role in timing the competitors and presenting the results for all the contests in the Archery World Cup.

World Archery launches public vote for 2014 athlete of the year awards

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n expanded award programme for 2014, which will see gongs presented at a gala ceremony in Las Vegas, has begun with World Archery asking the public to vote for its favourite athletes of the year. Voting is open until 31 January 2015 through a dedicated mini-site. World Archery is also offering people to submit images into a photographer of the year competition and nominate an exceptional

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volunteer in their archery communities for global recognition. Visit http://awards.worldarchery.org

Prize for Precision: women 172 Aida ROMAN 149 XU Jing 140 Tatiana SEGINA 133 CHENG Ming 131 Elena RICHTER


13102

compete in largest archery tournament, break world record C

ebu City, in the Philippines, ran the world’s largest archery class – 745 students – before running the largest archery competition the world has ever seen.

The 13,102 participant figure was nearly 4,000 more than the previous mark of 9,426, set in May last year in the USA. Cebu’s record attempts were conceived by archer Dondon SOMBRIO, who made PVC bows and collected enough arrows to kit out the phenomenal number of competitors. Dondon made over 3,000 bows for the event, which should soon be ratified as a Guiness World Record.

Farewells said to long-time staff member Didier MIEVILLE D

idier MIEVILLE announced his intention to leave World Archery and that the Archery World Cup Final in Lausanne would be his last event. “It has been a great nine years,” said MIEVILLE, who started his archery career in 2005 to help launch the sport’s international circuit. “It started with the 2006 edition of the World Cup and a Final at the Mayapan Pyramids in Mexico, which was probably one of the most challenging events one could organise.”

Before joining World Archery, Didier had experience at the International Gymnastics Federation and was known to be keen on hockey.

“Archery is a sport that offers breath-taking matches at world class events. It is also a sport accessible to everyone who wants to have some fun shooting some arrows.”

“As a community, World Archery is hardworking, forward-thinking and blessed with athletes that have taken advantage of new, exceptional competition ideas “It set the tone of iconic venues for and venues – and organisers that work presenting archery.” together to improve archery’s standing as Nine years later, after Finals in Dubai, a major sport.” Copenhagen, Istanbul, Tokyo and Paris – to name a few – it is fitting that Didier’s last “I wish everyone to continue with the same event is the World Cup Final in Lausanne. dedication and love of this wonderful sport: a sport I have discovered and truly enjoyed “It could not finish in a better way. My during these last nine years.” hometown, and the hometown of this federation, World Archery.”

A true Swiss and proud of his home, Didier MIEVILLE will become Director of the “La Côte” tourism office, the region between Lausanne and Geneva, as of October.

“During these nine years, we have raised the profile of archery considerably and I have been fortunate to work with some of the best people, the best team, I could ever “Didier has been an integral part of World wish. I would like to thank everyone for this.” Archery’s growth over the last decade.

He is a true team player who has always strived for better,” said World Archery Secretary General Tom DIELEN. “We understand that he now wishes to spend more time at home and explore new challenges.” “On behalf of the entire World Archery Family, we would like to thank him for his contributions and wish him the best of luck in his new career.”

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Werner Beiter

1939 – 2014

Born on 18 March 1939, Werner BEITER was a popular icon in archery worldwide thanks to his high-quality products and generous personality. He died on Tuesday 25 November 2014, aged 75.

the athletes that use his equipment. Werner loved to compare the tuning of a bow to the tuning of a musical instrument. He has, in his own personal way, composed many great symphonies in archery.”

Beiter factory in Dauchingen, Germany. He used high-speed video to make refinements to his products and was the first to make the footage available both to the public and to elite athletes.

An innovator in the field of micro plastic engineering, Werner applied precision techniques and developments from the fields of medical technology and electronics to the precision sport of archery, his passion.

He trained as a master toolmaker and designer before founding his own plastic part design office and injection molding companies in 1968.

As well as the arrow nocks, plungers and stabilisers for which the company is now widely recognised, the Beiter company continues to produce a range of accessories for the sport, including clickers, scopes and tools to this day.

The archery products he designed have been used by countless Olympic Champions and medallists, World and European champions, and have helped break many world records. Werner, known for his commitment to finding perfection in equipment, constructed a popular archery training facility – the Werner and Iris Centre, named after his wife – and had particular passion for encouraging creative initiatives within the sport. “We have lost a great inventor in archery,” said World Archery Secretary General Tom DIELEN. World Archery awarded Werner BEITER the Golden Arrow for his contribution to the sport in 2009. “Werner loved to solve archery problems. His fantastic work will continue through the work of his family, and especially through

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Over the decades that followed, Werner earned much recognition for his innovations in the field of micro plastic engineering, as his company became an industry leader in the production of parts for medical tools. In 1985, after extensive research, design and development stages, Werner began producing archery components at the Werner BEITER receiving his Golden Arrow award for his contribution to archery from the World Archery President in 2009

“World Archery and the wider Archery Family offers its sincere condolences to his wife Iris, his daughters Nicole and Simone and the entire family,” said Tom DIELEN. “On a personal level, I want to thank Werner for his eternal inspiration, his friendship and great discussions.”


Quick shots: news in brief Maria Emma GAVIRIA, President of the Archery World Cup stage in Medellin and former President of the national archery federation in Colombia, was elected President of World Archery Americas at the continental association’s general assembly in Rosario in October. She addressed delegates: “Together we will make archery one of the biggest sports in the Americas.”

Mexico City 2015 The next Archery World Cup Final date has been set. Next season’s circuit-ending two-day event will take place in the Mexican capital city on 17/18 October, five weeks after the last stage in Medellin and two weeks before Mexico City hosts a Formula 1 Grand Prix.

Nancy MYRICK, the first woman to ever shoot more than 1,200 points on a 1440 Round (then FITA Round), passed away on 27 November. World Archery sends its condolences to Nancy’s family, World Archery Americas and USA Archery. Aladin GABR was re-elected as President of World Archery Africa at the organisation’s Congress in Luxor. He highlighted the continent’s strong participation at Nanjing 2014 and that Africa will have six places at Rio 2016.

The continent is the subject of express development efforts from World Archery, and Luxor saw entries from Tunisia and Sudan for the first time

Brazilian athletes got the first opportunity to shoot in the next Olympic and Paralympic venue: Brazil’s National Archery Championships took place in the Sambodromo in November. World Archery Oceania recently voted in a new Council. Hans JENSEN from Tonga took the presidency, Tahiti’s Didier GRASS the vice-presidency. Secretary and Treasurer are now Patsy VERCOE, New Zealand, and Australian Jim LARVEN, respectively. Egypt dominated the African Archery Championships in Luxor. First Youth Olympic Champion Ibrahim SABRY won the recurve men’s title after a fairly quiet four years since Singapore. Egyptian athletes also won the women’s recurve and compound individual titles. Zimbabwe returned to the international scene: Gavin SUTHERLAND, who is now a resident of the United Kingdom, came second behind SABRY.

Fourteen African nations competed in Luxor

Archery was part of the first Invictus Games, held in Great Britain, for wounded, injured or impaired service men and women from 13 nations. The Hare East venue, which used to be the London 2012 main broadcast centre and is situated on the Olympic park, had a sell-out crowd of over a thousand for the novice, experienced recurve and experienced compound finals.

The recurve men’s podium in Luxor: (L-R) SABRY (EGY), SUTHERLAND (ZIM), ELKHOLOSY (EGY)

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Archery approved for inclusion in Tokyo 2020 Paralympic sport programme P

ara archery will make an appearance on its 26 th Summer Paralympic programme in Tokyo in 2020. It will also be included at Rio 2016 and has been featured at every Paralympic Games since the first held in Rome in 1960. According to the International Paralympic Committee, sports were assessed for worldwide participation in terms of countries and continents, the competition programme, athlete classification, antidoping programmes, rules and regulations and initiatives taken to make the sport more attractive. “Our aim is to ensure that the final Tokyo 2020 Paralympic sports programme is fresh and features the best para sports possible,” said IPC President Sir Philip CRAVEN after the announcement of 26 sports’ acceptance. “I would like to thank all the sports that submitted applications.” Para archery’s categories and structure

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have undergone some changes recently, designed to make competition easily understandable, appealing to audiences and in compliance with the IPC’s classification principles. “We have worked hard to develop the para discipline of archery to maintain its relevance and value to the Paralympic Games,” said World Archery President Prof Dr Uğur ERDENER. The level of para archery competition is ever increasing. In 2014, multiple new world records were set, particularly in the compound open and W1 divisions. At both Rio and Tokyo, attention has been focused on more severely impaired athletes. For these competitors, both these Games will feature a mixed team competition for the first time, which was introduced since World Archery assumed governance of para archery from the IPC in 2009. “Given the sport’s pedigree and our para athletes’ continuously improving standards,

it’s key that it remains a staple sport at the Paralympic Games. We’re proud to have been confirmed for Tokyo 2020.” Archery has been on the Paralympic programme since the very beginning. The sport was used as a rehabilitation tool for injured veterans by Dr Ludwig GUTTMAN. GUTTMAN organised a competition for patients with spinal cord injuries at Stoke Mandeville Hospital. This competition evolved into the International Wheelchair Games, first held in 1948 to coincide with the Olympics in London. Held again four years later, this elite multisport event for people with impairments was the precursor to the first Paralympic Games. Para archery is well integrated into the able-bodied and open side of the sport. Wheelchair athletes have competed at two past Olympic Games and para athletes are often seen at international able-bodied and open competition.


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Lausanne 2014

Archery in the Olympic Capital: Lausanne 2014 Brady ELLISON made it three titles, a historic first, Olympic silver medallist Aida took women’s gold and youth archers won compound crowns in Lausanne Words Chris WELLS World Archery Communications Manager

#WCLausanne

Images Dean ALBERGA World Archery Official Photographer

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Olympic silver medallist Aida ROMAN added another accolade: the Mexican is now a World Cup Champion

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t’s been a steady process for Aida ROMAN to get back on the individual podium on archery’s biggest stages. After collecting Olympic silver at London 2012, she faced the challenge of finding a new coach and worked through the hangover of Games success. Signs the Mexican star was back to that form appeared at the indoor worlds to begin the year, where she took gold, and were confirmed in Lausanne: Aida fought hard. She won her first match against Germany’s Lisa UNRUH after a tiebreaker, beat London team silver medallist XU Jing from China in five sets – then needed another five to overcome XU’s teammate CHENG Ming in the final. “I go step by step in this game,” said Aida after winning the Lausanne final.

Wroclaw mascot Archie went on tour… and is modelled here by Dutch coach Ron VAN DER HOFF

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“This is archery: one day you’re on top and the next you just don’t know…” Midway through her last Olympic success and the next Games, Aida is on top again. But the win did not come easily, she admitted she was nervous. “I tried not to think of the results, just improve with each arrow after the last,” explained Aida. Drawn at three-all with CHENG after three sets, ROMAN chose the right moment to up her game, unleashing two 29-point sets for one set win, one draw and the gold medal. World number one XU secured bronze. She beat Tatiana SEGINA 7-3. Russia’s SEGINA received her Lausanne invitation after a Korean withdrawal, then beat Korean JUNG Dasomi, in a quarterfinal shoot-off before losing to CHENG Ming in another tiebreaker.


LAUSANNE 2014 RECURVE WOMEN’S BRACKETS 6 XU Jing

4 XU

4

6

2

Elena RICHTER

CHENG

6

ROMAN

6

Nathalie DIELEN

CHENG Ming

4 CHENG

6

6

Aida ROMAN

Tatiana SEGINA ROMAN

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5

SEGINA

5 Lisa UNRUH

(L-R) CHENG (CHN), ROMAN (MEX), XU (CHN) – recurve women’s podium

5 XU

7

BRONZE

3

SEGINA

JUNG Dasomi

International Olympic Committee President Thomas BACH came to watch the recurve finals

Germany’s Lisa UNRUH capped a successful season by taking ROMAN to a one-arrow tiebreaker in the Lausanne 2014 quarterfinals

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LAUSANNE 2014 COMPOUND MEN’S BRACKETS 148 Reo WILDE

146 WILDE

146

139

PJ DELOCHE

146 9* DELOCHE

145

DEATON

148

Kevin BURRI

Rajat CHAUHAN

144 DELOCHE

145

144

Bridger DEATON

Alex DAMBAEV DEATON

147

146 9 ELZINGA

144

145 WILDE 146

Seb PEINEAU

BRONZE

144 ELZINGA

Peter ELZINGA

Indoor Archery World Cup Champion PEINEAU didn’t make it past the quarters

LAUSANNE 2014 COMPOUND WOMEN’S BRACKETS 144 Sara LOPEZ

145 LOPEZ

147

140

146

Erika JONES

JONES

126

LOPEZ

147

C DE GUILI

A USQUIANO

145 JONES

144

145

Linda OCHOA

Toja CERNE AVDEEVA

145

137

CERNE

145 Natalia AVDEEVA

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140 AVDEEVA 145

BRONZE

144 CERNE

Albina LOGINOVA


Neither Sara LOPEZ nor Bridger DEATON needed any help for their plane tickets to the Final: both topped their respective compound – women’s and men’s – World Cup rankings and arrived in Lausanne as number one seeds. Both, aged 20 and still able to compete as juniors, converted those top seeds into Archery World Cup Champion titles. The States’ DEATON, shooting his first international season as a senior, beat Indoor Archery World Cup Champion Sebastien PEINEAU from France in the quarterfinals. He then faced his USA senior Reo WILDE – who won the first World Cup Final – in a coming-of-age contest for the right to shoot for gold. WILDE actually looked stronger throughout the match but in the final end planted his first two arrows into the nine, opening the door for Bridger to overtake the veteran. Reo was happy an American went on to win gold. And Bridger did it in style: he did not miss the 10-ring until his 12th arrow of the final against world number one PierreJulien DELOCHE. The Frenchman came second at the last worlds in Belek, losing to youth Dutch athlete Mike SCHLOESSER in the gold match. After beating the Netherlands’ Peter ELZINGA in the semis in a shoot-off, another loss to a junior shooting the senior level relegated PJ to another silver. “Just to come to Lausanne is overwhelming,” DEATON said after the match. “And to have good results in my first season…” It took just two seasons for Sara LOPEZ to win her first Archery World Cup Final title. She emerged at Antalya in 2013 and broke the 15-arrow match world record last season, but fell

Sara LOPEZ: 15-arrow match world record holder and Colombia’s second World Cup Final winner

This was Bridger DEATON’s first international season as a senior

Reo WILDE lost to his junior States teammate DEATON in the semifinals by a single point

Mexico’s OCHOA made her second Final after Edinburgh back in 2010

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LAUSANNE 2014 RECURVE MEN’S BRACKETS 6 Rick VAN DER VEN

4 VAN DER VEN 4

2

Pierre PHILON

0 KAHLLUND

6

ELLISON

6

Adrian FABER

Florian KAHLLUND

5 DALMEIDA

6

0

Brady ELLISON

Jake KAMINSKI ELLISON

6

6 DALMEIDA

5 OH Jin Hyek

6 VAN DER VEN 6

BRONZE

short against her Colombian compatriot Alejandra USQUIANO at the Paris 2013 World Cup Final. USQUIANO went on to beat the USA’s Erika JONES to gold in France. The pair were matched up in the Lausanne quarterfinals, offering Erika some form of revenge – which she duly took, taking advantage of a failure with Alejandra’s equipment to advance to the semis and a second contest with Toja CERNE on the year. JONES won Medellin individual stage gold by beating CERNE, from Slovenia, earlier in the year – and she repeated the result in Lausanne, storming to a comfortable nine-point victory and setting up second ticket to the Archery World Cup Final gold medal match in two years.

