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EASTERN CAPE NGO COALITION STRATEGIC PLAN 2019-2024


The strategic plan was developed with support by:

Deutsche Gesellschaft fĂźr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Governance Support Programme (GSP) Hatfield Garden Office Park 333 Grosvenor Street Pretoria - SOUTH AFRICA Contact: Ruan Kitshoff (ruan.kitshoff@giz.de) Website: www.giz.de

We thank GIZ, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and the National Lotteries Commission for their contributions to the operations and organizational development of the ECNGOC, as well as the member organizations for their intensive participation in the strategic planning process.

Authors: Lesley Steele, Len Khalane, Mbumba Development Solutions, East London, lsteele@iafrica.com

Sandra Lehmann, GIZ-GSP

Concept development: Rooks Moodley, Director ECNGOC, rooksmoodley@ecngoc.co.za


CONTENTS 1.

Introduction to the Eastern Cape NGO Coalition and its footprint........................................................... 1 1.1 Programmatic approach and key interventions......................................................................................... 1 1.1.1 Promoting Active Citizenship and Asset-Based Development Orientation............................................. 1 1.1.2 Supporting engagement on the National and Provincial Development Plan......................................... 2 1.2. Vision and Mission Statement of the ECNGOC......................................................................................... 3 1.3 Theory of Change and main services of the ECNGOC................................................................................ 4 1.4 Governance System of the ECNGOC.......................................................................................................... 5 1.5 Organisational Structure............................................................................................................................ 6

2.

Objective of the Strategic Plan............................................................................................................... 7

3.

Methodology in Developing the Strategic Plan....................................................................................... 7 3.1 Participatory Approach.............................................................................................................................. 7 3.2 Feedback collected from partners and stakeholders................................................................................. 8 3.3 Review of existing strategic documents and resolutions........................................................................... 8 3.4 Application of the Theory of Change Methodology.................................................................................. 8

4.

Analysis of the socio-economic context that informs the planning.......................................................... 9 4.1 International Situation............................................................................................................................... 9 4.1.1 VUCA Phenomenon................................................................................................................................ 9 4.1.2 Sustainable Development Goals........................................................................................................... 10 4.2 National Situation.................................................................................................................................... 11 4.3 Provincial Situation.................................................................................................................................. 11

5.

Core Services and Interventions of the ECNGOC....................................................................................13

6.

Thematic Priority Areas.........................................................................................................................15 6.1 Rural Development ................................................................................................................................. 17 6.2 Civic Engagement in Local Governance................................................................................................... 19 6.3 Human Rights.......................................................................................................................................... 21 6.4 Education................................................................................................................................................. 22 6.5 Health...................................................................................................................................................... 24

7.

Organisational Development Priorities..................................................................................................26 7.1 Sustainability........................................................................................................................................... 27 7.2 Impact-Orientation and Monitoring........................................................................................................ 27


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INTRODUCTION TO THE EASTERN CAPE NGO COALITION AND ITS FOOTPRINT

The Eastern Cape NGO Coalition (ECNGOC) was established in 1995 when development NGOs of the Eastern Cape Province decided to establish and participate in an association of NGOs, through which joint action, representation of common interests, provision of training and support, information-sharing and co-ordination of activities could be pursued. The ECNGOC is an umbrella organisation that represents more than 900 CBOs, NPOs and FBOs across all development sectors in the Eastern Cape. It is recognised as the most representative structure of the NGO sector in the province. The ECNGOC implements initiatives and has representative structures and consultative platforms in the 6 districts and 2 metros of the province. It plays a significant role as a collective voice in many consultative stakeholder forums and governmentled development structures and processes, not just in the province, but in South Africa. The ECNGOC addresses its mandate through working on three focus areas. These are: •

Strengthening NPO compliance and legislation

Strengthening NGO sustainability through capacity development and collective voice

Influencing the development trajectory through Asset-Based-Community-Driven Development (ABCD) and bottom-up accountability

The overall objective of its interventions is to address South Africa’s triple challenge of poverty, unemployment and inequality.

In its strategic plan the ECNGOC applies the internationally used terminology of civil society organisations and the civil society sector. According to the World Bank definition civil society organizations include “a wide array of nongovernmental and not for profit organizations that have a presence in public life, express the interests and values of their members and others, based on ethical, cultural, political, scientific, religious or philanthropic considerations”.1 Within the civil society sector the ECNGOC sees itself as the main representative body of the NGO sector in the Eastern Cape and implement its interventions with special focus on serving its member organisations. In its initial phase the membership of the organisation was predominantly made up of established NGOs. Over the years the membership became more diversified and a high number of grassroots-community-based organisations (CBOs) joined the organisation. The peer learning between experienced and emerging organisations and the engagement between the provincial and the grassroots perspective enrich the discourse and interventions of the organisation.

1.1 Programmatic approach and key interventions Since its foundation the ECNGOC focuses on pro-poor, people centred development in its advocacy and program implementation.

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1.1.1 Promoting Active Citizenship and AssetBased Development Orientation Since 2009 the ECNGOC champions the application of the Asset-Based-Community-Development Approach (ABCD) in partnership with the Canadian COADY Institute and other like-minded organisations. The approach focuses on enabling citizens to shape local development processes by identifying and leveraging on existing assets of the community instead of focusing primarily on deficiencies and needs. The ABCD approach is well aligned to the longstanding engagement of the organisation in the field of sustainable rural development and local governance. The ECNGOC has over 10 years of experience in implementing local governance projects. Hereby a strong focus was placed on capacitating CBOs to identify their development priorities and constructively engage with government and other stakeholders to consider these in planning processes and address related service delivery and governance challenges. From 2015-2016 the ECNGOC, in partnership with GIZ, successfully implemented the project “Integration of the ABCD approach into Municipal planning” which triggered discussion and new thinking at provincial and national level. Another important initiative was the E-Citizenry Service Delivery Surveys Project (2016-2017) that was supported by the Making All Voices Count Programme (MAVC) of Hivos. Currently the ECNGOC is implementing a multi-sectoral leadership training on citizen engagement in the IDP process (2017-2019) which is supported by GIZ.

1.1.2 Supporting engagement on the National and Provincial Development Plan The ECNGOC is a strong supporter of the National Development Plan (NDP) and promotes the alignment of government, civil society and private sector strategies to its principles and goals. The principles of investing in human capabilities as well as strengthening active citizenship and deepening democracy are directly speaking to the core of the ECNGOC’s mission statement and practical work.

Consequently in 2015 the ECNGOC partnered with the Eastern Cape Socio-Economic Consultative Council (ECSECC) to support the broad consultation of civil society on the development of the Eastern Cape Development Plan (PDP)-Vision 2030. Whereas the ECNGOC is fully supportive of the principles, goals and catalytic initiatives of the original version of the PDP, it finds it regretful that not enough priority and resources were devoted to the implementation of specific initiatives. The ECNGOC therefore highly appreciates the review of the PDP and advocates for and plays its part in the engagement of civil society on the plan and its consequent implementation.

