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Check out the array of fun activities to do this summer

KIDS CAMP

Special Section

February 10, 2013

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

Yes, winter winds are still blowing. That makes it the perfect time for you and your children to dream about warm days by the pool — and to think about which summer camp will be best for them.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL SHOOTING CAMP ---- JUNE 1 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTAL ---- JUNE 3-8 MEN’S BASKETBALL BOYS CAMP ---- JUNE 9-11 MEN’S BASKETBALL ELITE CAMP ---- JUNE 12-14 FOOTBALL HIGH SCHOOL --- JUNE 12 FOOTBALL O-LINE/D-LINE CAMP --- JUNE 13 FOOTBALL MIDDLE SCHOOL --- JUNE 14 YOUNG HARPISTS CAMP --- JUNE 16-30 BOBCAT VOLLEYBALL CAMP ---- JULY 22-23 VOLLEYBALL TEAM CAMP --- JULY 28-30 CHEERLEADING TEAM CAMP --- AUG. 10

Our Kids Camp section shows you a variety of places, including those that focus on theater, soccer, world travel . . . you name it.

SATELLITE CAMPS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. SEE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION & REGISTRATION DETAILS.

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T H E A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

Kids Camp

Register Now!

A special section produced by the news division of the Omaha World-Herald. Special sections editor: Shelley Larsen Designer: Jan DeKnock Copy editors: Howard K. Marcus and Pam Thomas Contributors: Neal Gebhard, Bill Hord, Bryan Redemske, Daisy Hutzell-Rodman, Kelsey Stewart Advertising sales manager: Terri Campbell On the cover: During last year’s Montessori summer program at Kopecky Elementary School, some children gathered in the playground for a photo. For more on this year’s session, see Page 16. For special section advertising information, contact Dan Matuella, 402-444-1485.

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Discover your star power at the Rose In addition to camps at the theater, children also can attend an outdoor overnight camp. BY DAISY HUTZELL-RODMAN WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

Students who want to spend the summer learning about theater do not need to look to New York City. The Rose offers a variety of adventures to let future stars shine. Many of the Rose’s offerings are day camps, with themes including “Curious George” for kids as young as 4 and “Legally Blonde” for teenagers up to age 18. “I can tell you from advanced interest that Legally Blonde is going to be huge,” said Stacy Maddux, marketing specialist at the Rose. “Musical theater camps are very popular with young girls in particular.” The day camps at the Rose will keep young performers busy as they learn theatrical skills. “You’re there for a couple of weeks during the day,” Maddux said. “They’re very focused, and it starts with basically an overview of ‘This is what we want to accomplish this week.’ At first it sounds overwhelming, but by the time the week is over, the kids

R O S E T H E AT E R

From left, those facing the camera are Karlie Qualheim, Alyc Beasley, Michelle Petty, Asia Harper and Frances Joyner. They attended last year’s Josh Brockington Overnight Theater Camp at Platte River State Park.

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waits education a venture and useum’s d a f o r e m A sum ham M the end The Dur kids who att s! They will learn about p m m ca ha r ur e summ d in “D x ever foun largest T. Re turing this summer’s ed fea T. Rex Nam Dinosaurs” exhibition, A blockbuster go’s Field Museum. ca Sue from Chi e range offers a wid story, art, o ls a um e The mus uding hi All l topics incl of additiona ar culture, and health. are ul nd p a o s p ie activit science, e hands-on e age camps includ iFed teachers in thre um. rt ul ce ic rr y b cu taught priate age-appro vailable for an h it w s up ro a g is after care Before and . e fe rg additional Museum.o

.Durham Visit www 2) 444-5027 for or call (40 ation. Hurry more inform up fast! camps All

801 SOUTH 10TH STREET OMAHA, NE 68108

(402) 444-5071 WWW.DURHAMMUSEUM.ORG

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

THE ROSE PERFORMING ARTS SUMMER CAMPS Dates: Camps of varying lengths throughout summer Cost: Varies by camp, from $85 a week for the youngest performers to $395 for teenagers Contact: www. rosetheater.org or 402-345-4849

R O S E T H E AT E R

Sienna Garner takes part in a trust exercise at last year’s Josh Brockington Overnight Theater Camp at Platte River State Park. Instructor Katie Grant demonstrates a theater game for students at last year’s overnight camp.

Theater: Summer camp at the Rose lets children discover their star power Theater Camp. “The overnight camp truly offers you the traditional camp experience, combined with the expertise that the Rose can offer,” Maddux said. “They do hiking, they do swimming, they do crafts, they do campfires at night. It truly is the whole camp experience, it just happens to be about performing.” Why overnight camp instead of onstage? “I think it has to do with the camaraderie,” Maddux said. “You are there with the same people for many days. You really have time to bond and discover your strengths that might be brought out by other people.

are thinking ‘Where did the time go?’” The Rose wants to bring out the best in young performers by bringing in the best teachers and counselors. “These are all professional performers who have a lot of training,” Maddux said. The voice teachers are one example. “It’s hard to find voice teachers who will teach kids to take care of their voice. It’s one thing to belt out a song. It’s another to do it so that you don’t hurt your voice.” Those who want a more traditional camp experience can attend the Rose’s annual Josh Brockington Overnight

PASSPORT

“The kids get the opportunity to work together in more than just doing the show. The theater is all about the ensemble performance. That means the people onstage and the people offstage. At overnight camp, you work together in different ways, such as in a canoe or swimming. It gives kids a better sense of the overall aspect of theater.” Kids going to classes or camp at the Rose are welcomed as part of the larger Rose family, and the goal is to keep them involved in theater. “This isn’t about coming one time, this is about growing as a performer,” Maddux said. “We want you to come perform with us, and we want you to stay with us.”

SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING MATH

TO THE

WORLD!

Inspire your child to discover the world through creativity “Visit” the cultures of countries including China, Egypt, Australia, Italy

GUEST SPEAKERS COOKING ARTS & CRAFTS SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS MUSIC DANCE

Everyday: Daily Academic Montessori Studies

AND ALWAYS…

SWIMMING!

Montessori Educational Centers & Kopecky Montessori Elementary

402-393-1311 | www.OmahaMontessori.com

www.SASMuseum.com

$#/ 3/- !,3)/&/* 3% .%)3%,*&0 1&) " .+30, 4#(,#2'(

Summer Camps Robotics 101 (Ages 8-17) June 3-7 Robotics 201 (Ages 10-17) June 10-14 & July 15-19 Robotics 301 (Ages 12-17) July 22-26 Astronaut Academy (Ages 12-16) June 17-21 The Sky Is The Limit (Ages 12-16) June 17-21 Mad Scientist (Ages 14-17) July 29-Aug 2 Johnson Space Center Travel Camp(Ages 14-17) July 28-Aug 2

28210 West Park Highway Ashland, NE 68003 402.944.3100

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

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Camps • Leagues Lessons • Li’l Diggers Sand Volleyball Plyo Training The view at one of two new river lodges at Camp Rivercrest.

