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January 15, 2016 Vol. 25 No. 12

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H USE that L VE built

Indiana Youth Group preparing to move to bigger facility

Brothers United on mission, Page 6 Gov. Holcomb inaugurated, Page 10 Mr. Indiana Leather chosen, Page 18

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IYG’s present home


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The Eagle

www.midwesteagle.com

TO THE READERS

Formerly The Word, est. 1991 Volume 25, Number 12 January 15, 2017 www.midwesteagle.com 1060 N. Capitol Ave., Suite E-325 Indianapolis, IN 46204 Main Office 317-632-8840 GENERAL INQUIRIES news@midwesteagle.com PUBLISHER Doran Omnimedia, LLC dj@doranomnimedia.com EDITOR Rick Sutton rick@midwesteagle.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR/DESIGNER John Lyle Belden john@midwesteagle.com PHOTOGRAPHER Tom Fleetwood TRAVEL EDITOR Rob McQuillan rob@gaycationmagazine.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Matt Mutchmore

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2017 is off to a fast start

n this edition, we proudly announce the coming Indiana Youth Group capital campaign. It’s one of the best causes in town. IYG turns 30 this year. Its mission is one of the most-noble in our community — serve and protect young LGBTQ folks in a safe environment. Their upcoming capital campaign is certain to catch fire in our community. The group purchased a foreclosed office building near 38th and Meridian in Indianapolis. It’s ground-zero for some of their most vulnerable populations: minority, transgender, queer and questioning youth who need answers, support and help. They have bene operating out of a ramshackle facility near the Indiana State Fairgrounds — it’s homey, but tight. They now offer programs for up to 1,600 kids in multiple settings and in many ways. It’s a badly-needed group, and their new home needs our help. It’ll take $2.6 million to purchase and rehab the new building. The story in this

FROM THE EDITOR

edition highlights the IYG board and staff hopes for the new facility, and you’ll have ample opportunities to chip in to finish the fund-raising. Elsewhere in this edition, there’s a story and pictures about the inauguration of Gov. Eric Holcomb, Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch and other state officials. They began their new duties just a few days ago. After a contentious election campaign, one in which they weren’t projected to win, Republicans seized on opportunities provided by the enormous Trump margin in Indiana. Holcomb outlined his hopes and goals at the inauguration ceremony, which was traditional in almost every sense. But the untraditional part of his Inaugural Weekend was purely Hoo-

AD SALES sales@wordpublications.press Ads & Classifieds 317-632-8840 National Advertising Representative: Rivendell Media 212-242-6863 DISTRIBUTION distribution@midwesteagle.com EVENTS Steve Leonard events@midwesteagle.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Krisztina Inskeep, Bill Malcolm, Chris Paulsen, Terri Schlichenmeyer, John Schneider and David Auten The Eagle is distributed free of charge to specific locations throughout the midwest.

Copyright ©2017 by Doran Omnimedia, LLC. All rights reserved. The Eagle is published the first and 15th day of every month. While every effort is made to ensure accuracy and fairness, the publisher assumes no responsibility for errors. Liability is limited to the cost of said ad. Ads not cancelled by published deadlines will be billed at agreed-upon price. Ads may be edited or rejected for content at the discretion of the publisher. All materials submitted to The Eagle are subject to the same terms applied to submissions of content. Those terms can be found at www.midwesteagle.com/terms.

About our cover These photos, provided by IYG, show the difference between the cozy Eastside house where local LGBTQ youth found a safe space, and its new digs in the heart of Indy, suitable to the organization’s expanding client base and mission. Corrections We strive to get the facts correct, but if we err, or even spell your name wrong, let us know as soon as possible at editor@midwesteagle.com. E

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sier — a free basketball shot-around at Hinkle Fieldhouse the day prior. It’s quintessential Indiana. A locally-written stage musical about the life and work of artist and sculptor Sandy Calder — featured in these pages last June — gets its full premiere this month. Regular contributor Sheila Kennedy opines about the loss of true customer service, and we’ll introduce you to the new board of directors of the Indy Rainbow Chamber of Commerce. All in this edition of The Eagle. In the Feb. 1 edition we’ll outline legislation that affects our community, pending at the Indiana General Assembly. Buckle up. Happy reading!

RICK SUTTON Editor The Eagle E


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The Eagle

NEWS

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IYG finds new home By RICK SUTTON Eagle Editor One of the Indianapolis LGBTQ community’s most precious assets, the Indiana Youth Group, has found a new home. IYG has purchased, and will renovate, an abandoned office building at 3733 N. Meridian Street. The property became IYG’s at a closing Dec. 30. The purchase price was $400,000. IYG plans a massive capital campaign – kicking off soon — to reach the $2.6 million total price tag. Campaigns chairs will be Krisztina and Ken Inskeep and Michael Overdorf. The organization has existed at its cramped East 46th Street location for many years — that property is now for sale. It’s a converted residence, which has served the organization well, but IYG’s programs now reach 1,600 attendees in over 30 programs. It is also a United Way agency. “We had to find more space,” said Buffy Adams, IYG’s director of development. “This (N. Meridian) property offers us everything we need for the future. It’s an exciting time.” The Meridian Street property was in a foreclosure auction. It sits on a vital transit corridor, which fits the organization’s needs. It also has a large side parcel available for outdoor activities and perhaps future expansion. The 15,000 square-foot building has three operational floors and a basement, which will

be heavily-used by the organization. The retrofit for IYG’s needs will be extensive — the current building has multiple corridors and small offices, typical of the 1970s building style. IYG will open up most floors for larger meeting space, and other features including: • commercial kitchen. Many evening activities involve food. Adams said IYG also hopes to provide some cooking and practical-needs classes for attendees. • large and small meeting room space. Some space will be allocated for public group meetings for a period of one-two years, until IYG needs the space. “That’s definitely going to happen,” Adams said. “We will need all the building’s space not too far into the future.” • full security systems. The organization serves many at-risk youths; any space allocated for public group meetings will be secured away from the youth space. • space for up to 40 parked cars. “We’re parking in the grass, next door, and anywhere at our current location.” Adams said. “This gives us a lot more room.” The full capital campaign will kick off soon. There will be multiple donor naming opportunities, Adams noted. “We’re still finalizing the exact details,” she said, “but it will be exciting.” She said the current total raised or pledged for the building is about $800,000 short of the goal. If all goes as planned, IYG could be operational in the new facility in as little as 12 months. E

Proposed site plan by Schmidt Associates for new IYG building at 3733 N. Meridian

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The Eagle

OPINION

www.midwesteagle.com

Good luck, Mr. Trump

...and keep Mike Pence out of your chair (and out of our hair)

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n a couple of days, Donald Trump walks onto the giant stage near the U.S. Capitol and takes the oath of office. Hoosiers have to wish him luck. Because his early departure for any reason gives us a toxic outcome: Mike Pence. This is not a plea to abandon your principles and support Mr. Trump blindly. It’s a loud scream for his continued good health because Mike Pence anywhere near the Oval Office is not an option we want to consider. His four years in the Indiana governor’s chair were