1.1.3 Reacting to the sustainability crisis of the NPO sector in the Eastern Cape The last years saw a strong decline in foreign donor funding, as well as national funding opportunities to civil society. This is due to South Africa’s classification as middleincome country, higher priority of donors to address the international conflict and migration crisis, recession, as well as changing thematic funding patterns. In this regard the ECNGOC was tasked by its members and non-members to look into the strong funding cuts of the Department of Social Development (DSD) which occurred mainly in the child protection sector. The ECNGOC undertook a survey among NPOs to gain a better understanding of the issue and be equipped for evidence-based advocacy. The DSD issue was addressed through litigation-based advocacy which is still ongoing. The consequences of the sustainability crisis are quite visible in terms of the overall weakening of the NPO sector. The symptoms are fewer available platforms to receive information and debate on current issues, less organisational stability and less capacity and confidence of NPO leaders to advocate for their concerns. Even the ECNGOC itself is affected by the sustainability crisis and has to adjust its funding and operational model to the new context. The strategic planning review process had therefore an even strong focus on organisational development as on program development.

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1.2. Vision and Mission Statement of the ECNGOC The Eastern Cape NGO Coalition is guided by the following mission and vision statement:

VISION The Eastern Cape is a transformed society where citizens exercise their rights, engage effectively in democratic processes and proactively contribute to development processes that affect their lives.

MISSION The Eastern Cape NGO Coalition seeks to strengthen the sustainability, collective voice and coordinated action of civil society in the Eastern Cape to effect socioeconomic development and transformation.

The vision and mission are based on the following values or principles: VALUES •

Rights-based – because poverty is the manifestation of unfulfilled rights, there is a need to engage in upstream strategies to promote social change. This approach focuses on the realisation of second-generation rights such as shelter, health care, water, food and social security.

ABCD approach – focus on assets and capacities rather than needs and deficiencies. Fostering active citizen engagement, building a stronger civil society, and creating local economic opportunity are central to this approach.

Gender equity – the influence and unique circumstances relating to gender should be naturally considered in policies and programmes at political, economic and societal spheres leading to a reversal of inequality.

Youth Perspective – as youth constitute 37 % of the population and are strongly affected by poverty and unemployment, conscious efforts have to be made to consider the needs and interests of young people and promote intergeneral dialogue in the services, structures and programming of development organisations and institutions.

Pro-poor – poverty is not only an economic issue, but also impacts on the social, environmental and psychological spheres of individuals and communities. Sustainable development recognises the interconnectedness of these spheres, and that all must be considered in unison in any poverty-focused intervention that works towards equity and redistribution.

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1.3 Theory of Change and main services of the ECNGOC Strengthening the civil society sector* in the Eastern Cape to improve its services to communities and influence the development agenda towards people-centred development. This entails the following elements: Civil society organizations* provide better services to communities

Civil society organizations* influence the development agenda towards people-centered development:

Citizens are enabled to improve their own living conditions:

Civil society organizations are enabled to better analyze societal issues and use their collective voice for advocacy, policy input and promotion of new development approaches.

Through influencing mindsets, policies and practices development interventions become stronger geared towards promoting active citizenship, investing in human capabilities and building onto existing assets of the community.

Through access to information, advice and support, critical debate and skills development citizens are enabled to better analyse the opportunities and challenges that they have as individuum and as communities. They are encouraged to reflect on their mindsets and values.

As a result, citizens are empowered to invest into their personal and community development, initiate activities and build partnership to improve their livelihoods.

Civil society organizations are enabled to improve the living conditions of communities by providing high quality support services. This is based on strengthened governance, organizational development, access to information and continuous upgrading of thematic expertise and applied methods.

*For an explanation on the terminology please refer to Chapter 1 on page 1

Promoting innnovative, people-centred development approaches Information sharing and communication

Collective advocacy and policy input

Providing platforms for debate and stakeholder engagement

MAIN SERVICES OF THE ECNGOC Advisory services on NPO management Capacity development and peer learning

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1.4 Governance System of the ECNGOC The Provincial Assembly is the organisation’s highest authority, comprising all member organisations. It meets bi-annually to consider and decide on strategy and to confirm the incoming Provincial Executive Committee (PEC) and alter, vary or amend the Constitution, as well as normal administrative business. A small Provincial Council with lesser powers meets in the years between the Provincial Assembly. The PEC governs the Coalition between Provincial Assemblies, generally meeting quarterly. Members are nominated to a PEC selection committee that selects and

recommends members for approval by the outgoing PEC. The PEC members represent the 6 districts and 2 metros. Additional members can be appointed from outside the membership according to the expertise and knowledge they bring to the PEC. Prior to the Provincial Assembly each district holds District General Meetings (DGMs) for members to attend and discuss issues to address at the Provincial Assembly. Each DGM elects an honorary District Convenor who acts as the link between the members in that district, the PEC and the secretariat.

Members of the Provincial Executive Committee (PEC), District Convening Organizations (DCOs) and staff members at ECNGOC’s Biennial General Meeting (BGM) 2017.

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1.5 Organisational Structure ECNGOC’s lines of authority and accountability are shown in the following organisational structure. The filling of all positions is a strong priority in order to further increase the capacity of the organisation and is considered in all resource mobilization efforts.

MEMBERS

PROVINCIAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE

FINANCE COMMITTEE OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT TEAM (OMT)

DIRECTOR FINANCE & ADMIN MANAGER

PROGRAMME MANAGER

2 PROGRAMME FACILITATORS

DIRECTOR’S PERSONAL ASSISTANT

FINANCE/ADMIN/HR OFFICER PROGRAMMES ASSISTANT

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RECEPTIONIST, ADMIN, PROGRAMME SUPPORT, MEMBERSHIP OFFICER


2

OBJECTIVE OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN

The objective of the strategic plan is to produce concepts on improving the impact of the ECNGOC as an umbrella body in strengthening the collective voice and action of civil society in socio-economic development. The recipe for success lies in adjusting to the recent challenges and opportunities, staying relevant and choosing a funding and operational model that is lean and effective. As the membership is growing while resources are limited, the ECNGOC will strategize on how

3

to use modern technology to provide services and create information sharing platforms to all members, in both urban and rural areas. The participatory process intends to generate innovative ideas on keeping the ECNGOC relevant and sustainable over the coming years. The strategic plan provides strategic direction for the ECNGOC for the period 2019 – 2024.

METHODOLOGY IN DEVELOPING THE STRATEGIC PLAN

3.1 Participatory Approach The strategic plan was developed in a multi-stage, participatory process. For the first time in the history of the ECNGOC all structures of the organisations took

two metros. As local governance strongly relates to the priority areas of the ECNGOC, the draft strategic plan was presented for feedback at a Governance

part in two intensive strategic and operational planning workshops and a good number of member organisations participated in feedback sessions in all six districts and

Stakeholder Workshop. The results of these sessions were incorporated into the final strategic planning document.

