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WORKS DESIGN PORTFOLIO ARCHITECTURE | URBANISM | FLATWORKS

BY REID MULLIGAN


WORKS 2009 B.e.d. Texas a&M university

2011 m.arch University of houston

BY REID MULLIGAN


006

086

102

CONTENTS ARCHITECTURE

Buildings, Components, & Details

URBANISM

Research, Planning, & Visioning

FLATWORKS

Graphics, Photography, & Sketches


Blaffer Gallery

UH : Houston, TX : Fall 2010

008

Tensile trajectory

UH : Houston, TX : Spring 2010

024

Shakespeare in the suburbs

UH : Houston, TX : Fall 2009

040

HAwk watch tower

UH : Houston, TX : Fall 2010

052

Trinity Station

Texas A&M : Fort Worth, TX : Spring 2009

058

PSP internship

Work : Dallas, TX : Summer 2008-2010

070

l-House

Texas A&M : Llano, TX : Fall 2008

074

soho

Texas A&M : Phoenix, AZ : Fall 2007

080

Detail

Texas A&M : Tosu City, Japan : Fall 2007

082

3x3: Stair

Texas A&M : Component Study : Fall 2007

083

3x3: door

Texas A&M : Component Study : Fall 2007

084

3x3: balcony

Texas A&M : Component Study : Fall 2007

085

Soccer CitY

UH : Houston, TX : Fall 2010

088

SEED

UH : Port Arthur, TX : Spring 2010

094

Houston symphony poster

UH : Houston, TX : Spring 2010

104

designboom: green earth

Independent : Competition : Fall 2008

106

[re]act logo

Independent : Competition : Spring 2010

108

photography

Texas A&M : College Station, TX : Fall 2008

110

Sketches

Independent : Travels : 2007-2010

114


ARCHITECTURE Buildings, Components, & Details

p. 008-087


UH Campus | Houston, TX

Blaffer Gallery The Blaffer Gallery is a proposed addition to the Fine Arts Building at the University of Houston. An expansive program consisting of administrative and educational spaces, but primarily additional galleries for student artwork. The site is bordered by the Fine Arts Building, the Moores School of Music, and the Wortham Theater, effectively creating an arts district at the north edge of campus.

008

Architecture Blaffer Gallery

University of Houston


009 ARCHITECTURE Edge of Campus j Fall 2010

Architecture Blaffer Gallery


SCHOOL OF MUSIC

COURTYARD

BLAFFER

SCULPTURE

FINE ARTS BUILDING

ARCHITECTURE

010

N

CONCEPT A thorough analysis of site patterns such as paths, open spaces, and adjacent buildings revealed the importance of this courtyard-like space. The initial thought was to minimally disrupt the site by pressing the new addition against the Fine Arts Building to preserve pedestrian paths, maintain the natural flow through campus, and preserve the best green space on campus.

Wortham Theater

Moores School of Music

Sprawling Campus

Architecture Blaffer Gallery

Fine Arts Building & Blaffer Museum

Urban Front

Over the years, a building line has been maintained along the north end of campus but as one moves south the campus begins to sprawl and flatten out. This condition creates a peculiar transition across the disconnected campus. The design approach for the Blaffer Gallery was thus to create a coherent link between the urban edge and the suburban-like open space among south campus; a transition from hard to soft, public to institutional, parking to park. The resulting concept is to stack and shift the program so that it gradually steps down from north to south, establishing an assertive formal entry to the north then topped by galleries that descend to the scale of south campus.

College of Architecture

University of Houston


Process

Build

Downtown Hard Urban Public Parking

ing H

eight

Campus Soft Suburban Institutional Park

University of Houston

IAGALLERY

A

LOBBY

011

REST

LOUNGE GALLERY

ADMIN CAFE

SERVICES

Program Organization

Relationship to Fine Arts Building

Visual Continuity Fall 2010

Architecture Blaffer Gallery

ARCHITECTURE

ME ART EXHIBIT UD ITO D RIUM


West Elevation

B L A F F E R H O U S T O N

012

B

H O U S T O N

cafe

B L A F F E R

Section A Architecture Blaffer Gallery

University of Houston


Gallery Study |

013 ARCHITECTURE

C

Fall 2010

D

Architecture Blaffer Gallery


014

Lobby Architecture Blaffer Gallery

University of Houston


ADDRESSING THE urban EDGE

Fall 2010

Architecture Blaffer Gallery

015 ARCHITECTURE

During the time the Fine Arts Building was constructed, the adjacent street was used for services explaining why the building's back faces the road. As the campus plan evolved and new buildings were built along this street, it became the face of UH campus. The Blaffer is seen as an opportunity to create a formal entrance that the arts facility currently lacks. The design solution is a multilevel lobby enclosed in structural glazing, creating a clear and inviting entry to students and the general public. The space is accented by the underside of the auditorium slope with a small gallery that pokes through to give bystanders a small taste of art.


Gallery

EFAC

Cafe

Office

Corridor

Studio

016

Facade Concept Architecture Blaffer Gallery

University of Houston


The top level contains the media gallery, which sits atop the auditorium. A series of mezzanine galleries overlook the cinema space to engage users visually and audibly throughout the building.

A corridor runs between the auditorium and the main gallery providing a place to rest, socialize, and get a glimpse of art through the transparent display cases.

017 ARCHITECTURE

A student lounge sits next to the cafe on the first floor providing seating for students to eat and study as well as creating an engaging slope that ascends entrants in the lobby up into the art galleries. Fall 2010

Section B j Architecture Blaffer Gallery


018

Section C Architecture Blaffer Gallery

University of Houston


THE TUNNEL As the student lounge ascends into the gallery space, the underside of the tunnel spans across an existing path between the Fine Arts Building and the courtyard. The tunnel not only provides an interesting transition between the spaces but also emphasizes the strategy to maintain the natural pedestrian flow. The result is an exterior covered boulevard that provides visibility and access to highly public spaces like the cafĂŠ, bookstore, and ground level gallery.

019 ARCHITECTURE

Fall 2010

Architecture Blaffer Gallery


connecting to campus While the front of the building takes an aggressive stance to the city, the back modestly transitions back to the lower volumes of south campus. The approach was to use a sloping grassy hill that detaches from the green roof and declines to ground level. The hill provides a seamless transition between natural spaces and access to the roof garden at all times.

020

Section D Architecture Blaffer Gallery

University of Houston


021 ARCHITECTURE

Fall 2010

Architecture Blaffer Gallery


ROOF [DE]CONSTRUCTION The strategy for the roof was to use structure as a means for architectural intervention. The idea is a corrugated-like concrete form that subsequently provides cavities on the top and bottom surfaces. These cavities are prospective places for interior building systems like HVAC, natural and artificial lighting, water lines, and equipment as well as the exterior systems such as water collection, planters, and seating. The structural solution is a series of V-shaped precast concrete extrusions that span across the gallery spaces.