EAGLE EDITORIAL quite enough. It’s not just Mr. Pence’s blank-stareinto-space. He’s unfailingly polite, but then, most Hoosiers are. He tried to push a state-run news agency down our throats. He sent the state’s lawyers into battle three separate times to defend unconstitutional abortion bans, and the equally-unruly Marriage laws of our state. As a result, the U.S. District Court for Southern Indiana awarded his opponents’ lawyers millions in legal fees. They should’ve installed a revolving door on the Courthouse, because Pence’s theocracy-laden policies gave the state’s lawyers frequent-flyer miles in the (get

this) Birch Bayh Building. Mr. Pence also choked essential government services to their last breath — all in the name of building a state “budget surplus.” He had help on that one – former Gov. Mitch Daniels invented that maneuver because, you know, a Republican presidential run requires a governor to have a strong state budget balance, even a surplus. He also micro-managed his policies deep into crevices previously unvisited. He forbade any distribution of condoms at state-agency tables at public events. He allowed a shadow Department of Education to be established, all to thwart the authority of the state’s only elected Democrat, School Supt. Glenda Ritz. He fought against a federally-suggested

program of needle exchanges in highrisk counties where disease ran rampant, alongside record poverty and drug abuse. So, you see, when the rest of America watches the Trump swearing-in next week (if you can), most LGBTQ Hoosiers and our allies will shudder not at the thought of Pres. Trump., his Mexican Wall or his friendly Russian parlays. To be sure, we will watch Trump’s policy execution with a keen eye. He’s already back-pedaling furiously on multiple issues. But his tenure is four years, and we need it to last all four years. Because, you see — we know how the Presidential Succession Amendment works. And a presidential vacancy is the last thing we’d wish on fellow Americans. E

This is a place for ideas, not ideologues

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deologue: An adherent of an ideology, especially one who is uncompromising and dogmatic. Recently I had the distasteful experience of interacting with an ideologue, a young, inexperienced one at that. This person, who shall remain nameless, reacted to post made on our social media page and engaged in a conversation that can only be described as bullying. They took exception with the not only the content of the post but with labels attributed to the participants. They made claims of fact without any basis in truth or accuracy and, even when confronted with facts, resisted the acceptance of that truth. I encourage free expression of opinion and invite cerebral debate, but please have your facts straight before you decide to spout off – it will improve the credibility of your argument. There is nothing written in stone that we all have to agree all of the time; that is what is both exciting and refreshing when we engage with one another. However, if your only position is that you do not like or agree with something but cannot articulate the reasons for your disagreement with facts, then you’re just whining. The person I referenced above made the leap that, because of the post that was made, The Eagle was not really an Ally of the community. They did not post, email or pick of the phone to get more informa-

FROM THE PUBLISHER

tion about their concerns, nor did they take into account the 25-year history of this paper serving the community, good and bad, before they made that assertion. Fake news and clickbait stories are in the headlines because people click on and read them. We are in an age where we now make decisions or form our opinions based almost entirely on talking points

and sound bites. We have become lazy in our due diligence of the truth. It has become so much easier to post on social media rooted in how we feel about news, rather than take the time to do a little research and post our thoughts based on facts. In a way, I should thank this person for bringing to the forefront the importance of doing our journalistic homework before we put a story or comment out there as the truth – especially on social media. The wrong headline or controversial topic can be a double-edged sword. It can inspire intelligent debate in search of the truth, or it can unleash phony sanctimony to justify making attacking statements. We are

living in a brave new world of journalism and publishing, and it is our responsibility to make sure we get it right more often than not. It is clear that we still have a lot of work to do, but were getting better with each issue. Keep holding us accountable and challenging us, because, in the end, that is what will make us even better.

DJ Doran Owner, Doran Omnimedia

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EAGLE Opinions: A glossary

Opinion articles in The Eagle will always be labeled “Opinion” or with a columnist’s byline and contact info.

Look at the top of each page; if the colored band across the top of the page is red or says “Opinion”, that’s where we’ll place opinions. Yours, ours, others. If it’s the newspaper’s opinion, that will be clearly stated. Columnists write columns to generate discussion. As such, the opinions they express are their own.

You are welcome to send your opinions to us for potential publication. They can be sent to us at: snail mail 1060 N. Capitol, Suite E325, Stutz Building, Indianapolis 46204; email: editor@midwesteagle.com.

We reserve the right to edit submissions for space or other reasons, but rest assured, we won’t alter your written opinion. All submissions become our property, so we’ve got dibs if you become a Nobel author. E

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Twitter: @mweaglenews

OPINION

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The Eagle

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Fix my appliances, please

Or: ‘We’re experiencing a high call volume’

o politics today. Just some observations from a consumer, underlining the fact that – despite Americans’ reverence for “entrepreneurship” and the private sector – incompetence is just as prevalent there as elsewhere. Over the past week, I have had three experiences with service providers. Two of them could learn a lot from the third. Experience #1 was with the website of Thermador, a high-end manufacturer of kitchen appliances. My husband and I were in the market for a new range and refrigerator. Architects get discounts from some manufacturers – not large, but worth pursuing. In order to determine eligibility for the program, we were directed to the company’s website. What followed would have made a great comedy sketch. The form we were instructed to complete read: “Go to [URL] and click on the link for [X].” Except there was no such link. We called the company; held for a considerable amount of time because (cough) they were “experiencing unusual call volume.” It turned out that the link didn’t show up if you were using Firefox as your browser. We changed to Safari and clicked; it appeared. We were then told to enter additional information – except, again, there was no

A longtime LGBT ally in every meaningful way, she blogs at www.sheilakennedy.net.

Sheila Kennedy visible place to enter it. Another call. The woman who answered said their website only works correctly if you use Chrome as your browser. (And no, nothing on the page said that.) This is a national company. They manufacture pricey appliances, and could probably afford a competent web designer. Let’s just say I hope they pay more attention to their products than they do to their abysmal website. Experience #2 involved another appliance. Our dishwasher began making awful noises. We called Epic Appliance Repair, a service we had used once a few years ago; they said to expect the repairman between 2 and 4. I rearranged my schedule and waited. When no one had come by 4:30 – and no one had called to say there would be a delay – we called and were told it would be around 6 p.m. No apology. Six came and went. No repairman, no call. We called; the man who answered (again with no apology) said “let me check and get right back to you.” He

didn’t. After a half-hour, we called again. No apology for not calling back, and no explanation. “We’ll be there at nine in the morning.” Right. No one came at nine. Or ten. Or Eleven. No one answered their phone, and no one ever came or called. Needless to say, we called a different repair service – one that did come when they said. Experience #3 was refreshingly different. I wanted my outdoor cushions cleaned before putting them away for the winter, and my regular dry cleaners can’t do those. I went online, found a service called Fire Dawgs, and – through their very user-friendly website – requested a time the next day. (I really expected they wouldn’t be able to come on such short notice, but I was wrong.) Within half an hour, I had a call confirming the time and cost, followed by an email reiterating the information and price. Twenty minutes before the scheduled time, I got a text – and then a phone call – identifying the workman who was on his way, and giving me an estimate of how long it would take him to get from where he was to my house. He came promptly, cleaned the cushions, charged what I’d been quoted and left. I received an emailed receipt shortly after he left – and an email the next day thanking me for my patronage.

Contact us for details at editor@midwesteagle.com E

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Guess who I’ll use again? Guess who I won’t. I’ll admit that I am flabbergasted by #1 and #2. You would think, in this day and age, that large national companies would understand the importance of a user-friendly website that works properly on all browsers. You’d think a company purporting to provide a repair SERVICE would understand that people have lives, and need to be informed when a schedule cannot be met. (You’d also think they might apologize for failing to do so or let you know they weren’t ever coming.) You might also think they’d want positive reviews and maybe even repeat business – but evidently not. (Some of us do know how to post to Yelp.) Tell me again how competition guarantees that the private sector will always be superior to those ineffectual government workers… E Sheila Kennedy is Professor of Law and Policy in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis. (Quite a mouthful!) She is a Faculty Fellow with both the Center for Religion and American Culture in the School of Liberal Arts and the Tobias Center of the Kelley School of Business, and an adjunct professor of political science.