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The following graphic illustrates the different stages of the strategic planning process: Peparatory session with ECNGOC Secretariat on Strategic Planning

Consultation of partners and donors per questionnaire

2 Day Strategic Planning Workshop with PEC and DCOs

Consultations of Member Organisations on Draft Strategic Plan in 7 Districts and 2 Metros

Consultation of Governance Stakeholders on Draft Strategic Plan

Prepartory Session of ECNGOC Secretariat on Operational Planning

2 Day Operational Planning and Resource Mobilization Strategy Workshop with PEC and DCOs

Finalisation of Strategic Plan and Operational Plan by ECNGOC Secretariat

3.2 Feedback collected from partners and stakeholders

3.3 Review of existing strategic documents and resolutions

An integral part of the strategic planning exercise was the collection of feedback from partners and stakeholders of the ECNGOC through a questionnaire. The external service provider, Mbumba Development Services designed the questionnaire in collaboration with the ECNGOC and implemented the collection of feedback as a neutral party. On the basis of a list submitted by the ECNGOC the service provider contacted a sample of highly relevant partners and stakeholders. Due to the short timeframe, not all contacted organisations were able to complete the questionnaire, but the feedback received from the participating organisations was immensely valuable. The recommendations confirmed the self-assessment by the ECNGOC that the organization should further enhance its undoubtedly strong relevance by introducing results-based planning and monitoring and developing a clear Theory of Change as a basis for its strategic planning. As illustrated in the following, these aspects and other recommendations were fully embraced as guidance for the strategic planning review process.

The strategic plan 2014-2017 was used as a starting point for the planning process since its main framework is still relevant and some sections only needed to be refined. Further documents and resolutions that were used as basis for the planning process are the following: Provincial Council Meeting Held in 2016, BGM held in November 2017 and the issues raised by the member organisations during the district dialogues conducted in 2017-2018.

3.4 Application of the Theory of Change Methodology The Theory of Change Methodology was applied to trigger fresh thinking, concentrate on desired results and strategize how different interventions could supplement each other in contributing to specific outcomes. The following text box presents the essence of the Theory of Change Methodology:

The Theory of Change is a specific type of methodology for planning, participation, and evaluation that is used in the development sector to promote social change. The methodology was developed with the aim to create a critical theory that ensures a transparent distribution of power dynamics and aims for a process that is necessarily inclusive of many perspectives and participants in achieving solutions2. The most distinctive aspect of the methodology is that the planning process starts with defining the long-term goals of the interventions and then mapping backward to identify necessary preconditions and lastly plan relevant activities.

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The theory of change was used in the strategic planning process to identify the current situation (in terms of needs and opportunities), the intended situation and what needs to be done to move from one to the other.

This helps to concentrate on impact, design more realistic goals, clarify accountabilities and establish a common understanding of the strategies to be used to achieve the goals3.

ANALYSIS OF THE SOCIOECONOMIC CONTEXT THAT INFORMS THE PLANNING

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As it has proved challenging to unlock the development potential of the Eastern Cape the province remains strongly affected by unemployment and poverty. While the historical backdrop for development and underdevelopment in the Eastern Cape remain the main cause of continued low rankings in terms of social and economic development, it is necessary to recognize that institutions of the state, private sector and civil society work in a dynamic, interconnected and fast changing environment4. As the international and national economic trends and policy decisions have a high impact on the Eastern Cape it is important to consider the broader international and national picture.

4.1 International Situation 4.1.1 VUCA Phenomenon Globally, the current period is characterised by growing divides, increasing disruptions, higher levels of distrust, deepening divisions and greater diversity. Technology development

is

creating

major

opportunities

for

innovation and efficiency, as well as new challenges for governance, and the labour market5. The challenges that the international community faces highlight a need

for structural changes and a global shift towards more sustainable and equal economies and societies. Among the main challenges are climate change, an overexploitation of resources, as well as continuing poverty and inequality. The causes and effects of these global challenges are heavily intertwined, and no single actor has sufficient knowledge to solve the problems unilaterally6. In such a complex, fast changing system it becomes more challenging to predict socio-economic developments and plan accordingly. The following graphic7 illustrates the VUCA phenomenon:

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How well can you predict the outcome of your actions?

PLANNING IN VUCA ENVIRONMENT

COMPLEXITY

VOLATILITY

Multiple key decision factors

Fast rate of change

VUCA WORLD AMBIGUITY

UNCERTAINTY

Lack of clarity about meaning of events

Unclear about the present

How much do you know about the situation?

Will the traditional planning tools assist us in navigating this environment? 4.1.2 Sustainable Development Goals As cooperation in complex systems becomes imperative for finding new solutions, the Sustainable Development Goals take cognisance of these joint responsibilities of the international community.

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The SDGs build on the success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and aim to go further to end all forms of poverty. The 17 Goals are unique in that they call for action by all countries, poor, rich and middleincome to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and address a range of social needs including education, health, social protection, and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and environmental protection8. The “leave no one behind principle” emphasizes that all development interventions have to ensure that disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of society are reached and enabled to improve their situation9. For the South African government and civil society, the SDGs are an important guide for strategy development and impact monitoring of development efforts. The ECNGOC acknowledges the high relevance of the SDGs and advocates for more civil society engagement on their integration into government strategies such as the PDP and monitoring activities.

4.2 National Situation South Africa has been severely affected by prolonged recession, low growth and low investment levels. The National focus on ‘state capture’ has demonstrated that there is a danger of elite capture of the development agenda and there is a need to focus more on social and economic transformation for the majority of the population and deepening of democracy10. The Indlulamithi 2030 South Africa Scenarios argues that social cohesion is the key to shaping the future of South Africa due to risk factors stemming from continued stark inequalities and societal divisions. The scenarios argue that unless its various dimensions are addressed – be it through reconciliation, or addressing inequality, or crafting a national identity, or rural/urban divides – economic development strategies will not be effective11. In the light of the described challenges, the National Development Plan (NDP) is timelier and more relevant than ever in its critical analysis and holistic solutions. Its call for multi-stakeholder collaboration to address the triple challenge of unemployment, poverty and inequality is particularly relevant for the socio-economic profile of the Eastern Cape. The same goes for the emphasis

on investing in human capabilities, active citizenship, deepening democracy and strengthening social cohesion. The ECNGOC acknowledges that these principles were comprehensively considered in the Eastern Cape Provincial Development Plan and will advocate for and contribute to its effective implementation. Consequently, the ECNGOC has strongly aligned its strategic plan to the NDP and PDP.