CAMP RIVERCREST

Fun-filled activities and a Christian message

Learn how to play at the

BEST PLACE IN TOWN!

Camp Rivercrest features a zip line, a giant swing and more. BY BILL HORD WORLD-HERALD CORRESPONDENT

Every summer, more than 1,000 youngsters have a swinging good time along the banks of the Platte River at Camp Rivercrest near Fremont, Neb. At the same time, camp staffers ensure that campers are fed with home-cooked food at mealtime and a healthy dose of spiritual food at chapel services and devotional gatherings. “Kids are coming to the camp to have an outrageously good time, but part of that is that we let them know they are valued and important to God,” said Jon Classen, camp director. “It’s all about having a relationship with Christ.” Camp Rivercrest plans eight summer camps in 2013, including a one-night stay for first- to third-graders, a three-night mini-camp for

CAMP RIVERCREST

A camper comes to the end of Camp Rivercrest’s 380-foot zip line.

NATURE DISCOVERY DAY CAMPS 2013 in our backyard now no n ow enrolling en e nro ro ollllllilin ing pre-k prre p e--k - 6th 6th grade 6t grad gr grad ade visit fontenelleforest.org or call 402.731.3140 Early Ea arrlly registration re eg giist ist s tra stra rati tion tion on discount diissco scco ou un nt ends en e nd dss May Mayy 10 10

The Volleyball Academy is the best training in the Midwest for all ages! For questions see our website or contact Deb at: dgraf@cox.net or 402.213.4644 www.thevolleyballacademy.com

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

Christian: Camp Rivercrest offers fun activities — and a message CAMP RIVERCREST

CAMP RIVERCREST

Teen campers enjoy free time at the Rivercrest pool.

third- to fifth-graders and five nights for those in fifth through 12th grade. The cost of camp is on a three-tier system, with the highest tier — tier C — covering 100 percent of cost. The costs of tier A and tier B are subsidized through donations. Regardless of the payment level, the camp experience doesn’t change, Classen said. “About $100,000 in donations comes from all over,” he said. Some funding comes from churches within the Christian and Missionary Alliance, which started the camp in 1958. About 35 percent of youths attending the camp come from Christian and Missionary Alliance churches, but more than 100 churches are represented among participants. Each day of camp mixes a variety of activities with a chapel service, quiet time for devotions and cabin Bible study. Though tents were the accommodations back when the camp was founded, campers now reside in air-conditioned cabins, worship in an air-conditioned chapel and eat in an air-conditioned dining hall. The camp is surrounded by evergreens planted in 1962 by Omaha high school students, providing a wilderness-like setting. “You wouldn’t know you were in Nebraska,” Classen said. A campaign begun in 2004 for renovation and addition continues. Two new lodges overlook the river. In 2011, the dining hall and kitchen were remodeled. The seven original cabins have been remodeled. Each includes 10 bunk beds. Other buildings at the camp include the chapel lodge with accommodations for up to 12, staff offices and an expansive deck; and a dining hall that seats 250. Classen said Camp Rivercrest provides

When: Eight sessions, June 9 to July 26, ranging from overnight to one week Where: 2840 County Road 13; Fremont, Neb. Who: Boys and girls first grade through 12th grade Cost: Three-tiered system. $89 to $149 for first-to-third-grade overnighter; $234 to $304 for third-to-fifth-grade mini-camp; $299 to $369 for fifth-to-sixth-grade camp; $309 to $379 for seventh-and-eighth-grade camp; $309 to $379 for ninth-to-12th-grade camp Information: 402-628-6465; www.camprivercrest.org

young people with a wide variety of activities that challenge and excite them physically while maintaining a commitment to safety. Activities range from the traditional, such as swimming, basketball and sand volleyball, to the thrilling, such as a high-ropes courses, a giant swing with a harness, a 380-foot zip line that spans a ravine and the flying squirrel, which suspends youngsters above ground. “We have been very intentional in having activities that you can’t do at home,” Classen said. The high-adventure equipment is designed by a professional company with safety assured. Young people also take to the 50cc minibikes and trails, a swimming pool, a 300-foot water slide and paint ball. Camp Rivercrest is a year-round facility that also hosts retreats and reunions. Its staff of four full-time and six part-time workers swells to 36 during the summercamp season. “We have a rich history,” Classen said.

Create Your Own Movie

Ages 13–18 ($200) June 3–7 | 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

HOT TALENT, COOL KIDS! Day Camps for every stage!

Since 1967, Camp Mount Michael has provided boys ages 7-14 with summers filled with outdoor adventure and fun: archery, horseback riding, camp outs and more. For more information, contact the Camp Director at 402.253.0946 or . camp@mountmichael.org .

Musical Theatre Dance

Ages 7–13 ($100) June 3–7 | 9–11 a.m.

Improv Comedy Camp

Ages 13–18 ($200) June 24–28 | 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Drama Day Camp #1

First Stage Summer Theatre Academy

2013 CAMP DATES

Session I- June 16-21 Session II- June 23-28 Session III- July 7-12 Session IV- July 14-19 Session V- July 21-26

Ages 12-18 ($350) July 15–26 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. M–F !"& %&%%#!" !"'$

Ages 4–6 ($100) June 3–7 | 9–11 a.m.

Drama Day Camp #2

Ages 7–10 ($200) June 10–14 | 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Drama Day Camp #3

Ages 11–13 ($200) June 17–21 | 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

402.553.4890, ext. 131 | WWW.OMAHAPLAYHOUSE.ORG

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

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Kids get a kick out of soccer camps Participants receive extra training, and UNO has a chance to tout its program. BY BRYAN REDEMSKE WORLD-HERALD CORRESPONDENT

Don Klosterman has been head coach of the University of Nebraska at Omaha women’s soccer team since its inception in 1999. During much of that time, he and the UNO staff have run summer soccer camps for kids. That’s the case again this year, with camps scheduled in June and July for beginners through advanced high school players. » Mini Mav Camp (boys and girls ages 6 to 7) will be July 8 through 11. » Junior Mavs Camp (ages 8 to 12) runs from June 8 through 12. » Advanced Junior Mavs Camp (ages 8 to 12) is July 8 and 9. » Elite Training Camp (for high school players) runs from July 14 to 18. » A goalkeeper camp for ages 12 to 18 will be offered from June 11 to 14. “The camps keep us busy in the summer, and it’s a good way to expose our athletes to the kids,” Klosterman said. “And for the kids, it’s a good way to get out and get some extra training and have some fun.” For the youngest campers, UNO soccer camps are designed to introduce the sport and provide some great exercise. As players progress in age and skill, the focus is more on advanced skills and concepts. For the Elite Training Camp, overnight accommodations are available in the UNO dorms. “For the little ones, it’s good to get out and run around for an hour — their atten-

UNO

UNO Coach Don Klosterman, shown with his team, also runs summer soccer camps. tion spans are pretty limited,” Klosterman said. “With the older kids, we’re trying to improve technical ability, skills and tactical ideals.” Though elite and high school-level camps are for girls only, those designed for younger players welcome boys and girls. “At younger age groups, it’s good for boys and girls to play together,” Klosterman said. Like many Division I programs that offer summer camps, UNO uses its high school camps as a recruiting tool of sorts. It’s not only a good way for coaches to see elitelevel players from around the area, it’s a good way for those players to see what the university has to offer — from coaching staff to training to facilities. “It’s great for us to be able to identify those players, but also for them to be able to identify with us,” Klosterman said. Over the years, the UNO roster has included a number of players who attended the school’s summer camps. Some have attended summer UNO summer camps for years, starting in the youth soccer ranks. “It’s like they’ve been a part of the program for years,” Klosterman said.