Marcus D’ALMEIDA (BRA), Brady ELLISON (USA) and Rick VAN DER VEN (NED) on the Lausanne 2014 recurve men’s podium

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4 KAHLLUND

Marcus DALMEIDA

Meanwhile, on the opposite site of the brackets, LOPEZ had beaten the Switzerland’s representative in her first match and Natalia AVDEEVA in her second. AVDEEVA, from Russia, beat CERNE to compound women’s bronze: then let slip that it was her birthday. Sara LOPEZ and Erika JONES traded a point here and there through the first nine shots of the final. Drawn with six arrows left to shoot, LOPEZ cleaned the back straight: scoring 60 out of 60 points and building a two point lead to win. Erika shot 29 points every end – with one arrow just out of the 10-ring every time – and it wasn’t enough. The former world number one (LOPEZ recently overtook her) lost the World Cup Final to a Colombian athlete for the second year in a row.


Rick VAN DER VEN closed out a final set over Florian KAHLLUND to take bronze

Another USA archer, Brady ELLISON, knows what it is like to be close but not quite there. After winning back-to-back Archery World Cup Champion title in 2010 and 2011, Brady was second at Tokyo 2012 and bronze medallist in 2013. Shooting at his fifth consecutive Final in Lausanne – an impressive feat in itself – ELLISON collected an unprecedented third gold medal at a World Cup Final. It would be easy to be fooled into thinking he beat Korean Olympic Champion OH Jin Hyek for that third gold, too – but their match was the first of the day and a quarterfinal contest. Brady was trailing by four set points quickly and looked all but out. Suddenly, his level rocketed – and the Edinburgh and Istanbul champ won the next two sets to level the match at 4-all. They split the last, scoring 28 points each and took the match to a tiebreaker. Brady’s next 10 was better. His formed flowed into his semifinal match against Dutch archer and top seed Rick VAN DER VEN, where a lone perfect

30 series made the difference – and Brady was into his fourth World Cup Final gold medal match in five years. His opponent there: in his first. At his first Final, in his first full season and fresh off the back of winning Brazil’s first Olympic medal at the Youth Games in Nanjing. Marcus D’ALMEIDA had not lost a set in his first two matches. In fact, he had not even surrendered a set point to either States man Jake KAMINSKI or Florian KAHLLUND from Germany. That clean sheet would not continue in the gold final. D’ALMEIDA and ELLISON drew the first, Marcus won the second, Brady took the third – then they split the fourth. Four all. In the fifth: 10-9-9 for both, but one of ELLISON’s arrows was close to the line. It did not get upgraded. In the tiebreaker, Marcus shot first. Marcus shot a nine. Brady shot a nine, too… but his was closer. “I wanted to remind everyone I’m still a threat,” said a victorious Brady. “It’s been too long since I won a tournament.” “Don’t forget about me.”

ELLISON beat Olympic Champion OH Jin Hyek in a first-round shoot-off; in any other event, it would have made a fantastic gold medal match

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AN UNFORGETTABLE MEMORY A SPECTATOR’S IMPRESSION OF THE LAUSANNE 2014 WORLD CUP FINAL By Olivier SCHÖPFER, Former Head of Sport at Swiss newspaper Le Matin

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dream setting, that of the place of Navigation, in Ouchy, probably the most beautiful place in Lausanne; a rare beautiful summer time; impeccable organisation: everything came together the weekend of 6/7 September for the Archery World Cup Finals be successful. They have been and will remain an unforgettable memory for me. First impression: the VIP welcome is warm and spotless, as is the video clip by World Archery showing Lake Geneva, Ouchy harbour, and then dive onto the shooting line set on the place of navigation. One is immediately in the mood for a great event. And it will be this Sunday from 11:00 to 17:00. The day before, I had followed the compound competitions on the World Archery website. Very informative. On site, it’s easy to understand why. The infrastructure is prodigious, cameras are placed so as to show every detail, the giant screen not only gives images of the competition but statistics for each archer – and the two targets are equipped with a laser enabling graphics to show the position of each arrow with near-absolute accuracy... A remote control car emblazoned with the colours of Kia, one of World Archery’s sponsors, brings the arrows back to the shooting line and is piloted by a young hopeful athlete from the Compagnie des Archers de Lausanne. It’s a car that caught the eye of Mayor of Lausanne Daniel BRÉLAZ who came to watch the competition in the company of International Olympic Committee President Thomas BACH. But of course, this would be an empty nutshell without the key players, the best archers in the world. The Sunday was reserved for recurve bows, the bow that accompanied me in my early shooting days 12 years ago. I was keen to see the athletes’ technique, the flight of the arrows, time and competition pressure management. The first thing that strikes you when you are a user of ‘normal’ archery fields is that the shooting line

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classical 70 metres, but in everything else around: the target face appears small, tenuous, insignificant in the immensity and complexity of the setting.

of an international competition is very different. Not in distance, it is still the normal 70 metres, but in everything else around: the target face appears small, tenuous, insignificant in the immensity and complexity of the arena setting. There’s the giant screen, on the right, business partners’ advertising, the podium between the shooting line and the targets, the cameras, including one mounted on a huge arm, the stands in which the public gives voice. Enough to impress even the best. The competition itself is incredibly well paced. No downtime, no opportunity to be bored. The level is exceptional. While an average archer like me is delighted with an 8, here we are in the yellow universe: all arrows or almost go into the 10 or 9. A red, and you hear some “Ohs…” of surprise from the stands. One comes to consider it almost quite natural and easy to put the arrow in the centre of the target. Illusion, of course, as when we say that it is easy to play tennis after seeing Roger FEDERER perform. The movements of the archers are fluid, seem to require no effort. At release, no movement, the athlete is frozen like a statue. At first glance, however. Because on super-slow motion – just outstanding, like the whole re-

alisation – it shows something else: bows that vibrate and shiver in the release of the arrow, the latter undulating through the air like a snake sneaking into tall grass, then spinning on itself more than 200km per hour before the flat “pok” sound of its arrival on goal. Fantastic, all that escapes the human eye, but not to that of the camera. This day was also a chance to see friends that you would normally only meet at the field of the Company des Archers de Lausanne. Some as volunteers, for the greeting, the demonstrations, for staff. And others at work: Nathalie DIELEN, who managed the feat of taking a set to the world number one, China’s Jing XU, courtesy of a 10 at the first arrow. Or Iliana DEINEKO, a young and promising engaged in the mixed team and who discovered hat on this occasion the specific conditions of such an event. In the end, eyeful memories, the full head, heart filled. A great pleasure to have lived that for real, in three dimensions. Pleasure of discovery, pleasure to see how everything is so professional, pleasure of emotions felt. And the desire to train harder, not to match these great champions one day, but to simply progress, inspired by and following their example.


Iliana DEINEKO and, behind her, Florian FABER – the two young archers given the nod to represent Swizterland in the mixed team event against Mexico to gain experience

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LAUSANNE 2014 RECURVE MIXED TEAM BRACKETS MEXICO

6 6

0

0 SWITZERLAND

Aida ROMAN & Luis VELEZ

Aida ROMAN

Iliana DIENKO & Florian FABER

LAUSANNE 2014 COMPOUND MIXED TEAM BRACKETS USA

158 158

151 Erika JONES & Bridger DEATON

SWITZERLAND

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Patrizio HOFER & C DE GIULI

Bridger DEATON left Lausanne having won individual and mixed team – with Erika JONES – titles

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The mixed team competition at the Archery World Cup Final pits the best recurve and compound pairs from the season’s four stages against mixed teams from the host nation. With the 2014 edition being held in Lausanne, the Olympic Capital and home of the International Olympic Committee, the mixed team contenders came from Switzerland. Eventual individual finalists Erika JONES and Bridger DEATON took the opportunity for extra practice in the finals arena in their match against Patrizio HOFER and Clementine DE GIULI. The Swiss pair shot a respectable 151, but their opponents were impressive. Bridger DEATON drilled every single one of his eight arrows into the 10-ring. (It was a sign of what was to come in his final-four matches that followed soon after.) Erika JONES shot two nines in their first four arrows, then joined DEATON in the 10. The USA pair won by seven points. Junior archers Florian FABER and Iliana DEINEKO represented Switzerland in the recurve mixed team final, and were watched by International Olympic Committee President Thomas BACH among other high-ranking VIPs.

RECURVE MEN

Brady ELLISON

RECURVE WOMEN

Aida ROMAN

FABER got to the last eight phase at the Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing shortly before Lausanne and DEINEKO had previously competed for the Swiss senior team. The opportunity to pit two of Switzerland’s promising young archers against Mexico was too good to pass up, especially to gain experience ahead of the first European Games in Baku next summer. They only lost the first set to Mexico by a single point – before Aida ROMAN and Luis VELEZ, who travelled to Lausanne to compete in just the mixed team event saying “shooting with Aida is always fantastic”, pulled away. The Mexican pair won the back two sets thanks to three Aida 10s and the match, six set points to nil. Aida ROMAN, like Bridger DEATON, had both mixed team and individual gold in Lausanne. Brady ELLISON won his third title and Sara LOPEZ inherited the crown from her Colombian teammate. The next Archery World Cup Final will be held in Mexico City on 17/18 October 2015. See full results, news, photos, videos from the Lausanne 2014 Archery World Cup Final at www.worldarchery.org

COMPOUND MEN

Bridger DEATON

COMPOUND WOMEN

Sara LOPEZ

An unprecedented third Archery Aida, on the podium two years Still eligible to shoot as a junior Taking up the mantle: 15-arrow World Cup Final Champion title for out of the next Olympic Games at and in his first international match world record holder LOPEZ the States’ Brady. Rio 2016. season, World Cup Final gold. inheriting title from teammate.

Marcus D’ALMEIDA

CHENG Ming

PJ DELOCHE

Erika JONES

Rick VAN DER VEN

XU Jing

Reo WILDE

Natalia AVDEEVA

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Carioca craze:

Rio produces youngest ever World Cup Finalist Marcus D’ALMEIDA is Brazil’s best archer. He won silver at the Youth Olympic Games and the Archery World Cup Final in 2014… and he’s only 16 years old

Words Andrea VASQUEZ World Archery Reporter Images Dean ALBERGA World Archery Official Photographer

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orn in Rio de Janeiro, the host city of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, Marcus Vicinius CARVALHO D’ALMEIDA has suddenly become one of Brazil’s brightest hopes for a medal at that next Olympiad. “Marcus Vinicius shines in archery and turns into a medal hope for 2016” and “Marcus Vinicius, a Brazilian revelation” read the headlines in the Brazilian media this summer: “Marcus Vinicius makes history for Brazil with a silver medal in archery.” Despite the attention, Marcus does not seem phased at all. With maturity far beyond his years

and a serenity that encompasses the young man as he talks, walks and competes, he explains to me: “I don’t feel any pressure. I train as much as any other archer does.” “I’m not different. We all have the same chance to win.” But Marcus is different. He’s already surprised the archery world with all he has achieved at the age of 16. In 2014, he not only became the youngest athlete to compete at an Archery World Cup Final but climbed the podium there. That was just weeks after he became the only Brazilian to ever win an Olympic medal in archery.

Marcus went from novice to international archer in three years

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Marcus and Sarah NIKITIN shot the Medellin mixed team final against Korea

It took a shoot-off to separate D’AL ELLISON in the Lausanne World Cu

Not phased: pressure no problem Shooting in Wroclaw: Marcus’ first individual finals match

He came second in the recurve men’s event at the Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing, China in August. With two years to go to Rio 2016, Marcus is gathering attention from the Brazilian Olympic Committee (he was included in the nation’s athlete of the year voting in 2014), the media and his colleagues for his great potential. When he returned from Lausanne the President of Brazil met and congratulated him for his outstanding performances. “Everybody asks me about how different I feel for achieving so much at my age,” says Marcus. “But the truth is that it is the same as if I was older.” Perhaps it might be the same for the athlete, only focused on the goal at hand. But for his growing cohort of fans in Brazil and abroad, Marcus is special.

The beginning A youngest child and only son, Marcus has four sisters who – along with his parents – have been extremely supportive of everything he has done. Before archery, he practised swimming, sailing and jujutsu, but at the age of 12 he decided on his favourite sport. “I don’t know why I chose archery,” Marcus says to me, sitting in the sport’s Lausanne headquarters during a break from the World Cup Final training field. “I like that it’s a sport of precision; one that requires extreme focus. The competition is fantastic, exciting and you can see the results immediately… I love that.” “My parents always told me to practise a sport. I took their advice and now I thank them so much – because I think I’m on the right track.” He winks as he says those words. It is a subtle hint that his peacefulness contains a good deal of confidence, too. Marcus’ potential was spotted early. After only two years of training, he was invited to join the Brazilian team. At the age of 14 years he accepted the challenge and moved to Campinas, one of the 10 biggest cities in Brazil, located in Sao Paulo state. He left his family, friends and school behind to pursue the big The Brazilian ended up with Brazil’s first Olympic medal in Nanjing

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ELLISON congratulates Marcus after their Lausanne match

LMEIDA and the USA’s Brady up Final gold medal match Evandro and Marcus embrace after his semifinal in Lausanne

dream: become an Olympic Champion. It was a huge turning point in his life. He moved 500 kilometres away from his caring and nurturing sisters and parents – and has lived at the Olympic training centre ever since. Marcus stays at the facility in Campinas from Monday to Friday every week, then travels to Maricá, a small municipality 36 kilometres from Rio where his family and girlfriend live, each weekend he can. Marcus makes a pause to take a deep breath. He turns nostalgic when I ask him a question about his family… quiet for a moment, lost in his own thoughts. “They are the most important thing in life for me. All of them. Every minute spent with them is a treasure I keep,” says the Carioca. (Carioca is a Brazilian word that refers to natives of Rio de Janerio.) Less than one year after his move away from Maricá, Marcus was wearing the Brazilian jersey at his first World Cup competition in Wroclaw, Poland. That will forever be where his journey as an international athlete began. With the cooperation of the Time Brasil sports authorities, the Brazilian Olympic Committee and Rio 2016, World Archery implemented a development plan in Brazil to try to produce medal contenders for the nation’s own Olympics. Marcus has come through that programme, and the Campinas centre he trains at was built with the facilities, staff and the expertise to support a strong team. Marcus’ first coach was Dirma Miranda DOS SANTOS. Then came Korean LIM Hee Sik, followed by Great Britain’s Richard PRIESTMAN. Now, he trains with Brazil’s new head coach Renzo RUELE, from Italy, and his assistant Evandro DE AZEVEDO in Campinas. Evandro is the coach that travels with the team, and particularly with Marcus. Spending so much time together in airports, planes and hotels has made Marcus and Evandro’s relationship closer than that of a normal athlete and coach.

During his first full international season, Marcus climbed into the top 10 in the world rankings

The right attitude: smiles and thumbs-up during Lausanne competition

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Home Games: Marcus in front of the Olympic countdown clock next to the Lausanne Finals arena in Ouchy

Marcus D’ALMEIDA World ranking: 8* (all-time high) Age: 16 Match wins**: 29 Match win percentage**: 74% Shoot-off wins**: 3 Shoot-off win percentage**: 50% International podiums this season • Silver: Lausanne 2014 Archery World Cup Final • Silver: Nanjing 2014 Youth Olympic Games • Mixed team silver: Medellin 2014 Archery World Cup stage 2 • Three golds: individual, team and mixed team: Santiago de Chile 2014 South American Games * World Ranking correct as of 1 November 2014. ** Individual world-level international matches: World Cup, World Championships and world multisport events.

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“Evandro is my friend. He has always been there for me since we met,” explains Marcus. “He’s like the brother I never had.” “We are friends and I will always wish him the best, but as his coach I feel responsible for everything that happens to him,” Evandro adds. “It’s a mix of the job of a father, brother and friend.” They look at each other, smile and give a barely-noticeable nod. They understand what their relationship is like nobody else. Whatever mix of responsibilities Evandro has, he is more than a coach. “In everything I have been through, he has never let me down or behind,” says Marcus. “One day, we were coming back to Brazil after a tournament. I was going to Maricá and Evandro to Belo Horizonte. I missed my connection and instead of leaving me alone he let his plane leave and waited until I was gone…” “I will keep that day in my mind forever.”