4.3 Provincial Situation The Eastern Cape consists of six district municipalities and two Metros, namely: Alfred Nzo, Amathole, Cacadu, Chris Hani and Joe Gqabi District Municipalities, as well as Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality and Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality. The Eastern Cape’s population increased from 6.6 million people in 2011 to 7.08 million in 2017, making it the third most populous province in the country12. The Eastern Cape, much like the rest of South Africa, is undergoing a difficult economic transition as evidenced by long-term GDP growth. The GDP growth rate of the Eastern Cape economy has declined sharply over the last decade and stood at 0.3 % real GDP growth in 201713. This decline is, however, in line with the national trend. The historical structural location of the Eastern Cape economy remains the main factor of under development. The historic absence of significant mining activity in the Eastern Cape, and the creation of the former homelands as unproductive “labour reserves” are the main reasons that the provincial economy has tended to underperform the national economy in terms of higher rates of poverty and unemployment14. In 2017 the Eastern Cape recorded a Human Development Index of 0.602 compared to the national total of 0.65815. This is the lowest result of all provinces. In the same year, there were 4.5 million people living in poverty, using the upper poverty line definition, across the Eastern Cape Province - this is 1.50% higher than the 4.44  million in 200716. The unemployment rate in the province (based on the official definition of unemployment) was 30.91%, compared to 27.2 % in 200717. The structure of the provincial economy has not changed significantly over the past 25 years. The province has

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a comparatively large public sector and a small and slowgrowing private sector. Government services in the Eastern Cape grew faster than in the country as a whole18. For the Eastern Cape, the main demographic trends are the overall stagnant population, high outmigration, urbanisation and the continued large youth population that is not absorbed by the labour market. The EC has a much higher rate of out-migration than other provinces and deep rural areas are de-populating19. The natural environment provides the basis for human, social and economic co-existence. In this regard, it is

important that the interaction between human beings, development and eco-systems is a central part of any development strategy. This is particularly the case as the province promotes development based on natural resource-based sectors (e.g. agriculture, ocean economy, alternative energy and tourism)20. The Provincial Development Plan and Provincial Strategic Framework (2019-2024) outline the development priorities for the province. The PDP was developed in 2014 and revised in 2018. It is based on the following six development goals:

Goal 1: An innovative and inclusive growing economy Goal 6: Capable democratic institutions

Goal 2: An enabling infrastructure network

EASTERN CAPE 2030 Goal 5: Environmental sustainability Goal 4: Improved human development

Goal 3: Rural Development and an innovative and high-value agriculture sector

The PDP’s Developmental Principles: • • • • • • • •

Understanding the context Advancing social justice Spatial development and justice Intergenerational equity and sustainable development Enhancing positive human agency People centred development Coordination of efficiencies Trans-sectoral resourcing of the PDP

The six goals are strongly interrelated. The following gives a short overview on what is intended by the six goals21: • Respond to the ongoing economic downturn by increasing funds available for provincial investment expenditure and addressing infrastructure spending challenges • Develop and implement the Provincial Spatial Development Plan to ensure better integration and agreement on spatial prioritisation • Transform the agriculture sector and practice • Make progress on the education seven-point plan, with a focus on the school rationalisation process • Improve the health care profile of the province • Strengthen ICT connectivity and ICT based innovation • Integration of government programmes and projects to meet the objective of functional local government The province is currently working on an implementation plan for the revised PDP. The ECNGOC advocates for stronger consultation with civil society on the revised plan and its implementation measures, as well as for better resourcing of the implementation process.

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CORE SERVICES AND INTERVENTIONS OF THE ECNGOC

NGOs are critical to the economic and societal development of civil society. This is true for the Eastern Cape Province. NGOs, CBOs and social movements fulfil important duties of checks and balances in democracies, they are able to influence the government and hold it accountable. In both resource-rich and resourcepoor contexts, grassroots organizations can develop an alternative neighbourhood or village-based voice that challenges prejudice and the discrimination of the poor. They are key to building voice, agency and capacity for community-led development. The networking of grassroot organizations improves the opportunities of community members to input into important political, development or resource decisions that directly affect their lives. The value add of the ECNGOC as umbrella structure includes capacity development and support of its members, ensuring coordination, collaboration and strengthening the collective voice (advocacy). The organisation keeps a database of its over 900 members that includes information on the regional and sectoral focus of the organisations. The database is used to connect members with stakeholders, share information about relevant events, learning and funding opportunities and promote peer-learning among members. The ECNGOC secretariat shares regular information on the latest trends, challenges and opportunities in the NGO sector and informs about its current initiatives and projects. Quarterly district dialogues are held in the 6 districts and 2 metros of the Eastern Cape that reach a minimum of 240 member organisations per quarter. The district dialogues are an important platform for information sharing, peer learning and forming joint advocacy positions. They help the ECNGOC to cascade down information and channel up concerns and suggestions of its members to provincial stakeholders and policy makers. The ECNGOC does not

only engage on thematic issues but also advocates for fair and adequate regulation, administrative procedures, as well as support and funding mechanism in the NGO sector. Information gathering and surveys among members are utilized to develop evidence-based advocacy strategies. The ECNGOC is of the view that strengthening corporate governance is the foundational pillar to achieve and enhance NGO sustainability. Hence, it offers advice and implements trainings on NPO management and organisational development, including project management, financial management and board governance. Accredited and non-accredited training on Asset-Based-Community- Development (ABCD), as well as leadership training courses are offered for a reasonable price to member organisations and stakeholders from civil society, government and the private sector. The ECNGOC has identified the expansion of its training offers as important strategy for resource mobilization and popularizing people-centred, sustainable development approaches. In its recent resource mobilization activities strong efforts are made to make the high-quality training offers accessible to an increased number of member organisations. In its programming the ECNGOC designs project interventions in the five thematic priority areas defined by its members. Pilot projects are implemented to test new approaches and reach buy-in from stakeholders. Broadbased interventions are designed by building onto good practices of the ECNGOC, its member organisations and other stakeholders. To increase its outreach, strengthen its capacity and promote innovation, the ECNGOC has decided to work even stronger in partnerships and consortiums with other NGOs, government institutions, institutions of higher learning and the private sector.

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Staff members of the Secretariat of the ECNGOC.

E-Citizenry- Service Delivery Survey Feedback at Raymond Mhlaba Municipality (2016).

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6

THEMATIC PRIORITY AREAS

The following graphic illustrates the five thematic priority areas of the ECNGOC that were refined in the strategic planning process. On the next pages the plans for each of the thematic priority areas will be presented in detail.

• Sustainable land use • Access to land • Economic opportunities (focus women and youth) • Innovative approaches and ICT • Youth involvement in agriculture • Adaption to climate change • Advocacy and Information on access to quality health services and NIH implementation • Strengthening Clinic Committees • Participatory Monitoring • Community Awareness on health matters (HIV/AIDS, TB, diabetes etc.)

• Active Citizenship • Civic Education • Meaningful citizen engagement • ABCD in Municipal Planning • Bottom-up accountability • Service delivery monitoring • Community dialogues • Leadership Training

RURAL DEVELOPMENT

HEALTH

HUMAN CENTRED DEVELOPMENT

EDUCATION

• Advocacy on access to quality education • Strengthening SGBs • Participatory Monitoring • Professionalization of Early Child Development Centers • Quality services for children with special needs

CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT IN LOCAL GOVERNANCE

HUMAN RIGHTS

• Human rights awareness and dialogues • Collaboration with Chapter 9 Institutions • Rights of vulnerable groups • Child rights and Child safety • Women’s rights and Gender • Socio-economic rights • Social cohesion

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6.1 Rural Development SDGs: Rural development crosscutting issue in the realization of all goals NDP: Chapter 7: Vibrant, equitable, sustainable rural communities contributing to food security for all Chapter 10: Protect and enhance our environmental assets and natural resources PDP: Goal 3: Rural development and an innovative and high-value agriculture sector Strategic Objective 3.1 Sustainable community agriculture and diversified livelihoods 3.2 Development of agricultural value chains 3.3 Land reform and land rehabilitation programmes

Background: Given the spatial imbalance in the province and the persistent underdevelopment of its rural regions where the majority of citizens live, the PDP prioritises rural development as key to sustainable development. Even though the Eastern Cape Province remains predominantly rural, with over 70 percent of citizens living outside of the metropolitan areas, a process of urbanisation and settlement change is underway. The Eastern Cape has a much higher rate of out-migration than other provinces and deep rural areas are de-populating22. Rural communities suffer from unequal access to quality services and service monitoring and interventions are often insufficient in remote areas. The majority of the rural poor in the Eastern Cape Province depend primarily on agriculture for social progress. In this context, access to land and leveraging natural resources are vital for pro-poor development. It is therefore important that civil society advocates for and takes part in inclusive, constructive engagements on land questions. Due to the high levels of poverty and unemployment persisting in the rural areas of the Eastern Cape it is important to provide citizens with opportunities for improving their livelihoods. Key to this is skills development and supporting entrepreneurship with a focus not only on the formal economy but also on the informal economy. As the rural and economic development strategy outlined in the PDP is reliant on natural resources (agroindustry,

ocean economy, tourism and energy), it is important that the Eastern Cape’s rich natural resources are sustainably used, and its rich biodiversity conserved23. In this context it is also important to proactively plan for adaptation to climate change as several areas are already strongly affected by drought and other negative consequences. Central to achieving these will be harnessing indigenous knowledge as well as the technology and innovation made possible by the 4th industrial revolution. With regard to this, goal 3 of the PDP emphasizes the need to promote innovation and orientation towards high-value production in the agriculture and the rural sectors. The application of ICT in agriculture should also be pursued as a means to attract more young people to work in the sector. There is a need though, for stakeholders to engage in further debates on: •

Practical strategies for land reform and optimal land utilisation and land redistribution

Strategies to promote rural areas to counterbalance the rural exodus and brain drain to other urbanised provinces

Strategies for safeguarding community participation and beneficiation in larger scale economic investment projects in rural areas

Access to land rights and economic opportunities for women in rural areas to promote equity and curb economic dependence and vulnerability to genderbased violence.

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Identified result areas and interventions: Goal Sustainable livelihoods and improved living conditions for rural communities

Anticipated result •

Strengthened civil society contribution to sustainable rural development policy and practice.

Strengthened information sharing, dialogue platforms and capacity building for member CBOs on current rural development issues.

Increased attractiveness of rural areas and decreased brain drain.

Rural communities have improved access to economic opportunities by leveraging and preserving their natural resources.

Enable members to inform themselves and input into policy debates on sustainable land use, SDGs and adaption to climate change.

Provide inclusive information on the land debate and its gender dimension considering the broader context, experiences on the ground, relevant (draft) legislation and reform agendas.

Input into policy debate and practice on how to give rural communities better access to economic perspectives and services.

Partner with institutions of higher learning and other stakeholders to boost the capacity of the ECNGOC’s structures on sustainable rural development and innovation.

Advocate for the application of ABCD principles in rural sustainable development, implement training of trainers and showcase good practices.

Contribute to innovative projects on skills development and entrepreneurship promotion in the formal and informal rural economy.

Implement partnership projects on access of women to land and economic opportunities in rural areas.

Pilot partnership initiatives on the use of ICT in agriculture with focus on youth and women.

Develop comprehensive social facilitation package to safeguard community participation and beneficiation.

Innovation is used to promote skills development and entrepreneurship in the formal and informal rural economy.

Improved access to land and sustainable land use methods with focus on women and youth.

Rural communities are empowered to steer economic investment projects in favour of equitable, sustainable development.

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Planned Interventions


6.2 Civic Engagement in Local Governance

SDGs: Good Governance - crosscutting issue in the realization of all goals NDP: Active Citizenship guiding principle Chapter 9: Responsive, accountable, effective and efficient local government Chapter 14: Nation building and social cohesion PDP: Strategic Objective 6.3: Instilling a culture of good governance. 4.6: Promotion of social cohesion and moral regeneration

Background: Local government is the sphere of government closest to the people which has to deliver and coordinate the provision of services to the communities in its jurisdiction. The South African local government system has very extensive legislation on public participation that requires municipalities to consult residents on all major processes and enable them to participate from an informed standpoint. However, from the citizens’ perspective, the quality of engagement and outreach is often not sufficient. Many citizens feel that there are not enough mechanisms provided for meaningful two-way communication and feedback loops on service delivery issues. Equally, in many municipalities service delivery outcomes

are found to be wanting due to institutional instability, resource and capacity constraints, good governance challenges and also the lack of effective mechanisms for oversight and bottom-up accountability. As a result of these serious challenges the level of trust in local government is declining, resulting in growing public participation fatigue. In 2018 the Eastern Cape was the worst affected province from violent service delivery strikes, amounting to 20 % of all incidents in the country24. According to the National Development Plan, a capable state and active citizenship are key for realizing local good governance. Since not every individual citizen can participate in governance processes, organized civil society plays a key role in representing citizens’ interests. Yet, due to experiences of non-responsiveness of municipalities, the politicisation of public participation

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structures and capacity constraints to engage in municipal processes, many CBOs retreat from the local governance space. The ECNGOC wants to change this trend by building up a critical mass of CBOs across all districts who take an active stand for local good governance and active citizenship in their municipalities. Capacity development is therefore needed on how local government works, understanding citizens’ rights and responsibilities and how to engage government constructively on service delivery. This also requires improving technical skills in analysing policies, planning

and budgeting documents, defining own priorities and advocating for them, as well as monitoring service delivery implementation and holding municipalities to account. As local government alone cannot shoulder the myriad socio-economic challenges of our communities, the ECNGOC promotes collaborative partnerships between local government, business and civil society. In this respect, we see the enhancement of transformative leadership skills among all stakeholders and the application of the ABCD approach as further critical elements to improve meaningful citizen engagement in municipal processes.

Identified result areas and interventions: Goal Empowered citizenry in local governance processes.

Anticipated result

Planned Interventions

Increased impact of civil society on local good governance.