UNO SOCCER CAMPS When: June and July Where: UNO Soccer Field, 68th and Spring Streets Who: Ages 6 and up Cost: Most camps are $60 to $180; the Elite Training Camp with residential option is $275. Information: www.unosoccercamps.com or call 402-554-4962

This summer’s HOTTEST Camps are at... 3)C& D , F FG '5 F 3 C' L(

Destination: DISCOVERY

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

To learn more about UNO youth programs, search “summer camp” at www.unomaha.edu

OMAHA UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA NEBRAS R KA ATT OM RAS AHA

Kids love summer at UNO! 2013

Chance Lindley Mavericks Basketball Camp, LLC

This summer – be a Mav! MAVERICK MA VE V ER E RIIIC R CK C K BOYS’ BOYS BOYS BO OYS YS’

BASKETBALL B ASKETB AS A SK S KE K ET E TB T BA B AL A LL L L CAMPS CAMP C CA AM A MP M PS P S Sapp Fieldhouse on UNO Campus

Skill Development evelopment elopm elop op Camp C I (Entering (Enterin (En eri ering ring rin inng 1st-5th t- grades)) Junee 3-6 Ju 3Position Po Po os s sit si it it tiiio on o n Camp Cam Ca am mp p ((Entering (Enter (E Enter ering ri g 9th-12th ri 9th-1122th 9th 2thh grades) 2t graad des) Junee 8-9 Ju 8-99 Skill S lll Development D lopmen pm pme men me m ent e n nt tC Camp Ca a II (Entering Ente Ent nt 6th-8th grades)) June 10-13

INDIVIDUAL SKILLS S CAMPS CAMPS JUNE U UNE 17 7 - 19 & JUNE UNE 24 - 26 U • OFFENSIVE IMPROVEMENT CAMPS C CAMP S JULY L 24 - 26 & JULY LY JUL LY 31 - AUG 2 LY •

Camps st tarting at $ 40 / single da ay & $130 / week Earl ly Bird S Special pecial $ 120 / Wee Week ek

UNO

VOLLEYBAL VOLLEYBALL VO V OL O LLE LL LEY EY YB BALL BA SUMMER SU S UMMER UM U MM M ME ER R CAMPS C AMPS AMPS AM PS Individual Camp

July 9-10 • Grades 5-8

Advanced Individual Camp Julyy 11-12 • Gra Grades des 7-9

Junior Camp

Julyy 13 • Grades Grades 1-5

Position Camp

Julyy 15-16 • Gra Grades des 8-10

Advanced Specialty Camp July 17-18 • Grades 10-12

High School Team T Camp July 19-20 • Grades 9-12

To register: Go to LadyMavsBasketballCamps.com (402) 554-2571

For camp da ate tes es, es info & to reg register: register gister: unobasketballcamps.com unobasketb t allcam tb l lcam p ps.com 402.554.2574

FOR MORE INFO: 402-554-3275 or go to t

www.omavs.com/volleyballcamps

Y won’t be singing the Blues at this camp… You Y be swinging to the beat You’ll oofatop-notch ofat op-notch JAZZ camp! FEATURING FEATURIN A ATURIN G

T Jim Widner The n Big Band ner

June nne 16 16 – 21, 2013

A One-Week Camp for: MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS COLLEGE STUDENTS • ADULTS L LTS VISIT

unojazzcamp.com

Summer camps at UNO are a fun and educational way for your child, or teen, to spend their summer days. Learn more: search “summer camp” at www.unomaha.edu

Camp activities at the Durham Museum include crafts projects.

The Exploring Omaha camp lets kids sample attractions BY KELSEY STEWART WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

Campers at the Durham Museum will have an opportunity to tour seven Omaha attractions in five days this summer in the Exploring Omaha day camp. “The nice thing about it is the camp involves several not-for-profits,” said Shawna Forsberg, director of marketing and public relations at the Durham Museum. “It gives kids exposure to a variety of the things they can do in Omaha.” Children start and end each day at the Durham Museum. But throughout the week, they will spend days at the Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, Joslyn Art Museum, Lauritzen Gardens, the Omaha Community Playhouse, Boys Town, the Durham Museum and the Strategic Air & Space Museum. Education directors from each of the nonprofits worked with the Durham Museum to organize activities for campers. “It’s a collaboration,” Forsberg said. The weeklong camp costs $140 per child for members and nonmembers, including transportation to and from the Durham Museum. Exploring Omaha will have two sessions, from June 3 to 7 and from July 29 to Aug. 2. Each session will have versions for children ages 5 to 7 and ages 8 and up. Content is customized for the age groups, Forsberg said. To sign up, go to www.durhammuseum. org or call 402-444-5027.

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

Supplies to consider for overnight camps

Prevent homesickness

An overnight camp is filled with endless possibilities: swimming, hiking, playing sports — the list goes on. With all these different activities in mind, making sure you pack the right things for your child’s camp experience can be a challenge. However, there are some tried-and-true items you can send to camp with your child that will help ensure he or she is prepared for almost anything. Check with the camp for a specific list.

HEADGEAR Scarves, bandanas, baseball caps, sun hats, eyeglasses, sunglasses, swimming goggles CLOTHING T-shirts/tank tops, shorts, long pants, jeans, jacket, raincoat, sweater, sweat shirt/sweat pants, swimsuit, dress clothes (check with camp), pajamas and robe, polos, fleece outerwear, underwear, footwear, boots, tennis shoes, sandals/flip-flops, dress shoes (check with camp), socks

Stone Creek Stone Cre eek -SESSIONSMAY 13-17 4:00, 5:15, 6:30

JUNE 3-7

8:30, 9:45, 11:00, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30

JUNE 17-21

8:30, 9:45, 11:00, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30

THE WORLD-HERALD

The well-outfitted camper needs a variety of supplies, including a cap, sunglasses and reusable water bottle.

JUNIOR LEAGUE SIGN-UP

EEagle agle R Run un and Stone and Stone C Creek reek att a

Junior Leagues

8 Weeks starting the second week of June. Sign-ups begin March 1st.

Eagle Run has a League on the par 3 for ages 7 and up (Cost $85).

The Executive for ages 11 and up ($105). Play is on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.