The achievements This March, Marcus started his first full international season. He won three gold medals – individual, team and mixed team – at the South American Games in Santiago de Chile and made at least the last 16 in the individual events at each Archery World Cup stage in 2014. His first finals appearance came at the Medellin stage. With partner Sarah NIKITIN, Marcus shot the mixed team gold medal match against Olympic Champion OH Jin Hyek and Korea. The Brazilian pair lost, five set points to one. At Wroclaw in August, Marcus secured an invitation to the Archery World Cup Final. It was also his last competition preparation ahead of the Nanjing 2014 Summer Youth Olympic Games, where he was one of the favourites to win gold. He upset India’s Jayanta TALUKDAR and beat Olympic team silver medallist Jake KAMINSKI from the USA on route to the individual bronze medal match. With a chance at his first individual podium, Marcus held his own in the Wroclaw arena but couldn’t beat experienced Frenchman Jean-Charles VALLADONT.

That fourth place finish pushed Marcus up into the second spot in the Archery World Cup circuit rankings, behind just London 2012 finalist and fourth-place finisher Rick VAN DER VEN. Like Dutchman VAN DER VEN, it also pushed Marcus up into the top 10 in the recurve men’s world ranking lists. When the competition was over, he flew straight to Nanjing. The event became particularly special for the young Brazilian before competition even began. “I had already spoken with my coach during the journey: ‘imagine if I carry the flag of Brazil during the opening,’ I told him,” Marcus was quoted as saying when he was informed that he would lead the Brazilian delegation out into the stadium at the Nanjing opening ceremony. “It was an important moment for my life and personal career,” says Marcus now. “I’m an athlete and I have always wanted to make my country proud. Carrying the flag was another dream come true.” A dream that became complete when he won the silver medal later in the week. Drawn against Korean international rookie LEE Woo Seok for gold, Marcus shot a match that would have beaten most other archers on the field. But LEE was exceptional. He drilled 13 of his 15 arrows into the 10-ring and shot four perfect sets in the five-set final. Marcus lost the match, 7-3. “Hi everyone! I just won silver at the Youth Olympics in Nanjing. I want to share my happiness and would like to thank everyone. This victory is not only mine,” Marcus wrote on his Facebook page. “It was magical to represent my country and to see all your support was very important to me.” The reaction to the medal from the Brazilian media was, predictably, explosive. “I like them talking about me, about archery. It’s good to know that Brazil is getting some knowledge of our sport, of how we are preparing for Rio 2016,” Marcus says, already aware of the need to promote not just himself but the sport of archery ahead of his home Games.

More than a coach: Marcus and Evandro’s coach-athlete relationship is a winning combination

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Nanjing was not the end of Marcus’ season. He travelled from the Youth Olympic Games to the Olympic Capital of Lausanne in search of another title: Archery World Cup Final Champion. It would not be an easy task but Marcus was motivated. He had the honour of being the youngest ever qualifier already, and the Brazilian press were behind him. “I think here in Lausanne I can win a medal because I am ranked second in the competition so far. I came from the other side of the world, so I will go for it,” Marcus said two days before the World Cup Final started. He shot on Sunday 7 September. Recurve Sunday. And he did not lose a set in his first two matches: the only archer with that record heading into the gold finals. Marcus was making it look easy. But his final match against two-time Archery World Cup Final Champion Brady ELLISON would be tight. The commentator in the venue announced that the USA favourite was 10 years Marcus’ senior before the match began. Brady – who started his international career as a junior, too – looked at the booth, opened his arms and questioned why that particular fact needed to be revealed. It wasn’t relevant in the match, and there was no such divide in the scores at the target. Marcus started with an eight, which was then followed by two arrows in the 10-ring to draw the first set. He won the second. Brady won the third. Then they split the fourth. Four all. The last regulation set: two nines and a 10 for Marcus – the same for Brady, although one of his nines was close to cutting the line of the 10-ring and had to be checked by the judge. It wasn’t upgraded: shoot-off. One arrow to decide the recurve men’s title at the 2014 Archery World Cup Final: Marcus shot first. He shot a nine. Brady shot next: nine… but closer. Sunday 7 September 2014, Independence Day in Brazil, and the day Marcus D’ALMEIDA made history. Silver for the youngest ever – and first ever Brazilian – athlete at the Final of archery’s premiere international circuit. But there’s still more to come… the still relatively inexperienced Marcus had been travelling long distances, across a number of time zones for over a month when he arrived in Lausanne. Before his final, he admits he lost faith in himself and struggled to convince himself that he was strong enough to shoot it, and shoot well. His coach and friend Evandro took his iPad and showed him a popular motivational video on YouTube: “Look at this. This is what you need to see today, you can make it.” “His reaction was the best,” remembers Evandro. “After watching it, he was roaring like a lion.” Filling his mind with positive thoughts and harbouring regret at losing his confidence, Marcus went straight to the field to give it all. He did himself, Evandro, his family back in Maricá and country proud.

He was not calm and contained during interviews as usual that day, but gushing with emotion.

The future Marcus’ progress has been incredibly fast. His journey from beginner to international took three years, to Archery World Cup finalist and silver medallist at the Youth Olympic Games and Lausanne 2014 just four. With two years to go until Rio 2016, Marcus is focused on achieving great results at the next Olympic Games. Before then, he still has two Archery World Cup seasons, the Pan-American Games at Toronto 2015, two World Archery Championships, youth and senior, and other major competitions in and out of Brazil to compete at. “Everything I have done until today is part of my work for Rio 2016 were I want to be a champion. Not only for what it means but because it is my home,” says Marcus, determined. “I believe I can win a medal at Rio 2016.” Brazil will receive the full six quota places – three women, three men – as the host nation. “Marcus is young. He has the opportunity to keep winning titles, but nobody knows for sure,” says level-headed Evandro. “Everything he is living at the moment is forcing him to mature faster than any other person his age. Don’t forget that he is just 16 years old.” He is part of a new generation of archers that were born into the set system. Not that long ago, recurve head-to-head archery consisted of straight-score, set-length matches – but Marcus only knows the set format and it shows in his shooting. “Archery’s format allows you to come back at almost every stage,” mentioned Marcus after winning silver in Nanjing. “You can win from almost any set. It doesn’t matter what you’ve already done, the next shot is always the most important.” The young Brazilian seems to improve with that next shot, getting better as a match progresses. It is something that will suit him well, if it continues over the next few years – even if his coach Evandro would rather he shoots his best from the start! No matter what happens in the next few years, Marcus is proof of the future in archery: young athletes succeeding on the world stage thanks to a combination of talent, attitude and the support of a sound competitive development programme. “In Brazil you only get media coverage if you have good results,” the three-time international silver medallist in 2014 says. “I don’t know if I’m a promise of further success for Brazil in archery or what’s going to happen with my shooting.” “I’m just enjoying myself and doing my best to avoid all the pressure that this attention might bring.” These are not the words of a 16-year-old who has found and enjoyed his five minutes of fame. These are the words of an international athlete on the rise, with the potential to achieve big things.

My family is the most important thing to me. To remember their happiness is my biggest pride.

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Marcus was one of 12 athletes in Time Brasil’s sportsperson of 2014 vote

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“I’ll remember this for the next two years,” said Marcus, after the Brazilian national championships in the Sambodromo

Shooting in the Rio 2016 venue for the first time

Seven questions One dream? “To become an Olympic Champion” What is your favourite place? “My mom’s house” What is your favourite food? “Stroganoff” Who is your hero? “Ayrton Senna. He was a nice man and a good athlete, a good combination” Do you have a girlfriend? “Yes. We have been together for two years. She lives in Maricá but things work well between us no matter the distance” If not archery, then what? “I don’t really know…” One piece of advice? “It is never over until it is finished” A Brazilian national team title for Marcus’ men’s trio

Calm and collected: Marcus focused while loading his bow during Lausanne 2014

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World office: World staff World Archery is a truly international federation. Home to a staff of 10 different nationalities, expanding to 19 at events and a board and committee list including individuals from more than 30 nations…

Words Ludivine MAITRE WICKI World Archery Senior Communications Coordinator Images Dean ALBERGA World Archery Official Photographer

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lthough English is the official language of communication, it is certainly not the only tongue you will hear spoken in the Lausanne offices. French, Spanish, Italian, Dutch and many more have all recently been uttered within the headquarters’ walls. This happens to be highly useful, of course, due to the variety of countries – each with different mother tongues – that the organisation operates in. Staff members come from a large variety of backgrounds, not always from sports, and sometimes from archery, sometimes not. Those in the office fulfil three main services to members: event management, development and communications. Plus there’s the office administration function, including finances, human resources and IT.

But there aren’t enough people in the office – or with the right expertise – to run the calendar of international events World Archery delivers. So while some office staff travel to tournaments, they are supplemented by event specialists, working closely with local organising committees. The World Archery events department coordinates the Archery World Cup, Indoor Archery World Cup and world championships for each of the sport’s disciplines. It also works in partnership with external organisations including the International Olympic Committee, International Paralympic Committee, International World Games Association, International World Masters Games Associations, FISU and others to deliver other large and multisport events.


Assistant to the Secretary General Thomas AUBERT won medals with the French national archery team

Bringing the passion: Italian Ianseo crew members Andrea GABARDI and Matteo PISANI

Speaker Steven GEORGE, who worked on archery at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, from Great Britain

Spanish Events Director Juan Carlos HOLGADO (left), British Events Manager Chris MARSH (middle) and Belgian Secretary General Tom DIELEN (middle right) during the team managers’ meeting in Wroclaw

Juan Carlos HOLGADO, Events Director since October 2004, who was Olympic Champion with the Spanish archery team at Barcelona 1992, has experience as a competitor, coach and organiser. Among other hats, Juan Carlos served as Technical Operations Manager at the Athens Olympic Games just before starting at World Archery. Since 2012, the event team has an in-house Events Manager, too. Chris MARSH is a former British Champion and record holder who has competed from club to world championship level across five continents, representing both Great Britain and Switzerland. He also previously worked as the Archery Competition Manager for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. “Not sure where it came from but I always wanted to shoot a bow and arrow,” Chris says. Archery was an intriguing alternative to a young 13 year old, living in the Shropshire English countryside, where the traditional sports of football, cricket and rugby were the only options at school. Chris contacted a local club and he was very fortunate to have his introductory course by the mother of Leroy WATSON, Olympic team bronze medallist at the 1988 Seoul Games. “The club members were very welcoming, helpful and the challenge of shooting and competing was addictive, and I still am after 26 years.” One Spaniard, one Brit… requiring an Iranian Events Assistant and Swiss Project Manager to complete the department. Both Raheleh AHADPOUR and Laurent HADORN have a background in sports. Laurent is an active tennis player and coach who has taken youth teams to national titles and won regional championships himself. Raheleh was a canoe athlete and coach for nine years. She won several international championships, but also practised archery in Iran before she moved to Switzerland to continue her studies in sport. To complement an AISTS master programme, Raheleh had to do an internship. As she was familiar with archery, she applied to World Archery and that’s how she became part of the family. “What I really like is the team spirit and supportive atmosphere among people,” she says. An opinion and feeling shared by all office and event staff. Andrea VASQUEZ, Communications Coordinator at Medellin local organising committee, acquiesces: “Working with the team has been an amazing experience so far. I am very proud to work with such a great group of supportive, enthusiastic and trustworthy people.” Back in January 2014, the Colombian was offered to coordinate communications for the Archery World Cup stage in Medellin and met the World Archery team in May. By that time World Archery was looking for someone to coordinate communications at the World Field Championships in Zagreb and Andrea accepted the job. Although archery was a new scenario for her, Andrea has found it interesting and been enjoying it since then. She admits that she took some archery lessons but immediately realised she was no good: “I’d rather keep my mind on the writing part.”

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Juan Carlos HOLGADO Events Director

Juan-Carlos holds a Masters of Management and Administration of Sport from the Polytechnic University of Madrid. He’s a four-time Olympian – 1988, 1992, 1996 and 2000 – and won gold at Barcelona ’92. He’s run or participated in more than 200 seminars around the world.

COLOMBIA

Carl ARKY

Live TV Commentator The announcer for Weber State University broadcasting of basketball and American football games, Carl’s archery ability is – in his own words – “laughable”. He started commentating on archery at Ogden 2011 and has been on the tour ever since.

Dean ALBERGA

Official Photographer Now Archery GB coach Lloyd BROWN was the first person to put a bow in Dean’s hands – when he was on vacation in Suriname, Lloyd was running an archery introduction project there! Dean works in archery 24/7 – but does enjoy the occasional round of golf, too.

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Andreas LORENZ Athlete Marshall

Andreas highlights his best memory as the Final of the 2007 Archery World Cup in Dubai. He started shooting when he was five or six, still shoots now and is best recognised when collecting athletes from the practice range in time for their appearance on the finals field.

SLOVAKIA

Countries covered by office staff are shaded pink, normal event staff yellow!

(Map not to scale and not geographically accurate)

Raheleh AHADPOUR

Member Services Coordinator When Raheleh does go shooting, she says she spends about a third of her time trying to find the arrows she shot that did not hit the target. She speaks fluent English, French and Farsi – and is the first point of contact for national member associations in World Archery.

Rocky BESTER Show Producer Rocky’s worked in film, television, live events and huge sports games. He produced archery at the Athens 2004 Olympic Games because he had produced Beach Volleyball at Sydney 2000 and did not want to do it twice in a row. (He’s worked on archery ever since!)

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Six in-office nationalities at one table: staff celebrate the awarding of the 2015 Archery World Cup Final and 2017 World Archery Championships to Mexico City with a Mexican-style dinner

Rather longer on the communications staff: Dean ALBERGA. World Archery’s official photographer since 2006, he still appreciates the atmosphere. “To me it’s more a family than a team,” says Dean “I see them almost as much as my wife and kids back home.” Binational Dutch and Surinamese and an archer himself, Dean ALBERGA explains that like any family there are disagreements, “but in the end we all want the same thing: make archery better.” Among other familiar faces at World Archery events, show producer Rocky BESTER has been around since the 2004 Olympic Games. After producing beach volleyball at Sydney 2000, the Australian born who now lives in South Africa was asked to do archery in Athens. He accepted the position, and “magic happened!” When World Archery developed and then implemented the plan for the World Cup, Rocky was asked to deliver the sport presentation. Both parties were keen to work together and he has been involved with World Archery ever since. Rocky likes the ability of the team to put the event before the ego.

From left to right: Britain, Belgium, Marrakesh organiser Meriam, Somalia, Switzerland and Iran!

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“World Archery is a team that works for the good of the sport and not for personal praise, making every day a pleasure,” he says. “World Archery is living proof of what clear vision and professional application can be done to raise the profile of a sport globally. Add a unique ability to combine professional leadership with friendship and a positive working environment, and you have, in my estimation, the reason that the team continues to consistently deliver events of the highest international standard.” Friendship is often a bridge into World Archery team. Andreas LORENZ was asked by his friend Juan Carlos after the first World Cup in Croatia 2006 if he could help assist archers and teams as well as layout the field of play. Andreas was already a member of the World Archery Technical Committee since 2001 and Target Committee since 2009. In everyday life Andreas works as the Sales and Customer Service Manager at Beiter, a well-known archery equipment manufacturer in Germany. An archer himself, Andreas had a dream: to compete at the Olympic Games! Qualified for the 1988 Olympics, a decision of his national Olympic committee’s medical commission almost prevented him from attaining that dream… Although he never had the chance to compete directly, Andreas was involved in the past three Olympic Games and has shot at an Olympic venue: “I fulfilled my dream to shoot at the Olympics. It was in Athens in 2004 together with other archery friends, the night before the finals.” If the Olympic Games is the biggest celebration of people from many different nations coming together to celebrate sport, it’s a fitting memory to encompass what this international team, delivering international archery events to an international level around the globe is… …10 nationalities in office – including dual passports – 19 at events and many more in boards and committees… …a truly international federation.


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Nanjing 2014:

Chinese and Korean athletes impress at Youth Olympics The second Youth Olympic Games gathered 64 cadet archers in Nanjing, China, to compete for medals in individual recurve brackets and the unique mixed nationality, mixed team competition – only seen at this event

“Y Words Chris WELLS World Archery Communications Manager Images Dean ALBERGA World Archery Official Photographer

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ou can’t get any better than a shoot-off in the final,” said International Olympic Committee President Thomas BACH after watching host nation competitor LI Jiaman win the individual recurve girls’ competition at Nanjing 2014 on a one-arrow tiebreaker. “It was a fantastic competition.” LI was conistent in her advance through the brackets but her final, against France’s Melanie GAUBIL, was not smooth sailing. “I was so nervous, sweating all over,” admitted the young Chinese girl, knowing her parents, family and friends were watching. She was 5-3 set points down and needed to win the last set to force a one-arrow sudden-death situation for the Youth Olympic title. And she was alone in the arena. Every other athlete had their coach with them but LI’s coach – three-time Olympian, Atlanta 1996 individual silver and Athens 2004 team silver medallist HE Ying – was not accredited to join her on the finals field of play due to a cap on the number of officials host nation China could include in its delegation. Jiaman composed herself, communicated with her coach in the stands via a system of hand signals the pair had developed, and shot three sweet 10s to drive the match to a shoot-off. She then shot another 10, a fourth in a row, to win it. Asked after the competition what the hand signals she shared with her coach before the final arrow meant, LI laughed: “I had to calm her down! I gave her the sign to say ‘don’t worry, I can do it’!” It is the second time in two Olympics in China that a Chinese archer has won individual women’s gold. ZHANG Juanjuan won Beijing 2008. She sent LI a message of support before the final.

“I can’t believe an Olympic Champion was behind me,” said Jiaman. Now she is one, at the youth level, too. The individual title was not LI’s first of the tournament. She had already won mixed team gold with Luis Gabriel MORENO. Not your average Chinese name – and that is because the archery mixed team event at the Youth Olympic Games is mixed nation, as well. Ranked third after qualification, LI was paired with the 30-seed recurve boy: MORENO, who was shooting for the Philippines. MORENO did not shoot like a 30 seed in the eliminations. He was good in the pair’s first match, which they won in straight sets, and pretty good in the second round. But from the quarterfinals, LI and MORENO did not lose a single set – and that was after near disaster. They were just seconds away from being disqualified from the competition when MORENO was absent for the start of their quarterfinal. He was stuck in traffic. “I was crying in the taxi,” admitted Luis. “It was awful. But I got there, ran to the field, collected myself and then all the nerves were gone.” A 38-38-37 three-set series cruised MORENO and LI to mixed team gold over Germany’s Cynthia FREYWALD and ZOLKEPELI from Malaysia. LI Jiaman attributed the win to MORENO’s good luck. “I’m not the least bit angry about the quarterfinal scare,” she said. “It it wasn’t for that we wouldn’t have got the gold medal.” Jiaman did say, though, that if Luis had not made it back to the field, she would have liked to have tried to shoot the match on her own. Canada’s Eric PETERS and Finnish archer Mirjam TUOKKOLA had mixed team bronze.


World record setters: The Korean LEEs both shot world-best scores for the 60-metre ranking round in Nanjing

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All three teams that made the podium displayed how important communication was in the team event. They made the effort to work together despite clear language barriers. “This is what the Youth Olympics are about,” said IOC President Thomas BACH. “The opportunity for high-level competition but to show them that the Olympic idea goes beyong competition – and that the Youth Olympic Games are about making friends!” Korea’s LEE Eun Gyeong was spotted coaching an archer from Egypt on the practice range after the completion of the girls’ competition. It was a striking embodiment of the sentiment of the Olympic Movement. LEE had won girls’ bronze – and set one of two world records in qualification. Her teammate LEE Woo Seok set the other. Female LEE scored 681 to beat the previous mark by five points while male LEE had a huge 704, an 18-point increase, for the 72-arrow ranking round shot over 60 metres. Both archers were more used to shooting the Olympic 70-metre distance. Left: Chinese Taipei’s FANG Tzu-Yun shoots a tiebreaker arrow in her second round match against Sylwia ZYZANSKA from Poland

n FABER Switzerland’s Floria ed LEE se top to ts lost in four se phase l na at the quarterfi

at ics, athletes shoot At the Youth Olymp the n tha r he 60 metres, rat Olympic 70 metres

spoke with athletes The IOC President recurve girls’s finals after watching the

NANJING 2014 RECURVE BOYS’ BRACKETS 6 LEE Woo Seok

6

LEE

7

4

Marcus DALMEIDA

3 DALMEIDA

0 Mete GAZOZ

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GAZOZ

4

BRONZE

4 6

VERMA

Atul VERMA


NANJING 2014 RECURVE GIRLS’ BRACKETS 4 LEE Eun Gyeong

6

GAUBIL

5

4

LI Jiaman

6 LI

6 Melanie GAUBIL

LEE

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Ana MACHADO

sident Prof Dr Ugur World Archery Pre s IOC DE ER NER welcome CH BA as om Th President

e tournament structur The Youth Olympic row -ar 72 : ics Olymp is the same as the s then head-to-head ranking round and

the Communication is xed challenge in the mi is Th ts. team even not GBR–JPN pair could age gu lan me sa speak the

Right: the girl’s podium. (L–R) France’s Melanie GAUBIL, winner LI Jiaman from China and Korean LEE Eun Gyeong

Frenchman Thomas KOENIG shot a personal best in competition of 679. He was complementary of his opponent’s big score, saying “it was super impressive.” LEE Woo Seok continued to be impressive throughout the rest of the competition. He won his first two matches in straight sets, lost just one to Switzerland’s Florian FABER in the quarterfinals and then was back to keeping a clean sheet in the semifinals, beating Mete GAZOZ of Turkey. It set up a final against Brazil’s Marcus D’ALMEIDA. Already all-but-qualified for the Archery World Cup Final when he was in Nanjing, Marcus’ Youth Olympic experience was special before competition had even began. He had carried the Brazilian flag at the head of the delegation’s entrance into the stadium at the opening ceremony. His gold final against LEE was nothing short of epic. LEE started with two 30s, Marcus with two 29s to fall 4-0 behind. The pair drew the third set and the Brazilian won the fourth to

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NANJING 2014 RECURVE MIXED TEAM BRACKETS

LI & MORENO CHN & PHI

5 LI Jiaman

2

6

L MORENO

R MARTENS

R ROMERO

C FREYWALD

M ZOLKEPELI

0 1 E PETERS

GER & MAS FREYWALD & ZOLKEPELI

M TUOKKOLA PETERS & TUOKKOLA

6

BRONZE

2

6

MARTENS & ROMERO

LI and MORENO embrace after a straight-set win in the mixed team final

Marcus D’ALMEIDA won Brazil its first Olympic archery medal, but Korean LEE Woo Seok took gold

LI Jiaman: home hero in China after claiming double gold at Nanjing 2014

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The mixed nation, mixed team podium, featuring athletes from four out of five continents!

pull the match back to 5-3, LEE in the lead. With one set left to shoot, D’ALMEIDA needed a set win to have a chance to win the match in a shoot-off. But LEE had other ideas. The Korean shot another three 10s. A 30-point set to close out – and nothing Marcus could have done would have kept him in the match. He shot a 29. LEE Woo Seok shot 13 of his 15 arrows in the final into the 10 ring, scoring four perfect 30-point sets and a Youth Olympic Games gold medal. By anyone’s standards, it was an impressive performance.

RECURVE MEN

LEE Woo Seok

The Korean did admit to being relieved the competition was over, saying that shooting so many 10s required a great deal of concentration! “I didn’t lose that final,” said Marcus after collecting his silver medal. “Woo Seok won it. He was amazing.” Marcus did win Brazil’s first ever Olympic medal in archery competition, as did Atul VERMA for India when he beat Mete GAZOZ to bronze. See full results, news, photos and more from Nanjing 2014 at www.worldarchery.org and www.olympics.org

MIXED TEAM

RECURVE WOMEN

LI Jiaman

First international outing for the The only athlete without a coach Korean boy: first world record and in the box – but with a home first gold medal. crowd supporting her all the way.

Luis MORENO

LI Jiaman

From near disaster to victory – Luis was stuck in a taxi in the Nanjing traffic and nearly missed their quarterfinal. He made it in time: and you can bet he’s glad he did!

Marcus DALMEIDA

Melanie GAUBIL

M ZOLKEPELI

C FREYWALD

Atul VERMA

LEE Eun Gyeong

Eric PETERS

M TUOKKOLA

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How to:

build lasting relationships with the media

There’s no shortcut to making friends. Small steps, effective communications and a helpful attitude go a long way to winning favour with the press Words Nick DAWES JTA Consultant Images Dean ALBERGA World Archery Official Photographer

I

t’s difficult to construct a strategy for spreading the word about archery and the successes of your federation – whether that’s elite archers at international competitions or in development and governance – without really knowing exactly whom or what is being targeted. The word “media” was once easy to define. “Media” was the traditional newspapers, magazines, radio and television outlets, but that was before the arrival of the internet and world wide web. Now, the lines are far more blurred. Press industry experts define “new media” as ondemand content, accessible anytime, anywhere and on any digital device. It is the media that allows for interactive user feedback and creative participation. That was once, perhaps 12 months or a couple of years ago, easy to define. It was social media: but, now, even the lines there have been blurred. Outlets are producing content across new media, old media and media that’s being innovated every minute of the day. Whether it is interactive or delivered, pushed to a device or called on by the user, there is one constant: the content.

The media’s product – their content – is so easily consumable in this age that press organisations must work harder than ever to keep their customers coming back for more. And don’t confuse magazine or newspaper readers with anything other than customers, consumers. Media want to print, run or show stories that their customers like. So if the content is not interesting, it won’t go very far.

Audience Identifying what is interesting to whom is the first and arguably the most important lesson in media relations. You wouldn’t find a recipe for chicken pie in the Financial Times, just the same as you wouldn’t find a report on the latest big bank merger in Jamie Oliver’s monthly magazine for those who enjoy their time in the kitchen. The archery content that is best to write for the press may not even be interesting to you. A longbow archer is not likely interested by the fact that a new recurve world record has been shot from a sports point of view, but that’s not the audience for such news.

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MEDIA LONG LIST A

long list can be built up over time, it doesn’t need to be one afternoon’s work – but it’s about getting a press contact list together over time and experience. These are real contacts – not just the basic office email address. You will need to collect: • Contact name • Contact details • Position and what media organisation(s) they work for • Media type (internet, new media, social, newspaper…) • Audience (public, archery public, sport officials…) • Readership/viewership (how many people) • Reach (local, regional, international, niche…)

InsidetheGames.biz’s Nick BUTLER trying archery at the World Cup Final in Lausanne

The press to target with record news is keen on the Olympic sector, Of course, there’s some simple ways to make your content more looking to discover sporting success ahead of the next Games. appealing to most. Timliness is important, as is relevance. Don’t That is just one example, it’s down to you – or the press and wait until a month after The Hunger Games release to take media relations officers, volunteers and staff in your federation – to advantage of the media hook – do it at the same time. Reporting find out who will be interested in what news as it comes along. on your national team success two weeks after it wins medals: too The largest, most interesting and most challenging difference late, be ready straight away. in media audience in the Olympic sports environment is the divide And your best friend in a release: statistics. A good fact goes a between industry press and sport journalists. Industry press will be long way, especially if it involves numbers! interested in the federation’s latest elections – but sport journalists won’t. They will care more who is national champion or going to be Finding the key message representing the nation at the Olympic Games. A key message is the core lesson you want your target audience It is key is to do your research. No one has a packaged list that to hear and remember. People – including the media – can only will work for everyone’s content as markets are different in each remember a maximum of three messages at any one time. country. For example, in South America news outlets prefer straight World Archery’s three key messages as an organisation are: results in list format but in Europe, it’s the human interest and more • Archery is an elegant sport, combining extreme precision, emotional stories the wires pick up. intensity and timing Every time your federation makes a step into the media world, • As an organisation and a sport, we constantly aim to surprise save the contact details of the person at the press organisation and are always innovating who is reached. Somebody might need to spend a little time getting • World Archery strives for a world where everyone has the the first four or five together, but before long a working media long opportunity to make the important Olympic sport of archery their list will have been collected. elite or recreational activity of choice It will mean the federation has a starting point for which people – Every press release, advisory or note to the media calls back and, most importantly, in which organisations – to contact whenever to one of these core principles that help nurture the desired there is some good news to share. opinion press and public build about the organisation. If a journalist perceives a federation in a good way, he’ll want to be more related Content to it and grant it more exposure. Matching content with audience is where the magic happens. Finding an angle to present the news that needs to be shared Pick your friends wisely that the press also find interesting is sometimes difficult, and will When good, timely content to the right press audience, they will run change from media organisation to organisation. it and they will provide the feedback needed to keep it improving. Over the page you will see a picture of a robin hood at the World The ones that are receptive need to be involved further. Invite Cup stage in Medellin on a UK newspaper website. It’s not about one or two – pick wisely: those who will appreciate the experience – the results of the tournament – which appeared everywhere in the to come to top events, award galas, dinners… Colombian press – but it is fantastic exposure for the sport. … because, let’s face it: who wants to be stuck behind a desk? If just one member of the non-archery public takes away the Any excuse to get out and experience the sport is a good one! fact that there’s an Archery World Cup stage taking place then it’s Plus, there’s something particuarly special about archery: most been more effective than the piece not running. If just one person people love it when they try it. gets inspired, gets interested or gets into archery because of the Get the press on the range, get them hooked – and watch the story – then all the better! federation’s list of friends in the media grow.

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EFFECTIVE resolution version, don’t embed it, and have the high-quality copy available upon request or downloadable from a sharing platform like Dropbox, WeTransfer or GoogleDrive • Make it timely. If you can link it to current affairs, do • The first paragraph of any release should answer the following five questions: who, what, why, where and when? • Quotes from influential people are attractive (use a senior person in the organisation or athlete, depending on the audience and news) • Send it as a pdf, with the content copied into the body of an email, so it’s easy for the recipient to use • And if your news is truly ground-breaking, don’t be shy about it!

A

lways remember: style matters. A clean, professional look with clear vocabulary and grammar will always be better received than something messily thrown together that is difficult to follow. At the end of the day, it will be easier for the media to use. Some quick tips: • Put your logo at the top and contact details at the bottom • Deliver accurate, clear information in short sentences • Details – the interesting ones – foster creativity • Pictures sell a story: but attach a low  

World Archery’s press release format: clean and simple text

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World Archery awards 2015 World Cup Final and 2017 World Championships to Mexico City Archery’s two most important independent events will stop for fixtures in the Mexican capital as the sport’s popularity continues to rise in the Americas. Mexico has developed into a key market for international archery following the team’s success at the London 2012 Olympic Games. Aida ROMAN won recurve women’s silver and Mariana AVITIA bronze, making Mexico the only nation to put two athletes on the same podium. World Archery hopes that by awarding two elite events to a city that already displays an appetite for the sport, strong development and community engagement programmes can be built to complement the continued growth of archery in Latin America. Mexico City 2015 will be the second time the nation hosts the Archery World Cup Final. The first ever such event was held in the Mayapan Pyramids in 2006, the same year in which Merida ran the World Archery Youth Championships nearby. Mexico also has a decorated history of hosting major multisport events, including Pan American, Caribbean and Central American Games – and the Mexico City Olympics in 1968. A strong bid backed by Mayor Dr Miguel ANGEL MANCERA and Director of Sport Mr Horacio DE LA VEGA – who had a great career as an athlete – national government and broadcasters persuaded the World Archery Executive Board to award both events to the same organiser. The two tournaments offer very different dynamics. A World Cup Final is held over a weekend, features the year’s top 32 athletes and focuses on individual match-play and sports presentation. More than 500 archers from 70 nations are expected at the ten-day long world championships. That event also culminates in a two-day finals programme – with images distributed worldwide through World Archery’s growing stable of broadcasters – and will include the World Archery Congress. Mexico City promoted its candidature by creating the Mexican Challenge, first held at the end of 2013. The innovative event – produced by Moveo Lab, the sports company that will organise both the newly-awarded tournaments – pitched eight of Mexico’s finest against eight top archers from the rest of the world. Athletes from both teams praised the atmosphere, smooth organisation and efforts to engage with the large live and broadcast audience it attracted. Team USA Paralympic silver medallist at London 2012, Matt STUTZMAN – better known as the inspirational archer – who was born

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new media resources: an online catalogue Your own new media – that’s website, social pages like Facebook and Twitter, Flickr accounts and other online image repositories (World Archery uses SmugMug) – is a resource for media. Keep links to these showcases of your content on the bottom of everything that a media person might come in contact with: releases, advisories, emails…

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GOING VIRAL

This picture, taken by the in-house photographer at the Archery World Cup stage in Medellin, was picked up by tabloid press in the United Kingdom. It’s good content and something that appeals to their diverse audience, which is why they ran it.