Strengthened information sharing, dialogue platforms and capacity building for member CBOs on local governance issues.

Strengthening of active citizenship

Organize panel discussions on current societal topics that reflect on the local government level.

Change of mindsets and behaviour of citizens and local government representatives.

Build capacity and support local governance change maker CBOs in all districts.

Implement training for CBOs on local government structures and processes, how to engage government on service delivery grievances, social accountability tools, ABCD and collaborative leadership.

Strengthened citizen participation in municipal planning and budgeting.

More constructive • engagement on service delivery resulting in decrease of violent service • delivery strikes.

• •

Citizens hold (local) government to account

More proactive and responsive local • government and improved service delivery.

Advocate for the integration of the ABCD approach into municipal planning, partner with municipalities to refine and replicate existing pilots. Promote civic education in collaboration with (local) media and other stakeholders. Partner with specialized NGOs to develop initiatives on the use of ICT for citizen engagement and bottom-up accountability.

Design and implement community dialogues on service delivery issues.

Promote dialogue with local government and traditional leaders on civic participation and economic empowerment of women in rural areas.

Support member organisations to make constructive inputs at public participation forums, monitor impact and channel up concerns to provincial level.

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Refine and implement Leadership Training for Citizen Engagement for municipal representatives, local civil society and private sector.


6.3 Human Rights SDGs: Strong human rights focus of goals 1-8, 10-13, 16 and cross-cutting theme in other SDGs NDP: Strong human rights focus of outcome 1-5, 7-8, 12-14 and cross-cutting theme in other outcomes PDP: Strong human rights focus of goal 4 - Human Development and cross-cutting theme in other goals Most of the complaints received by the South African Human Rights Commission’s (SAHRC) Eastern Cape Provincial Office over the last years deal with the inadequate realization of economic and social human rights. International human rights treaties oblige states to the “progressive realization” of these rights. This means they have to take appropriate measures and take concrete steps towards the full realization of these rights to the maximum of their available resources25. The shortage of resources therefore does not free the state

underachievement of the province in improving basic infrastructure in public schools to ensure the safety and dignity of learners26. A 2015 public survey by the Foundation for Human Rights (FHR) indicates that only about 10% of the national population is aware of the mandates of the Chapter 9 institutions27. In the 2016/17 year, race, disability and ethnic or social origin continue to be the highest grounds of equality related complaints reported

from the obligation to act decisively in improving public schools and health services, as well as to effectively address backlogs in the field of housing, electricity, water and sanitation.

to the Human Rights Commission28.

Against this backdrop, the state of public health services and the provision of water and sanitation services were subject to a high number of complaints to the SAHRC EC provincial office. The strongest concerns were, however, expressed by SAHRC with regard to the

rights issues among its members. To address the

Therefore, the ECNGOC decided to increase its collaboration with chapter 9 institutions and contribute to awareness raising and capacity building on human continuing divide in our society, initiatives will be extended to support social cohesion, nation building and act against hate speech and disrespect of human rights.

Identified result areas and interventions: Goal

Anticipated result

Planned Interventions

Increased awareness on human rights issues and more respect for each other’s rights and diversity in society

Increased awareness and activism of civil society on human rights issues.

Change of mindsets and behaviour of citizens and government representatives.

Strengthened information sharing, dialogue platforms and capacity building for member CBOs on human rights issues.

Collaboration with Chapter 9 institutions to increase awareness of human rights issues among member organisations.

Implement initiatives on social cohesion, respect for cultural diversity and nation building in collaboration with community initiatives, churches and local businesses.

Advocacy for the implementation of socio-economic rights, in particular right to health and education.

Civil society takes a strong stance against hate speech and discrimination based on race, disability, sexual orientation, ethnic or social origin. Good practices on strengthening social cohesion and multi-ethnic collaboration that can inspire other communities.

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6.4 Education SDG Goal 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all NDP Outcome 1: Quality basic education PDP: Strategic Objective 4.1: Early childhood development 4.2: Improved quality of primary and secondary education 4.3: Improved education and training for economic development

Background: Even though in 2018 the EC had the greatest improvement of all provinces in terms of its matric pass rate which went up to 70.6 percent from 65.8 percent in 201729, the state of the public education sector remains worrying. The deficiencies of the education and skills development system contribute to the falling share of the province in the national economy. The quality of teaching, in particular in maths and science, shortages and qualification deficits of teachers, as well as little access to computers and internet for research and learning remain a problem in many public schools. This is exacerbated in rural areas. In terms of infrastructure provision and basic service delivery to schools, the EC is lagging behind the other provinces. In May 2018 the EC had still 25 schools without proper sanitation, a large number had no access to electricity and there are still 205 schools that were built with inappropriate material30. Overall, the education levels in the province have improved over the past years. The number of people without any schooling decreased from 2007 to 2017 with an average annual rate of -3.81%, while the number of people within the ‘matric only’ category, increased from 596,000 to 858,00031. The province’s functional literacy rate increased on average 2.23% annually and stands at 77.63% in 2017 which is lower than the national total of 83.69%32. The drop-out and grade repetition rate between grade 10 in 2016 and grade 12 in 2018 was as high as 39.3%

and puts the celebration of the official matric pass rate into question33. According to a community survey conducted in 2016 only 67.1 % of youth aged 16-17 had completed grade 9 or higher. 34.7 % of youth aged 20-24 have completed matric or gained a higher qualification34. Teenage pregnancy remains a strong challenge with 30.8 % of females aged 15-24 years having given birth to a child in 201635. In 2017, 462 000 youth between 15-24 years in the EC were neither employed nor in education or training (NEET)36. In terms of access and quality of early childhood development (ECD) centres the province has realized that it strongly needs to improve its efforts. According to DSD, in 2018 only 6.2 % of 870 900 pre-schoolers attended ECD centres in the EC37. In deep rural areas access is very low and compliance with norms and standards on infrastructure remains an overall challenge38. The ECNGOC will advocate for and contribute to the professionalisation of ECD practitioners and the integration of the centres into the formal education system. Even though the province has established 6 new public special needs schools39, still much more needs to be done to improve the education opportunities for learners with special needs and the piloting of inclusive education. The ECNGOC will advocate for and contribute to strategic pilot interventions in this field. Overall, making progress on the implementation of the Education Transformation (seven point) Plan, with a focus on the school rationalisation process remains key and must be followed up by all stakeholders.

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Identified results areas and interventions: Goal All children have access to quality education starting from early childhood development and catering also for children with specials needs.

Anticipated result

Planned Interventions

Civil society is enabled to use evidence-based advocacy on education issues.

Strengthened information sharing, dialogue platforms and capacity building for member CBOs on education matters.

School governing bodies contribute to improved monitoring and governance of schools.

Enable member CBOs to input into policy dialogues and advocate for access to quality education.

Parents and guardians are better informed about education policies and service standards.

Pilot training of local CBOs on participatory service delivery monitoring at schools and use of results for evidenced-based advocacy.

