Page 48

32

World Bank Working Paper

Figure 4.3. Distribution of doctors, by district (public and private) 40 Number of districts

35 30 25 20

40

15 10 5 0

13 0

10

1–6

2 4 6–12 13–18 19–24 Number of doctors per district

0 25–30

3 30+

Source: Herbst and Gijsbrechts 2007.

The distribution of enrolled and registered nurses across districts is just as uneven, with two districts having fewer than 10 nurses and midwives and three having more than 300 (figure 4.4; HFC 2006). Milenge and Chilubi have only six and eight nurses/ midwives, respectively. At the other end are Ndola, Kitwe, and Lusaka, having 462, 625, and 1,383 nurses/midwives, respectively. Though not as extreme as the distribution of doctors, Lusaka alone has more than 17 percent of all registered nurses in Zambia. The majority of districts, 38 out of 72, have fewer than 60 nurses (Herbst and Gijsbrechts 2007). Although the majority of all health workers in Zambia work in rural areas, doctors are predominantly found in urban areas. As 2006 HFC data shows, for all health-specific cadres in Zambia, 52.6 percent of health workers work in districts considered to be rural, while 76.4 percent of doctors work in districts considered to be urban (figure 4.5; Herbst and Gijsbrechts 2007).

Figure 4.4. Distribution of nurses (enrolled and registered), by district (public and private) 40

Number of districts

35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 <60

60–120

Source: Herbst and Gijsbrechts 2007.

120–180 180–240 Number of nurses per district

240–300

300+

The Human Resources for Health Crisis in Zambia  

Despite reporting some health gains since the 1990s, health outcomes remain poor in Zambia and it will be very challenging to achieve the he...

The Human Resources for Health Crisis in Zambia  

Despite reporting some health gains since the 1990s, health outcomes remain poor in Zambia and it will be very challenging to achieve the he...