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OTHER VOICES

www.midwesteagle.com

BU mission important, ongoing

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or over 16 years, Brothers United Inc. has worked diligently to fulfill its mission of enhancing the health and wellness of our community, which includes sexual, gender and racial minorities, and the people who live and work in our neighborhoods. Brothers United is the only Black AIDS service/community-based organization in Indiana which specifically focuses on providing services to Black LGBTQ community members. Brothers United provides over 3,000 services each year and was recognized by the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors for outstanding linkage to care services, and was chosen as a national best practice for engaging and retaining Black MSM into care services. Brothers United’s Indy-area caseload has an HIV viral suppression rate of 71 percent and the organization has been a major community advocate, helping increase PrEP usage among Black men who have sex with men in Indianapolis. Brothers United’s commitment to improving the health of Indiana resi-

BROTHERS UNITED BU is dedicated to better health for minority communities, especially persons with HIV/AIDS

Kiwan R. Lawson dents though care services, particularly those living with HIV/AIDS, has never been greater. It has partnered with other AIDS service organizations and government entities, both locally and nationally, to provide technical support, strategic planning, and build alliances to help deliver premium care and support services. In December 2015, I was chosen by Brothers United Board of Directors to be Interim Executive Director. Since my hire, I have worked hard to rebrand the organization and made necessary changes to respect and protect client confidentiality, yet offer an all-inclusive space for all clients and community members to receive services and support. I have also worked closely with Terrell Parker, Program Director, to implement Brothers United’s 2017 strategic program design, which is inclusive of four ele-

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ments: Advocacy, Care Services, Prevention Services, and Support Services. New programs such as AIDS United’s Positive Organizing Project, and Sisters United (a trans and cisgender women program) emerged to target the most vulnerable community members in our neighborhood. In addition, because of Brothers United’s access to what the CDC declares as the most vulnerable population to be impacted by HIV/AIDS by 2021, all Black MSMs, Brothers United partnered with The Damien Center to offer PrEP education and services with a special focus on young Black MSM youth, ages 16-24. Ending the 2016 year, Brothers United hosted its annual World AIDS Day Celebration, in collaboration with Janssen Therapeutics, at the Marriott North

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Keystone at the Crossing with MSNBC Contributor and Washington Post Editor, Jonathan Capehart. The event was organized to accomplish two main objectives. The first was to survey the HIV/AIDS epidemic from an international perspective to a U.S. perspective, then highlight the achievements of Brothers United’s efforts to help end the epidemic. The second objective was to showcase the Ballroom program, “Red Ribbon Rumble,” which is mostly comprised of Black LGBTQ community members in Indianapolis. Without question, Brothers United has demonstrated its viability and legitimacy in the community. In 2017, Brothers United will continue to fulfil its mission of enhancing the health and wellness of our community, which includes sexual, gender, and racial minorities and the people who live and work in our neighborhoods. We cannot fulfill our mission without the community’s support. To make a contribution or volunteer, please call 317-931-0292 or go to www. brothersunitedinc.org. E


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OTHER VOICES

www.midwesteagle.com

Obama LGBTQ policies are on the line By REP. HANK JOHNSON JR. (D-Ga.) EDITOR’S NOTE: With a new Congress and President, and a far-right agenda, the next battleground for the LGBTQ community could very well be the policies enacted under Pres. Obama. In almost every federal department, equality policies have been in place for several years — by Executive Order. Rep. Johnson sounds this alarm:

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he GOP took a lot of flak this past week for its foolish attempt to use House rules to gut the Office of Congressional Ethics. Public scrutiny quickly sunk that effort, but another very dangerous rule change passed without much fanfare or media attention. As a result, House Republicans — with the backing of the incoming Trump administration — now have powerful tools to attack not just entire federal departments, but to go after individual

GUEST EDITORIAL federal workers as well. It’s called the Holman Rule, which was first used in 1876 and last used by Congress in 1983. It allows members on either side of the aisle to offer amendments to appropriations bills — which are often hundreds of pages long — in order to reduce the amount of money an agency receives, the number of employees an agency has, or the amount of money an individual federal employee can be paid. It’s alarming that members of Congress will now be able to engage in targeted witch hunts against entire departments or individual employees who happen to work on subjects that do not fit a representative’s values or agenda. The most obvious targets are Department of Energy climate scientists and State Department teams that work on gender equality issues — both of which

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have already been singled out by yet-tobe-sworn-in Trump administration. But the rule change can broadly apply to any program or individual civil servant. This means any federal employees — such as those who help monitor dangerous chemicals in the environment, patent examiners, those who administer vital health and food programs, federal student loan advisers — can be targeted. Reviving the Holman Rule is not just about finding waste. The author of the rule change clearly stated that members could cut the amount of money “that could be paid to an employee of the U.S. government.” This is not to say that House members would engage in such behavior, but even allowing for such powers in the legislative process, without any input from the agency or the targeted employee, is unacceptable. The federal workforce has undergone many cutbacks under both Republican and Democratic administrations. The

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fantastical myth that civil servants are somehow responsible for a ballooning “big government” is simply pretext for baseless political attacks on federal workers. Employees of the federal government work in every congressional district to keep our food, water and air safe for all Americans. We must take a stand to protect hard-working, diligent employees who now find themselves at risk of losing their jobs or suffering crippling pay cuts if a particular member of Congress or president decides to single him or her out. Members of our country’s federal workforce should not be turned into political pawns. E Johnson represents Georgia’s 4th Congressional District, which includes DeKalb County and the eastern edge of Atlanta.


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The Eagle

YOUR FINANCES

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Taxing question for same-sex spouses S ince same-sex marriage was legalized, the number of same-sex couples who play Tax Loophole Twister, like our straight peers, has increased. We’re heading into tax season and getting a hold of your accountant may be harder than the 2016 election. Here’s the most important question same-sex spouses should ask before filing taxes: Should we file “married and jointly” or “married and separately”? For most same-sex spouses, this question is new, the difference is considerable and the decision consequential. Here’s what you should know. Pros & Cons of Filing Jointly Considering the tax incentives offered to married couples, the government wants people married. (Up until recently, it just wanted the “right” people to be married.) First, there’s the marriage bonus. The marriage bonus happens when there’s income disparity between spouses. If

QUEER MONEY

Financial services professionals and partners in marriage and business; see www.DebtFreeGuys.com.

John Schneider & David Auten

it applies, the marriage bonus puts the average income of the couple in a lower tax bracket because of the lower income earner. Being married and filing jointly offers tax credits that may not apply if you’re married and filing separately. These credits include, but aren’t limited to: Credit for Child and Dependent Care, Earned Income Tax Credits and education credits, such as American Opportunity and Lifetime Learning Education Credits. Joint filers also have higher income thresholds for deductions, which means they can qualify for incentives while making more money. Credits and deductions lower the net

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total in taxes couples pay. Qualifying for them keeps more of your hard-earned money as income. Married life and taxes aren’t all roses, though. The con with married and filing jointly is the marriage penalty. Married couples without income disparity can be bumped into a higher tax bracket than when they filed as individuals or if they filed separately. Filing jointly poses a risk if your spouse has tax problems. If your spouse has tax liens or owes the government money, you may become responsible for their burdens. If you file separately, you’re shielded from such risks. Pros & Cons of Filing Separately Certain deductions that require a percentage of your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) are more easily achieved with the lower AGI from filing separately rather than jointly. For example: • Miscellaneous expenses that are more than 2 percent of your AGI may be

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deducted. • Emergency expenses over 10 percent of AGI may be deducted. • One of you may qualify to contribute the max for a Roth IRA, whereas jointly neither of you might qualify. However, you are off the hook for tax liabilities your spouse may have if you file separately. Doing so might shield certain assets from the government. Going solo isn’t a bed of roses, either. Filing separately lowers deductions for Traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA) contributions. While it’s good to invest in an IRA regardless, this reduces immediate benefits. Along with the other tax deductions and credits afforded to couples who file jointly, you can’t take the student loan interest or tuition deduction if you file separately. If this all sound confusing, that might be the point. Therefore, consult your tax professional. E


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NEWS

www.midwesteagle.com

Holcomb touts state’s progress By RICK SUTON Eagle Editor

Gov. Eric Holcomb takes the oath of office (top) on Jan. 9, but the day before, he enjoyed a more relaxed basketball shoot-around with friends and supporters in Butler University’s Hinkle Fieldhouse, Tom Fleetwood photos E

Indiana’s 51st governor, Republican Eric Holcomb, took his oath of office Jan. 9 at a tightly-scripted event at the Indiana State Fairgrounds. Holcomb praised former Govs. Mitch Daniels and Mike Pence — and omitted two-term former Gov. Evan Bayh, a Democrat, who was in attendance. He said he and his team want to take Indiana “to the next level.” Holcomb recalled ancestral Hoosier pioneers who forged a state from an untamed wilderness. “They built homes and communities, planted fields, constructed canals and roads to connect themselves to one another and to the new country,” he said, “and established laws to govern themselves to spark the opportunity for prosperity for all.” He also mentioned several Indiana pioneers – including Eli Lilly, Madam C.J. Walker, Gus Grissom and late Indianapolis Mayor Bill Hudnut – who blazed

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trails in their own ways. “All of these pioneers have in common are the…traits that have been part of our DNA for 200 years: self-reliance, grit, a can-do attitude, a sense of fairness, and a spirit of generosity,” Holcomb said. He added that Hoosiers are known for humility and touted the state’s economic gains in the last few years. He called Indiana a hotbed for technological development and said the state was in sound financial shape with a triple-A bond rating and nearly $2 billion in its rainy-day fund. “We’ve become national leaders in business growth, and we’ve been landing jobs and business relocations that — 10 or 12 years ago — were going to Austin or Boston or the Silicon Valley, practically anywhere but here. That’s no longer the case,” he said. “Today, Indiana has three times the high-tech job growth as the nation as a whole.” He mentioned innovation in Warsaw – the “Silicon Valley of orthopedics”— and Indiana’s position among the nation’s leaders in life sciences. E


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NEWS

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Queering Indy: A fresh approach to LGBTQ activities By RICK SUTTON Eagle Editor About two years ago, an enterprising licensed counselor got an idea to host varied activities for our community, and “Queering Indy” was born. Cassandra Avenatti wanted to “intentionally and radically create interest spaces that have never existed here before,” so she put her ear to the ground — and listened. As a result, there are multiple specialinterest groups meeting under the QI umbrella. Her work as a therapist in private practice gave her keen insight into the community’s voids —but others had ideas, too. “I was interested in impact to the com-

munity,” she said, “and effectiveness.” The QI name stretches across several areas now: • Queering Indy Happy Hour — a monthly mixer which moves locations; • Quake: A Showcase for Queer and Transgender Talent” is becoming a regular talent show, also moved to varying locations; • Queer Reader: Reading for Pleasure and Power, a book and discussion club with a queer/transgender focus, meets the third Sunday of each month at IndyReads on Massachusetts Avenue. Cambia York is a facilitator for this group; • MelaNation is a queer discussion group for people of color and their allies. It meets at General Public, a meeting space in Fountain Square. Michelle

Jordan helps facilitate this group; • A new queer self-defense group met for the first time on Jan. 8; more meetings are likely. • QI wants to offer a forum for bisexual folks as soon as possible. All the events are free and open to the public. Queering Indy was formed to help provide safe and informative meeting spaces for the community. Avenatti emphasized that the organization values its grassroots heritage. “We get program ideas from that base,” she said. “When we hear needs that aren’t being met, we try to find a way to do it in a safe and supportive environment. There was obviously a need. We’ve got about 800 Facebook friends and the

meetings are all well-attended.” In order to provide a semi-permanent home and to potentially apply for 501(c)3 Federal tax status, Queering Indy agreed to seek a grant from Indy Pride for those basic startup costs. Pride approved a $3,000 matching grant recently; the final details are being worked out now. Avenatti hopes to rent a storefront somewhere, to provide a more consistent meeting place for some of the activities. Avenatti said she’s “always looking for dynamic and committed humans for a specific area of involvement. I’d welcome that help.” Contact QI by email, queeringindy@ gmail.com, and Facebook.com/groups/ queeringindy. E

Photo provided

Indy Rainbow Chamber board members (from left) Janelle Keele, Andy Ward (Treasurer), Ashley Kistler (President), Emmanuel Merchiers (Board Chair and Membership Chair), Jeffrey Ramsey, Barbara Baird (Secretary), Eddie Beagles (Event Chair), Teddie Linder (Communications Chair) and Maureen Damer.

President unveils new focus for Chamber By BILL MALCOLM Eagle contributing writer INDIANAPOLIS — The new President of the Indy Rainbow Chamber, Ashley Kistler, and her communications director, Teddie Linder, unveiled their 2017 plans at the group’s Jan. 4 meeting. Also present was Andy Ward, the new treasurer. The meeting was held at the Hinge Bureau, a shared-office-space business at 719 Virginia Ave. Sarah Popkin has been hired as the new director of development, and will focus on attracting new members. A new membership level – sponsor – has been created to

attract corporate and other sponsors. The website is being totally redone. A new online directory has been added, showing the current membership roster. Going forward, the chamber will also focus on being a statewide LGBT organization. New chamber members include Horizon Bank. The Rainbow Chamber meets the first Wednesday of every month at 5:30 p.m., open to the public (you do not have to own a business to attend or to be a member). The next meeting, Feb. 1, will be at JP Parker Flowers, 801 S. Meridian. For more information, go to www. gayindynow.com. E E

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LGBT NEWS BRIEFS

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N.C. Gov. whines against ‘liberal media’

RALEIGH, N.C. (Dec. 30) — North Carolina’s outgoing Gov. Pat McCrory (R) blamed media and political pressure — especially from liberal groups — for thwarting a deal to repeal the law known as “the bathroom bill.” On the eve of his last day in office, McCrory discussed his state’s free fall after the controversy over House Bill 2. The law is best known for requiring transgender people to use restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificates in many public buildings. After the election, when it was clear he’d lost, McCrory called the General Assembly into special session to consider a repeal of the law, but a potential deal fell apart. “There is so much political pressure — primarily from the left — not to get an agreement,” he said in an Associated Press phone interview. He did not offer specifics for his claims. “There are a lot of people who like this conflict to be ongoing,” he added. “They’re raising money off of it. I was hoping for the best but not surprised that it broke down.” During the hastily-called and unprecedented Special Session, McCrory was accused of backing out on their promise. McCrory said he unsuccessfully tried three times in the past year to broker similar deals. He said he believes the issue will ultimately be decided in court. “My main message on this is frankly, the Justice Department under the Trump administration and the U.S. Supreme Court are really going to be the deciding factors for the nation, not just North Carolina, on what the definition of gender will be,” he said. The state law also excludes gender identity and sexual orientation from statewide antidiscrimination protections. E

Texas judge halts Obama pro-trans policy

NY Transit image

Gay couple part of new NYC subway art

NEW YORK ( Jan. 2) — It was just a matter of time. There’s a new mural of two men holding hands on the walls of a new subway station in New York City (pictured, above), and the subway system may soon put up more LGBTQ murals. “It was like winning the lottery,” Thor Stockman, 60, said of finding out that he and his husband of 3½ years, Patrick Kellogg, were going to be part of artist Vik Muniz’s “Perfect Strangers,” a series of life-size mosaic portraits of everyday New Yorkers gracing the walls of the new subway station at 72nd Street. The station on the city’s newest Second Avenue subway line opened Jan. 1. Muniz praised the transit system for its portrayal of everyday New Yorkers in the station murals — including the gay male couple. An expert in LGBTQ art history, Jonathan D. Katz, said he could find no other example of a permanent, non-political LGBTQ public artwork in New York City, and few anywhere in the country. A work like Muniz’s is long overdue in a city “ostensibly the epicenter of both the art world and the gay movement,” said Katz, director of the doctoral program in visual culture studies at the State University of New York-Buffalo and the former executive coordinator of the Larry Kramer Initiative for Lesbian and Gay Studies at Yale University. “What makes it a turning point is it isn’t gayness singled out and made the theme. On the contrary, the work naturalizes gayness within the fabric of the city, and in so doing, that’s actually an even more powerful message,” he said. E E

HOUSTON (Dec. 31) — A federal judge in Texas with a history of anti-LGBT rulings issued an order blocking the Obama administration from any enforcement of the Affordable Care Act to prohibit discrimination in health care against transgender people and women who have had abortions. In a 46-page decision, U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor, an appointee of George W. Bush, issued a preliminary injunction against the rule on the basis it violates the Administrative Procedure Act “by contradicting existing law and exceeding statutory authority” and likely violates the Religious Freedom Restoration Act as applied to the plaintiffs, who are religious-affiliated medical providers challenging the regulation. “The agency’s six-year delay in issuing the Rule strengthens the Court’s conclusion that the delay imposed by the injunction would work no significant harm on Defendants,” O’Connor writes. “The injunction would merely maintain the status quo — allowing HHS to prohibit sex discrimination in healthcare services as defined by Title IX and incorporated by Section 1557. If the Rule is invalid, it will be set aside in its entirety and the public interest will be served by the injunction. But even if the Rule is valid, the injunction will merely delay its implementation, pending final review on the merits.” O’Connor wrote that Congress couldn’t have meant to bar gender discrimination in the Affordable Care Act because lawmakers spelled out both “sex” and “gender identity” as protected classes in the Matthew Shepard & James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act and the Violence Against Women Act. E

Ailing Waters misses his can’t-miss party

BALTIMORE (Dec. 24) — “It’s a new concept in home entertainment — the host doesn’t show up.” Or so it goes with iconic filmmaker John Waters. He missed his own annual holiday party this year because he was in the hospital briefly for treatment of kidney stones. Waters’s annual bash is a coveted party invitation — guests get to mingle with Waters, who is known for cult films such as “Pink Flamingos” and “Female Trouble” and books such as “Shock Value” and “Crackpot.” He also just worked on “Hairspray Live!” airing on NBC, and a restored version of his 1970 film, “Multiple Maniacs,” released in movie theaters over the summer. But guests invited to Waters’s North Baltimore home for the party on Dec. 23 say they arrived to learn that the host wouldn’t be present. E

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Twitter image: Golden_Gaytime

Rose Parade float honors Orlando victims

LOS ANGELES ( Jan.1) — The 128th Tournament of Roses Parade float (above) that honored survivors and victims of the Pulse Nightclub massacre in Orlando was awarded the Lathrop K. Leishman Trophy for most-beautiful noncommercial float. The float was the entry of Los Angeles based AIDS Healthcare Foundation and was entitled “To Honor And Remember Orlando.” It was one of about 40 floats in this year’s parade. Three survivors of the June 12 shooting, which left 49 dead and at least 68 others injured, rode on the float along with Barbara Poma, co-owner of the nightclub, and Orlando Commissioner Patty Sheehan. Other riders — who had aided in Orlando’s healing and recovery — included HIV counselor Joel Morales, and Impulse Group Orlando’s Corey Lyons and Gustavo Marrero. A large white dove and 49 white stars covered in coconut hovered above a bed of 15,000 red roses. Everything on the float was made of or covered in flowers, seeds or plants, including the chairs and stools, which are covered in crushed parsley. During a stop on the parade route, live white doves were released from the float. E

Gay author releases new story collection

TORONTO (Dec. 31) — Renowned gay author David G. Hallman has released a collection of short stories, titled “Book Tales,” about living and loving as an openly gay man. “These stories revolve around the characters’ interactions with a piece of literature,” Hallman said. “The tales are emotionally engaging and intellectually stimulating, while exploring the joys and heartaches, ups and downs, of personal and social relationships.” Hallman had published a number of books on environmental and social ethics throughout his career, as well as a memoir, “August Farewell,” written after the loss of his long-time partner. He later authored a gay novel, “Searching for Gilead.” Along with “Book Tales,” Hallman’s books have earned him the coveted “Editor’s Choice” and “Rising Star” awards. “I’m so thrilled with the reception this book has already received,” Hallman said. “I find pure passion in connecting with readers who share my love of literature.” E E

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NEWS

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Center notes trends for Trans issues in 2017

PHILADELPHIA — Dr. Sherman Leis, founder of The Philadelphia Center for Transgender Surgery, one of the leading resources for transgender surgery and medical support in the United States, has released his annual list of the top 10 trends that will affect the transgender community in 2017. “While cultural and public support for the transgender community and its people has grown tremendously in the last year, there is still much more to be accomplished,” Leis said. “However, due to the changing political climate, there is an air of uncertainty among the transgender community and its advocates about the continuity and pace of this progression. That said, I remain optimistic and believe

the achievements we have made through 2017 will continue to move in the right direction.” Dr. Leis’ top 10 trends for 2017 are: 1. The Affordable Care Act (ACA/”Obamacare”) will be curtailed or eliminated, causing changes in health coverage for transgender people and others. 2. Discussion surrounding the priority of LGBTQ issues will rise. 3. Health insurance coverage for transgender people will peak, especially through government programs. 4. Corporations’ and non-profits’ role as advocates and supporters for transgender issues will increase. 5. The establishment healthcare com-

munity’s focus on transgender people who are minors will continue to expand. 6. 2017 will see major growth in the number of transgender surgeries scheduled, influenced by uncertainty regarding the future political climate in the U.S. 7. More high-profile figures will share their coming out as transgender stories, influencing cultural standards of acceptance. 8. There will be a continued reduction in the alarmingly high transgender suicide rate as awareness, education, institutional and societal acceptance, and transitioning increases and expands to create a more nurturing environment. 9. Transgender care will be more available, due to a continuing rise in

healthcare professionals being trained to practice transgender medicine, although it may become less affordable as government insurance programs are reduced. 10. The attitudes and environment prevalent in the United States will influence and effect global attitudes towards transgender people. The Philadelphia Center for Transgender Surgery is recognized as one of the leading facilities in the world, specializing in gender reassignment surgery, and founded by Dr. Leis to be a source of information and expertise in medical care for the transgender patient. It is located at 19 Montgomery Ave., Bala Cynwyd, Penn; phone 610-667-1888 or visit www. thetransgendercenter.com. E

Adamson keeps Council office The Indianapolis City-County Council re-elected its officers Jan. 9, including Vice President Zach Adamson. Adamson (D) and President Maggie Lewis (D) were unanimously reelected. Adamson is the only openly gay officeholder in Indiana. Also re-elected were Minority Leader Mike McQuillen (R) and Democratic Leader Monroe Gray. Adamson represents the eastside of Indianapolis, district 17. The district includes some of the city’s most-gentrified

and diverse neighborhoods, as well as industry, retail and office establishments. Adamson is the owner of Urban Designs Indy, a downtown hair salon. He and his husband, Christian Mosburg, are frequent attendees at neighborhood events. Adamson was re-elected to his council district seat by an overwhelming margin in 2015. Early last year, his council colleagues elected him vice president. His first election, in 2011, was for an at-large seat on the council. The Indiana legislature, in an unprecedented move, stripped the city of its at-large council representatives prior to the 2015 election in an attempt to shift the chamber to Republican control. It did not work. E

NC’s HB2 causes conference to relocate BALTIMORE ( Jan.3) — A national organization of business historians is protesting North Carolina’s controversial transgender law by moving the Business History Conference to Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. The conference, scheduled for April 2018, is expected to bring 350 guests and $120,000 in spending to Baltimore. The historians — who study the history of businesses and their role in society — have announced they would meet instead at the Embassy Suites by Hilton Baltimore Inner Harbor.

The meeting was originally planned to be held in Charlotte, N.C. The new North Carolina law blocks cities from approving protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities. Charlotte had adopted such an ordinance last year. HB2 also governs individuals’ restroom use; they may only use restrooms that correspond to the gender identified on their birth certificates. Conference organizers said they might have members that the law would affect. Rather than risk their members’ ire, the conference relocated to Maryland. E E

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COMMUNITY

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Mr. Indiana Leather 2017 chosen

Finalists in the Mr. Indiana Leather contest, held earlier this month at Gregs in downtown Indianapolis, are (from left) Damin Phillips, Nikolas Allen, winner Matthew Williams and Pockets. A number of leather/kink notables, including past Mr. Leather and Mr. 501 winners, were in attendance at the packed event.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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Artist’s life, work subject of musical INDIANAPOLIS – On Jan. 27, a different kind of “circus” comes to town. That will be the world premiere date of the full production of “Calder: The Musical,” a local project that has been building over the past year – much like a Calder mobile sculpture. Dustin Klein, an elementary music teacher at the Orchard School, was inspired by the book “Sandy’s Circus,” by Tanya Lee Stone, which tells the story of Alexander “Sandy” Calder, an artist whose work spanned both the sculptural and theatrical worlds. “I started with a play with kids,” Klein said in a story published in The Eagle (then The Word) in June, “but I thought we could make it more mainstream. We’ve added things in for everybody.” He worked with Tom Alvarez, a writer for Examiner.com (and past contributor to this paper) with a background in television and film. He was already a fan of Calder. “We see [this] as a way to reinforce this idea that art can inspire,” Alvarez said. “When you see [Calder’s] work, you can’t help but be happy.” He quoted Arthur Miller, who said that Calder wanted to create a “world without evil.” Klein was more taken by Calder’s sense of childlike whimsy than his art. “Now, I’m a bigger fan after I explored his work,” he said. “But when I went to the art museum, I would see the paintings and I’d skip the sculptures. What captured me about him was how theatrical [Calder’s work] was – the colors. Everything was very imaginative. I was always a kid at heart, so I was drawn to that.” Together, they fleshed out the play into “Calder: The Musical,” debuting a couple of its songs during an event to raise support for the project in March. In August, a one-act version of the musical premiered during the annual IndyFringe, and was the festival’s top-selling show. In constructing their production, Klein and Alvarez structured their work as they liked, due to the fact that biographicallybased musicals are a rarity. They explained that, while the musical tells the life story of Calder, they wanted to detail his work and “bring his art to life.” For example, a

Calder’s Circus

Whitney Museum photo

Alexander “Sandy” Calder (1898–1976) was an American sculptor known as the originator of the mobile, a type of moving sculpture made with delicately balanced or suspended shapes that move in response to touch or air currents. Calder’s monumental stationary sculptures are called stabiles. He also produced wire figures, which are like drawings made in space, and notably a miniature circus work that was performed by the artist. He was born in Lawnton, Penn.; both parents were artists and his grandfather made the popular statue of William Penn at Philadelphia’s City Hall. He started making artworks and jewelry in childhood, but studied mechanical engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey. He worked as an artist in New York, Paris and Connecticut before settling in France in 1963. His mobiles and giant stabiles are on display worldwide. From Wikipedia

Klein (left) and Alvarez

scene centers around “Calder’s Circus,” a performance art piece constructed and presented by Calder himself between the years 1926 and 1931. It focused on a collection of mechanical toys that represented the various classic circus characters and creatures. By pulling a string, blowing into a tube, or some other method, each piece would be moved to represent a piece of a larger production. As a sort of ringmaster, Calder took advantage of his training as a mechanical engineer to stage animal tricks, clown acts, and even a trapeze performance. To see how this and other aspects of Calder’s art and life are brought to the stage, see the musical, Friday through Sunday, Jan. 27-Feb. 12, at the IndyFringe Theatre, 719 E. St. Clair St., just east of the St. Clair/College/Massachusetts Ave. intersection. See the musical’s Facebook page at facebook.com/ wiiresandpliers or get tickets at www. indyfringe.org. E E

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT – THE BIG TO-DO

Powerful plays reflect on true events

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All in Indianapolis unless listed otherwise (For list of Sports events, see Page 40) - LGBTQ emphasis - Other

- Concert - Dance * Free (ticket might still be required)

- Museum

Mondays *- The DJ Doran Show live internet radio and podcast, broadcast live 6-8 p.m.; kwirradio.com Saturdays and Sundays *- Chris Gonzalez Gay & Lesbian Library, 429 East Vermont St., noon-6 p.m. (or by appointment during week); www.indypride.org/library

Rob Johansen portrays a man who is haunted by a note from someone he met when, as a teen, he found himself in Africa during an ethnic genocide, in “Dogs of Rwanda,” playing through Sunday at the Phoenix Theatre, 749 N. Park Ave. in downtown Indianapolis. There will be a Q&A talkback after each performance. Johansen also stars in “How to Use a Knife,” which also reflects on the 1994 Rwandan genocide, opening Jan. 19 at the Phoenix Theatre. See phoenixtheatre.org for info. Photo provided

ON STAGE

All in Indianapolis unless listed otherwise

Through Jan. 15 • “Dogs of Rwanda,” Phoenix Theatre, 749 N. Park Ave.; phoenixtheatre.org • “The Sound of Music,” Murat Theatre, Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre.com • “On Broadway” Cabaret, Carmel Community Players, 14299 Clay Terrace Blvd., Suite 140; www.carmelplayers.org Through Jan. 22 • Hoosier Playwright Month: “Puppet Man” and “Clutter,” Theatre on the Square, 627 Massachusetts Ave.; www.tots.org Through Jan. 29 • “Shear Madness,” Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre, 9301 N. Michigan Road; www.beefandboards.com • “Little Shop of Horrors,” Footlite Musicals, 1847 N. Alabama St.; www.footlite.org Through Feb. 4 • “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?” Indiana Repertory Theatre, 140 W. Washington St.; www.irtlive.com Jan. 19-Feb. 12 • “How to Use a Knife,” Phoenix Theatre, 749 N. Park Ave.; phoenixtheatre.org Jan. 27-Feb. 12 • “It Shoulda Been You,” Actors Theatre of Indiana, The Studio Theater, 4 Center Green, Carmel; www.atistage.org • “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown,” Buck Creek Players, 11150 Southeastern Ave.; www.buckcreekplayers.com • “Calder, The Musical,” IndyFringe Theatre, 719 E. St. Clair; www.indyfringe.org • “Dancing Lessons,” Theatre on the Square, 627 Massachusetts Ave.; www.tots.org Jan. 28-Feb. 26 • “The Cay,” Indiana Repertory Theatre, 140 W. Washington St.; www.irtlive.com Feb. 2-March 26 • “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre, 9301 N. Michigan Road; www.beefandboards.com Feb. 3-18 • Neil Simon’s “Rumors,” Booth Tarkington Civic Theatre, The Center for the Performing Arts, 3 Center Green, Suite 300, Carmel; civictheatre.org

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Jan. 15 *- Classical Concerts at Central with members of Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St.; www.indypl.org - MLK Community Day (free admission with donation of non-perishable food, toiletries or school supplies for Martin Luther King Community Center), Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 N. Michigan Road; www.imamuseum.org Jan. 16 *- Martin Luther King Jr. Day activities, Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers; www. connerprairie.org *- Martin Luther King Jr. Day activities, Indiana History Center, 450 W. Ohio St.; www.indianahistory.org Jan. 18-22 - Disney on Ice, Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St.; bankerslifefieldhouse.com Jan. 18 - G Love and Special Sauce, The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave.; www.thevogue.com Jan. 19-22 - Indianapolis Winter Magic Festival, IndyFringe Theatre, 719 E. St. Clair; www.indyfringe.org Jan. 19 *- IndyPride monthly mixer, Shoefly Public House, 122 E. 22nd St.; www.indypride.org Jan. 20-21 - Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra: “Song of the Earth” and “The Four Seasons,” Hilbert Circle Theatre, Monument Circle; www.indianapolissymphony.org Jan. 20-29 - Indianapolis Home Show, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St.; www.indianastatefair. com/event/, indianapolishomeshow.com Jan. 20 - “Times Have Changed,” Cabaret at the Columbia Club, 121 Monument Circle, Suite 516; www.thecabaret.org - The Wailers, The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave.; www.thevogue.com - Prague Philharmonia Orchestra, Palladium, Center for the Performing Arts, Carmel; thecenterpresents.org Jan. 21-22 - Fantastic Food Fest, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St.; www.indianastatefair.com/ event/, www.fantasticfoodfest.com Jan. 21 - Hogeye Navvy and Irish Arts Academy of Indianapolis, Indy Folk Series, 615 W. 43rd St.; www.indyfolkseries.org - Swordbeach, Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre.com - Thunderstruck (AC/DC tribute), The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave.; www.thevogue.com - 101 Years of Broadway, Palladium, Center for the Performing Arts, Carmel; thecenterpresents.org Jan. 22 *- Hot Jazz for Cool Kids featuring Rob Dixon Quartet, Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St.; www.indypl.org - Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra: Music of the Earth, Palladium, Center for the Performing Arts, Carmel; thecenterpresents.org Jan. 24 - Jazz Violinist Joel Smirnoff, Indiana Landmarks Center, 1201 Central Ave.; www.violin.org Jan. 26 - Sharing Hoosier History through Stories: Over There and Back Again by Sharon Kirk Clifton, Indiana History Center, 450 W. Ohio St.; www.indianahistory.org, storytellingarts.org - Jim Jeffries (standup), Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre.com - Badfish (Sublime tribute), The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave.; www.thevogue.com Jan. 27-28 - Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra: “The Firebird,” Hilbert Circle Theatre, Monument Circle; www.indianapolissymphony.org - The Texas Tenors, Palladium, Center for the Performing Arts, Carmel; thecenterpresents.org Jan. 27 - Storytelling Arts: “Over There and Back Again” by Sharon Kirk Clifton, Indiana History Center, 450 W. Ohio St.; www.indianahistory.org, storytellingarts.org - God Save the Queen (Queen tribute), The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave.; www.thevogue.com Jan. 28 - Naptown Roller Girls, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St.; www.indianastatefair.com/ event/, www.naptownrollergirls.com - Led Zeppelin 2 (tribute), Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre.com

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EVENTS CALENDAR

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“Finding Dory” is part of the Disney on Ice show, “Follow Your Heart,” Jan.18-22 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in downtown Indianapolis. - Riot: A Comedy Variety Show, Theatre on the Square, 627 Massachusetts Ave.; www.tots.org - Saved by the ‘90s, The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave.; www.thevogue.com Jan. 29 - Drew Petersen (2017 American Pianists Awards finalist), Indiana History Center, 450 W. Ohio St.; www.indianahistory.org or www.americanpianists.org - Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra with Enchantment Theatre Company, “The Firebird,” Hilbert Circle Theatre, Monument Circle; www.indianapolissymphony.org - Dancing With the Stars: Live! Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre. com - Hoka, Old National Centre (Egyptian Room), 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre.com Jan. 31 *- 29th Annual Meet the Artists Exhibit opens (through March 26), Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St.; www.indypl.org Feb. 1 - Datsik, Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre.com Feb. 2-4 - Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra: Rachmaninoff’s Paganini Rhapsody, Hilbert Circle Theatre, Monument Circle; www.indianapolissymphony.org Feb. 2 - That 1 Guy, Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect, www.futureshock.net

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Disney photo

Feb. 3-5 - Woodworking Show, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St.; indianastatefair.com/event/ Feb. 3 *- IDADA First Friday, various downtown galleries; www.visitindy.com/indianapolis-events-idadafirst-friday - Under the Streetlamp, Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave.; cloweshall.com - Chris D’Elia (standup), Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre.com - Third Annual Buckaroo Bash, Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect, www.futureshock.net - Sara Evans, Palladium, Center for the Performing Arts, Carmel; thecenterpresents.org Feb. 4-5 - Great Train Show, Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St.; www.indianastatefair.com/event/ Feb. 4 - The Chocolate Slide opens (through April 23), Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, 3000 N. Meridian St.; www.childrensmuseum.org - Chippendales, Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey; www.oldnationalcentre.com - The Cadillac Three, Old National Centre (Deluxe), 502 N. New Jersey; oldnationalcentre.com - ICON Live: Bob Marley, The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave.; www.thevogue.com - Five Irish Tenors, Palladium, Center for the Performing Arts, Carmel; thecenterpresents.org Feb. 5 - “Going...Going...Gone!” Theatre on the Square, 627 Massachusetts Ave.; www.tots.org

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT – BOOKS

Imperfect book about an imperfect marriage

T

he flowers were a very nice touch. They greeted you from the kitchen counter just as you got home, and were followed by a romantic dinner, candlelight conversation, and a quiet evening at home. It was a gift from your spouse, who often has many surprises for you. But, as in the new book “The Gay Preacher’s Wife” by Lydia Meredith, some surprises aren’t so welcome. Born into a large southern family, Lydia Meredith had a “strict Christian upbringing” that kept her somewhat sheltered until she went to college. Her first year at Vanderbilt, she says, was “a real culture shock,” in part because she’d had little experience with dating and no experience with sex. That changed at college, and so did Meredith. Gone was the scared little mouse, replaced by a confident young woman who landed a high-paying job, bought her own home, and dealt with racism in the workplace. It was a good life but Meredith was lonely, and she prayed to God for someone to love.

THE BOOKWORM SEZ

“The Gay Preacher’s Wife” By Lydia Meredith

Wisconsin-based Schlichenmeyer is a nationally-published book reviewer; like “The Bookworm Sez” on FaceBook.

Terri Schlichenmeyer God, she says, told her that Dennis Meredith would be her husband. That was an odd notion, since Meredith had had little contact with her church’s youth pastor. He was a charismatic preacher and she wasn’t sure she liked the way he spoke from the pulpit. She’d barely even acknowledged that he existed but from then on, she says, “I could not take my… mind off this man…” She was not, therefore, surprised when Dennis asked her out. Their romance was not without its problems. Meredith says he was not her type, that she wanted someone to whom she could “marry up.” She didn’t want to be a preacher’s wife like the “miserable” First Lady of her childhood church. Still, Mer-

Publisher: Gallery Books, 2016 Price: $16 Length: 244 pages

edith married Dennis, settled down, and things got better before they got worse. Shortly after their third son started school, Meredith began “to see some changes in Dennis… but I couldn’t put my finger on it.” He seemed preoccupied, and she blamed their harried life until she found a gay porn video and Den-

Central Indiana resident and former film writer and actor Karl J. Niemiec is donating a portion of proceeds from sales of these books in paperback or Kindle book at Amazon, http://amzn.to/karlniemiec, to Indiana Youth Group, which supports local LGBTQ , ages 12-20. E

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nis admitted to Meredith that he was bisexual, maybe gay. He was sleeping with men – lots of them – and Meredith began practicing “denial, suppression, and avoidance!” Until she couldn’t any longer… There’s a really good story inside “The Gay Preacher’s Wife.” Somewhere. Author Lydia Meredith goes off-topic so often that readers will need to be light on their toes, so to speak. When her (not altogether unusual) story is told chronologically, it’s very good – Meredith can be outraged and outrageous, all in the same paragraph – but random, seemingly irrelevant bits found between those linear parts can ruin the mood imparted. Worse, it takes a minute to get back into the spirit of what was being said, somewhat like trying to make sense of three simultaneous TV shows. Which leads to this: there’s a lot of drama in this book, which is tiresome. If you can overlook all that, you’ll like “The Gay Preacher’s Wife.” If not, well, you won’t want to touch it. E


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SPORTS

TOURNEY BOUND

Trevor Cox Open Singles and Doubles

Jess LaNore D Singles

These IndyTennis members qualified for the GLTA Year End Championships in February at the new USTA complex in Lake Nona, Fla. Indy will be represented in every division.

Andre Hines A Doubles

Rodney Graff D Singles

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SPORTS CALENDAR

Professional teams playing in Indianapolis: • Indiana Pacers (NBA), Bankers Life Fieldhouse, pacers.com, bankerslifefieldhouse.com • Indy Fuel (ECHL), Indiana Farmers Coliseum, State Fairgrounds, www.indyfuelhockey.com Off-season: • Indiana Fever (WNBA), Bankers Life Fieldhouse, fever.wnba.com • Indianapolis Colts (NFL), Lucas Oil Stadium, www.colts.com • Indianapolis Indians (Minor League Baseball), Victory Field, indyindians.com • Indy Eleven (MLS), Michael A. Carroll Stadium, IUPUI, www.indyeleven.com Jan. 16 • Pacers vs. New Orleans Pelicans Jan. 20 • Indy Fuel vs. Toledo Walleye Jan. 21 • Indy Fuel vs. Cincinnati Cyclones Jan. 22 • Indy Fuel vs. Cincinnati Cyclones Jan. 23 • Pacers vs. New York Knicks

Dan Fox B Doubles

Jan. 27 • Indy Fuel vs. Rapid City Rush • Pacers vs. Sacramento Kings Jan. 28 • Indy Fuel vs. Quad City Mallards Jan. 29 • Indy Fuel vs. Quad City Mallards • Pacers vs. Houston Rockets

LGBTQ SUPERFAN WANTED: Local athletics enthusiast needed to help cover area “queer sports” - contact editor@midwesteagle.com

Tyson Smith C Singles Composite image provided by IndyTennis; indytennis.com

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TRAVEL

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Views of Vietnam

Story and photos by MEG TEN EYCK

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s a travel journalist, I’ve done a lot of pretty amazing things: I’ve worked as an elephant ecovolunteer, I’ve learned to cook traditional cuisine in a Thai kitchen, I’ve hiked 40 consecutive miles of the John Muir Trail — I’ve even white water rafted in a Dominican rain forest. Yet nothing compares to my time motorbiking through Northern Vietnam. This past December, my friend Julia and I rented motorbikes in Hanoi. Julia had never ridden a bike before but agreed with a bit of coaxing. Julia is 24 going on 76. She researched safety laws, traffic codes and licensure bylaws before reluc-

tantly agreeing, though I insisted that we’d live to tell the tale. I’m older but still play the rebel. I’m the “YOLO yelling” rule-breaker to

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Julia’s color-coded Excel documents. Despite our personality differences, we were both nervous about mechanical issues and getting lost. I’m not your stereotypical lesbian; I can’t even build IKEA shelves. If we broke down, we were screwed. To ease some of our nerves about the ride, we decided to hire a guide to serve as a mechanic and opted for automatic bikes. After arriving late, we spent our first night wandering aimlessly around the narrow side streets of Hanoi. The next morning, we got up two hours early and waited on the stoop of Flamingo Travel. Once the shop opened, we met our tour guide, Johnny, a native Vietnamese man in his 30s. With the inner calm of a

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professional, he helped us get fitted with motorcycle jackets and helmets while Julia pretended like she knew what she was doing. I had ridden a motorbike before, but not since middle school in my grandmother’s backyard. I acted like an old pro until the first time I revved my engine on accident. On the inside I was mentally repeating, “Be cool, be cool. This was your idea...” I was an anxious wreck when Johnny told us we’d be taking the highway out of the city of Hanoi. Once we got started, it ended up being a smooth ride. We adjusted quickly, following the flow of traffic. As we got outside the city, we settled


Twitter: @mweaglenews

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TRAVEL

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Meg Ten Eyck is a former LGBT rights activist, currently living in South Korea and traveling the world with her partner, Lindsay. She writes about their experiences as a queer couple traveling together on her blog Dopes on the Road and posts travel photos on Instagram at @dopesontheroad.

onto the country back road and farm country views of our three-hour ride. As I rode, I found myself relaxing and taking in the scenes and people around me. I passed a family of four on a yellow Yamaha. A mom was driving with a tiny baby in a carrier strapped to her chest. Behind her, two elementary school girls in uniforms rode with their arms clasped around each other. At a four-way cross, a man on a motorbike pulled up next to me. Strapped over his shoulder like a jousting javelin was a piece of metal piping that spanned at least 30 feet. The metal was lightly skimming the ground on each end. Motorbiking gave me the freedom to witness everyday life outside of the cities. On our way to Cat ba Island and La Han Bay we got a tiny glimpse of what the world looked like through Vietnamese glasses. We were driving on winding roads within a hair’s breadth of the edge. As we came around a bend and I got our first glimpse of La Han Bay, I pulled off to the side of the road. I had to take a minute to let the view sink in. I let the reality of my day hit me full force; I was really in Vietnam. La Han Bay is the kid sister to

UNESCO World Heritage Site Halong Bay. It’s smaller but more local. Halong bay has gorgeous views crowded with tourists, whereas La Han Bay is home to a community of fish farmers who live on the water. Families live in houses built on floating platforms made of wood. Each family raises fish and seafood they sell in the local market. We left our bikes with a local merchant and boarded a small junk boat just before sunset to tour the fish farm village. