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M AY – J U N E 2 0 1 1

98TH EDITION

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worldaa.com

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A u s t r a l a s i a ’s l e a d i n g a n t i q u e s a n d c o l l e c t a b l e s m a g a z i n e

FROM HOLLYWOOD MOVIES TO ENGLISH ECCLESIASTICAL TRADITIONS

Profiling very different interests

AUST $9.95 NZ $13.95

COIN COLLECTING FOR HERITAGE, HISTORY AND SURVIVAL THE VERY YOUNG How to make it interesting and fun without breaking the bank

Codes in quilts Camouflage in silk Textiles will never be the same again

COLLECTING AUSTRALIAN ART WARE: CERAMICS TO JEWELLERY

Artists to look out for from the last century to works made today


48 FEATURE ARTICLES 6

66

Collecting Australian ceramic art Marvin Hurnall

12

Deception and insider trading via silver candlesticks Roy Williams

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Introducing children to numismatics Peter Lane

24

Contemporary craft jewellers - new directions Dorothy Erickson

34

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Collecting bookends – practical plus decorative Donna Braye

48

Rituals and life in medieval manuscripts

56

Collecting Native American Apache baskets Melody Amsel-Arieli

66

A Lalique car badge

16

SPECIAL FEATURE: FROM THE THEATRE OF WAR

34

Margaret McNiven covers memorabilia born from war

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The Changi quilts Memorabilia remembering Queensland’s worst maritime disaster

52

A pilot‘s wearable World War II map of Europe

KNOWLEDGE BASE 54

Diamond jewellery in the 15th century

FOCUS: COLLECTING PERSPECTIVE VERY DIFFERENT INTERESTS FASCINATING COLLECTIONS 20 60

56

Collecting a Hollywood icon A commemorative collection in Melbourne Margaret McNiven

67

OUT & ABOUT

REGULAR FEATURES 38 39 45 69 70 72 76 79 78

6

Online magazines Conundrum Collectables fairs Collectables subscription Bulletin board Marketplace: buy and sell Recent books for collectors Advertising rates Advertisers’ Index

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WIN conundrum enter our prize draw See page 39

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3


Collecting Australian art ware

A family affair Una Deerbon (1882-1972) and her cousin Jack Castle Harris (1893-1967)

1

Until recently the focus for collectors of Australian ceramic art has been mainly on the output of artisans including Grace Seccombe, Marguerite Mahood and William Ricketts 2

Marvin Hurnall

T

he potter and craft worker Una Deerbon was born in Woollahra in Sydney in 1882. Her parents Alfred and Clara Deane sent her to a convent school as a boarder, and it was there that her interest in fashion and design was ignited via regular needlework classes held by the nuns. She attended Sydney Art School after she completed her schooling, studied painting under Julian Ashton. In 1904, when she was 22 years old, Una married Englishborn businessman Richard Darlow, who was also a part-time journalist and artist. Although exact dates are not known, we do know that between 1904 and before the outbreak of

Una Deerbon

1

, Vase, 1933, 15 x 18 cm, decorated with cascading series of gum leaves, incised signature ‘Deerbon’. Courtesy State Library of Victoria

2

Una Deerbon, postcard signed ‘Una Darlow’ Una Deerbon, Fruit platter, c. 1933, 4.5 x 29 cm, incised signature ‘Deerbon’

3

World War I she designed clothes for the department store David Jones, and opened the Sydneybased Madam Darlot’s Design School. Una also created and sold sets of humorous postcards, signing them ‘Una Darlow.’ During the years of her first marriage she travelled to London studying at the Slade School, and the United States where she studied at the Chicago School of Art. After the collapse of her marriage she moved to Brisbane where she worked as a potter. It

3 6

COLLECTABLES Trader


Silver candlesticks

aristocratic deception and insider trading 1

Time travel back to life in cosmopolitan 18th century Paris where, as Roy Williams explains, some behaviours have a familiar ring – wisdom in hindsight!

‘H

ouse prices never go down,’ proclaimed the young person, and indeed they had not in his lifetime. However, I involuntarily thought ‘Aha! You didn’t watch television every night in 1989 when house prices tumbled and evictions and financial ruin were daily news.’ I recalled the words of noted Spanish philosopher George Santayana – ‘Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it,’ and the sequence of events that have left a trail of financial disasters in this century – from the victims of the dot com crash (2001) to the GFC (2007-10). Perhaps there might have been more caution had there been the study the Tulip crash (1637), the South Sea Bubble (1720) the Mississippi Company Crash (1720) the Crash of ’29 or the twenty or so other major financial crises since

12

COLLECTABLES Trader

Tulipmania. In each of these cases the multitudes were ruined and the few were made immensely rich.

Insider trading in the 18th century One of the odd but instructive results of the Mississippi Company was the Paris technological revolution of the 1730s. Those who cashed in their shares at the peak of the bubble amassed immense fortunes. They included commoners as well as nobility. Insider trading was rampant, by the way. This new patronage by rich commoners placed different demands on architects and designers than traditional aristocratic requirements. This led to vigorous competition between patrons and artists for the very latest in housing and technology, as a result of which great developments in plumbing, air conditioning and heating were accomplished.

Symbols of prestige in 18th century Paris The Paris rich were much more likely to have a water closet (plumbed flush toilet) in 1730 than in 1830. Technological advances are not always permanent. The same clients demanded cutting edge design in furnishings and interior decoration. One could hardly be seen with last season’s furniture in the salon. In an age before home theatres and giant televisions, the principle prestige home ware in the 18th century was silver for the rich and textiles for the middle classes. A well-to-do merchant’s housewife would ensure the maid would carry in fresh bundles of embroidered linens to the armoire lavishly stocked with textiles if her friends were present to show wealth. Textiles were enormously expensive before machine weaving arrived about 1840.


A head start

for budding young numismatists It is never too early to start collecting and Peter Lane provides useful and practical tips for parents and mentors

R

eaders often want to know the best way they can help their children to start collecting coins. My suggestion is to begin with the coins in your pocket, showing how to collect by date and value. If the children lose interest, you can put the coins back in your pocket – that is your 100% moneyback guarantee.

16

COLLECTABLES Trader

If the interest continues, buy a kilo bag of modern coins from a coin dealer, they are cheap and perfect for little hands. Collecting is a very tactile and enjoyable experience. Never buy things that children cannot play with.

A workshop for young enthusiasts Recently I was invited to conduct a two-hour session on coins at the Gifted and Talented Children of South Australia’s Saturday Club for children aged between six to nine years. Both flattered and daunted, I put considerable thought into planning this session, whether to make a digital presentation on the history of coins or just focus on Australian coinage. As children are children, I knew that the best form of learning at their ages was to let them handle many different coins. The session was in the afternoon in a classroom and as it was a small group, the children sat

together in the front row. Some of the parents decided to attend and join in the fun, and all learnt about the hobby of collecting coins. All the children wanted a magnifying glass, a must-have piece of equipment for all ages. Some of the children brought along and talked about their own coin collections, many received from friends and relatives. Most of these coins were brought back from overseas holidays.

Step I: explain the history of coins I began with the history of coins and passed around some ancient coins from Roman times that were used in Egypt and England. Then I talked about African ring money and explained that the people in that region did not have pockets until about 100 years ago, so their coins were a different shape and were looped on their belts.


1

Girl Guides trefoil logo embroidered in

centre rosette of Changi Girl Guides quilt. Courtesy Sheila Allan, Collection of British Red Cross Museum

2

Sheila Allan’s secret diary in Changi

Prison, WWII. Collection of Sheila Allan

1

Bed coverings that became messages of hope:

The Changi quilts Despite the cruelty of their situation and the inhumanity of their captors, these remarkable women used their needlework skills to send coded messages 2

Margaret D McNiven

rough further away. Each group had to make its own comforts and organise a collective life to survive.

I

t is ironic that the beauty of Changi proved to be the setting for man’s inhumanity to man. Over 2,000 civilian women, children and men were interred in Changi Gaol on 8 March 1942 after the fall of Singapore. Here, hundreds of women cared for children in the women’s camp, segregated from their husbands, sons aged over 12 years, brothers and fathers in barracks 6 kilometres away. Captured POWs camped

28

COLLECTABLES Trader

There has been a regrettable oversight of the imprisoned civilian women who battled brutality, daily hunger, disease and filthy conditions while protecting teen girls and children. As survivor Pat Darling states (Portrait of a Nurse: Prisoner of War …), ‘The most tragic victims of all in camp were the children and their mothers. The children’s thin, haunted little old faces are still a troublesome memory, even today.’


NE 2011 M AY – J U

98TH EDITION

s e l b a t c e l l co online@

worldaa.com

trader

agazine tables m d collec iques an TING ding ant HISTORY COLLEC ART WARE: GE, s i a ’s l e a N a ITA l LIA a r HER TRA t s u AUS A ELLERY VIVAL LECTING FOR

COIN COL D FROM HOLLYWOO THE VERY YOUNG g LISH it interestin MOVIES TO ENGL How to make TICA IAS breaking LES ECC and fun without S ION TRADIT ests the bank

AND SUR

s Codes in quilt silk Camouflage in r be the Textiles will neve same again

CERAMICS TO JEW

out for from the Artists to look y works made toda last century to

rent inter Profiling very diffe

TO BE RI SUBSOCW N

CLICK HERE

$13.95 AUST $9.95 NZ

WELCOME TO THE INTRIGUING WORLD OF COLLECTING Collectables is published bi-monthly with each edition bringing fresh insights and fun collecting themes. Discover the latest collecting craze; explore the quirky and traditional collectable; learn how best to start a collection. There are tips on preserving and caring for valued possessions. Read the diary and plan a visit to a fair.

1

Step 2: Learning to sort A head start

for budding young numismatists It is never too early to start collecting and Peter Lane provides useful and practical tips for parents and mentors

R

eaders often want to know the best way they can help their children to start collecting coins. My suggestion is to begin with the coins in your pocket, showing how to collect by date and value. If the children lose interest, you can put the coins back in your pocket – that is your 100% moneyback guarantee.

16

If the interest continues, buy a kilo bag of modern coins from a coin dealer, they are cheap and perfect for little hands. Collecting is a very tactile and enjoyable experience. Never buy things that children cannot play with.

A workshop for young enthusiasts Recently I was invited to conduct a two-hour session on coins at the Gifted and Talented Children of South Australia’s Saturday Club for children aged between six to nine years. Both flattered and daunted, I put considerable thought into planning this session, whether to make a digital presentation on the history of coins or just focus on Australian coinage. As children are children, I knew that the best form of learning at their ages was to let them handle many different coins. The session was in the afternoon in a classroom and as it was a small group, the children sat

COLLECTABLES Trader

More to read • Book reviews • Memorabilia • Trader: Buy & Sell

together in the front row. Some of the parents decided to attend and join in the fun, and all learnt about the hobby of collecting coins. All the children wanted a magnifying glass, a must-have piece of equipment for all ages. Some of the children brought along and talked about their own coin collections, many received from friends and relatives. Most of these coins were brought back from overseas holidays.

Step I: explain the history of coins I began with the history of coins and passed around some ancient coins from Roman times that were used in Egypt and England. Then I talked about African ring money and explained that the people in that region did not have pockets until about 100 years ago, so their coins were a different shape and were looped on their belts.

Next, every child was given about 100 modern world coins, of which the oldest was just over 200 years old. They sorted the coins by date. This proved very popular, especially when they came across a coin minted in the year they were born, or else a very old one. Later the children sorted the coins by country. The process involved learning about the many differences in designs, metals, sizes and shapes, such as square or with holes in the centre.

Step 3: Importance of reference books Coin books and catalogues were browsed, but regretfully there was not enough time to read them completely. If children show interest in reading about coins, please visit a library and borrow a book or two on this fascinating subject. Coin books in libraries are under Dewey number 737.

Step4: Looking at Australian coins We then looked at some Australian pennies and all the children knew Queen Elizabeth II’s portrait. Understandably at their early age, they were not familiar with her father, George VI and her grandfather George V. Looking and talking about those coins, they began to understand the monarchy at a family level, which the children found fascinating.

Step 5: Creating coin designs To close, the children drew coin designs as ‘school money’ to use at their own school with the Queen replaced by the principal. On the other side of the coin the children added different motifs. Some were of their school’s badge, others put local animals, birds and even dinosaurs! The coin designs bore a date and had a value on them. Readers who want academiclevel study on ancient coins, Macquarie University in Sydney offers a postgraduate course. Details at www.humaities.mq.edu.au

A starting point I hope readers will now want to share their collecting experiences with the next generation. There are several useful sites, including the Gifted and Talented Children of South Australia’s website: www.gtcasa.asn.au. If interest continues, then the budding collector should join a local collector’s group. The Numismatic Association of Australia’s website lists all the numismatic clubs and societies in Australia and New Zealand on www.naa-online.com. A bag of 200 world coins for children usually costs around $20 and can be purchased at coin shops.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES There are few employment opportunities in Australia in this field. There are some related jobs in Europe, notably the cataloguing of coin hoards discovered almost every day that must be catalogued to comply with local treasure trove laws. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS • Walter Bloom and John McDonald, for technical advice • Gifted and Talented Children’s Association of SA • Grant Morton of I.S. Wright, Adelaide, for the loan of modern coins • Participating children and parents, including permission to print photos

1 Tetradrachm, Philip I, Alexandria mint, c. 244- 249 CE 2 Bronze, Constantius II, Rome mint, c. 305-352 CE

2

COLLECTABLES Trader

17

NUMISMATICS FOR THE YOUNG Give budding collectors a head start by following the tips of Peter Lane, Secretary of the Numismatics Association of Australia


Silver candlesticks

SILVER PLATED BRASS CANDLESTICKS AND A CAUTIONARY TALE FROM 18TH CENTURY PARIS

aristocratic deception and insider trading 1

Time travel back to life in cosmopolitan 2

18th century Paris where, as Roy Williams

3

explains, some behaviours have a familiar ring – wisdom in hindsight!

‘H

ouse prices never go down,’ proclaimed the young person, and indeed they had not in his lifetime. However, I involuntarily thought ‘Aha! You didn’t watch television every night in 1989 when house prices tumbled and evictions and financial ruin were daily news.’ I recalled the words of noted Spanish philosopher George Santayana – ‘Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it,’ and the sequence of events that have left a trail of financial disasters in this century – from the victims of the dot com crash (2001) to the GFC (2007-10). Perhaps there might have been more caution had there been the study the Tulip crash (1637), the South Sea Bubble (1720) the Mississippi Company Crash (1720) the Crash of ’29 or the twenty or so other major financial crises since

Faking it is not new and was a common practice even back in the 1700s when imitation silver made you look richer than you were 12

Tulipmania. In each of these cases the multitudes were ruined and the few were made immensely rich.

Insider trading in the 18th century One of the odd but instructive results of the Mississippi Company was the Paris technological revolution of the 1730s. Those who cashed in their shares at the peak of the bubble amassed immense fortunes. They included commoners as well as nobility. Insider trading was rampant, by the way. This new patronage by rich commoners placed different demands on architects and designers than traditional aristocratic requirements. This led to vigorous competition between patrons and artists for the very latest in housing and technology, as a result of which great developments in plumbing, air conditioning and heating were accomplished.

Symbols of prestige in 18th century Paris The Paris rich were much more likely to have a water closet (plumbed flush toilet) in 1730 than in 1830. Technological advances are not always permanent. The same clients demanded cutting edge design in furnishings and interior decoration. One could hardly be seen with last season’s furniture in the salon. In an age before home theatres and giant televisions, the principle prestige home ware in the 18th century was silver for the rich and textiles for the middle classes. A well-to-do merchant’s housewife would ensure the maid would carry in fresh bundles of embroidered linens to the armoire lavishly stocked with textiles if her friends were present to show wealth. Textiles were enormously expensive before machine weaving arrived about 1840.

Faking it: Aristocratic skulduggery

While bourgeois wealth was hard to fake, the aristocracy could resort to effective skulduggery. The rich would have a fabulous display of immensely valuable silver candlesticks, plates and ewers, cutlery and even chandeliers. Royalty would even have furniture entirely encased is sheets of finely worked silver. A few sets remain. However, the desire to impress is not always equalled by the financial wherewithal, even in aristocratic circles. Hence imitation silver was an important way of looking richer than you were. These days we have electroplating, since the 1840s, to make inexpensive EPNS (electro plated nickel silver). Since electricity was not readily available in the 18th century, other methods were employed. Many collectors will be familiar with Old Sheffield Plate, invented by Thomas Boulsover in 1743. This technique allowed a sheet of

sterling silver to be attached to a sheet of copper and an object could then, with great difficulty and skill, be made from the silver veneered copper sheet. Convincing imitation silver candlesticks, trays and tea services could be made, and appear to be the much more expensive solid silver.

Silver coating base metals

1

A pair of Charles X period French

2

A pair of Louis XV c. 1760 French brass

3

Pair of brass rococo candlesticks, French

candlesticks, c.1820, in brass now electroplated back to their probable original appearance candlesticks in polished and gilding lacquered, a way to imitate gold plating in the 18th century

c. 1770, which would once have been silvered or possibly gold plated. This bald condition is now how most once grand candlesticks are found

Prior to this it was possible to silver coat brass, using the same technique that persisted for many years in the manufacturing of silvered brass clock dials. Any metal rich in copper can be silvered this way. It involves coating the article with a mixture that includes cyanide of potassium, nitrate of silver, salt, and water. This silvering was not very durable, and very little brass remains with even a whiff of original silvering. Most has long since been worn completely away through use and cleaning.

COLLECTABLES Trader

COLLECTABLES Trader

13

3 1

Girl Guides trefoil logo embroidered in

centre rosette of Changi Girl Guides quilt. Courtesy Sheila Allan, Collection of British Red Cross Museum

2

THE CHANGI QUILTS: CODED MESSAGES OF HOPE Records of

Sheila

Allan’s secret diary in Changi Prison, WWII. Collection of Sheila Allan

1

Bed coverings that became messages of hope:

The Changi quilts Despite the cruelty of their situation and the inhumanity of their captors, these remarkable women used their needlework skills to send coded messages 2

Margaret D McNiven

I

t is ironic that the beauty of Changi proved to be the setting for man’s inhumanity to man. Over 2,000 civilian women, children and men were interred in Changi Gaol on 8 March 1942 after the fall of Singapore. Here, hundreds of women cared for children in the women’s camp, segregated from their husbands, sons aged over 12 years, brothers and fathers in barracks 6 kilometres away. Captured POWs camped

28

rough further away. Each group had to make its own comforts and organise a collective life to survive. There has been a regrettable oversight of the imprisoned civilian women who battled brutality, daily hunger, disease and filthy conditions while protecting teen girls and children. As survivor Pat Darling states (Portrait of a Nurse: Prisoner of War …), ‘The most tragic victims of all in camp were the children and their mothers. The children’s thin, haunted little old faces are still a troublesome memory, even today.’

3

Girl Guides quilt, early 1942, first quilt made in Changi, design:

4

Sheila Allan and Betty Hall with the Girl Guides quilt,

4

grandmother’s garden pattern. Courtesy Changi Museum Singapore

September 2006, London

Life in Changi Brave responses commenced with the practicalities of making furniture from scraps, repairing shoes and mending. Mrs Ethel Mulvaney, a Canadian started a ‘Red Cross corner’ in April 1942 for exchanges and by May, the first women’s concert was held. Women organised children’s activities including schooling, later language and handicraft classes and starting a girls’ club, the Changi Club or Girl Guides to provide meaningful respite from the boredom, fear and privations of captivity. Sheila Allan, then aged 18 years, wrote a diary on scraps of paper kept precariously hidden in her schoolbooks. Her journal (Diary of a Girl in Changi) recorded the refreshing immediacy of a teen observer. Creativity blossomed, with concerts, pantomimes, operettas, original plays, poetry and short story writing and reading events, at which women and men would see each other from afar but be unable to talk. The men’s orchestra

consisted of homemade and salvaged instruments including a smuggled piano. Almost no contact or information was allowed between the camps, except for occasional father-children meetings under guard. When men helped with women’s heavier work there was no talking. As Sheila Allan recalls, on Christmas Day 1943 they were finally allowed to mix and mingle, solely between 10 am and 12 noon. One way that the inmates were able to achieve a slight increase in contact was through ‘Changi University’ which had male lecturers for women’s classes.

Coded quilts: hidden messages of hope Eighteen young girls aged eight to 13years, scavenged scraps of material to sew secretly a birthday present for Elizabeth Ennis, a Scottish nursing sister who organised the Girl Guides in the camp. This simple quilt of hexagons was the first Changi quilt. In the centre of most rosettes is a girl’s

remarkable women outwitting

embroidered name. The central rosette is the Girl Guides symbol. Inspired by the girls’ quilt, four signature quilts were made by hundreds of women in the first six months of imprisonment (1942) as a communication strategy to the men. Mrs Mulvaney gave interested women a six-inch square of coarse rice or flour sack fabric and asked each to embroider and to ‘put something of herself’ onto her square, including her name. Army blankets were used to back each quilt.

their captors. Addressing the oversight of imprisoned civilian

I

n 2007 Betty Hall wrote in an article (Apa Khabar, January 2007) that Mrs Ennis gave the quilt to Sheila Allan in 1994 after hearing of her talks on the Changi quilts. Sheila next presented the quilt on 26 September 2006 – 61 years after her liberation – to the Imperial War Museum. As noted in a conversation with Sheila on 8 April 2011, the quilt was given to the IWM as both the Australian War Memorial and the UK Guides showed no interest.

women battling brutality, disease, starvation and filthy conditions

COLLECTABLES Trader

COLLECTABLES Trader

29

Collecting Australian art ware

A family affair Una Deerbon (1882-1972) and her cousin Jack Castle Harris (1893-1967)

1

Until recently the focus for collectors of Australian ceramic art has been mainly on the 2

output of artisans including Grace Seccombe, Marguerite Mahood and William Ricketts

Marvin Hurnall

TO BE I R C S B SU OW N

CLICK HERE

T

he potter and craft worker Una Deerbon was born in Woollahra in Sydney in 1882. Her parents Alfred and Clara Deane sent her to a convent school as a boarder, and it was there that her interest in fashion and design was ignited via regular needlework classes held by the nuns. She attended Sydney Art School after she completed her schooling, studied painting under Julian Ashton. In 1904, when she was 22 years old, Una married Englishborn businessman Richard Darlow, who was also a part-time journalist and artist. Although exact dates are not known, we do know that between 1904 and before the outbreak of

1 2 3

World War I she designed clothes for the department store David Jones, and opened the Sydneybased Madam Darlot’s Design School. Una also created and sold sets of humorous postcards, signing them ‘Una Darlow.’ During the years of her first marriage she travelled to London studying at the Slade School, and the United States where she studied at the Chicago School of Art. After the collapse of her marriage she moved to Brisbane where she worked as a potter. It

was here that she met the Czech economist Karel Jellinek whom she married in 1922, and with whom she two children. She changed her working name to ‘Deerbon.’ However, after plans to move to the United States failed to eventuate, Deerbon found herself a single mother, and in order to make ends meet she opened a guesthouse. At the same time she continued to create and sell pottery, as well as give lessons. Her cousin John Castle-Harris was one of her students. Although living and working in Brisbane, Deerbon was registered as a craft worker with the Society of Arts and Crafts of New South Wales, which provided her with the opportunity to exhibit at the Society’s annual exhibition. In 1931 she exhibited pottery and in 1932 she showed needlework and weaving, with just a single piece of pottery – a jug (Powerhouse Museum, Sydney). However, in June 1933 she exhibited more than 200 pieces of pottery in the Anthony Hordern & Sons department store gallery. The display was favourably reviewed in the Sydney Morning Herald (13 June 1933) stating: ‘The exhibition of pottery by Mrs. Una Deerbon which is being held at Anthony Hordern’s art gallery contains more than

4

200 pieces. Whatever one may think of Mrs. Deerbon’s manual skill, it is impossible not to admire the fecundity and liveliness of her imagination. The variety both of the forms and of the surface decorations is remarkable. It is only to be expected that the quality of work done by so adventurous a crafts woman should be uneven. Some of the pieces display admirable delicacy of form, and are decorated in an amusing style. In some pieces there has been less success, particularly in the colour schemes, but all of them are patently the work of an exceedingly enterprising and vigorous potter.’

5

4 Una Deerbon, Mantle vase, c. 1930, decorated with applied stylised flowers, 18 x 21 cm, incised signature ‘Deerbon’

6

5 Una Deerbon, Fruit basket, c. 1930, decorated with applied fruits, 19 x 24 cm, incised signature ‘Deerbon’ 6 Una Deerbon, Water jug, c. 1930, 21 x 20 cm, incised signature ‘Deerbon’ 7 Una Deerbon, Platters, c. 1930s, decorated with organic forms, diam: 36 cm, 28 cm, 24 cm, each with incised signature ‘Deerbon’ 8 Una Deerbon, Set of six soufflé dishes, c. 1930s, applied handles in the form of threedimensional chefs, 10 x 15 cm, each incised signature ‘Deerbon’

8

7

Una Deerbon, Vase, 1933, 15 x 18 cm, decorated with cascading series of gum leaves, incised signature ‘Deerbon’. Courtesy State Library of Victoria Una Deerbon, postcard signed ‘Una Darlow’ Una Deerbon, Fruit platter, c. 1933, 4.5 x 29 cm, incised signature ‘Deerbon’

3 6

COLLECTABLES Trader

COLLECTABLES Trader

7

AUSTRALIAN CERAMIC ART WARES TO COLLECT Identifying the work of studio potter Una Deerbon and fresh discoveries about the ceramics of her cousin John (Jack) Castle-Harris


DITION

E – JUN

2011

98TH E M AY

s e l b a t collec online@

trader

om

worldaa.c

ine agaz les m ctab NG T WARE: colle TI d EC n LL a RY CO STRALIAN ARWELLERY ques anti AU E, HISLTO S TO JE ing ERITAG lead CERAMIC out for from the ay FOR HAND SURVIVA i a ’s ECTING de tod to look LL alas quilts k r in CO t rks ma s s Artists IN Code CO Au in sil ry to wo the YOUNG uflage t centu

D THE VERYke it interesting LLYWOOSH FROM HO ma TO ENGLI How to breaking without MOVIESIASTICAL and fun ECCLES IONS the bank t interests TRADIT

Camo will never be Textiles ain same ag

las

feren very dif Profiling

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5 NZ $13.9

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