Architecture Blaffer Gallery

Equipment

Grass

HVAC

Seating

Artificial Lighting

Water Collection

Systems

Planting

Natural Lighting

022

University of Houston


023 ARCHITECTURE

Fall 2010

Architecture Blaffer Gallery


024

roofscapes The roofscapes establish a relationship between the roof gardens and the gallery spaces below. Striations of channeled glass fill in gaps between the V-shaped concrete extrusions providing natural lighting into the galleries during the day. Conversely, in the evening, galleries create an opposing effect with the artificial lighting glowing across the roof landscape. Architecture Blaffer Gallery

University of Houston


025 ARCHITECTURE

Fall 2010

Architecture Blaffer Gallery


Downtown | Houston, TX

Tensile Trajectory

hig

art

sd istr

ict

026

am eni ties

The challenge of this project was to design a public urban center dedicated to reconnecting people with their authentic selves, others, and nature. A comprehensive program consisting of spaces that encourage a connection with mind, body, social, and nature; the spaces were not meant to be discrete, but rather overlap, connect and be interdependent. Located in the heart of downtown Houston, the site’s adjacent corners comprise of Jones Hall for the Performing Arts, Philip Johnson’s renowned Pennzoil Place, and the soaring Chase Tower.

hw

ay

45

jones hall

chase tower

site

pub

lic

tra ns

it

pennzoil place

cap

st.

mil

am

st.

itol

Context Map Architecture Tensile Trajectory

University of Houston


027 ARCHITECTURE

Spring 2010

Architecture Tensile Trajectory


Shifting Floor Plates

028

Architecture Tensile Trajectory

University of Houston


+6 Plan

worship entry meditation garden +8

worship space

mind garden +7

library

yoga body garden +5

dance A

A

029

+4

ARCHITECTURE

spa pools body garden locker rooms +3

weight/spin body garden social garden treatment rooms

+2

ofďŹ ces retail social garden

+1

restaurant

A

+0

A

lobby entry plaza performance hall

-2

tunnel connection/ local vendors -1 Plan

Spring 2010

Architecture Tensile Trajectory


030

Floating Gardens Architecture Tensile Trajectory

University of Houston


031 ARCHITECTURE

Concept The small footprint of the vacant lot wedged between two midrise office buildings forces the building vertically, ideal for an urban intercession. The program is arranged vertically from social to body to mind, essentially from public to private, while the natural spaces are divided among the floors as extensions of their corresponding interior programs. Each level is shifted and twisted forming a continuous spiraling route through the building allowing for a procession from the bustling urban life of downtown to a collection of spaces where mind, body, and nature can interact. Spring 2010

Architecture Tensile Trajectory


PONDERTHINK WORSHIPDEVOTIONLIGHT CONTEMPLATEREFLECT PRAYER RELIGION RITUAL ASSEMBLEPRAISE MEDITATE GLORIFYBELIEVE

LEARNTEACH ENVIRONMENT LIBRARY STUDYFICTIONCLASS MIND STUDENTS LANDSCAPE TUNE GRADE SONG MUSIC ASK GRASSSOD REST MELODYRHYTHM EARTHHERBS

NOVEL INFORMATION

NOTESINQUIRE OUTDOORSGROWSOW

BOOKS

ECO TERRAIN

READ MAGAZINE

032

FEEL

PERFORM

WHIRLSWINGTAP HYDROTHERAPY WATCH LISTEN STEPSTRUTSWAY

SWIMH20 SITDANCE POOLS SPLASHWATERRELAXWADESPA FLOATBATHE

TERRACEFLOWERS LOCKER ROOMS TREESNATUREVINES

C B

COLDPLUNGEHOT GARDENSUNAIR

WEIGHTS

PUMPIRON FLEXSWEAT

WHEELS

C

PLANTSGREEN

B

BODY

EXERCISELIFTWORKOUTSPIN CYCLE SERVICECONFERENCE PEDALTRAINING

VOID WARM-UP OFFICES EXIT VESTIBULE PEDESTRIANS RESTAURANT ENTRY COMMONS WORKMEET HELPADMIN

EATDRINKORGANIC

BIKE

WAITHELLO MEETING PLACE

SOCIALIZE ASSEMBLY LOBBY AUDIENCE WELCOMEGREET PLAZA LIGHTSSTAGE SNACKBARSOCIALIZE LECTURES CAFEBISTROCOFFEEBREAK DESK HELP

THEATER

EATSTEAMUNCHGRUB

<<<<<<<<

PERFORMANCE INFRASTRUCTURE UNDERGROUND

Section A

CITYCONNECTIONDOWNTOWN ACTDRAMA STORAGESYSTEMSMECHANICAL TUNNEL

Architecture Tensile Trajectory

University of Houston


PONDERTHINK WORSHIPDEVOTIONLIGHT CONTEMPLATEREFLECT PRAYER RELIGION RITUAL ASSEMBLEPRAISE MEDITATE GLORIFYBELIEVE

LIBRARY LEARNTEACH ENVIRONMENT STUDYFICTIONCLASS MIND STUDENTS LANDSCAPE TUNE GRADE SONG MUSIC ASK GRASSSOD MELODYRHYTHM REST EARTHHERBS

NOVEL INFORMATION

NOTESINQUIRE OUTDOORSGROWSOW

READ MAGAZINE

ECO

BOOKS

TERRAIN

FEEL

PERFORM

WHIRLSWINGTAP HYDROTHERAPY WATCH LISTEN STEPSTRUTSWAY

POOLS

DANCE

SWIMH20 SIT FLOATBATHE SPLASHWATERRELAXWADESPA

TERRACEFLOWERS LOCKER ROOMS TREESNATUREVINES

COLDPLUNGEHOT GARDENSUNAIR

WEIGHTS

PLANTSGREEN WHEELS EXERCISELIFTWORKOUTSPIN CYCLE SERVICECONFERENCE PEDALTRAINING PUMPIRON FLEXSWEAT

BODY

VOID WARM-UP OFFICES EXIT VESTIBULE PEDESTRIANS RESTAURANT ENTRY COMMONS WORKMEET HELPADMIN

EATDRINKORGANIC

BIKE

WAITHELLO MEETING PLACE

THEATER

EATSTEAMUNCHGRUB

PERFORMANCE INFRASTRUCTURE UNDERGROUND

CITYCONNECTIONDOWNTOWN ACTDRAMA STORAGESYSTEMSMECHANICAL TUNNEL

Northeast Elevation Spring 2010

Architecture Tensile Trajectory

033 ARCHITECTURE

SOCIALIZE ASSEMBLY DESK HELP LOBBY AUDIENCE WELCOMEGREET PLAZA LIGHTSSTAGE SNACKBARSOCIALIZE LECTURES CAFEBISTROCOFFEEBREAK


034

Section B Architecture Tensile Trajectory

University of Houston


spatial relationships Rather than creating programmatic clusters that function independently the spaces begin to overlap and interface with one another. Music rooms spill into dance rooms, yoga rooms hover over the spa pools, and gardens float above one another. This continuous arrangement of spaces creates an expressionist trajectory that allows for the users to have a diverse range of experiences within a single space.