Measuring success

Professional media monitoring can be very expensive. Thankfully, there’s a free option…

Professional media monitoring can be very expensive. Thankfully, there’s a free and very effective option in Google Alerts. The system just needs a keyword and your email address to deliver summaries to your inbox. Choose your keywords depending on your interest – but a good place to start is “archery” and the country you live in, another alert for your federation name and one for World Archery. In fact, take a look at international sports industry media outlets like Inside the Games, Around the Rings, SportCal, Sport Business, SportsPro and Sports Features to see regular Olympic sport news. As well as the feedback you’ll get from the media you do build good relationships with, if your media campaign is effective then you’ll see an increase in mentions in your media monitoring. As well as picking up key news from peers, other organisations in sport and World Archery that may well be of interest to your federation. Strong media visibility can make an organisation much more attractive to commercial partners and sponsors, raise awareness of the sport and its successes among the audience served by the media you target – and help convert more people to archery. With two years to go until archery gets its highest worldwide visitibility at a national level – the Olympic Games – now is the time to take advantage of the opportunity. Nick DAWES is a Consultant with John Tibbs Associates, a media and communications agency specialising in the Olympic and sports industry.

High-profile individuals from outside the sport draw media to the Celebrity Day at the Mexican Challenge

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Study:

brain activity in recurve archers during the shot cycle Researchers at Manchester Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom have been investigating the relationship between brain wave activity and different stages of a recurve athlete’s shot sequence, and its applications in training

Words and figures Stephen SIGURNJAK, Peter TWIGG, Alex SHENFIELD, Dave SOUTHALL Contributors Images Dean ALBERGA World Archery Official Photographer

T

he sport of archery has both physical and mental aspects. Physical requirements involve coordination of the muscular and skeletal system to provide a repeatable pattern while under loading during the drawing, aiming and release of the arrow. The mental aspects include the great attention and concentration required over an extended period of competition. It is even taken as granted that at a certain level of proficiency, the mental aspect can be more important than the physical. But do we know what brain activity is present throughout the shot and how we could quantify this? Is it possible to quantify “good” or “bad” shots based off the brain activity or even train the archer to “get in the zone” when needed by observing brain activity? In this article, we present a method of monitoring the brain activity of experienced archers using commercially available and relatively inexpensive sensor systems from NeuroSky, with the hope that in future development work with experienced coaches, a system for developing mental training and performance improvement could be realised. The brain is a complex organ that allows us to make sense of our world; it processes information from the sensory organs and allows us to react to stimulus. When the brain is active small electrical signals are produced which can

be detected and recorded using a process called Electroencephalography (EEG). EEG data is collected by placing electrodes on the scalp of a person, the subject, as they perform an activity or task. The data collected can then be used to develop a base or standard to which other subjects’ signals can be compared for repeatability or common patterns. These patterns may help to learn archery technique or to develop effective mental training and feedback live results of the exercise to the coach. The brain is very much like a computer system. Brain cells to transmit messages to one another in order for us to function; these signals are known as brainwaves. Each brainwave has its own characteristic, and they can be characterised into five groups: Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta and Gamma frequency bands. The NeuroSky system allows the collection of these frequencies as well as proprietary measures of attention and relaxation determined by algorithms developed by NeuroSky itself. Previous studies have concentrated on these levels. One published by top coach Kisik LEE in 2009 showed a marked difference in patterns between novice and experienced archers. Experienced archers used greater alpha power during the final few seconds of the shot.

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This small pilot study, aimed to record brain activity for exploration of the attention and relaxation levels during the shot, was particularly interested in the characteristic alpha brain wave power increase found in other aiming sports like rifle shooting and basketball. Brain activity was recorded along with key points in the shot cycle and compared with video footage to provide an insight into brain activity between key shot landmarks. Figure 2 – Subject wearing the EEG device whilst shooting.

Method Data was collected from the archers using the EEG device during the different phases of the shot along with corresponding images of the archer at a frequency of 30Hz. Data was captured

EEG Device

Wireless connection

Laptop

Camera

Figure 1 – block diagram of the system.

wirelessly to a laptop in real time and stored for processing. A block diagram of the system is shown in figure 1. The two subjects used in the study both had over 10 years of archery experience and were both certified as master bowman, a level of ability approximate to around 1200 points on a World Archery 1440 round, by Archery GB. A series of 12 shots were recorded with the target placed at a distance of 90 metres for the test. Prior to the test, the subjects were allowed to practice at the target wearing the EEG device to become accustomed with the device while shooting. Both subjects reported that the device was very light and non-intrusive, and after a few minutes familiarisation they were not aware of any influence that the device was having on their archery performance or overall feeling. Figure 2 shows a subject wearing the EEG device while shooting.

Results Data sets were divided into individual shots for each archer. The data collected from the EEG device was then traced with the captured images for brainwave exploration at landmark points within the shot. Data samples were then analysed for repeatability, and dominant brainwave characteristics of each archer compare at the landmark points within the shot. The data in figures 3 to 7 shows the basic proprietary signals of ‘Attention’ and ‘Relaxation’ provided by the NeuroSky headset. The data in figures 8 to 13 shows graphs of individual brainwave bands – Alpha, Beta and Delta. The sample results presented in figures 3 and 4 show the attention and relaxation levels of subject A for two shots. Archer A considered that the shot represented by the data in figure 3 was good and shot that produced the data for figure 4 was not so good.

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The data is presented from the drawing phase of the shot, into the aiming and the release of the arrow. The results show a similar pattern and levels for both shots for subject A with regards to the attention and relaxation plots. During the shot process the attention level raises and peaks at 100% from the full draw – sample 65 to 101 for figure 3 and sample 43 to 64 for figure 4 – until the release of the string. The relaxation levels of subject A decrease slightly during the shot but remain within 35% to 65% during both shots. The other eight data samples for this archer are remarkably similar, with high repeatability characteristics. Figures 5 and 6 show the results for subject B over two shots. These shots were chosen as examples as archer B’s shot for the data in figure 5 was less than perfect and the shot made represented by the data in figure 6 was perfect. While the patterns for subject B differ in the overall levels compared to subject A, the data still indicates reasonable repeatability during the shot. The levels for attention increase during the aiming phase of the shot – samples 45 to 106 for figure 5 and 49 to 93 for figure 6. Figures 7 and 8 show the comparison between the Alpha frequency bands for shot one and shot four for subject A. In addition to the alpha levels measured during the shots, the green trace of the plots shows the distinct phases within the shot starting with the setup. On figure 8, samples 1 to 13 is the draw phase; samples 12 to 64 the archer aiming; the release is samples 61 to 109 – the arrow leaves at 109 – and samples 110 to 126 are the follow through. The markers are plotted on further graphs to illustrate the brain activity for the distinct phases of the shot cycle. The graphs show a distinct pattern for both of the shots with the Alpha 1 levels increasing after the release phase and into the follow through. As with the Alpha levels for the selected shots, the Beta plots are similar showing lower activity during the pre-release shot phases, increasing after the arrow has been released. Figures 11 and 12 show the Delta activity for subject A’s shots one and four. As with the Alpha and Beta plots, the Delta activity distinctly increases after the release of the arrow for both shots, although shot four has more Delta activity during the draw and aim phase than shot one.

Results This preliminary study recorded the brainwaves of two experienced archers during the shot sequence. Brainwaves


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000 were1 600analysed for repeatability and dominant characteristics This proposal may also be applied to subject A with figure 3 1 400 000 attaining a sustained, higher attention level than the plot within within individual EEG activity. Images of the archers were also 1 200 000 figure 4 and for the difference in Delta activity of subject A recorded to establish reference points within the shot cycle for Delta 1 000 000 shown within figures 11 and 12. correlating the EEG data sets. 800 000 The results have shown that there are repeatable patterns, Marker 600 000 ShotEEG 4 Training usage which400 000 emerge in brainwave activity obtained from the By monitoring the brain waves of a subject during a high device for each subject during the distinct phases of the shot 200 000 0 patterns also show distinct differences between the volume of shots, noting how the subject felt the shot went and cycle. The two subjects over the shot cycle, with subject A attaining higher correlating with video footage, it would be possible to define Sample Number an ideal brain wave pattern. This would correlate to good shots, attention levels during the aiming process than subject B. and likely successful scores. The results of the Alpha and Beta activity during the shot This could be used for training purposes, allowing archers cycles for subject A also show a repeatable pattern with an to put a measurable brain pattern to the feeling of “good” and increase in activity at these frequency bands when the arrow is “bad”, develop that pattern to be repeatable and maximise released; this is also evident for the Delta waves. performance. The Delta wave plots also show a difference between the It is possible the brain wave patterns may also show where two shots with more activity in the Delta frequencies during the bad shots break down, if the error is mental. draw and aim phase. The system could be expanded to include other biometric It must be noted that within this small, preliminary test no monitoring, such as pulse rates to measure the effects of correlation calculations were carried out between the results additional pressure – like during a head-to-head match – and of the EEG plots and the resultant scores of the arrow at the how this influences brain activity. target. This may be the notable difference in levels for subject Brain wave monitoring has the potential to be yet another B between the two shots with figure 5 being a less than perfect useful tool in the modern archery coach’s toolbox. shot, noted by the lower attention levels and figure 6 being a Stephen SIGURNJAK is a senior lecturer in the School of good shot for the subject, again noted by the higher attention Engineering at Manchester Metropolitan University. levels found within the results.

Could visualising “good”and “bad” shots in graphs help athletes repeat good mental technique in archery?

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Zagreb 2014:

two returning world field finalists defend champion titles

Ivana BUDEN, JC VALLADONT and Jesse BROADWATER all made their second consecutive World Archery Field Championship gold medal matches in a row – but only one walked away with a second crown… Words Chris WELLS World Archery Communications Manager Images Ben VAN DER VELDE World Archery Photographer

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ack in Croatia 10 years after the nation previously held the World Archery Field Championships, three of the defending champions from Val D’Isere 2012 made it back to their respective gold finals. Ivana BUDEN, Croatian compound woman shooting on home soil, beat Great Britain’s Christie RAVENSCROFT in the semis to set up a title clash with Toja CERNE. But by this point in the competition, it was CERNE not BUDEN who was the definite favourite. Toja, not far removed from her first senior finals appearance at the second 2014 Archery World Cup stage in Medellin – where she took silver – had led in Zagreb from the very start. She ranked first in qualification and came in top on both eliminations rounds. CERNE shot the highest four-target score in the semifinals – 64 – and finished with a 63 in the final, a huge 12 points more than BUDEN, to secure a first senior gold medal. Brady ELLISON – two-time recurve men’s World Cup Champion at this time – had never won a world title when

One of the top compound men’s groups scores during eliminations

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he arrived in Zagreb. Frenchman JC VALLADONT had, at the world fields in the French alps two years ago. The pair met in the gold medal match. It was a tight contest, but ELLISON emerged on top. “I knew it was going to be close,” said Brady soon after. “I expected both of us to shoot better scores. We both made mistakes… but I ended up on top.” In the recurve men’s bronze medal match, VALLADONT’s French teammate Jerome BIDAULT beat experienced Brit Jon SHALES. All three points in the 59-56 victory came on the last target. They were drawing before the closing three arrows. World field events also include barebow competition categories for both men and women. Known for asserting dominance in the division, Sweden collected both gold medals. Erik JONSSON beat teammate and 2002 World Champion Martin

Junior categories compete on the same courses as the seniors at the World Archery Field Championships

Inset: World Games Champion Naomi FOLKARD, from Great Britain, acknowledges crowd before her bronze final in Zagreb


ZAGREB WAFC COMPOUND MENS’ BRACKETS 71

67 T.6

BROADWATER

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J BROADWATER

Chris WHITE

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ANDERSON

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OTTOSSON by a point after the latter shot a one-point arrow on the finals course. It secured JONSSON his third world field title – the last also coming in Croatia, 10 years ago. World Games and defending World Champion Lina BJORKLUND made short work of Cinzia NOZIGLIA to win her second consecutive world field gold. She was five points up after the first target and only extended her lead over the following three. Three defending champions with a chance to repeat: two defending champions heading home from Zagreb with silver and one with a second title. The USA’s Jesse BROADWATER had a shot to secure his second crown and make it 50/50. He had already won team gold with the USA the previous day and had scored 20 more

Unmarked distances mean setting the sight is not as simple as usual

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RAVENSCROFT

Ivana BUDEN

points on the ranking round than any other compound man at the event. Standing in the way of Jesse’s second title in a row was Great Britain’s Chris WHITE, a former world field champion himself. In fact, WHITE’s title was won at the previous Croatian worlds a decade ago – just like Swedish barebow archer JONSSON. It was a vintage performance from the Brit to make the final. He needed a tiebreaker to beat Slovenia’s Slavko TURSIC in the semis and drilled a centre six to secure his finals place. After the four target finals course, WHITE would need another one-arrow shoot-off to beat BROADWATER. The pair tied on 65 apiece for gold and it went to sudden-death. Jesse shot six points – the maximum on the field face – while Chris could only manage a four.

Four different-size faces make up a field course: this, the 20cm-diametre, is the smallest – and 80cm is the largest

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Seventh-ranked Austria upset Sweden in the women’s team final, who had knocked out top seed Italy

The gold-medal winning USA men’s team: BROADWATER, ELLISON and ROGERS

ZAGREB WAFC RECURVE MENS’ BRACKETS 64

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ELLISON

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Brady ELLISON

JC VALLADONT

55 VALLADONT

56 Jon SHALES

SHALES 56

BRONZE

“When it comes down to four targets, anything can happen,” said WHITE. BROADWATER was pleased, but respectful of his opponent’s renaissance: “I know Chris prepared hard for this championships. He made it great match all the way through.” Recurve women’s World Games Champion Naomi FOLKARD – also from Great Britain – managed a bronze medal, beating Italy’s Anna BOTTO to the last spot on the podium. It was German Lisa UNRUH, who’s World Cup season had already been so successful, that took gold. Already qualified to compete at the Lausanne 2014 Archery World Cup Final with one stage to go when in Zagreb, UNRUH was full of confidence. She turned that into a 10-point win in the gold medal match, securing the title with a 16 out of 18 point 60-metre final target.

Slovenia’s Toja CERNE (middle) led the compound women’s competition from start to finishing with a convicing gold

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52 59 BIDAULT

Jerome BIDAULT

Individual success was an indication of team triumph for the men. In an event that combines one archer from each of the three competition divisions in a three-athlete team, the USA would have two individual winners in their winning men’s trio. The women’s title went to a surprise Austria. After only qualifying in seventh, the nation upset Germany, Great Britain and Sweden – who had beaten top-ranked Italy – to take gold. Host nation Croatia had more success in the junior world championship competition, claiming three titles: Matija MIHALIC had recurve junior men’s gold, Maja ORLIC and Mario VAVRO the compound women’s and men’s titles, respectively. Domajog BUDEN, brother of silver senior medallist Ivana, had bronze. See full results, news, pictures and videos from the Zagreb 2014 World Archery Field Championships at www.worldarchery.org

Selfie on the recurve men’s podium: (L–R) VALLADONT, ELLISON and BIDAULT


RECURVE MEN

Brady ELLISON

JC VALLDONT

J BIDAULT

RECURVE WOMEN Lisa UNRUH Laure DEFLAU

Naomi FOLKARD

COMPOUND MEN

Chris WHITE

J BROADWATER

Slavko TURSIC

COMPOUND WOMEN I BUDEN

T CERNE

BAREBOW MEN

BAREBOW WOMEN

S VANDIONANT

M OTTOSSON

E JOHNSON

M FISHER

L BJORKLUND

C NOZIGLIA E STROBBE

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Ludys TEJADA: Turning PVC pipes into basic bows An inter-university tournament encouraged students from across the Dominican Republic to make their own simple archery equipment…

Words and images Ludys TEJADA Contributor

Above: Students show off their decorated equipment. The bows do not look like they are made of PVC

Below: Competitors at the inter-university event

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udys TEJADA attended a World Archery Coaching Seminar near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in late 2013. She watched a presentation by two lecturers from Colombia on their experience of making simple bows from PVC tubes. Crediting this talk as an eye opener, certified coach trainer Ludys saw an opportunity to rapidly expand archery in the Dominican Republic in a simple and cheap way. All she needed was some basic tools and a little creativity. “I already had the creativity,” Ludys says. “So I just needed to find a handy-man friend that could help me with the workmanship: basic sawing, painting and gluing. And someone that wouldn’t mind making the trip to the hardware store! ” That man was Emmanuel CAFFARO. Ludys and Emmanuel made their first PVC bow in about a week. They made a couple of adjustments during the prototyping process to make the build as simple as possible, and just two weeks later they had a dozen working bows to introduce to the 30 university students Ludys would begin teaching archery in January 2014. First reviews were good. Some students learnt even quicker with the PVC bows than with beginner equipment bought in stores. Perhaps there were fewer things to worry about since the bows are simpler, or less tiring as the material is so light. Ludys asked her students to make a working PVC bow as their final exam. To test their attempts at building a bow, she organised a tournament with the equipment at the university. Emmanuel had to help the students with the basics, but they decorated the bows themselves.

The project was so well received that other universities were invited to make their bows over the next few months so that they could compete in an inter-collegiate tournament. Two clubs and three universities took up the challenge, entering about 50 archers and bringing the same again in spectators. Some experienced archers had even made their own simple equipment just to compete and some students had been very creative: PCV had been heated to recurve the limbs or the middle part of the bow crushed to make a window in the handle. There were even bows painted to give a wooden effect that had to be inspected to confirm they were made of PVC! For the students, the experience was fun, engaging and made archery available both as a sport and a creative activity. They didn’t just participate in the event; they bought into the production of the tools as well, learning a lot from each other in the process. At the moment, it is possible to make PVC bows with draw weights between 10 and 40 pounds. The main obstacle is the feeling of the handle in the bow hand. Ludys and Emmanuel are currently testing adding clay grips to the kit. “Of course, PVC bows are not as accurate as shop-bought equipment,” Ludys admits. “But for introducing people to the sport they are just fine – especially if the price is 90 percent less.” Ludys has a challenge for you… “I dare you to build your own PVC bow: if I can do it, I bet you can, too.”

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Brendon THORNE/Getty Images

Incheon Asian Games: headline on continental archery calendar Korea targeted four to six golds in Incheon, with pressure on the country’s recently-founded compound squads to deliver, the first Asian Games to include the bowstyle in competition – but Indian compounds make their mark, too… Words John STANLEY World Archery Reporter Thanks to CHOI Kyung Hwan, Grace KIM and Rachel GRAHAME for their help.

Top: the victorious Indian compound men’s team, who beat Korea in the Incheon gold medal match

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he Asian Games: the biggest multi-sport event outside of the Olympics, and for the big sporting nations of Asia by far the most important competition after the Games themselves. In 2014, nearly 10,000 athletes from 45 nations participated, as the 17th edition of the Asiad returned to Korea for the third time after Seoul in 1986 and Busan in 2002. With the Winter Games set to come to Pyeongchang in Korea in 2018 and neighbours Japan set to host the Olympics in 2020, the home nation needed to deliver both a grand spectacle and strong results on the field against a backdrop of fierce historical rivalries, sporting and otherwise.

So for Korea’s medal hopes, the pressure was firmly on – and the pressure on the Korean Archery Association to succeed at Incheon was particularly intense. The public regard the squad almost as a guaranteed fountain of gold medals, and Olympic Champion OH Jin Hyek was even given the privilege of reading the athlete’s oath at the opening ceremony. Compound bows were included for the first time, and with a fully-developed compound team to compete alongside the world-famous recurve archers, the Korean Archery Association’s official target was “four to six” golds from the eight available across the male and female, individual and team events.


Days before the Games officially got underway, the Korean Archery Association assisted the Incheon organising committee with final preparations. “We decided to fund the project ourselves since we understood organisers had no additional budget allocated for such a project,” said a representative of the federation after additional spectator experience facilities were installed. “We thought [it was] necessary given South Korea’s status as an archery nation.” The KAA took every precaution beforehand with its athletes, skipping international events and even holding off on sending some qualified athletes to this year’s Archery World Cup Final. In addition, Korean archers were sent on noise-adaptation training in Korea’s baseball stadiums, shooting on the pitch as a pre-game warm-up with spectators encouraged to make as much distracting noise as possible. Nothing was left to chance – and nothing but gold would do. The archery competition opened on the fifth day of the Incheon 2014 Asian Games with ranking rounds to seed the individual and team events. In recurve, both men and women shot a full 1440 round over two days, in contrast to the 70-metre ranking round now used at all world-level international events.

The Korean recurve men qualified one-two-three-four: LEE Suengyun taking top honours with 1377. OH Jin Hyek and KU Bonchan tied for second place with 1362 points, but the Olympic Champion advanced on total tens scored despite shooting fewer X’s. With the rules only allowing two individuals per country to advance into the head-to-heads, only OH and LEE stayed in the individual competition. KU joined them to contest the team competition. Former World Champion KIM Woojin shot 1353: good enough for fourth place but not good enough to make either the team or the individual knockouts! In the women’s event, a Korean one-two-three saw JUNG Dasomi and CHANG Hye Jin advance with scores of 1364 and 1359. LEE Tuk-Young ended up taking the third place in the team after JOO Hyun Jung was forced to withdraw with a rotator cuff injury. Of the other major medal challengers, China, Chinese Taipei, Japan, Iran and India all took top ten places. Indian superstar Deepika KUMARI placed a solid eighth, but the rest of her team struggled and only managed to qualify in fifth overall. Top Malaysian pro and World Cup medallist Khairul Anuar MOHAMAD took a strong sixth place in the men’s.

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Brendon THORNE/Getty Images

India’s Jyothi Surekha VENNAM shoots in the Incheon compound team bronze medal match


CHUNG Sung-Jun/Getty Images

OH Jin Hyek, Korean Olympic Champion at London 2012, reads the athletes’ oath at the Incheon 2014 Asian Games opening ceremony

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Thursday saw compound team and individual eliminations. The home team of SEOK Ji Hyun, CHOI Bomin and KIM Yun Jee scored 238 points out of a possible 240 in the women’s quarterfinal victory over Laos, breaking the world record of 236 points set by the USA in 2011. They then eased past Iran 229222 in the semifinals to set up a gold medal match against Chinese Taipei. In the men’s team, India booked a place against Korea in the gold medal match, although the hosts only just squeaked through their semifinal against the Philippines, who would face Iran for the bronze. Friday saw recurve eliminations on a rain-soaked Gyegang field, and stunned silence from the crowd after the semifinal defeat of the Korean men’s team, beaten by the Chinese, five set points to four. In windier conditions than previous days, the match went to a shoot-off with the teams tied on 29 points, but the Chinese shot closer to the centre and took it. The mighty Korean men had previously won every Asian Games team gold since 1982; now they faced a scrap for bronze with Japan, who had unexpectedly lost their semifinal to a resurgent Malaysia. The Korean federation was magnanimous in defeat. Women’s team coach Ryu Su-Jeong said: “Korean archery is still delivering, but I don’t think the public realises how difficult the victories are becoming… gold isn’t something to be taken for granted.” In the women’s team event, Korea cruised through to the gold medal match, beating Kazakhstan before crushing India to set up an eagerly anticipated clash with arch-rivals China in the final. The individual eliminations saw World Champion LEE Seungyun fall to YONG Zhiwei of China in the quarterfinals by a single point. Most quarterfinal matches went to form, setting up some intriguing clashes for Sunday, although Deepika KUMARI was soundly beaten in her quarterfinal by Diananda CHOIRUNISA of Indonesia – and the Indian recurve team did not live up to expectations. For the Korean media, double Olympic gold medallist KI Bo Bae – absent from international duties this year due to a shoulder injury – had been pressed into service as a commentator for national broadcaster KBS. She apparently amused the TV audience with particularly detailed observations of her former partner OH Jin Hyek’s personality and sent the more gossipy elements of the media into a frenzy with revelations about her personal life, proving that Olympic success truly does bring a different class of fame everywhere in the world. Saturday brought the compound finals, and India had its day in the sun as the men’s team capped a spectacular squad performance with a historic gold medal, beating favourites Korea 227-225. Rajat CHAUHAN, Sandeep KUMAR and Abhishek VERMA shot consistently in the 10 from the second arrow on in a closely-

fought contest that saw the hosts’ second shooter MIN Li Hong send down a seven in the fourth end to sink the Korean boat. CHAUHAN said: “We have been watching India’s position on the medals table and were determined to win the gold today. We are delighted to have done it.” The compound squad had made considerable preparations for the competition, including lengthy training camps in the USA and Korea, and the work paid off as they finished the day by taking one gold, one silver, and two bronze medals to push India into the top ten on the overall medal table. In the women’s team contest the host nation finally struck gold, beating Chinese Taipei 229-226 without missing the middle rings (nine or 10) once. Afterwards, CHOI Bomin pointed to the sky in tribute to former Korean Coach SHIN, who had been training the compound squad before he passed away at the end of 2013. India easily beat Iran for the bronze. In the women’s individual compound competition, a hometie gold medal match saw SEOK Ji Hyun and CHOI Bomin battle it out, the lead swinging back and forth with CHOI shooting the last end clean to win by just a single point, 144-143. The men’s contest saw Iran’s Esmaeil EBADI, who had taken top honours in the ranking round, take the lead from the second end to beat India’s Abhishek VERMA 145-141 in both athletes’ second appearance of the day. The match was a re-run of the first Asian Grand Prix final from this year, also won by EBADI. The bronze medal went to Paul Marton DE LA CRUZ of the Philippines. The tournament wound up on Sunday, with the recurve finals contested in front of a sold-out crowd and an expectant nation. The fierce battle for second place behind China on the medal table, played out between Korea and Japan at every Asiad so far, was finely poised. In the individual competition, the powerhouse nations lined up: Chinese Taipei versus Korea, China versus Japan, Korea versus Japan, China versus Korea. The team events were first, the Korean men out to contest for the bronze medal, which they won five sets to three. Japan came back in the third end to tie the score, but shipped in two eights in the final end to hand the Korean men the bronze and a sliver of self-esteem after their shock defeat on Friday. The men’s gold medal match was contested between China and Malaysia, who had that unexpected win over Japan to book their place there. It was a one-sided affair that saw the Chinese men comprehensively outscore their opponents to take gold. “We hadn’t expected that we could win so fast,” said YONG Zhiwei. “But we believed in ourselves. We had faith in the team.” MU Yong, manager of the Chinese archery team, said: “They showed no fear at all.” In the women’s team event, Japan beat India for the bronze, capping a miserable week for India’s recurves who left emptyhanded even as their compound teammates took four medals. In the gold medal match, the weight of expectation on the Korean women to beat China was almost suffocating – particularly after their last two major finals had ended in defeat,

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The Asian Para Games shooting line during the ranking round

Host nation Korea collected medals in the mixed W1 competiton

ASIAN PARA GAMES Zahra NEMATI, the inspiraitonal Iranian para athlete that won gold at the London Paralympic Games the last world title added an Asian Para Games gold medal to her collection in Incheon. Iran were successful throughout: recurve man Ebrahim RANJBARKIVAG won his open event and Hadi NORI had compound men’s open gold. Wurood AL MURSHEDI won the compound women’s open competition. Korea’s individual gold came in the individual W1 competition courtesy of KOO Dongsub.

and the Chinese had beaten them in competition as recently as June. After three tense sets that saw the Chinese archers’ form collapse – they hit the ten ring just twice – the crowd roared and Korea had their precious recurve gold, with an emotional team bursting into tears and kissing the ground. LEE Tuk Young said: “There’s been some incredibly hard work over the last 10 months, but I’m really glad to be part of history.” In an elegant illustration of the deep team bonds, she credited ‘elder sister’ and Olympic medallist JOO Hyun Jung, sidelined due to injury, as part of the team’s success “because our hearts beat as one”. The individual competition saw China’s XU Jing take the bronze medal from Japan’s Ren HAYAKAWA 7-3 after being 3-1 down after two ends. KUO Cheng Wei of Chinese Taipei beat Hideki KIKUCHI in the men’s bronze match to finish a relatively disappointing meet for Japan’s highly consistent recurves, who must certainly have arrived with higher expectations. The women’s individual final inevitably came down to the two in-form Koreans this year: JUNG Dasomi thumped CHANG Hye Jin 7-1 in a gold medal match that saw her miss the middle just twice in twelve arrows. She finished the job with a resplendent 10-10-10 end to a standing ovation from the crowd. Finally, the familiar frame of OH Jin-Hyek – expectantly dubbed ‘The Archer Of The Century’ by the Incheon press – walked onto the finals field, grim-faced and determined to take the fight to young Chinese athlete YONG Zhiwei for the men’s individual title. The crowd went suddenly quiet as YONG raced out to a 4-0 lead, before his form wavered and OH rattled off three straight

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sets to take the last gold medal, after a final end that saw both archers falter. The relieved expression on the Olympic Champion’s face said everything: the pressure was almost too great, but he had come through. He was composed for the press: “I concentrated on my last shot, but I scored an eight. I was fortunate to win a gold medal and I will continue to do well.” Although, perhaps the best quote came from his women’s counterpart: “Honestly, what I really want to do right now is cut my nails,” JUNG Dasomi confessed. “The hands are the most sensitive thing for archers, so I wasn’t able to trim my nails. It’s been almost two weeks now; I just want to go back to my room, eat, sleep and clip my nails!” In the end, the tournament didn’t spring too many surprises. Almost all of the medals went to the big Asian archery nations, with notable performances from Malaysia and the Philippines. The home nation Korean archers delivered the expected clutch of silverware and the Indian compounds impressed in the first continental Games to include the style. CHOI Kyung Hwan, training manager in Korea, summed up the tournament in familiar style: “Yes, there is obviously a huge expectation from the Korean public but it is not a novelty for us, we always struggle with the pressure and we have made great achievements under such conditions. I think the only way to overcome the pressure is to continue our efforts to being on the top of the world.” John STANLEY is better known as The Infinite Curve. Read his archery blog at www.theinfinitecurve.com


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Anastasia Radion Š 2012

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An archery alter-ego: world-renowned bass player Reggie HAMILTON While touring with some of the biggest artists, Reggie HAMILTON has had the opportunity to shoot at clubs around the globe Words and images Reggie HAMILTON Contributor

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Postcards: pictures from Reggie’s travels, visiting archery clubs around the world, while on tour for work

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I

t is a blessing when one’s job allows for meeting new people and fulfilling a dream at the same time. In that, I have been particularly privileged. Over the past year or so, I’ve visited a number of countries with my bow and in that time I’ve been invited to shoot at many different ranges with people whom I can call my archery family. This ever-growing family has influenced how I approach this wonderful sport. I’ll keep my past brief. I’ve been a professional musician for close to 40 years and have been lucky enough to travel the world through my art. I’m a bass player, and I’ve toured or recorded with artists like Tina TURNER, Aretha FRANKLIN, and Whitney HOUSTON. Well, some time ago, my daughter wanted to try archery and I took it too lightly. I finally took her to a local range and sat waaaay behind the shooting line to read my book. The range master quickly told me that archery is not a spectator sport: he grabbed me and put a bow in my hand. I took the safety class, drew the bow, loosed an arrow and I was hooked! Archery became my sanctuary. Since then, through the help of coach Don RABSKA and World Archery’s Secretary General Tom DIELEN and Events Director Juan-Carlos HOLGADO, I have had the opportunity to visit more than 25 different clubs around the world while on tour with work. Each club has wonderful people representing the sport as well as such great histories – and they’ve all been fantastic. After witnessing so much archery in so many different places, certain things stand out to me. At some clubs there is so much of a family connection. When I visited Rome and the indoor venue at Gallarate, for example, I felt like I was at a giant table and sharing a Sunday meal. Across the world, while everyone has their own headspace when shooting, the archery family has been a very kind group of people. Everyone is helpful and has given me space to work on my form, occasionally offering suggestions without forcing their knowledge.

Little did all these people I’ve met know that I was a ball of nerves shooting around all these different archers, but… shhh… don’t tell anybody! It is exactly the same at the range when I shoot. The main goal when on the line is the same: repeat the form, repeat the shot. I watched multiple world champion and reigning Olympic team gold medallist Michele FRANGILLI shoot forty X10s, then an 8, in Italy. He refocused and then shot a lot more 10s. I watched field champion Frenchman Jerome BIDAULT shoot five sets of 57-57-56-57-54 at 70 metres with no warm-up and after a full day at work. I also witnessed club presidents Maurizio BELLI and Philippe PRIEELS pummel the spider at the same distance. Seeing young people train has been just as cool. I enjoyed the Dutch junior field team practice diligently as well as see the juniors in Berlin go through a full exercise routine after their successful shooting practice. The commitment development of the young Ivory Coast recurve archers was amazing as well. To see that level of discipline is always inspiring. I have so much respect for the world-class archers that we’ve all watched at so many competitions. Going into another country after limited sleep, adjusting to different time zones, competing at such a high level, and keeping the mind focused and the technique sharp… not easy tasks! I’ve taken to using the sport to keep myself focused before a gig. Crews and artists I have performed with have been very kind to find me a room or area within a stadium to practice in peace, if I have not been able to find the time to visit a club. Usually I email ahead, with Don’s help, before confirming a visit over the phone. Often, as was the case in Rome, Milan and Gallarate, the person I speak with will make themselves available during my visit to the club. I’ve spent decades playing music, and it’s always been my hobby as well as my profession. When I started shooting, I had another outlet for the technical side of my brain.

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It has been great to see that my professional field is so similar to archery. To be at that level requires such dedication to the mind and body as well as technique and understanding one’s instrument, just like with my bass. Now, before or after a sound check I shoot a few arrows to relax. I travel with a Danage practice bale to make that possible. From all that I’ve seen as an amateur archer and experienced as a professional musician, the level of dedication is the addictive ingredient, be it for recreation or competition. Well, enough dreaming of being world champion… time to go back to my day job, for now! I would like to extend special thanks for all they have done for me in my archery journey so far to: Tom DIELEN, Juan-Carlos HOLGADO, Maurizio BELLI, Fabio

Middle: Reggie HAMILTON’s Signature Fender bass guitar

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CINQUINI, Andreas LORENZ, The Werner and Iris Center, Ardingo SCARZELLA, Nathalie DIELEN, Jerome BIDAULT, Benjamin AJETI, Laurent PARMENTIER DE LEON, Philippe PRIEELS, Armando ROSSI, Sandrine VANDIONANT, Marina CANETTA, David CATALAN, Martin DAMSBO, Simon FAIRWEATHER, Michele FRANGILLI, Vittorio FRANGILLI, Andres JASSO, Mariano MORO, Junior BOLINAS, Linda OCHOA, Tomi POIKOLAINEN, Gerardo ALVARADO, Edwin DE LIGTER, the HADAS family, Christophe DOUSSOT, Nino ODDO, Mario SCARZELLA… and everyone else who has helped me. When not working on his archery technique with coach Don RABSKA, Reggie HAMILTON is a professional bassist and songwriter who has toured and/or recorded with: Seal, Babyface, Johnny HALLDAY, Eros RAMAZZOTTI, Thalia, Miyumi Nakajima, Tina TURNER, Christina AGUILERA, Bette MIDLER, John MELLENCAMP and many, many others.

Above: At the range with 2014 world field bronze medallist Jerome BIDAULT and friend in France


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Words Tom DIELEN World Archery Secretary General

Five years in the planning, it is a pleasure to announce that construction of the World Archery Excellence Centre in Lausanne has officially begun

World Archery Excellence Centre 77


The outdoor range, next to the centre, will have space for targets at up to 90 metres As much natural light as possible will be used to keep the centre in conditions suitable for archery while keeping costs down The upper level of the centre will have a cafeteria, gym, meeting rooms and office space

Left: The indoor range will accomodate targets at both 18- and 70-metre distances

Work has begun: the site of the soon-to-be-built World Archery Excellence Centre is currently being flattened

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The two levels: archery below, offices and work spaces above

The indoor range will be in use all year round and has the capacity to host small competitions

centre site

Lausanne

Putting the centre on the map: the site’s proximity to Lausanne

I

n 2009, the board of FIDTA – the development foundation of World Archery – began planning to build a world centre for archery excellence in the Olympic Capital of Lausanne, where our offices are based. Early in November 2014, the pre-build phase officially ended. The first construction machinery moved onto site and began to level the uneven ground, in preparation for the installation of the building shell and an outdoor archery range. The build is expected to take just under two years. It is hoped that the Excellence Centre will be ready before the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, however this is dependent on the Swiss weather! If the ground becomes too hard over the next two winters, then work will have to be delayed slightly. Either way, the centre should be open before the close of the next Olympic year. It will be a place for international athletes to come and train in a comfortable, high-performance environment with modern facilities. It is envisioned that some of the training camps held in advance of future Games will take place at the venue. With spaces including a gym, conference and meeting rooms, a large 18-metre indoor range – and the possibility to shoot 70 metres both indoors and out – the centre will be in constant use throughout the year when finished. Although it will not be large enough to host World Cup-level tournaments – and that is not its purpose – it could easily accommodate a reasonably-sized 18- or 70-metre indoor competition. The centre will flagship World Archery’s development activities in the future. As well as hosting judging and coaching seminars, accreditation and enrichment courses, it will coordinate worldwide development initiatives from within its ample office spaces. Its site, near Épalinges, is approximately 10 minutes drive north from Lausanne city centre – which has a direct train link with Geneva airport, so is easily accessible by visiting athletes. World Archery has begun talks with the centre’s neighbour: the Lausanne School of Hospitality, which has fully-functioning and good-quality accommodation, and excellent restaurant facilities. Cooperation with the school removes the need for rooms on site at the centre, freeing up space for sport applications. As the project develops, it is sure to need the space – when it offers archery to the local community and corporate clients, as well as the international athletes it is built for. A full schedule will help to ensure the centre become self-sufficient, financially, as planned, after initial investments from the Olympic movement, Lausanne City, Canton of Vaud and a list of World Archery sponsors and partners – the first of which is the Foundation of Sports in Vaud, with a comprehensive list to soon be announced in full. Before that, the preparation of the land at the site will continue as long as weather allows. The next big milestone in the setting of the centre’s first stone. This will not happen until spring when the ground softens enough to begin building. Hopefully, the next issue of The Target will include pictures from this quite momentous occasion in the history of this state-of-the-art new facility, FIDTA and World Archery. See more information soon at www.worldarcherycentre.org

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Indoor Archery World Cup starts in Marrakesh For the second year in a row, the international indoor archery circuit kicked off with a stop in Africa. The series offers the opportunity for anyone to compete against some of the best archers in the world

Words Chris WELLS World Archery Communications Manager Images Dean ALBERGA World Archery Official Photographer

Below: SCHUH versus FOLKARD, a pair with a history of meeting in medal matches, shoot the recurve women’s final in Marrakesh

T

he outdoor Archery World Cup series is the elite platform for national teams in the Olympic sport to showcase, train and identify talent. While some national teams shoot on the Indoor Archery World Cup circuit, too – shooting for your country is not a prerequisite to register. The indoor circuit is open to anyone who is a member of a World Archery member association. It means that many enter to get the chance to shoot against or on the same line as world champions, world medallists and the cream of the international archery crop. This season, the Indoor Archery World Cup returned to Marrakesh for its first leg. The second

will be in Bangkok, third back in Nimes after Telford stood in for one year and fourth and Final at the famous Vegas Shoot in Sin City. Marrakesh 2014, the second edition of the tournament and second time the African continent has hosted a World Cup level event, brought significant improvements in competition delivery, sports presentation and organisation – and it was most evident in the finals arena. A vintage clash between long-time nemeses Naomi FOLKARD and Berengere SCHUH on the local Moroccan carpet went the latter’s way. French athlete SCHUH, who’s a former world champion indoors, beat the defending Marrakesh

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MARRAKESH 2014 COMPOUND WOMEN’S BRACKETS

144

141 T.10*

JONES

141 T.10*

Crystal GAUVIN

E FILIPPOVA

141 T.9* FILIPPOVA

146 Naomi JONES

GAUVIN 143

BRONZE

gold medallist from Great Britain in straight sets. It was an encouraging sign for SCHUH, who has been rehabbing from injury for some time. “The shoulder is still not totally pain free,” she admitted. “But I take time between shots to avoid putting too much stress on the muscle.” USA compound man Braden GELLENTHIEN, like FOLKARD, also won in Marrakesh last year. Back in the final for the second year in a row, he had a tough match-up against the Netherland’s Mike SCHLOESSER, the top seed after scoring 595/600 for the ranking round. Mike made history last indoor season by becoming the first European archer to ever win the prestigious Vegas Shoot, which also now hosts the Indoor Archery World Cup Final. SCHLOESSER shot a 149 average in his Marrakesh eliminations matches, knocking out top archers like Sergio PAGNI, Stephan HANSEN and PJ DELOCHE. But in the final it was GELLENTHIEN on point. He started with nine straight 10s and built up a three-point lead over SCHLOESSER, which he would maintain over the finish line to claim a second gold in Marrakesh in a row. “I could not have started this season any better,” said Italian recurve man Matteo FISSORE after his top-seed winning 590 score in qualification. “I’ve already got a boost in confidence for the rest of the season.”

141 T.10* H MAGNUSDOTTIR

140 MAGNUSDOTTIR

That boost was quickly magnified when FISSORE – who has won himself the monikor ‘indoor specialist’ – beat Frenchman Adrien LERICHE in a semifinal shoot-off then recorded a 7-3 victory over Russia’s Alexey BORODIN in the Marrakesh gold medal match. The pair were tied at 3-all after three sets, before FISSORE won the back two sets and pulled away. It meant the Italian climbed one step higher on the podium, who had silver at Marrakesh 2013. Archery World Cup Final qualifier Pierre PLIHON, who had an impressive international debut season in 2014, beat LERICHE to bronze. It was a higher step on the podium for Britain’s Naomi JONES, too. With a track record of indoor success – she has won Nimes and the Face2Face tournament in Amsterdam before – JONES beat the USA’s Crystal GAUVIN by two points in the semifinals. The final was closer: drawn 141 with Elena FILIPPOVA after 15 arrows, JONES drilled a 10 to win the tiebreaker. Top seed GAUVIN, who has just completed her first season as a full-time professional archer, won bronze over Helga MAGNUSDOTTIR, shooting in Marrakesh as part of a surprisingly-large Icelandic contingent! See full results, news, pictures and video from the first stage of the 2014 Indoor Archery World Cup in Marrakesh at www.worldarchery.org

MARRAKESH 2014 RECURVE MEN’S BRACKETS

6

2

FISSORE

7

Matteo FISSORE

Pierre PLIHON

3 BORODIN

5 Adrien LERICHE

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LERICHE 2

BRONZE

6 6 PHILON

Alexey BORODIN


Indoor specialist Matteo FISSORE: first individual win

Brit Naomi JONES had a podium finish in Marrakesh in the event’s first year, she upgraded to gold this season

International Iceland: nation sent a big team to the competition in Marrakesh

RECURVE MEN

Matteo FISSORE

RECURVE WOMEN

Berengere SCHUH

COMPOUND MEN

B GELLENTHIEN

COMPOUND WOMEN

Naomi JONES

This is the second season in a Still not back to her form pre- The only compound man to win in Former Nimes winner JONES with row that FISSORE’s shown skills injury, this win is a big one for a Marrakesh with a second straight the best start to her 2014 indoor indoors. Just how good is he? once-dominant SCHUH. gold at the tournament. international campaign

Alexey BORODIN

Naomi FOLKARD

Mike SCHLOESSER

Elena FILIPPOVA

Pierre PLIHON

Emilie LACROIX

PJ DELOCHE

Crystal GAUVIN

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2014 INDOOR ARCHERY WORLD CUP: PIECES OF THE VEGAS PUZZLE MARRAKESH | 8-9 NOVEMBER 2014

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Another successful event in Marrakesh to start the indoor season: this time, complete with a very African finals arena and recorded by World Archery’s indevelopment Event Toolbox – a plug-and-play system that facilitates show production and internet-quality broadcast. How to watch: All the finals matches are now on Archery TV, World Archery’s YouTube Channel. Head over to www.archery.tv to watch Marrakesh in full.

BANGKOK | 6-7 DECEMBER 2014 Replacing Singapore on the circuit due to the size constraints of its predecessor. There has been rumour that some Koreans will shoot this indoor event – which is unusual – and not even the ones from ladies pro team LH that you might expect. What to watch for: Who shoots. Korea? India? A good finish here would make a Finals trip likely – and we haven’t seen many Asian athletes compete in Las Vegas in previous years.

2

NIMES | 23-25 JANUARY 2015

3

Berengere SCHUH, over a decade ago world indoor champion when the event was held in Nimes, won Marrakesh. In front of the French crowd she has always been good – and the biggest indoor tournament in Europe, on entries, has increased in difficulty each year of its existence. How much tougher can it get… What to watch for: A few years ago – before the set system – SCHUH shot a perfect 120 in the Nimes gold final. Let’s see it again?

LAS VEGAS | 6-7 FEBRUARY 2015 The last leg and Final shoot-down brackets that decide the Indoor Archery World Cup Champions takes places in Sin City: Las Vegas, Nevada in the United States. It’s the competition that attracts over 2,200 entrants. Last year, Sebastien PEINEAU climbed from the bottom – 16th – seed to the top spot in the compound men’s event, in a Las Vegas tournament that was led by Europeans throughout. What to watch for: Whether the States can reclaim a hold on one of the world’s largest events, on home soil.