JULY 8-12

Stone Creek League is for

* All lessons will be held at Stone Creek * Cost is $90/student for five 1-hour lessons * Lesson topics include: Full Swing - Chipping - Putting * Sign up at Stone Creek or Eagle Run

1 week clinic (5/1-hour lessons). Cost $80.

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golfstonecreek.com eaglerungolf.com

4:00, 5:15, 6:30

a material object sends the wrong message. The reward should be your child’s newfound confidence and independence.

» Encourage your child’s independence throughout the year. Practice separations, such as sleepovers at a friend’s house, can simulate the camp environment.

» Avoid the temptation to take the child home early. When a “rescue call” comes from the child, offer calm reassurance and put the time frame into perspective.

» Involve your child in the process of choosing a camp. The more that the child owns the decision, the more comfortable the child will feel being at camp.

» Talk candidly with the camp director to obtain his/ her perspective on your child’s adjustment.

» Reach an agreement ahead of time on calling each other. If your child’s camp has a no-phone-calls policy, honor it.

BED AND BATH Towels (bath, hand, beach), mattress pad, blanket, pillow and pillowcases, sheets, sleeping bag, laundry bag

JUNIOR CLINICS at at

Though many kids are excited about the prospect of an upcoming camp, for others it can be stressful. Here are some ways you can help your child look forward to the new experience.

» Discuss what camp will be like before your child leaves. Consider role-playing anticipated situations, such as using a flashlight to find the bathroom.

GEAR Bags/duffels/totes, books and magazines, compass, fan, flashlight and batteries, Frisbee, reusable water bottle or canteen, seat, Sharpie, writing paper, envelopes, stamps

BATHROOM KIT Shower caddy, brush and comb, shampoo, soap and soap container, on-the-go hand sanitizer, toothbrush and holder, toothpaste, deodorant, anti-itch ointment, insect repellent, hygiene products, sunblock, shaving gear Source: American Camp Association

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ages 12 and up (Cost $110). Play is on Thursday afternoons.

Junior Lessons

Sessions in May, June, and July. Check websites for schedule.

» Send a note or care package ahead of time to arrive the first day of camp. Acknowledge, in a positive way, that you will miss your child. For example, you can say “I am going to miss you, but I know that you will have a good time at camp.” » Don’t bribe. Linking a successful stay at camp to

» Pack a personal item from home, such as a stuffed animal.

» Don’t feel guilty about encouraging your child to stay at camp. For many children, camp is a first step toward independence and plays an important role in their growth and development. » Trust your instincts. While most incidents of homesickness will pass in a day or two, some cases are severe. If your child is not eating or sleeping because of anxiety or depression, it is time to go home early. However, don’t make your child feel like a failure if this happens. Focus on the positive and encourage your child to try camp again next year. Source: American Camp Association

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

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OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

THE VOLLEYBALL ACADEMY CAMPS When: July and August Where: The Volleyball Academy, 8930 S. 137th Circle, Suite 2, Omaha Who: Grades 3-6, 7-12 Cost: $80 to $120, depending on the camp Information: www.thevolleyballacademy.com or call 402-213-4644

The Lil’ Digger-Big Digger program has parents learn with their children. THE VOLLEYBALL ACADEMY

Get set for volleyball camp Kids can learn beginning to advanced skills. BY BRYAN REDEMSKE WORLD-HERALD CORRESPONDENT

If Nebraska boys grow up wanting to play football for the Huskers, it’s been safe to say that in recent years, many Nebraska girls have their sights set on being Husker volleyball players. Big-time success on the national stage by the Nebraska volleyball program — and, more recently, by Creighton University and the University of Nebraska at Omaha — has fueled a boom in an already popular sport. “We have some programs that are overflowing,” said Deb Grafentin, director of the Volleyball Academy in Omaha. “We’ve had to put caps on them to make sure the kids get the same quality of instruction.” The Volleyball Academy (TVA) offers lessons and camps for kids in kindergarten through high school. League play is also available for advanced players and teams. According to Grafentin, the quality of play in Nebraska has risen steadily over time. With successful college and high

July 15th - 27th, 2013 Ages 5-8 Mon. - Fri. 8:30 am - 10:30 am Ages 9-18 Mon. - Fri. 10:00 am - 5:00 pm Performances on Friday, July 26th and Saturday, July 27th 11800 S. 25th Street Bellevue, NE 68123

402-291-3727

school programs to follow, younger kids are aspiring to play at higher levels, which raises the bar for everybody. “So many different people and avenues have been added to the talent base,” she said. “The younger they’re starting, the better they’ll become.” Six summer camps are offered through TVA, broken into camps for grades 3 to 6 and 7 to 12. A serving and passing camp for grades 3 to 6 will be offered July 26 and 27, while a setting and hitting camp will run Aug. 2 and 3. Four camps are offered for older players. Defensive camp will be July 30 and 31, followed by multiple sessions of setter and hitter camps Aug. 6 and 7. Competition camp will be Aug. 8 and 9. TVA also offers a year-round program called Lil’ Diggers, designed for kids in kindergarten through fourth grade. The K-2 group focuses on basic skills such as receiving and passing. Though being able to whack the ball back over the net is a nice start, being able to

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402•393•3770

PLAY HERE, GROW HERE AT YMCA CAMP KITAKI Resident Summer Camp Programs for Kids age 7-17 YMCA Camp Kitaki is located 1/2 way between Lincoln and Omaha! www.ymcalincoln.org/kitaki • 402-434-9222

Older players learn advanced skills at the Volleyball Academy. control the ball will lead to more success. “That’s probably one of the hardest things for them to do at first,” Grafentin said. The third- and fourth-grade Lil’ Diggers work on more advanced skills in preparation for the next levels of play. Sessions are available for both levels in March, April, June, July, September and October. Grafentin said the fall sessions fill up quickly; the summer sessions tend to have a bit more room, since kids are taking part in other sports and activities.

A girl stretches to reach the ball at the Volleyball Academy.

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Cub Scouts have fun while learning responsibility BY DAISY HUTZELL-RODMAN WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

TRACY COGDILL

Fishing is one of the many camp activities for Cub Scouts. From foreground are A.J. Shade; Dylan Tipler; Aidan J. Anderson; Aidan’s father, Damien Anderson; Scott Morrison; and Scott’s dad, Jim Morrison.

Live your dream.

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CAMP FOSTER YMCA Making Memories That Last a Lifetime

Creative C reative Writingg C Campp June June 10 - 14 …for …f or Y YOUNG OUNG OUNG writers of all agess ((7to 7to 70 7 ) & ALL talent levels!

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PONCA HILLS FARM SUMMER DAY CAMP SESSION 1 / June 10 - June 28 SESSION 2 / July 8 - July 26 PONCA HILLS FARM 4-21#"% .&#"1" ( *1$#'-'/ "-'31 0)+,!

Limited spots for campers ages 8 -16. Call 402.453.4000 Dowload registration forms at poncahillsfarm.com

Celebrate the he

Our mission is for all children to have more than just a recreational experience. Our programs are designed to teach Christian values and develop each child spiritually, mentally, and physically.

Located in Okoboji, Iowa To register call or visit our site: www.campfosterymca.com 800-456-9622

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Dylan Tipler, 10, of Omaha, can tell people all about the experience of going to Cub Scout camp. “I’ve been four times,” Tipler said. “We fish, we ride horses, we swim, and we do hiking. Oh, yeah! We also do skits and crafts.” Camping has been a tradition for Scouts of all ages. “From a Cub Scout’s perspective, it’s just a lot of fun,” said Katie Godbout, director of public relations for the Boy Scouts of America’s Mid-America Council. “From a parent’s perspective, the boys get a chance to learn responsibility and leadership, but they are mostly having fun.” Having a young boy go to camp as a Cub Scout will help him when he becomes a Boy Scout, where camping becomes an essential part of the scouting experience. “There are a lot of things that happen at camp, and there are certain badges that a boy can never get without going to camp,” said Tracy Cogdill, assistant Cubmaster of Pack 760 in Omaha. For many activities, such as archery or horseback riding, Scouts typically don’t have the equipment at home to participate. But at camp, Cub Scouts can earn activity pins or belt loops for taking part. Participation in a variety of outdoor

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Scouts: Mixing fun, responsibility Continued from Page 13 activities will help them move up the ranks in Scouting. “That canoeing trip is a huge deal,” Cogdill said. “Last year there were these two boys that had never even met each other until they got in the boat together. Then, all of a sudden, they had to work together to paddle a canoe.” Adults are an essential part of the Cub Scout community. “At the Cub Scout level, you have an adult leader telling you what to do,” Cogdill said. “But the parents are really kind of an escort.” The Mid-America Council camps are Camp Cedars and Camp Eagle near Fremont; Little Sioux Scout Ranch in Little Sioux, Iowa; Camp Wa-Kon-Da in Bellevue; and Thomas Ashford Scout Ranch in Homer, Neb. Camp Eagle is geared toward accommodating younger scouts; Little Sioux Scout Ranch offers more primitive camping. Weeklong day camps and a two-night resident camp are available. Tipler, who becomes a Boy Scout this month, prefers Camp Cedars. “It has this awesome lake that we go boating and fishing on,” he said. “The food there is really good. It’s just really, really good.” A Cub Scout going to camp will not be bored. The boys are kept busy from the 7 a.m. wake-up call to bedtime at 10 p.m. Daytime hours are spent developing teamwork skills and taking part in activities such as archery, swimming and fishing. Evening programs include popular activities such as horseback riding. “That was one of my favorite memories,” Cogdill said. “Greyson (Cogdill’s 8-year-old son) was scared to death to get on a horse. Eventually he got on, and from that point, all he could talk about was how that was the coolest thing he did. He still talks about it.”

TRACY COGDILL

Logan and Garrison Cogdill with their tent at camp. Below, Logan takes aim.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA MID-AMERICA COUNCIL CAMP When: Weekly throughout June and July Where: Five camps, including a Cub Scout resident camp at Little Sioux Scout Ranch in Little Sioux, Iowa Who: Boys age 7 and older Cost: Varies depending on the camp Information: 402-431-9272 or www.mac-bsa.org/CubScoutCamp

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Summer Camp Line Up: > Rock 101 > iPod Shuffle > Song Writing and Recording Camp [two week camp]

“Be Set Free” this summer!

With over 50 years of Christian camping experience! Camp Rivercrest has modern lodging, trained college aged summer staff, amazing worship and fun activities for all ages like: Paintball, zipline, high ropes, giant swing, airboat rides and so much more! Located along the forested hills of the Platte river just outside Fremont NE. Register online at www.camprivercrest.org 402-628-6465

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Learn about live — and prehistoric — animals at zoo camp BY KELSEY STEWART

HENRY DOORLY ZOO & AQUARIUM

WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium has summer camps kids will dig. Some of this summer’s camps will focus on dinosaurs. The dinosaur-themed camps will coincide with a dinosaur exhibit, Dinosaurs Alive!, coming to the zoo in April. The exhibit will feature 15 moving dinosaurs on the zoo grounds. A camp called “Ya Dig It” will give campers a chance to explore the world of dinosaurs with fossil dig sites. The zoo offers 53 day camps, in sessions that range from one to four days, said Elizabeth Mulkerrin, the zoo’s director of education. “Day camps are very popular here at the zoo. That’s why we offer so many of them,” she said. Dinosaur camps will range from learning about paleontology as a career to learning about differences between prehistoric and modern animals. The zoo offers camps in addition to the dinosaur-themed offerings.

When: Fifty-three camps of varying lengths from May 28 to Aug. 2 Where: 3701 S. 10th St. Who: For children ages 5 to 12 depending on camp. An additional program is offered for high school students. Cost: $50 to $150 depending on camp Information: For more information call 402-7382092 or visit www.OmahaZoo.com.

“We have everything from career exploration day camps to getting into the different ecosystems and biomes, and animals in general,” Mulkerrin said. Other camps focus on specific animals, such as “Just Chillin’,” a camp about penguins. Animal-specific camps help participants learn about animal behavior in a hands-on way. All the zoo programs are hands-on, from learning about penguins and individual

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Five full days of fun each week. Cub Scouts will have a BLAST as they build on skills and adventures. Details can be found at www.mac-bsa.org/ CubScoutCamp. Location: Sioux City, Iowa Omaha, Nebraska Columbus, Nebraska Council Bluffs, Iowa

H E N R Y D O O R LY Z O O & A Q UA R I U M

Children learn at a Henry Doorly Zoo camp. Of the zoo’s 53 camps, some explore specific animals, others examine biomes and ecosystems, and still others explore careers.

Dates: June 3-7 June 3-7 June 10-14 June 24-28

Look for other program opportunities on our calendar at www.mac-bsa.org.

animals to broader topics such as being a zookeeper. “The hands-on piece is the important part,” Mulkerrin said. Though many of the camps are for children ages 5 to 12, the zoo offers select camps for middle school and high school students. For example, a camp for high school students will have participants spending a

week at the zoo becoming certified scuba divers. Then they will go to Cozumel, Mexico, for a week working with local university professors and studying the coral reef. They also will study animals they find while diving around the reefs and will have an opportunity to swim with whale sharks. “It’s a nice career exploration for the high school students,” Mulkerrin said.

Camp with

GIRL SCOU TS! Everyone welcome. GirlScoutsNebraska.org

Camp Legacy —S Summer ummerr D Day ay C Camps amp ps —

“Giving “Giv “G ivin iv ingg ch childr children h dr drenn bback ackk their theiir summer, th s mme su mer, one o e adventure on addventture at at a ttime” ime” e”

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1 1A C R ES OF OF OUTDOOR OU TDOOR FUN!! FU N !! 11 ACRES Upper Up ppe p r Camp Ca mp pa activities ctiv tivit ities include: includ de: ((Grades G ad Gr ades d K-6) K-6 - ) • Sk kits / Song ngs • A ng rche h ry y • Geocaching G ocachi Ge hhiing i ng • Z ip pll ine • Sports Spo p rt rts t Skits Songs Archery Zipline • Obstacle Obbstacle Course C oursee • Arts A rtts / Cr C raffts • Water Watte r A Wa Ac ctivities Crafts Activities

Lower Camp a available vailable at Legacy Primary School (Ages 3-6) Regg ister on www.legacyprimary.com starting 3/20/2013. 402-496-6017 • Register

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Montessori program lets children explore the world BY KELSEY STEWART WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

Children will need to have their virtual passports ready for Montessori’s Kopecky Elementary summer program. “We’re going to become world travelers,” said LaVonne Plambeck, administrator of Montessori Educational Centers. The summer program, Passport to the World, will help children discover the world through creative and hands-on learning experiences. Students will begin by going through the process of planning their trips. They will act as travel agents, preparing by finding information about and photos of their destinations, and by obtaining “passports.” Participants will “visit” a PASSPORT TO THE WORLD number of places scattered WHEN: June 3 to Aug. 9 around the world. They will WHERE: Montessori Educational travel internationally to Centers Inc. Egypt, China, Australia and Italy before heading stateWHO: 1st- through 5th-graders at side to the Grand Canyon. Kopecky Elementary, 913 Leawood “We will look into the type Drive; 3- through 6-year-olds at the of animals, the landforms, six other metro-area Montessori the language and the food Educational Centers. they eat,” Plambeck said. COST: $210 to $260 a week Students will get to meaINFORMATION: 402-393-1311 or sure landmarks, such as the www.OmahaMontessori.com Nile River and China’s Great Wall. They’ll take a stab at science projects, such as building compasses. For each country, students will sample traditional foods. They also will study famous landmarks of the regions, such as the Nile River, the pyramids, the Great Wall, the Great Barrier Reef, the Coliseum and others. Activities will relate to the countries being studied. Students will hear from guest speakers. They also will take part in arts and crafts, cooking, music and dance. Other program activities include science experiments, field trips, swimming and robotics. The 10-week program is offered for first- through fifth-graders. A similar program will be available for children ages 3 to 6. Both versions of the program will keep the world travelers busy. “We’ll be trying to inspire children to learn about the world,” Plambeck said.

A camper learns about the countries of Africa at last year’s Montessori summer program at Kopecky Elementary.

Robotics was part of the learning environment at last year’s Montessori session.

MUSIC CAMPS Sounds in the Summer

July 10-12 · drum line & color guard

All-State Vocal Camp

July 21-23 · prep for all-state audiIons

Broadway Bound

July 23-27 · musical theatre

Department of Music & Performing Arts

(308) 865-8618 · www.unk.edu/music/

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Camps for ages

4 -8

ocm.org

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Last summer, Neal Gebhard spent time checking out metro-area camp offerings. He visited Joslyn Art Museum to see children express their creativity at the Getting Sculpy camp, Strategic Air & Space Museum to watch a high-altitude balloon launch at the Sky Is the Limit camp and Fontenelle Forest to see participants in the Glorious Girls camp learn about the outdoors. Here’s a look at what he discovered, plus some details about this summer’s offerings at the same camps.

NEAL GEBHARD/THE WORLD-HERALD

From left, Aderyn Lawse, Georgia Lacey, Oracle Coaker, Megan Schneider and Abbey Hughes collect insects found along the trail at Fontenelle Forest during the Glorious Girls summer camp.

Noticing nature Activities at a girls-only camp at Fontenelle Forest differ by the day.

BY NEAL GEBHARD WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

“I’m closing my eyes when I see a snake!” said Georgia Sutherland, a firstgrader at Rumsey Station Elementary. Some of the other girls around her agreed as they gathered that morning, preparing to set out into Fontenelle Forest to seek out the slithering reptiles. But many of the girls were excited at the chance to see a snake in the wild, an experience new to many of the campers at Glorious Girls. This weeklong adventure in nature has

an important rule: no boys allowed. Debbie Beck, a naturalist and educator at Fontenelle Forest, said the camp is designed to introduce girls in first and second grade to a wilderness setting and to teach them about humanity’s relationship with the environment. “It’s different than school,” she said with a smile. And she’s right. Each morning the girls went on a hike through Fontenelle Forest with a different theme in mind. See Nature: Page 19 .

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Office of Precollegiate Programs for Talented and Gifted (OPPTAG) offers unique summer camp opportunities ranging from physics to fine arts.

Call 402-697-8702 to register For camp detials visit

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OFFICE of PRECOLLEGIATE PROGRAMS for TALENTED AND GIFTED

opptag.iastate.edu

University of Nebraska-Lincoln is an equal opportunity educator and employer

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Making a mess — on purpose

JOSLYN ART CAMPS When: Weeklong day camps, June 3 to Aug. 10 Where: Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St. Who: Camps grouped by children’s ages — 4 and 5, 6 to 8, 9 to 12, and 13 to 18 Camps: Drawing, sculpture and printmaking Cost: $50 to $180 per camp — prices vary based on child’s age and camp duration Information: www.joslyn.org and 402-661-3846

Art camps let kids immerse themselves in the creative process. BY NEAL GEBHARD WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

At Joslyn Art Museum, kids are all about bringing art into the world. Sometimes they draw, sometimes they paint. And sometimes they use their hands to make sculpture. Though many visitors admire the art at Joslyn, kids in particular often come to the museum to participate in art camps. At Getting Sculpy last summer, there was no end to the projects available to get kids’ hands dirty and minds working. The camp takes place in one of the studios below the permanent collection wing, where museum teacher Therese Straseski eagerly assists campers while they work. Getting Sculpy draws about 15 campers during the week, a number that makes the studio a place of creativity and friendship. For a week, campers are treated every

NEAL GEBHARD/THE WORLD-HERALD

Paige Betzold and Felicia Xiong work on their creations in a studio at the Joslyn Art Museum. afternoon to an experience that takes them from a creative impulse to a finished piece of sculpture. For Straseski, sculpture starts on the drawing board. Literally. “Every artist has a sketchbook to draw in before they execute,” she said. Every project at Getting Sculpy is put down on paper before the young artists get their hands dirty. And boy, is it messy. During one session, the young artists dipped strips of plaster into water and layered them on found objects. To the untrained eye, the works-in-progress were nothing more than recycled materials. But to each of the artists, an imaginary

animal was forming before them, coming to life with each bit of plaster. All the creatures came directly from the campers’ imaginations, even the one fabled unicorn whose styrofoam wings spread to impressive lengths. Paige Betzold, a fifth-grader at Wheeler Elementary School, said her mom signed her up for the camp. “I love doing art,” Paige said. She enjoys drawing in addition to sculpture. Logan Walker prefers clay when she is sculpting, but the fourth-grader at Wake Robin Elementary still knows her way around plaster strips. She and Paige became fast friends and worked together closely on

their projects. Logan found out about the camps at Joslyn by coming to the museum with her grandmother. In addition to producing the animal sculptures, campers worked with a number of different media throughout the week. “They’ll do clay relief, embossed work,” Straseski said. The young artists also completed painted papier-mâché heads designed to emulate a piece by Omaha artist Jun Kaneko in the museum’s sculpture garden. “My favorite part was the painted faces and heads we made,” said Salvador Becerra, a third-grader at Saddlebrook Elementary School. Joining Salvador during the week was his cousin, Felipe Carrier, a sixthgrader visiting from Uruguay. Both share an interest in art that has helped make summer a time to bond. “When I have time, I like doing art,” said Felipe, whose favorite part of the camp was getting to make his own sculpture. The allure of art was apparent during that week of sculpting. “When you do it, you have accomplished something,” Paige said. Logan agreed. “You can do anything!” she said.

Battle Summer Brain Drain!

with our Summer Enrichment Camp Held at YMCA Camp • Boone, Iowa

June 23 - 29 • Teen Week (ages 13-18) June 30 - July 6 • Kids Week (ages 8-12) Mini Camps Offered During Kids Week (ages 6 - 7) Swimming, canoeing, horseback riding, rappelling, archery, and many more activities PLUS education about diabetes management. Expert medical staff & experienced counselors.

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Hummel Park Nature Center 3033 Hummel Park Road • 402.444.4760

Birthday Party Packages • Nature Classes • Special Events

2013 Hummel Day Camp • June 3 - August 9 Registration begins April 13, 2013 Weekly Sessions • Bus Transportation Provided Voted Best Kids Summer Camp by the readers of Omaha Magazine!

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HIKING NATURE IDENTIFICATION ARCHERY ARTS & CRAFTS OUTDOOR COOKING WILDERNESS SKILLS FORT BUILDING CAMP SONGS

JUNE 17-21

JUNE 24-28

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9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Monday – Friday / Performance 7 p.m. Friday

Southeast heast Community y College Co Beatrice Campus pu p Half Day ay y and Full Day y Options Grades Pre-K - 8th Affordable, Educational and Fun! Email beatriceevents@southeast.edu for additional information

SUMMER CAMPS OF FUN! Resident Camps in June and July for Grades 1-12

Specialty Camps include Owl, Horse, Team Dance, Sports, Art, Cooking, Space, Photography, Performance Arts, Bike, Science, Survivor and Special Needs

Contact:

CAMP LUTHER • Schuyler, NE Web site www.campluther.org e-mail: campluther @campluther.org Phone/Fax: 402-352-5655

Lutheran Church of the Master East Campus 402-333-4444 Cost: $150*

*Add $25/registrations within 30 days of camp.

Grades 3 - 8 Welcome; sibling discount Cost includes T-shirt; please bring a lunch. Register online: www.kidshineonline.org/register.html

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Explore God’s Creation This Summer!

The Salvation Army Gene Eppley Camp and Retreat Center 10 Minutes South of Bellevue on HWY 75

Summer Camps Available June 3rd through July 26th Open to Boys and Girls 1st Grade through High School Sports Camps, Character Building Camps, & Outdoor Adventure Camps Available.

Download Applications at www.geneeppleycamp.org Or Call Us at (402) 898-5921

Join Us This Summer for the Fun & Excitement of Camp!

Offering Your Children a Creative Art Experience since 2005

Join us this summer...

‘Camp Clay Creation 2013’ HAND BUILDING BUI UILD LDIN LD INGG IN CLAY IN CLA LAYY HAND

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Nature: Activities differ by the day at Fontenelle Forest’s girls-only camp

FONTENELLE CAMPS When: Two-day and weeklong day camps, June 3 to Aug. 9 Where: Fontenelle Forest, 1111 Bellevue Blvd. North in Bellevue, and other nearby locations Who: Ages 3 and under (with parent); age 4 to sixth grade; grandparent-and-child camps for ages 4 to 8 and ages 8 to 13

Continued from Page 17 “Come on, girls, we have so many things to discover!” Beck said as 15 campers grabbed water bottles and canvas bags they decorated when they first arrived. Every hike is different. One day the girls might be catching butterflies and the next they are searching for and learning about animal habitats. Still, the lessons in nature are sometimes spontaneous. “A walk through these woods that might take you 20 minutes can sometimes take an hour and a half with these girls,” said Kathy Fischer, an educator at Fontenelle Forest. “They make you notice things you don’t notice anymore.” With a penchant for gathering daddy longlegs and finding every possible hiding spot for animals, 15 young girls can pick an area of the trail clean of discoveries. Not even the smallest insects clinging to the underside of a leaf remain obscured. Despite the absence of snakes on the trail, the girls learned about the kinds of food that snakes enjoy and where they find it. Holes along the trail provide homes for snake food such as rodents and insects. Back at the nature center, Beck brought out that day’s animal visitor, a fox snake. Fox snakes are not considered harmful to humans, Beck explained while holding the reptile. The girls watched in wonder and asked questions. “How do some snakes kill their prey?” Beck asked. “They wrap around them and hold real tight!” said Reagan Koom, a second-grader at Oakdale Elementary School. Glorious Girls was her favorite camp because she said it had more things to do than other camps. “More fun, more stuff,” she said.

Camps: Many subjects offered, from insects to mammals. Cost: $100 to $225 for nonmembers; $45 to $170 for Fontenelle members Information: Request a brochure at 402-731-3140, info@fontenelleforest.org or visit fontenelleforest.org NEAL GEBHARD/THE WORLD-HERALD

Aderyn Lawse gazes up at the forest canopy while on a hike during the Glorious Girls summer camp. Beck walked around the room to let each of the campers pet the snake. “When you handle a snake, you have to be careful because they’re all backbone,” she said. There was a skeleton of a snake that the girls could inspect to better understand how a snake moves. Next, Fischer produced a laminated snake skin from a boa constrictor. All told, it was roughly four-and-a-half girls long, a fact proved in the hallway as the campers lay head to toe beside the skin. Megan Schneider, a third-grader from St. Mary Elementary School, enjoyed petting the snake the most. “It’s fun!” she said. Megan was one of the seasoned campers at Glorious Girls, having attended eight Fontenelle Forest camps. Like the rest of the girls, she made lots of friends that week. “At the start of the week, Debbie told the girls ‘We have each others’ back,’ and they’ve stuck to that,” Fischer said. Oracle Coaker, a first-grader at St. Joan of Arc Elementary, summed up the week during the snake-hike. “We’re the queens of the forest!”

“Come On Down To The Farm”

m Camp Camp Farm Camp, Lil’ Farmers Day Camp, Exotic Pet Lovers & Adventure Camp!

1 Wk Camps~Ages g 4-12~Call 402-597-4920 www.esu3.org

HORSEMANSHIP CAMP

BLUFFS ARTS COUNCIL

Gifford Farm

Summer Day Camp

art classes & summer camps

camps for ages 7-15 • all day M-F $150 scholarships available

see the full schedule & register after april 1st at

www.bluffsarts.org

Introduction to

June 3 - July 26

OF THE MIDLANDS Omaha Carter Lake Council Bluffs

free breakfast & lunch, boat rides, canoes, paddle boats, KIXWTYQ WTGPHPOUL ZPHLJ IUWMLI GPS navigation course, remote control car track, nature LMFNPHWSTQ OWJMWTY ZPUVIQ KLUM trips, sports, sand volleyball archery,arts & crafts & more!

camp

June 3-7 ........ 9am-noon.....Beginners..................ages 5-6 June 17-21 .... 9am-4pm .....Beginners................ages 7-13 July 8-12....... 9am-noon.....Beginners..................ages 5-6 July 8-12....... 9am-4pm .....Beginners................ages 7-13 July 15-19..... 9am-4pm .....Beginners/Adv .......ages 7-13

• Horse Safety • Grooming • Breeds & Colors • Tack & Equipment • Riding Styles • Much more

www.campnakomis.org $

115

per week

5-1/2 mi. N. of I-680 off 72nd

NEAL GEBHARD/THE WORLD-HERALD

Top to bottom, Megan Schneider, Sarah Bunnell and Reagan Koom pet a fox snake held by Debbie Beck at the camp.

Seefus Riding Stable

June 4-6.......... Beginner Ages 5 - 8 June 11-13 Beginner/Intermediate Ages 9 & up (Every rider has

their own horse - limited space)

June 20 & 25 Trail Ride Camp

Weekly lessons available

S U M M E R CALL PAM AT 402-290-9245

HORSE CAMP seefusridingstable@yahoo.com

SUMMER DAY CAMPS

1st through 6th grade

10 Week-Long Camps Fun Themes Science Experiments Gardening Field Trips Tutoring available in all subjects

Registration forms at: www.mpccomaha.org or call (402) 345-2001

Montessori

AMERICAN LEGACY COMPLEX

www.amleg.com • 402-468-4588

19W

Picking up daily from Westroads Mall, 1st National Bank Tower, Mutual of Omaha

PARENTS’ CO-OP FOR CHILDREN, INC.

2616 S. 30th St.*Omaha, Nebraska 68105*info@mpccomaha.org

CREATE

Something ArTsy for Everyone! 402.933.4446 inspireandcreate.com Pre-Registration for Summer Camps starts Mar.1~Early Bird Special if registered by April 1

WE OFFER CAMPS JUNE 3 – AUG. 16

Drop-Ins are always WELCOME

Birthday Parties

CAMP EASTER SEALS

2013 Tentative Camp Dates: June 6 June 9-14 June 16-21 June 23-28 July 1-13 July 11-12

Lunch with the Staff- all Parents & Campers - Noon YoungAdults,ages 23-39 Adults,ages 40+ Youth,ages 6-13 No ESN Camp MilitaryYouth with disabilities only,ages 7-17, OffuttAFB,Base Lake July 14-19 Teens,ages 14-22 July 21-26 AllAges

800-650-9880 www.campeastersealsne.com

20W S U N DAY, F E B R U A RY 1 0, 2 0 1 3

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD

Aeronautics camp has high-flying fun BY NEAL GEBHARD WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

NEAL GEBHARD/THE WORLD-HERALD

Michael Sibbernsen, science and technology coordinator at the Strageic Air & Space Museum, releases a high-altitude balloon during The Sky Is the Limit summer camp.

How do you find the payload of a balloon that goes 16 miles up, directed only by the wind until it finally pops and parachutes down through the atmosphere? You use an Automatic Packet Reporting System tracker, equip the orange payload box with a satellite transponder and put a sticker on the box that reads “Reward if found.” Michael Sibbernsen, science and technology coordinator at the Strategic Air & Space Museum, said the sticker is the last resort to find the payload when it falls to Earth. It’s all part of the high-altitude balloon launch at The Sky Is The Limit camp at the museum. The camp, offered for kids ages 10 to 16 who are interested in aeronautics and astronomy, includes four days and three nights of activities, with lodging and food provided. This summer, the camp’s second season, will include activities similar to those offered during its debut in 2012: rockets, GPS trackers, telescopes, hot-air balloons and the high-altitude balloon launch. “We really pushed the limits on what we do,” Sibbernsen said. Though many events and activities at The Sky Is The Limit have been part of other camps offered at the museum, this past summer was the first time a week was devoted specifically to bringing them all together in an aeronautics camp.

SUPER SCIENCE SUMMER CAMPS When: Weeklong day and overnight camps, June 3 to Aug. 2 Where: Strategic Air & Space Museum, 28210 West Park Highway, Ashland, Neb. Who: Kids ages 8 to 17 Camps: Robotics 101, 201, 301; Astronaut Academy; The Sky Is the Limit; Mad Scientist; Johnson Space Center Travel Camp Cost: Ranging from $250 to $425 ($1,300 for Space Center) Information: www.sasmuseum.com/summercamps/ and 402-944-3100

It was early in the morning when the kids gathered outside the museum to learn more about the balloon they would be launching. Despite the tracking devices and cameras attached to the balloon, Sibbernsen said this was a fairly basic payload, meant for demonstration only. High-altitude balloons are usually sent up with an experiment in mind, he said, often one designed to learn what is happening in the atmosphere. As the campers gathered around the orange payload, Sibbernsen called on volunteers to help him ready the package. “It’s like UPS extreme!” said Broz Bykerk, a seventh-grader who attends Bluffs Middle School in Scottsbluff. Bykerk’s favorite part of the camp was building and launching rockets, but he also

was excited to see the results of the balloon launch. “I want to see the pictures,” he said. The balloon’s 16-mile upward journey sent it to near-space, a point in the Earth’s atmosphere above the cruising altitude of airliners but below the orbiting altitude of satellites. Images captured by the payload’s camera are of the outer edge of the atmosphere. However, the images are not the only purpose of the balloon launch. After the balloon ascended high enough to disappear from view, the 15 campers loaded into a van and headed off to intercept the payload when it landed. Along the way, they used the tracking devices they installed to follow the path of the balloon. Earlier in the week, the campers learned how to use a GPS device to track their own path through the sky as they flew in small planes. Claire Weakly, an eighth-grader at Lux Middle School in Lincoln, has attended Mad Scientist Camp at the museum for three consecutive years. Camp participants conduct experiments in physics, engineering and chemistry. Now she is moving to other subjects. “I like aeronautics and robotics,” she said. Her favorite part of The Sky Is the Limit was tracking her airplane trip with the GPS. Those electronic tracking skills are what led the campers 20 miles away, where they found the balloon’s payload in a creekbed. The camera had captured the rise of the balloon as the campers, the museum and finally the ground disappeared from view.

MAKING MEMORIES Specialty & Premier Camps . YMCA Camp Platte Summer Day Camp . And more! We have something for all ages and interests!

YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

www.metroymca.org

Check out our website for the YMCA Camp Guide!


Omaha World-Herald Kids Camp 2013