035 ARCHITECTURE

Spring 2010

Architecture Tensile Trajectory


036

Section C Architecture Tensile Trajectory

University of Houston


037 ARCHITECTURE Building Analysis Gardens | Structure | Skin Spring 2010

Architecture Tensile Trajectory


038

Vierendeel Truss system The structural system, a three dimensional Vierendeel structure, enables and liberates the spaces within the building. The steel system permits unencumbered spaces to be free of jumbled columns and allows the spaces to be architecturally defined and equipped for maximum dedicated performance. The Vierendeel structural system is essential to the shifting cantilevered green terraces that seemingly float over the streets of downtown. Architecture Tensile Trajectory

University of Houston


039 ARCHITECTURE Two-Way Vierendeel Truss System Spring 2010

Architecture Tensile Trajectory


Town & Country Mall | Houston, TX

Shakespeare in the Suburbs This project is a new theater for performing Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plays, essentially a modern twist on the renowned Globe Theater for the city of Houston. The site of the theater is challenged by a typical suburban location between the ubiquitous freeway and a New Urbanist shopping center. The concept for the theater was to create a place that embraces the automotive traffic to the west in balance with the pedestrian passage to the east.

040

Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs

University of Houston


041 ARCHITECTURE Freeway Frontage Road | Fall 2009

Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs


HC C

Context Map

042

I-10

S B U R B U S

8

& Y N R W T TOOUN C ALL M B

+++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++++ +++++ +++++++ +++ +++ +++ +++

+++ +++ +++ +++ +++++ +++++ +++++ +++++ +++ +++ +++ +++

Section A Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs

University of Houston


Concept Traditional | Redefined | Reorganized

parking

LOFT FRONT THEATER BACK ADMIN INFORMATION LOFT ISTRA PUBLIC THEATER TIVE

hotel

043

IN

lofts

ADMIN

ISTRA

N

RETAIL

C

Fall 2009

Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs

ARCHITECTURE

PU FORMATIO EATER TIVE BLIC TH


B

C

A

A

A

A

A

A

044

C

N

B Floor Plans Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs

University of Houston


A corridor below grade runs between the gallery and the stage providing convenient access for audience members to browse at art during intermission.

A dynamic bridge connects the lobby to the entrance of the theater, giving the users a chance to peak into the art galleries while crossing the bridge.

The gallery is placed below ground level displaying local art and theatrical exhibits regarding Shakespearian plays and history.

045 ARCHITECTURE Section B j Fall 2009

Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs


046

THE FACADES

<<

<<

Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs

01 Typically theaters have little or no transparency.

<<

Shakespeare’s work was progressive in its way of creatively addressing political, social, and economic issues that were considered taboo subjects at the time. Like his work, the concept for the theater was to reveal itself to the public through transparency and candor. To address the freeway, the façade acts as a figurative billboard that swoops and dives to reveal the theater space to passing traffic. The opposite façade addresses the shopping center by revealing the lobby, cafe and other public spaces to attract pedestrians and shoppers. During the day light shines in, the site becomes the backdrop, and pedestrians become extras. At night the theater lights shine out, revealing the theater’s energy to the public.

? 02 8’ Windows are placed around the perimeter for pedestrian viewing.

03 East facade peals up to reveal public spaces to pedestrians. Facade Concept University of Houston


047 ARCHITECTURE

>

EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

>

>

>

East Elevation NORTH ELEVATION

SECTION A-A

Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs

Fall 2009 SHAKESPERIAN


Corridors on either side of the stage link actors to dressing rooms as well as audience members to gallery spaces. After shows these corridors can act as interactive meeting spaces between actors and theatergoers.

Aisles running from the lobby flank the main stage and provide an informal place for the audience to watch plays or even act as secondary stages for the actors.

048

200â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Exploded Axon Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs

University of Houston


049 ARCHITECTURE Section C j Fall 2009

Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs


050

Exploded Axon Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs

University of Houston


051 ARCHITECTURE

THEATER EXPERIENCE Like the Globe, the theater has various seating types, both formal and informal. The formal seating is marked by two tiers of seating that align straight with the stage. Informal seating occurs above the corridors flanking the stage, where viewers are invited to stand and watch the play while creating a thrust-like stage experience. The corridors can also act as secondary stages for actors, giving interesting potential scenarios for the playwrights to work with. Beneath the corridors are hallways that direct actors to dressing rooms and the audience to art galleries during intermission. Fall 2009

Architecture Shakespeare in the Suburbs


Smith Point | Galveston, TX

Hawk Watch Tower

To birders the world over Galveston is one of the most important crossroads for North Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s migratory birds. On Smith Point in the Galveston Bay an undistinguished Hawk Watch Tower was badly beaten up during Hurricane Ike requiring a new structure. The functional requirements are limited needing only viewing platforms and information areas throughout the tower.

052

Architecture Hawk Watch Tower

University of Houston


B

B

B

A

A

+46'

+0' N

B

B

B

3

GALVESTON The Blaffer Gallery is a proposed addition to the Fine Arts Building at the University of Houston. An expansive program consisting of administrative and educational programs, but primarily additional gallery space for student artwork.

The site is bordered by the Fine Arts Building, the Moores School of Music, and the Wortham Theater, effectively creating an arts district at the north edge of campus.

2

HAWKS

The Blaffer Gallery is a proposed addition to the Fine Arts Building at the University of Houston. An expansive program consisting of administrative and educational programs, but primarily additional gallery space for student artwork.

The site is bordered by the Fine Arts Building, the Moores School of Music, and the Wortham Theater, effectively creating an arts district at the north edge of campus.

Elevations West | South | Fall 2010

Architecture Hawk Watch Tower

ARCHITECTURE

+28'

053


054

Galveston, TX

concept Birds from the mid-west and east coast of the U.S. and Canada are funneled across the skies as they make their way toward their feeding grounds each fall and spring. As the birds fly south for the winter they eventually reach Galveston Bay, where there is no obvious way to proceed without flying over open water. As a result, each fall hawks pile up and circle over the shore of Galveston Bay before summoning up courage to fly over open water. The idea for the project was to mimic this natural phenomenon by creating a continuous route that spirals around a central core, strategically manipulating circulation to articulate the massing of the tower. The trajectory creates a continuous linear arrangement of stairs, ramps, corridors, niches, viewing platforms, and seating to accentuate a feeling of movement. A central core made of steel houses an elevator for accessibility to the higher platforms and functions as the structure of the entire tower like a trunk of a tree. Architecture Hawk Watch Tower

University of Houston


03

055 ARCHITECTURE

02

GALVESTON addition to The Blaffer Gallery is a proposed the University of the Fine Arts Building at program consisting Houston. An expansive al programs, of administrative and education space for but primarily additional gallery student artwork.

*

Building, d by the Fine Arts The site is bordere of Music, and the the Moores School an arts effectively creating Wortham Theater, edge of campus. district at the north

HAWKS addition to The Blaffer Gallery is a proposed the University of the Fine Arts Building at program consisting Houston. An expansive l programs, of administrative and educationa space for but primarily additional gallery student artwork.

Building, d by the Fine Arts The site is bordere of Music, and the the Moores School an arts effectively creating Wortham Theater, edge of campus. district at the north

01

Section A | Fall 2010

Architecture Hawk Watch Tower


Inner Tube Scenarios

056

A Interactive Learning

B Seating

C Displaying

D Leaning

E Railing

Outer Tube Corten Steel Inner Tube Recycled Plastic

Architecture Hawk Watch Tower

University of Houston


057 ARCHITECTURE

migration patterns

TUBE WITHIN THE TUBE To combat the unavoidable natural disasters that are common in the Gulf, the steel structure of the tower is clad in Corten Steel to resist harsh natural conditions but also weather in its natural environment. In contrast to the rigid outer skin, the inner tube is made of a flexible plastic for organic and ergonomic interior scenarios such as seating, display, and interactive exhibitions. The inner-skin helps insulate the hot Texas sun as well as providing a dynamic interior environment. Fall 2010

Section B | Architecture Hawk Watch Tower


7th Street | Fort Worth, TX

Trinity Station Trinity Station is a transit hub for the city of Fort Worth that connects multiple forms of transportation and acts as a public node for the surrounding community. The architectural challenge for the project was to use concrete as the primary material and to explore its properties in an innovative manner. Partner: Ricardo Solar

058

Architecture Trinity Station

Texas A&M University


059 ARCHITECTURE 7th Street | Spring 2009

Architecture Trinity Station


PARKS

EDUCATION TRANSIT HUB

BUSINESS

TOURISM

CULTURE RETAIL RESIDENTIAL

060

CYCLE TRAM BUS

AUTO TRAIN

Site & context The transit hub seeked to efficiently organize various transit types while responding to its rich cultural surroundings. From Ando and Kahn’s gems in the museum district to the city’s largest natural park to the historic downtown, there was no shortage of cultural inspirations. The hub’s triangular form is derived from the intersection created by the streets surrounding the arts district. The resulting shape creates distinct facades to the urban life on 7th street and the natural space of the adjacent Trinity Park. Architecture Trinity Station

Texas A&M University


061 ARCHITECTURE Context Map Spring 2009

Architecture Trinity Station


BICYCLE STORAGE

AUTO DROP-OFF

PLAZA

ENTRANCE QUEUING

STREET CAR PLATFORM

COFFEE

RESTROOMS

RETAIL

VENDING

UNDERGROUND CONNECTION

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

Flow Diagram

FRANKENSTEIN BABY

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

FARE ZONE

062

LIGHT RAIL PLATFORM

Entrance & Fare Zone

Sky Bar

Mezzanine

Bicycle Ramp

Tunnel

Pedestrian Ramp

Light Rail Platform

CONCRETE RIBBON - CONTINUOUS FLOW & MOVEMENT

Section A Architecture Trinity Station

Texas A&M University


Plans Street Level | Roof Level

063

Roof Park

Staff Parking

Kiss & Ride

Bus Terminal

Underground Cafe Spring 2009

Architecture Trinity Station

ARCHITECTURE

N


064

Section B Architecture Trinity Station

Texas A&M University


passenger flow The design aimed for the integration of pedestrian paths with the transportation systems, such as bicycles, street cars, buses and a proposed commuter rail transformed from a preexisting freight rail. By positioning the transportation types vertically, pedestrians can navigate the hub with speed and ease through a series of ramps, escalators and elevators.

065 ARCHITECTURE

Spring 2009

Architecture Trinity Station


066

Section C Architecture Trinity Station

Texas A&M University


067 ARCHITECTURE

NTEGRATED TRANSPORT NETWORK: BUS AND CAR ROUTES

MODERN STREET CAR AND UNDERGROUND COMMUTER RAIL Grass Pods Skylight

Tessellating Concrete Slab Rethinking the Waffle Slab Spring 2009

Axon Roof Detail Architecture Trinity Station


068

Mezzanine Level Architecture Trinity Station

Texas A&M University


concrete roof The concept for the concrete roof was a redefinition of the traditional waffle slab. The rectilinear pattern of the waffle slab evolved into a stimulating tessellated honeycomb pattern. To further the function of the roof some of the coffers are punched through to allow for natural lighting into the station, while some are filled with earth to create grass pods. Collectively, these grass pods create an intimate green roof for walking paths and a natural space for the roof cafĂŠ.

069 ARCHITECTURE

Spring 2009

Architecture Trinity Station


Internship | Dallas, TX

Page Southerland Page

070

Mountainview Performance Hall Architecture Page Southerland Page

Internship


071 ARCHITECTURE Development Sketches Summer 2008-2010

Architecture Page Southerland Page


Lewisville Cultural Center - Lobby

072

EXPERience An opportunity to work with a professional architecture practice that involves architects, engineers and interior designers in house. A part of a team that designed the renovation to the Mountainview College Performance Hall, the Cultural Center for the City of Lewisville, and the Lewisville Police Station. Responsibilities: Design detailing and 3D modeling in Revit, AutoCAD, and SketchUp; generating plan and elevation schemes for schematic and design development phases, sketching schemes for trellis and skylight systems, and preparing presentations. Architecture Page Southerland Page

Before | Internship


Lewisville Cultural Center - Theater |

073 ARCHITECTURE

After Summer 2008-2010

Lobby | Architecture Page Southerland Page


Off the Grid | Llano, TX

L-House The objective of the dwelling for Llano, Texas was to diminish the ecological footprint commonly caused by home building by minimizing the size (1500 sq ft), using local materials, employing reusable energy techniques, and integrating outdoor spaces. The goal for the house was to not rely on grid systems for substantial parts of the year.

074

Architecture L-House

Texas A&M University


075 ARCHITECTURE

Fall 2008

Architecture L-House


roo Bed

076

eta Veg

ted

Ram

Stru

Roo

mB

ox

fs

Ea med

r th S

kin

e ctur

Exploded Axon Architecture L-House

Texas A&M University


B

B

B

A

A

N

B

B

B

077 ARCHITECTURE

Section A

Section B Fall 2008

Architecture L-House


078

Architecture L-House

Texas A&M University


079 ARCHITECTURE

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES L-House is structured with rammed earth walls to absorb heavy sunlight during the day and then release the heat at night. Some of the sustainable aspects of the house include a green roof that insulates the home and collects water for reuse, integrated solar arrays on the roof, passive cooling by utilizing prevailing winds across shorts structural bays, and passive heating through the use of a radiant slab, natural sunlight, and a wood furnace. Fall 2008

Architecture L-House


080

SOHO URBAN CONTEXT | PHOENIX, AZ An extensive study of the small office-home office and courtyard homes, the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus was on the relationship between interior and exterior spaces. The L-shape configuration allows for an open-plan interior that focuses the house inward to ensure privacy in an urban context. The courtyards and terraces become extensions of the interior spaces for natural lighting and ventilation. An important factor was the integration of a home office, accessed privately within the house and publicly through the use of an English patio.

Architecture SOHO

Texas A&M University


081

N

ARCHITECTURE

Fall 2007

Architecture SOHO


082

DETAIL ECOMS HOUSE | TOSU CITY, JAPAN The objective of this project was to extensively research the architectural details of an existing project. Analysis was shown through a detailed section, 30-60 axonometric drawing of the section, synthesized drawings, icon, and systems analysis of the building.

Form

Entry

Structure

Program

Circulation

Enclosure

Architect: Riken Yamamoto Project: Ecoms House Detail: Aluminum Lattice Framing

Architecture Detail

Texas A&M University


083 ARCHITECTURE

3X3: STAIR COMPONENT STUDY Rethink and redesign the designated architectural component. The Retractable Stair is designed for small residential spaces looking for more efficient use and flexibility. Its fusion of simple technologies, a hybrid of the garage door system and an attic ladder, allow the stairs to be easily withdrawn from a full extension to a compacted position beneath the landing. Its flexibility provides a more habitable and serviceable ground floor or can simply keep unwanted guests off the floors above.

Fall 2007

Architecture 3X3: Stair


084

3X3: DOOR COMPONENT STUDY Rethink and redesign the designated architectural component. The Spin & Slide Door is intended for storefronts in urban environments, like shops, clubs, small venues and offices. It regulates light, space, and air through its flexible movements: rotating and sliding. At its rotated position, the entrance is divided for in-and-out traffic and allows for natural air and light to pass through. Ball bearings are beneath rollers connected to the door, allowing the door to slide and embed within the adjoining walls to create a larger opening for greater traffic influx Architecture 3X3: Door

Texas A&M University


085 ARCHITECTURE

3X3: BALCONY COMPONENT STUDY Rethink and redesign the designated architectural component. Connect+Balcony is designed as a system of components not just a single balcony. The balconies are designed to network with each other, creating a unique way to interact and socialize. The system allows movement along a single unitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spaces (i.e. from living room to bedroom) as well as the opportunity to connect and share the balconies of neighboring units. The mechanics are based on the suspended tracks used by monorails.

Fall 2007

Architecture 3X3: Balcony


URBANISM RESEARCH, PLANNING, & VISIONING

p. 088-101


Thesis Proposal | Houston, TX

Soccer City

088

Urbanism Soccer City

The proposal for this thesis was to investigate sports venues and how they can act as a nucleus for urban regeneration and revitalization. How can a stadium become a functioning entity of the urban fabric where people can be seen every day of the week and not just on event days? How else can a stadium be utilized? The counter was for a venue that would be as flexible, adaptable, and permeable to planned events as to activities of daily urban life. A stadium that can maximize its potential over time, supporting sporting experiences, exhibitions, cultural, and social events in conjunction with day to day urban activity.

University of Houston


conditions Houston has already created enough spaces that are isolated from its surrounds. From freeways to malls to billboards to parking lots to big box stores, Houston is full of these ubiquitous conditions that tear holes in the city creating obscure, neglected, and disconnected spaces. East Downtown Houston is all too familiar with these types of circumstances and certainly needs no more. What sorts of opportunities lie within six vacant tracts of land in East Downtown?

089 URBANISM

con

6

06 CONCLUSION 84 WHAT IS STADIA? 90 THE CONCLUSION

PUTTING IT TOGETHER.

sion

SPORT IS...

SPORT IS...

PLAY

ORGANIC

Sport is inherent to human culture. “Through play, children grow. They learn how to use their muscles; they develop the ability to coordinate what they see with what they do; and they develop a sense of mastery over their bodies. Through play, children learn. They find out what the world is like and what they are like. They acquire new skills and learn the appropriate situations for using them. They ‘try out’ different aspects of life. Through play, children mature. They cope with complex and conflicting emotions by reenacting real life in play. They make ‘their lives more encompassable and endurable.”*

14

It is separated in space and time. Sport is uncertain and often the outcome is unpredictable. Not unlike art, the purest form of sport is fluid and unbound to convention. In addition to athleticism, sport requires imagination and creativity in order to develop a strategy or game plan. Although sport is often thought of as a tool for the body, the greatest athletes have an unwavering balance between body and mind.

RESEARCH

RESEARCH

15

RESEARCH

13

POLYSEMOUS ARCHITECTURE DISAMBIGUATING TYPICAL URBAN CONDITIONS There is a fundamental concept in linguistics that occurs when a word is judged to be polysemous, meaning there are multiple senses of the word whose meanings are related.* Various strategies can be applied to disambiguate this circumstance such as using contextual clues within the body of the text or looking at the words’ etymology, or meaning over time. However it’s vital to understand that there isn’t a singular template to resolve this matter, sometimes there is not enough substance in the context of the word, or as words become lost in etymology, what once was a useful distinction of meaning may no longer be so. The importance of this perplexity occurs in process of disambiguation in which the interpretation removes the obstacles to comprehension, clarification, and perhaps reveals the unexpected. The freeway, the parking lot, the vacant lot, and disconnected buildings are common examples of ambiguities seen throughout the city of Houston. Ubiquitous conditions that cause issues of void, disintegration, and fragmentation restraining potential urbanism. These components of the city are considered ambiguous not because they lack function or necessity, but due to the residual and undefined space they create. Not unlike polysemous words, these conditions contain possibilities beneath their surface and when understood within their context, origin, and temporal evolution a new clarity arrives. “The challenge arises from the possibility that beneath the surface of the normal or the familiar exists the strange or the unfamiliar; the possibility that what is considered normal must, by definition, include the abnormal.”*** Polysemic Architecture is not a course of examining the comprehensive nature of the term “architecture,” but investigating how it can elicit the atypical in the all too typical conditions found in the urban fabric. It’s understanding the multifaceted nature of architecture and the city in concurrence with its people, culture, economy, politics, and events. Polysemous Architecture embraces duality and contradiction, looks for real in the unreal, and merges ideal with the pragmatic.

WHAT IS SPORT? THE POLYSEMOUS NATURE OF SPORT

STADIA IS...

STADIA IS...

REJUVENATION

INFRASTRUCTURE

From the city and its constituents alike, there is rightful reluctance and restraint to build new sporting venues in the current economy. The city has protested new tax packages and, understandably since Houston already has the financial burden of the vacated Astrodome. Stadia should look for optimistic economies that can benefit the surrounding community to infuse a new life into abandoned and vacant spaces.

Fall 2010

What is sport?

Rather than creating space that disconnects the city, stadia can be public space that also acts as infrastructure for pedestrians, bikes, cars, and public transit. Issues: Obstruction and hindrance to traffic patterns, suburbanization. Goals: Repair disconnected paths, create new opportunistic connections

Issues: Cost, taxes Goals: Re-use of abandoned facilities and vacant land

88

In order to redefine a building typology, it’s imperative to understand the reason for its existence. Similar to architecture, it’s apparent that sport is a multifaceted subject that can be characterized and understood in many ways. Since ancient times, stadia have been places marked by celebration, competition, cult activities, and the evolution of sport.

* “Polysemy,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polysemy. ** Paul Lewis, Marc Tsurumaki, and David Lewis. Situation Normal--. (New York: Princeton Architectural, 1998), 4.

CONCLUSION

CONCLUSION

89

12

RESEARCH

Urbanism Soccer City


SPOrT

FAMILy

CONCerT

eXHIbITION

reLIANT STADIuM

MINuTe MAID

eVeNT TyPe

TOyOTA CeNTer

rOberTSON STADIuM

eVeNTS Per MONTH

090

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

38% 30% 49% 28% 62% 70% 51% 72% SPORT

FAMILY

CONCERT

EXHIBITION

MINUTE MAID

WeeK VS. WeeKeND

RELIANT STADIUM

EVENT TYPE

TOYOTA TOYOTA CENTER CENTER

ROBERTSON STADIUM

EVENTS PER MONTH

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

WHAT ELSE CAN STADIA DO FOR ITS CITIES?

A white elephant is an expression for a valuable possession of which its owner cannot dispose and whose cost (particularly cost of upkeep) is out of proportion to its usefulness or worth.* The city’s current dilemma of what to do with the vacant Astrodome is a prime example of this idiom. In recent years, venues have expanded to accommodate a wider variety of events but really only to provide for other types of events. There is so much more possibility to maximize these enormous structures. Can these places accommodate the city’s infrastructure, provide public facilities, or even protect the environment?

TOYOTA CENTER

MINUTE MAID BALLPARK

Architect: Populous Location: 501 Crawford St. Houston, TX Year: 1997 Surface: Grass Capactiy: 40,950 Cost: $250,000,000 Brief: The ballpark was Houston’s first retractableroofed stadium, protecting fans and athletes from Houston’s notoriously humid weather as did its predecessor, the Astrodome, but also allowing fans to enjoy outdoor baseball, the Houston Astros, during favorable weather.

ROBERTSON STADIUM

Architect: Harry D. Payne Location: 3874 Holman St. Houston, TX Year: 1941 Surface: Grass Capactiy: 32,000 Cost: $650,000 Brief: Robertson Stadium, is a multi-purpose stadium in Houston located on the campus of the University of Houston. It is the home of the Houston Cougars football and women’s soccer teams. The stadium also hosts home games for the Houston Dynamo of Major League Soccer, which began play in the 2006 season.

SITE

Architect: Populous Location: One Reliant Park Houston, TX Year: 2000 Surface: Grass Capactiy: 71,500

SITE

41

MASSING STUDY

MINUTE MAID BALLPARK

Architect: Populous Location: 501 Crawford St. Houston, TX Year: 1997 Surface: Grass Capactiy: 40,950 * Gensler, “TIRZ 15 Visioning Session.”

64

MASSING

ROBERTSON STADIUM

Architect: Harry D. Payne Location: 3874 Holman St. Houston, TX Year: 1941 University of Houston Surface: Grass Capactiy: 32,000 MASSING

65

HOuSTON SP

Architect: Populous/Morris Location: 1510 Polk St. Houston, TX Urbanism Soccer City Year: 2001 Surface: Multi-Purpose Capactiy: 19,000

RELIANT STADIUM

Architect: Populous Location: One Reliant Park Houston, TX Year: 2000 Surface: Grass Capactiy: 71,500 Cost: $352,000,000 Brief: The stadium is the home of the National Football League’s Houston Texans, the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, the Texas Bowl, host to many international soccer matches for the USA National Soccer Team and other events. The stadium served as the host facility for Super Bowl XXXVIII in 2004.

RELIANT STADIUM

* “White Elephant,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_elephant.

40

TOYOTA CENTER

Architect: Populous/Morris Location: 1510 Polk St. Houston, TX Year: 2001 Surface: Multi-Purpose Capactiy: 19,000 Cost: $202,000,000 Brief: The Toyota Center is an indoor arena located in downtown Houston, Texas. The arena is home to the Rockets of the National Basketball Association, the principal owners of the building, and the Aeros of the American Hockey League.

HOUSTON SPORTS VENUE ANALYSIS

STADIA USAGE

WEEK VS. WEEKEND

38% 30% 49% 28% 62% 70% 51% 72%


091 URBANISM

Fall 2010

Urbanism Soccer City


WHAT IS SPORT? PLAY ORGANIC INSTITUTION WELLBEING URBAN SPECTACLE UNIVERSAL

092

C U R N R IN

RESEARCH SITE

SITE CONSTRAINTS SITE ACCESSIBILITY FREEWAYS ACT AS BARRIERS LACK OF 24/7 ACTIVITY NO IDENTITY HIGH LAND COSTS UNEMPLOYMENT INSULATED LANDMARKS LAND VACANCIES TRAFFIC VOLUME INDUSTRIAL LAND

PROGRAM

TYPICAL USERS objective The intention was to recognize the typical technical and functional demands that stadium structures pose to the designer, but to focus on weaving the stadium fabric with the complex and subtle cultural and urbanistic conditions that define an ever-present context throughout Houston; to look for the unfamiliar in the familiar. This thesis was insistently referred to as a counter-proposal, not just against the intended scheme but to an entire building typology. Stadiums are in need of architectural intervention, to be looked at as an opportunity to rethink, redefine, and redesign how sports can resolve and reinvigorate issues in the urban environment. Urbanism Soccer City

CONDITIONS

SPECTATORS OPERATIONS PARTICIPANTS MEDIA ADMINISTRATION CIRCULATION SERVICES SITE

University of Houston

IN D M P P S D B P R

R

C A R A C IN E E


WHAT IS STADIA? CELEBRATION URBANISM RECREATION NATURE REJUVENATION INFRASTRUCTURE

SPORT

INTERESTING HISTORY DIVERSITY & CHARACTER MIXED-USE AMENITIES PEDESTRIAN ACTIVITY PATH CONNECTIONS (BIKE, CAR, & METRO) SOFTENING WITH TREES AND LANDSCAPING DEVELOPING UNDERUTILIZED SPACES BROADER APPEAL PUBLIC SPACE RELATIONSHIP WITH COMMUNITY

URBANISM

SITE OPPORTUNITIES

093

URBAN CULTURE ARCHITECTURE

SPORT

REDEFINED USERS COMMUNITY AMENITIES RECREATION ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT COMMERCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY ECOLOGY

Fall 2010

DYNAMO STADIUM URBAN CULTURE

STRATEGIES

ARCHITECTURE Urbanism Soccer City


Community Design | Port Arthur, TX

SEED Over the course of a group of five graduate students in partnership with the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Community Design Resource Center, studied the existing conditions in the West Port Arthur community as well as developing potential future strategies for community development and change, an idea we define as SEED. Partners: Jennifer King, Jay Taylor, Eimile Gavagan, & Jules Gianakos

094

Urbanism SEED

University of Houston


UR TH AR RT PO

URBANISM

84. conclusion 74. industry & job creation 64. transportation revitalization 46. open space opportunities 45. the vision 44. SWOT analysis

39. emissions 38. pipelines

37. hazards

36. transportation 35. county vs.. city land 34. land vacancies

32. parks 30. worship centers 29. income 28. education 27. amenities

26. housing tenure 24. household types 23. ethnicity 22. population 16. time lines & history 12. location & vicinity

Urbanism SEED Spring 2010

095 SW OT

WPA

LO CA LP AR KS 08. introduction

index

VISIONING KNOWING

Identity Icons


CORRIDORS

EDUCATION

WHERE ARE THE MAIN ARTERIES THAT CONNECT THE COMMUNITY?

GRADUATION RATES

SA VA NN AH

US

28

15

PR OC TE R

HO US TO N

KNOWING

TEXAS

N HE ITC ’S K LLY KE

PORT ARTHUR

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

10%

096

20%

W PORT ARTHUR

ML K

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATES

PU BL IC HO US ING

MALE

7T H

ST .

Upon first glance, education seems to be a non-issue in West Port Arthur as the level of male education surpasses that of both Port Arthur and the state of Texas. However, the concern stems from the gap between male and female education. At a 10% spread, West Port Arthur’s educational comparison when it comes to gender is an issue specific only to this community as the country, state and city levels show an equal level of education between the two genders. The issue in West Port Arthur is compounded when one takes into consideration that there are almost twice as many females as males living in poverty in West Port Arthur. These numbers lead one to the conclusion that there are underlying issues keeping females (a) in West Port Arthur and (b) out of educational facilities. Since this issue does not seem to be affecting males, childbearing at an early age seems the likely culprit.

GU LF WA Y

TH OM AS

FEMALE

+16%

PORT ARTHUR POPULATON (THOUSANDS)

70

-14%

60

-3%

+130%

50 40 30 20 10 0 CITY FOUNDATION

1900

1910

1920

WHITE FLIGHT

INFLUX OF AFRICAN AMERICANS

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010 Population Flux

Urbanism SEED

University of Houston


ASIAN ASIAN HISPANIC

HISPANIC

HISPANIC

WHITE BLACK WHITE

BLACK BLACK BLACK BLACK

097 URBANISM

HISPANIC HISPANIC

WHITE BLACK WHITE

ASIAN ASIAN

Port Arthur 1990

Port Arthur 2000

BLACK BLACK

WHITE WHITE

LACK

West Port Arthur 2000 knowing

128%

128%

31%

Diverse City | Segregated Communities Spring 2010

31%

The comprehensive project began with an analysis of the demographics, existing conditions, and opportunities in the community to identify both the community assets and constraints and as a means to develop broadbased design, community development and economic strategies that support and augment the existing social and cultural strengths of the community and its citizens. This report compiles the strategies developed for the West Port Arthur community which are focused in three areas: Mobility Connections, Open Spaces, and Community Opportunities. Urbanism SEED


Node | Kelley's Kitchen

098

visioning The strategies were all considered "SEEDS," programs that have the potential to begin small and grow into comprehensive and sustainable change in the community. For us, to SEED, was to address the social, economic, and ecological development challenges in communities and provide both pragmatic and visionary solutions. Community Opportunities seek to seed change, creating local employment and business opportunities, spaces to gather, and places of learning and fun, transforming West Port Arthur into a place of opportunity. Open Spaces strategies seek to turn vacancy into opportunity by proposing new uses and landscapes that together will provide job opportunities, improve access to healthy food, and mitigate soil and air quality hazards, while enhancing the spaces for community gathering. These spaces include community gardens and new solar energy fields. Urbanism SEED

Node | Keyhole Club | University of Houston


BLOCK STRATEGY VACANT LOTS

grow bags

community gardens

SURFACE TREATMENT demonstration garden

horseshoes

52

53 soil reclamation VISIONING

basketball courts

food carts

public art/murals

SHORT-TERM (QUICK FIX)

LONG TERM (PERMANENT)

099

ower planters

URBANISM

bike racks recycling node

EDGE TREATMENT

Open Space Opportunity Spring 2010

The Th e va vaca cant ca nt llot ott is ub ubiq iqui iq uito ui t us thr to h ou ough ghou gh outt Po ou Port rt Art Art rthu hurr hu th thus huss a nu um mbe er off lot lo ottsc scap ap pin ing g el e em emen ents are ents en re pro opo p se ed that th a var at ary y in i dur u at atio ion io n an and nd co cond n it nd itio io on sh show own ow n in n tthe he he g ap gr aph. h. Com h. ommu mu uni nity nity t g gar arde ar dens de ns pro ovi v de e acc cces esss to es fres fr essh pr e p od oduc uce uc e an nd pl plan ants ts as we ts wellll as ac acce ce cess ess s to sa sati atiisffyi y ng n llab ab bor o , ne neig ig ghb borrho ood d im mp pro ove ement me ent nt,, sse ens n e o com of mmu muniity and d con o ne nect ctio ct io on to the e env nvir i on ir nme m nt n. Th hey are e pub bliicl cly y fu unc n ti t on onin in ng in n ter erms ms of ow o ne ners rshi rs hip, p, p, ac cce ce ess ss ss, s, an and ma mana nag nage na ge e eme me ent n.

Street Art Urbanism SEED


SW OT

SWOT

THE VISION

STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES & THREATS

decreasing population increasing land vacancy

need for community gathering space solar farms/clean energy

44

lack of personal transportation few local amenities need for reliable public transportation

100

strong church community with resources connect people to places of work low income levels low employment rates need for local amenities movement for green jobs partnership with schools for job training

} } }

OPEN SPACE OPPORTUNITIES

GREEN JOBS

TRANSIT REVITALIZATION

COMMUNITY GATHERING FUTURE WPA

INDUSTRY & JOB CREATION

CONNECT HOMES TO WORK

TRANSIT REVITALIZATION

INDUSTRY & JOB CREATION

}} }}

lack of personal lack of personal transportation transportation

CHURCH BUS CHURCH ROUTES BUS ROUTES

few local amenities few local amenities

need for reliable needpublic for reliable public transportation transportation

45

OPEN SPACE OPPORTUNITIES

VISIONING

soil reclamation

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF WEST PORT ARTHUR?

STREET ARTSTREET ART

TRANSIT TRANSIT REVITALIZATION REVITALIZATION

NEW CITY BUS NEWROUTES CITY BUS ROUTES

strong church strong community church community with resources with resources

STOREFRONT STOREFRONT ART ART

connect people connect to people to places of work places of work

BUS STOP STRUCTURES BUS STOP STRUCTURES

BLOCK

BLOCK

Connecting WestConnecting Side Neighborhoods West Side Neighborhoods Procter St. Procter St.

COMMUNITYCOMMUNITY Connect West Side Connect to Downtown West Side to Downtown Gulfway St. Gulfway St.

CITY

CITY

Connect West Side Connect to East West Side Side to East Side Gulfway St. Gulfway St.

Transit Revitalization Strategy Urbanism SEED 01 ANALYSIS 01 ANALYSIS

02 CONCEPT 02 CONCEPT

03 STRATEGIES 03 STRATEGIES

of Houston 04University SITES 04 SITES


HOME REPAIR REFINERY SUPPORT CREDIT UNIONS REUSE WAREHOUSE CHURCH BUS ROUTES STREET ART NEW CITY BUS ROUTES STOREFRONT ART

CULTURAL

INSPIRED CREATIVITY SOFTENS HARDSCAPES VACANCY AWARENESS GREEN JOBS

101

SPECIALIZED TRAINING WORK

CO-OPS

RECYCLED MATERIALS

SELF-RESPONSIBILITY HOME REPAIR JOBS RELIABLE INCOME NEW BUS DRIVER JOBS SUSTAINABILITY

LOT IMPROVEMENTS

PARTNERSHIP WITH SCHOOLS

DILAPIDATED HOME REMOVAL EVENT ANNOUNCEMENTS EQUALITY

CONNECTIVITY

BUS STOP STRUCTURES

EMPOWERED COMMUNITY VOLUNTARY SERVICE ACCESS TO AMENITIES

Synthesis Spring 2010

Urbanism SEED

URBANISM

SOIL RECLAMATION

AIR/GROUND TOXIN REMOVAL

EDUCATION

JOB TRAINING CENTER

PLANTS & PRODUCE

DEVELOPMENT

MURALS+PUBLIC ART

INDUSTRY & JOB CREATION

COMMUNITY GARDENS

TRANSIT REVITALIZATION

SOLAR FARM

OPEN SPACE OPPORTUNITIES

ENVIRONMENTAL

CLEAN ENERGY


FLATWORKS GRAPHICS, PHOTOGRAPHY, & SKETCHES p. 104-115


104

HOUSTON SYMPHONY 2011 POSTER COMPETITION Awarded first place and will be used to promote a 2011 Houston Symphony competition. The purpose of the poster was to announce, attract, and promote the 2011 Young Artists Competition for the Houston Symphony. In addition to the poster, the design will be used on programs and invitations. The design was selected by a panel from the Houston Symphony staff and League volunteers.

Flatworks Houston Symphony

University of Houston


105 FLATWORKS

Spring 2010

Flatworks Houston Symphony


se a gr so eens nt in gs 106

DESIGNBOOM COMPETITION | GREEN EARTH Awarded top 100 of 3966 participants from 91 countries. Published on www.designboom.com The competition called for a graphic artwork that would make the holiday season a moment to consider what could be done to help the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s survival. Use of iconic Christmas motifs in the design, like reindeers, trees, etc., were encouraged by the jury members.

Flatworks Designboom

Independent


s ea gr so eens nt in gs

107 FLATWORKS Flip & Tumble Bags

Fall 2008

Flatworks Designboom


[re]act. [re]act. 108

[re]think. [re]design. [re]act.

[re]act. [re]act.

[re]act.

[RE]ACT

STUDENT ORGANIZATION LOGO

This logo was designed for group started by graduate students from UH. The organization is dedicated to providing experimental volunteer work to allow young architecture professionals to assume a social responsibility by responding to community problems through creative analysis and sustainable design solutions, then provoking dialogue amongst the community.

[re]act.

Flatworks [re}ACT

Independent


At the intersection of San Jacinto & Wheeler, Highway 59 slashes through the urban grid and spans an enormous space. In response to the programs adjacent to the site (the Consulate of Mexico, Fiesta Grocery Store, Mexican Institute, Sears, and Wheeler Metro Station), pedestrians inevitably pass through and utilize the existing underpass for shelter and shade. Even with unfavorable conditions, the underpass is populated with pedestrians seeking communal space. In response to this condition, food wagons and vendors are scattered throughout the area to feed these people idling between spaces. At the intersection of San Jacinto & Wheeler, Highway 59 slashes through the urban grid and spans an enormous space. In response to the programs adjacent to the site (the Consulate of Mexico, Fiesta Grocery Store, Mexican Institute, Sears, and Wheeler Metro Station), pedestrians inevitably pass through and utilize the existing underpass for shelter and shade. Even with unfavorable conditions, the underpass is populated with pedestrians seeking communal space. In response to this condition, food wagons and vendors are scattered throughout the area to feed these people idling between spaces. At the intersection of San Jacinto & Wheeler, Highway 59 slashes through the urban grid and spans an enormous space. In response to the programs adjacent to the site (the Consulate of Mexico, Fiesta Grocery Store, Mexican Institute, Sears, and Wheeler Metro Station), pedestrians inevitably pass through and utilize the existing underpass for shelter and shade. Even with unfavorable conditions, the underpass is populated with pedestrians seeking communal space. In response to this condition, food wagons and vendors are scattered throughout the area to feed these people idling between spaces. At the intersection of San Jacinto & Wheeler, Highway 59 slashes through the urban grid and spans an enormous space. In response to the programs adjacent to the site (the Consulate of Mexico, Fiesta Grocery Store, Mexican Institute, Sears, and Wheeler Metro Station), pedestrians inevitably pass through and utilize the existing underpass for shelter and shade. Even with unfavorable conditions, the underpass is populated with pedestrians seeking communal space. In response to this condition, food wagons and vendors are scattered throughout the area to feed these people idling between spaces. At the intersection of San Jacinto & Wheeler, Highway 59 slashes through the urban grid and spans an enormous space. In response to the programs adjacent to the site (the Consulate of Mexico, Fiesta Grocery Store, Mexican Institute, Sears, and Wheeler Metro Station), pedestrians inevitably pass through and utilize the existing underpass for shelter and shade. Even with unfavorable conditions, the underpass is populated with pedestrians seeking communal space. In response to this condition, food wagons and vendors are scattered throughout the area to feed these people idling between spaces. At the intersection of San Jacinto & Wheeler, Highway 59 slashes through the urban grid and spans an enormous space. In response to the programs adjacent to the site (the Consulate of Mexico, Fiesta Grocery Store, Mexican Institute, Sears, and Wheeler Metro Station), pedestrians inevitably pass through and utilize the existing underpass for shelter and shade. Even with unfavorable conditions, the underpass is populated with pedestrians seeking communal space. In response to this condition, food wagons and vendors are scattered throughout the area to feed these people idling between spaces. At the intersection of San Jacinto & Wheeler, Highway 59 slashes through the urban grid and spans an enormous space. In response to the programs adjacent to the site (the Consulate of Mexico, Fiesta Grocery Store, Mexican Institute, Sears, and Wheeler Metro Station), pedestrians inevitably pass through and utilize the existing underpass for shelter and shade. Even with unfavorable conditions, the underpass is populated with pedestrians seeking communal space. In response to this condition, food wagons and vendors are scattered throughout the area to feed these people idling between spaces. At the intersection of San Jacinto & Wheeler, Highway 59 slashes through the urban grid and spans an enormous space. In response to the programs adjacent to the site (the Consulate of Mexico, Fiesta Grocery Store, Mexican Institute, Sears, a n d W

[re]act.

[re]act.

[re]act. 109 FLATWORKS

[re]think. [re]design. [re]act.

[re]think. [re]design.

[re]act.

[re]act.

[re]act.

[re]act.

[re]act.

[re]think. [re]design. [re]act.

Spring 2010

Flatworks [re]ACT


110

PHOTOGRAPHY BLACK & WHITE FILM An exploration of black and white film by learning the basic techniques of film photography as well as processing, developing, and printing. The projects emphasized fundamentals such as lines, texture, saturation, high and low tones, compression, expansion, and rhythm.

Flatworks Photography

Texas A&M University


111 FLATWORKS

Fall 2008

Flatworks Photography


112

PHOTOGRAPHY COLOR A sample of photos taken throughout travels and free time.

Flatworks Photography

Independent


113 FLATWORKS

2007-2010

Flatworks Photography


114

SKETCHES VARIOUS MEDIUMS A sample of sketches done throughout travels and free time.

Flatworks Sketches

Independent


115 FLATWORKS

2007-2010

Flatworks Sketches


works  

working design portfolio

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