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4


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Outdoor World Ranking as of 1 November 2014 Recurve Men

Rank Progress 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 +1 8 +2

Recurve Women

Rank Progress 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 +1 8 +1

Compound Men

Rank Progress 1 2 +1 3 -1 4 +1 5 -1 6 +1 7 -1 8

Athlete LEE Seungyun OH Jin Hyek Rick VAN DER VEN Florian KAHLLUND Pierre PLIHON Brady ELLISON KU Bonchan Marcus DALMEIDA

Continent Asia Asia Europe Europe Europe Americas Asia Americas

Code KOR KOR NED GER FRA USA KOR BRA

Country Korea Korea Netherlands Germany France USA Korea Brazil

Points 246.5 234.5 226.5 199.5 188.25 178.25 174.6 168.75

Athlete XU Jing JUNG Dasomi Maja JAGER YUN Ok Hee CHANG Hye Jin Elena RICHTER JOO Hyun Jung Tatiana SEGINA

Continent Asia Asia Europe Asia Asia Europe Asia Europe

Code CHN KOR DEN KOR KOR GER KOR RUS

Country China Korea Denmark Korea Korea Germany Korea Russia

Points 252.5 213.25 186.5 184.25 182.5 174 171 170.25

Athlete Pierre Julien DELOCHE Peter ELZINGA Reo WILDE Sebastien PEINEAU Mike SCHLOESSER Bridger DEATON Alexander DAMBAEV Sergio PAGNI

Continent Europe Europe Americas Europe Europe Americas Europe Europe

Code FRA NED USA FRA NED USA RUS ITA

Country France Netherlands USA France Netherlands USA Russia Italy

Points 270.5 222.75 220.55 207.45 202.85 184.475 175.7 174.15

Continent Americas Americas Europe Asia Americas Europe Europe Europe

Code COL USA RUS KOR COL CRO RUS GER

Country Colombia USA Russia Korea Colombia Croatia Russia Germany

Points 216.45 203.9 182.25 173.4 171.625 164.825 164.025 157.1

Compound Women

Rank Progress 1 2 3 +2 4 +4 5 +1 6 -3 7 8 -4

Athlete Sara LOPEZ Erika JONES Albina LOGINOVA CHOI Bomin Alejandra USQUIANO Ivana BUDEN Natalia AVDEEVA Kristina HEIGENHAUSER

LEE Seungyun (KOR)

XU Jing (CHN)

Pierre-Julien DELOCHE (FRA)

Sara LOPEZ (COL)

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Para Archery World Ranking as of 4 November 2014

New para archery classifications and competition divisions came into effect on 1 April 2014. This world ranking list includes archers classified to compete in para archery events from this date. Recurve Men Open Rank Progress Athlete

Continent Code

Country

Points

1

Bato TSYDENDORZHIEV Europe

RUS

Russia

174

2

Paul BROWNE

Europe

GBR

Great Britain

138.9

3

+2

Hanreuchai NETSIRI

Asia

THA

Thailand

131.3

4

+2

Vaclav KOSTAL

Europe

CZE

Czech Republic 123.4

5

+7

Timothy PALUMBO

Americas

USA

USA

112.4

6

+3

Anton ZAYPAEV

Europe

RUS

Russia

107.9

7

+4

Stephane GILBERT

Europe

FRA

France

96.8

8

+10

Michael LUKOW

Americas

USA

USA

96.65 Bato TSYDENDORZHIEV (RUS)

Compound Men Open Rank Progress Athlete

Continent Code

Country

Points

Jere FORSBERG

Europe

FIN

Finland

198.5

1

2

+1

John STUBBS

Europe

GBR

Great Britain

193

3

-1

Alberto SIMONELLI

Europe

ITA

Italy

178

4

+1

Marcel PAVLIK

Europe

SVK

Slovakia

160

5

-1

Matt STUTZMAN

Americas

USA

USA

159

6

+2

Jeff SENA

Americas

USA

USA

110.6

7

+2

Martin IMBODEN

Europe

SUI

Switzerland

105.75

8

+3

Matteo BONACINA

Europe

ITA

Italy

103 Jere FORSBERG (FIN)

Recurve/Compound Men W1 Rank Progress Athlete

Continent Code

Country

Points 197.5

1

+1

Jean Pierre ANTONIOS

Europe

FIN

Finland

2

-1

David DRAHONINSKY

Europe

CZE

Czech Republic 191.9

3

+1

John CAVANAGH

Europe

GBR

Great Britain

178.7

4

-1

Jeff FABRY

Americas

USA

United States

149

5

+2

Uwe HERTER

Europe

GER

Germany

123.2

6

+2

KOO Songsub

Asia

KOR

Korea

110.5

7

-1

Peter KINIK

Europe

SVK

Slovakia

110.2

8

+1

Jerry SHIELDS

Americas

USA

USA

88.475 Jean Pierre ANTONIOS (FIN)

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Recurve Women Open Rank Progress Athlete

Continent Code

Country

Points

Milena OLSZEWSKA

Europe

POL

Poland

169.675

1

2

+2

Brigitte DUBOC

Europe

FRA

France

129.925

3

+5

Svetlana BARANTSEVA

Europe

RUS

Russia

118.4

4

+2

R DZOBA-BAYLAN

Europe

UKR

Ukraine

117.15

5

+6

Margarita SIDORENKO

Europe

RUS

Russia

112.4

6

-3

Elisabetta MIJNO

Europe

ITA

Italy

108

7

-5

Zahra NEMATI

Asia

IRI

Iran

100

8

-1

Irina BATOROVA

Europe

RUS

Russia

94.7 Milena OLSZEWSKA (POL)

Compound Women Open Rank Progress Athlete

Continent Code

Country

Points

1

Mel CLARKE

Europe

GBR

Great Britain

173.6

2

Burcu DAG

Europe

TUR

Turkey

139.2

3

+1

Zandra REPPE

Europe

SWE

Sweden

122.6

4

+3

Eleonora SARTI

Europe

ITA

Italy

103.2

=5

-2

Stepanida ARTAKHINOVA Europe

RUS

Russia

102.6

=5

+3

Larysa MIKHNIEVA

Europe

UKR

Ukraine

102.6

7

+3

Lucia KUPCZYK

Europe

GER

Germany

100.1

8

-3

Olga POLEGAEVA

Europe

RUS

Russia

99.8 Mel CLARKE (GBR)

Recurve/Compound Women W1 Rank Progress Athlete

Continent Code

Country

Points

1

New

Jo FRITH

Europe

GBR

Great Britain

10

2

New

Vicky JENKINS

Europe

GBR

Great Britain

8.5

3

New

Chloe BALL

Europe

GBR

Great Britain

7

4

New

Elena KRUTOVA

Europe

RUS

Russia

6

– no other athletes yet ranked in division –

Jo FRITH (GBR)

89


90


Calendar See a full calendar of World Archery events, including World Cups, World Championships and World Ranking competitions at www.worldarchery.org

INDOOR CALENDAR 2014/15 8-9 November 6-7 December 8-9 December 23-25 January 6-7 February 24-28 February

Indoor Archery World Cup stage 1 Indoor Archery World Cup stage 2 Indoor Para Archery World Cup Indoor World Cup stage 3 Indoor World Cup stage 4 and Final European Indoor Championships

Marrakesh (MAR) Bangkok (THA) Bangkok (THA) Nimes (FRA) Las Vegas (USA) Koper (SLO)

Asia Cup stage 1 Asia Cup stage 2 European Grand Prix leg 1 (Quota for European Games) Archery World Cup stage 1 Archery World Cup stage 2 World Archery Youth Championships European Games (Archery: 17-22 June) 28th Summer Universiade (Archery: 4-8 July) Pan American Games (Archery: 13-18 July) World Archery Congress World Archery Championships Para Pan American Games (Para Archery: 8-11 August) Archery World Cup stage 3 World Archery Para Championships World Archery 3D Championships Archery World Cup stage 4 AqueceRio - Rio 2016 International Archery (Test Event) Archery World Cup Final 19th Asian Championships + CQT Asia Asian Para Archery Championships + Para CQT

New Dehli (IND) Bangkok (THA) Marathon (GRE) Shanghai (CHN) Antalya (TUR) Yankton (USA) Baku (AZE) Gwangju (KOR) Toronto (CAN) Copenhagen (DEN) Copenhagen (DEN) Toronto (CAN) Wroclaw (POL) Donaueschingen (GER) Terni (ITA) Medellin (COL) Rio de Janeiro (BRA) Mexico City (MEX) Bangkok (THA) Bangkok (THA)

OUTDOOR CALENDAR 2015 12-17 January 16-22 March 16-22 March 5-10 May 26-31 May 8-14 June 12-28 June 3-14 July 10-26 July 24-25 July 26 July-2 August 7-15 August 11-16 August 23-30 August 31 August-6 September 8-13 September 15-22 September 17-18 October 1-8 November 10-19 November

Bold/Red Bold/Green Bold/Italics Blue

Archery World Cup Indoor Archery World Cup World Championships World multisport events (Olympic/Paralympic, World Games and others)

91


153 Member Associations ALG Algeria ARG Argentina ARM Armenia AUS Australia AUT Austria AZE Azerbaijan BAH Bahamas BAN Bangladesh BAR Barbados BEL Belgium BEN Benin BER Bermuda BHU Bhutan BIH Bosnia and Herzegovina BLR Belarus BRA Brazil BUL Bulgaria CAF Central African Republic CAM Cambodia CAN Canada CHA Chad CHI Chile CHN People’s Republic of China CIV Ivory Coast CMR Cameroon COD Democratic Republic of the Congo COL Colombia COM Comoros CRC Costa Rica CRO Croatia CUB Cuba CYP Cyprus CZE Czech Republic DEN Denmark DOM Dominican Republic ECU Ecuador EGY Egypt ESA El Salvador ESP Spain EST Estonia FIJ Fiji FIN Finland FLK Falkland Islands FPO Tahiti FRA France FRO Faroe Islands GAB Gabon GBR Great Britain GEO Georgia GER Germany GHA Ghana GRE Greece

92

GUA Guatemala GUI Guinea HAI Haiti HKG Hong Kong, China HON Honduras HUN Hungary INA Indonesia IND India IRI Islamic Republic of Iran IRL Ireland IRQ Iraq ISL Iceland ISR Israel ISV Virgin Islands ITA Italy JPN Japan KAZ Kazakhstan KEN Kenya KGZ Kyrgyzstan KIR Kiribati KOR Korea KOS Kosovo KSA Saudi Arabia KUW Kuwait LAO Lao People’s Democratic Republic LAT Latvia LBA Libya LBR Liberia LIB Lebanon LIE Liechtenstein LTU Lithuania LUX Luxembourg MAC Macau MAR Morocco MAS Malaysia MAW Malawi MDA Republic of Moldova MEX Mexico MGL Mongolia MKD F.Y.R.O. Macedonia MLT Malta MNE Republic of Montenegro MON Monaco MRI Mauritius MYA Myanmar NAM Namibia NCA Nicaragua NED Netherlands NEP Nepal NFI Norfolk Islands NGR Nigeria NIG Niger

NOR Norway NZL New Zealand PAK Pakistan PAN Panama PAR Paraguay PER Peru PHI Philippines PLW Palau PNG Papua New Guinea POL Poland POR Portugal PRK Democratic People’s Republic of Korea PUR Puerto Rico QAT Qatar ROU Romania RSA South Africa RUS Russian Federation RWA Rwanda SAM Samoa SEN Senegal SIN Singapore SLE Sierra Leone SLO Slovenia SMR San Marino SOM Somalia SRB Serbia SRI Sri Lanka SUD Sudan SUI Switzerland SUR Suriname SVK Slovakia SWE Sweden TGA Tonga THA Thailand TJK Tajikistan TOG Togo TPE Chinese Taipei TTO Trinidad and Tobago TUN Tunisia TUR Turkey UGA Uganda UKR Ukraine URU Uruguay USA United States of America UZB Uzbekistan VAN Vanuatu VEN Venezuela VIE Vietnam ZIM Zimbabwe


Official Sponsors KIA Motors Official Car Sponsor of World Archery

SporToto

FILA

Turkish Airlines Official Airline of World Archery

Longines

Official Partners Hoyt Official Bow Partners

Easton Technical Products Inc. Official Arrow Partners

DHL Global Forwarding

Win & Win Archery Official Presenter of the Archery Fan Reporter

93


Development Fund Partners

BS |

1.05

F I V I C S C O R P O R AT I O N

I D E N T I T Y S TA N DA R D S

시그니처_좌우조합

시그니처는 심볼마크와 로고타입을 최적의 비례로 조합한 것으로 적용 매체의 특성에 따라 좌우조합 또는 상하조합 등

Horizontal Signature

적절한 시그니처 타입을 선택·사용한다.

Danage of Scandinavia Denmark

시그니처의 사용은 본 매뉴얼 CD-Rom에 수록된 원고용 파일을 출력하여 사용하는 것을 원칙으로 한다

FIVICS Archery* (formerly “Soma Archery”) Korea

슬로건 포함 기본형

HIGH FIVE VICTORY

기본형

Rosa Inc. Japan

심볼마크 강조형

Easton Technical Products Inc. USA 로고타입 강조형

Hoyt USA

Samick Sports Co. Ltd Korea

Win & Win Archery Co. Korea

Lancaster Archery Supply USA

®

Shibuya Archery (a division of Yasui & Co.) Japan

Sports Glasses PILLA USA 94


Thanks W

orld Archery wishes to thank its sponsors, partners, suppliers and associate members for their support and contribution to the development of archery. Special thanks to the World Archery President Prof Dr Uğur ERDENER, Robert C.W. SMITH, Uğur KORKMAZ, Hakan BALCI, Dean ALBERGA, Reggie HAMILTON, Ben VAN DER VELDE, Andrea VASQUEZ, John STANLEY, Nick DAWES, Stephen SIGURNJAK and his colleagues at the University of Manchester, the World Archery staff and officers, as well as any other person involved in this issue for their valuable contributions.

Next issue of The Target magazine: Summer 2015

The Target Winter 2014 © 2014 World Archery

Front cover: Marcus D’ALMEIDA Photography: Dean ALBERGA Designed and published by World Archery in Ankara, Turkey All rights are reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior permission of World Archery in writing. All opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily of World Archery.

World Archery Federation Maison du Sport International Avenue de Rhodanie 54 1007 Lausanne SWITZERLAND Website: www.worldarchery.org Email: info@archery.org Telephone: +41 21 614 30 50 Fax: +41 21 614 30 55 World Archery Staff: Raheleh AHADPOUR, Thomas AUBERT, Jenny BRUGGER, Pascal COLMAIRE, Séverine DERIAZ, Tom DIELEN, Laurent HADORN, Juan-Carlos HOLGADO, Ludivine MAITRE WICKI, Chris MARSH, Caroline MURAT, Deqa NIAMKEY, Matteo PISANI and Chris WELLS

96


Associate Members Archery Life Co. Korea

JP Archery Co. Japan

Arrowhead* (also sells under “Temple Faces”) Great Britain

J.V.D. Distribution* Netherlands Krueger Targets* Germany

Asahi Archery Inc. Japan Bagar & Pilar Sweden Bjorn Bengtson Sweden AB* Sweden Danage of Scandinavia Denmark

BS |

1.05

F I V I C S C O R P O R AT I O N

I D E N T I T Y S TA N DA R D S

시그니처_좌우조합

시그니처는 심볼마크와 로고타입을 최적의 비례로 조합한 것으로 적용 매체의 특성에 따라 좌우조합 또는 상하조합 등

Horizontal Signature

적절한 시그니처 타입을 선택·사용한다.

®

Lancaster Archery Supply USA

LAS Distribution France Mathews Inc. USA

Decut China

Maple Leaf Press Inc.* USA

Easton Technical Products Inc. USA

M.K Korea Korea

FIVICS Archery* (formerly “Soma Archery”) Korea

Petron United Kingdom

Geologic* France

Samick Sports Co. Ltd Korea

Hoyt USA

Shibuya Archery (a division of Yasui & Co.) Japan

Ishii Archery Co. Ltd. Japan

Win & Win Archery Co. Korea

시그니처의 사용은 본 매뉴얼 CD-Rom에 수록된 원고용 파일을 출력하여 사용하는 것을 원칙으로 한다

슬로건 포함 기본형

HIGH FIVE VICTORY

기본형

심볼마크 강조형

로고타입 강조형

Arrow Wraps Socx Arrow Wraps Netherlands

*Licensed Manufacturers of World Archery target faces. Only target faces produced by licensed manufacturers may be used at World Archery events.

95


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IV

The Target: Winter 2014  

Features, reviews and interviews from the world of international archery. This issue includes: a profile of young Brazilian star Marcus D’Al...

The Target: Winter 2014  

Features, reviews and interviews from the world of international archery. This issue includes: a profile of young Brazilian star Marcus D’Al...

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