Training of trainers of CBOs on capacity building The early childhood development of school governing bodies and awareness centres are professionalised and of communities on education policies and offer quality services.

standards.

Increase in special facilities and improved expertise of practitioners on serving learners with special needs.

Implement advocacy campaign for the professionalisation and improved regulation of ECD sector. Implement leadership training and thematic capacity building for CBOs working in the ECD sector. Advocate for and support initiatives on improved education services for learners with special needs including the promotion of inclusive education.

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6.5 Health SDG Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages NDP Outcome 2: A long and healthy life for all South Africans PDP: Strategic Objective 4.4: Improved Health Profile of the Eastern Cape Province

Background: The strategic objective 4.4 of the revised Provincial Development Plan is an “Improved health profile of the Eastern Cape Province”. The PDP envisions that the people of the province should live healthy and long lives with a life expectancy of 70 years and an HIV/AIDS free generation under 20 years. The achievement of a healthy population is underpinned by a health system that provides quality health care to people in need, values patients, cares for communities, provides reliable services, creates opportunity to build health care capacities and values partnerships. Thus, the communities of the Eastern Cape have improved awareness on healthy lifestyles supported by a community oriented and efficient primary health care system40. The current health statistics show that slight improvements have been achieved but much still needs to be done to reach the relevant targets:

children in 2015/16 whereby the target of less than 34 per 1 000 has already been achieved. This is less likely for the maternal mortality rate which stood at 135.2 per 100 000 in 2015/16 against a target of less than 100 per 100 000 by 201943. In addition, key social factors such as child malnutrition and stunting persist, as well as the changing burden of disease, with increases in non-communicable and lifestyle diseases such as diabetes and hypertension44. In terms of access to quality services at public health facilities, several recent reports by health NGOs and advocacy alliances have pointed out the concerning conditions prevailing at many facilities. The inspection reports by the Office of Health Standards Compliance confirm these challenges45. The ECNGOC advocates for the improvement of the following deficiencies of the health care system of the Eastern Cape:

According to the fifth South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence, Behaviour and Communication Survey Conducted by the Human Sciences Research Council in 2017, the Eastern Cape had a HIV prevalence among adults aged 15 to 49 years of 25.2 %. After KZN and the Free State this is the third highest prevalence of all provinces41. Adolescent girls and young women between the ages 10-24 remain the most vulnerable to new HIV infections and are at high risk of teenage pregnancies42. In 2015 the Eastern Cape was the province with the highest reported rates of TB incidence at 692 per 100 000 citizens. The child mortality rate was 12.8 per 1 000

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Insufficient access to quality services and medication at many health facilities

Shortage of health care workers, in particular in rural areas

Inadequate conditions and availability of health infrastructure

Insufficient health system and facility management, including incidents of corruption

Inequalities in public healthcare provisions

Insufficient information on the strategies and implementation measures of the National Health Insurance


Identified results areas and interventions: Goal

Anticipated result

Citizens are enabled to • access quality health care services and make informed choices about • their health.

Planned Interventions

Civil society is enabled to conduct • evidence-based advocacy on health issues.

Strengthened information sharing, dialogue platforms and capacity building for member CBOs on public health matters.

Citizens are better informed about the policies, strategies and service standards on health issues.

Enable member CBOs to input into policy dialogues and advocate for access to quality health services.

Hospital boards and clinic committees contribute to the monitoring and governance of health services.

Organising dialogue sessions and cascading down information on the National Health Insurance Scheme.

Pilot training of local CBOs on participatory service delivery monitoring at local health facilities and use of results for evidencedbased advocacy.

Training of trainers for CBOs on capacity building of hospital boards and clinic committees.

Provide capacity building to CBOs working the field of HIV/AIDS, treatment adherence support and home-based care on project management and organisational governance.

Training of trainers of local CBOs to inform community members on access to health services, healthy lifestyles and the prevention and treatment of diseases.

Local CBOs working in the field of HIV/AIDS, treatment adherence support and home-based care achieve better results due to improved capacities. Improved information of communities on healthy lifestyles and the prevention and treatment of diseases. Improved health outcomes in the EC province.

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7

ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PRIORITIES

The bases for high quality sector programming are sound organisational systems and processes. Without these, the plans presented in the previous chapter cannot be realized. Hence, the strategic planning process devoted considerable time to discussing the organisational development of the ECNGOC. The following graphic illustrates the jointly defined organisational development results and necessary measures to realize these.

NECESSARY MEASURES TO REACH DESIRED RESULTS

Continued strategy review and implementation

Capacity development of staff, additional recruitment and measures to supplement capacity

Donor retention and establishing new partnerships

Generating CSI and philantrophy funding

Partnerships and consortiums with specialized sector NGOs and ICT experts

Strategic use of partnerships with goverment institutions, think tanks and private sector

Improved collaboration with SETAS

Partnerships with institutions of higher learning

Collaboration with media

Stronger involvement in relevant networks and international alliances

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DESIRED ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESULTS

Diversified, sustainable funding model

Strenghtened capacity of secretariat, board (PEC) and DCOs

Community Foundation established

Improved communication and outreach through ICT

Increased advocacy and media engagement

7.1 Sustainability

Recognising the ongoing funding crisis and overall weakening of the South African civil society sector, the ECNGOC has put strong emphasis on the crafting of a resource mobilization plan as part of its strategic planning review process. Expert advice was sought on integrating good practices on diversified funding models, promoting community philanthropy and tapping into corporate social investment funding (CSI). The main pillars of the resource mobilization strategy will be: •

Refining the value proposition of the ECNGOC on its overall services and sector specific offers

Developing a diversified funding model

Strengthening the training offers and collaboration with SETAS as a source of income generation

Concept and partnership development on strengthening community philanthropy and putting respective organisational structures in place

Concept and partnership development on SCI funding and collaboration with the private sector

Establish the ECNGOC as a funding conduit and implement re-granting programmes

Increased training offers to members and as income base

Stenghtened research and impact monitoring

Build strategic partnerships and consortiums to offer state of the art approaches for local government, health and other key funding sectors

The resource mobilization strategy was developed in a participatory manner. The sharing of the draft strategy and its underlying resource mobilization approaches will also help the members to improve the sustainability of their own organisations.

7.2 Impact-Orientation and Monitoring As an outcome of its self-reflection process and engagement with partners, the ECNGOC decided to integrate results-based monitoring (RBM) into its operations. This will help to better track, document and strengthen the change that our interventions are facilitating at the level of intermediaries and at direct community level. As a first step the ECNGOC has inducted all structures, staff members and stakeholders involved in the strategic review on SMART planning principles and indicator development and ensured their full application throughout the process.

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This abridged version of the strategic plan document has been produced for the benefit of partners and stakeholders with the aim of giving a concise overview of the broader concept and planned interventions. For

Resources required

By when

internal steering and monitoring purposes the detailed version of the strategic plan, as well as the operational plan will be used as critical tools. These include the following information: Who is responsible

Indicators/milestones (How will you know you are on track?)

New programmes and projects will be fully designed in a result-based manner. Internal research will be done on how to measure the impact of the core services of the umbrella structure and the development of relevant indicators. The organization also plans to boost the capacity of its staff members in the field of results-based planning and monitoring. A system will be developed to ensure regular review and monitoring of the strategic plan. The following questions will be asked during the process: •

Are goals and objectives being achieved or not? If not, then why?

Will the goals be achieved according to the timelines specified in the plan? If not, then why?

Do staff have adequate resources (money, equipment, facilities, training, etc.) to achieve the planned goals?

Are the goals and objectives still realistic?

What can be learned in order to improve future planning activities?

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REFERENCES 1. Word Bank, Partners- Civil Society, http://www.worldbank.org/en/about/partners/civil-society#2, accessed May 2019 2. Wikipedia, Theory of Change, accessed May 2019 3. UNICEF Theory of Change Methodological Brief No.2, 2014 4. Environmental Analysis - Extract from ECSECC 2019/2020 Annual Performance Plan, p. 2 5.

ibid, p.2

6. GIZ-AIZ Leadership Toolbox-Leadership for Global Responsibility, p. 6 7. Graphic extracted from ECSECC presentation on PDP, 2018 8. UN Sustainable Development Goals Knowledge Platform, https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs, accessed May 2019 9. UNDP, What does it mean to leave no one behind?, https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/librarypage/ poverty-reduction/what-does-it-mean-to-leave-no-one-behind-.html, accessed May 2019 10. Environmental Analysis - Extract from ECSECC 2019/2020 Annual Performance Plan, p. 3 11. ibid, p. 5, SA Scenarios 2030-Indlulanithi, http://sascenarios2030.co.za/ , accessed May 2019 12. IHS Markit, Statistical Overview Eastern Cape Province, 2018, p. 5 13. Environmental Analysis - Extract from ECSECC 2019/2020 Annual Performance Plan, p. 4 14. ibid, p. 3 15. IHS Markit, Statistical Overview Eastern Cape Province, 2018, p. 51 16. ibid, p. 55 17. Ibid, p. 34 18. Environmental Analysis - Extract from ECSECC 2019/2020 Annual Performance Plan, p. 3 19. ibid, p. 6 20. Ibid, p. 7 21. Eastern Cape Vision 2030- Draft Provincial Development Plan, Eastern Cape Planning Commission, June 2018 22. Environmental Analysis - Extract from ECSECC 2019/2020 Annual Performance Plan, p. 6, Eastern Cape Vision 2030- Draft Provincial Development Plan, Eastern Cape Planning Commission, June 2018, p. 12 23. Environmental Analysis - Extract from ECSECC 2019/2020 Annual Performance Plan, p. 7 24. Municipal IQ, Municipal data and intelligence, 3 key trends from 2018’s all-time service delivery record, Jan 2019, accessible at https://www.municipaliq.co.za/ 25. OHCHR, Fact Sheet No33, Frequently Asked Questions on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, p. 13 and 16, accessible at https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/FactSheet33en.pdf 26. Times Live, Human Rights investigation into Eastern Cape Schools after girl drowns in pit toilet, March 2018, https://www.timeslive.co.za/news/south-africa/2018-03-16-human-rights-investigation-into-eastern-capeschools-after-girl-drowns-in-pit-toilet/ 27. South African Human Rights Commission, Annual Report 2016, accessible at: https://www.sahrc.org.za 28. South African Human Rights Commission, Annual Report 2017, accessible at: https://www.sahrc.org.za 29. Mail & Guardian, Eastern Cape joins 70 % performance club, 03.01.2019, https://mg.co.za/article/2019-01-03eastern-cape-joins-70-performance-club

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30. Business Day, Eastern Cape Schools are worst in SA for poor infrastructure, 25.05.2018, https://www.businesslive. co.za/bd/national/education/2018-05-25-eastern-cape-schools-are-worst-in-sa-for-poor-infrastructure/ 31. IHS Markit, Statistical Overview Eastern Cape Province, 2018, p. 59 32. Ibid, p. 61 33. RNews, Matric Results 2018: Eastern Cape’s ‘real’ pass rate is 31.3 % not 70.6% says DA, 04.01.2019, https://www. rnews.co.za/article/23121/matric-results-2018-eastern-capes-real-pass-rate-is-31-3-not-70-6-says-da 34. Youth Explorer, https://youthexplorer.org.za/profiles/province-EC-eastern-cape/, accessed in May 2019 35. ibid 36. Department of Higher Education and Training, Fact Sheet on “NEETs”, August 2018, p.6, accessible at: file:///C:/Users/PCZA/Documents/GSP%20documents%20and%20presentations/Strat%20Plan%20ECNGOC/ background%20information/WED%20Fact%20sheet%20on%20NEETs_Final_Version_29%20Aug%202018.pdf 37. RNews, Only 53 700 out the 870 000 Eastern Cape pre-schoolers enrolled at ECD centres, 11.04.2018, https:// www.rnews.co.za/article/19373/only-53-700-out-of-870-000-eastern-cape-pre-schoolers-enrolled-at-ecd-centres 38. OTP, presentation on “Progress on the Implementation of the National Development Plan”, 03.2017, p. 11 39. ibid, p. 12 40. Eastern Cape Vision 2030-Draft Provincial Development Plan, Eastern Cape Planning Commission, 11.06.2018, p.31 41. HSRC, HIV Impact Assessment Summary, July 2018, http://www.hsrc.ac.za/uploads/pageContent/9234/SABSSMV_ Impact_Assessment_Summary_ZA_ADS_cleared_PDFA4.pdf 42. Ibid. 43. OTP, presentation on “Progress on the Implementation of the National Development Plan”, 03.2017, p. 14 44. Environmental Analysis - Extract from ECSECC 2019/2020 Annual Performance Plan, p. 6 45. Treatment Action Campaign, State of Provincial Healthcare System- Spotlight on Eastern Cape, May 2018, https://tac.org.za/files/tac-eastern-cape-state-of-health-report-may-2018.pdf

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PHYSICAL ADDRESS Block C East London IDZ Science & Technology Park, Harbour Arterial Street, Sunnyridge POSTAL ADDRESS Postnet 227, Private Bag X9063, East London, 5200 Tel: 087 373 1082 / Fax: 086 622 4780 Email: info@ecngoc.co.za

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Eastern Cape NGO Coalition. Strategic Plan 2019-2024  

The Eastern Cape NGO Coalition (ECNGOC) is an umbrella organisation that represents more than 900 CBOs, NPOs and FBOs across all development...

Eastern Cape NGO Coalition. Strategic Plan 2019-2024  

The Eastern Cape NGO Coalition (ECNGOC) is an umbrella organisation that represents more than 900 CBOs, NPOs and FBOs across all development...

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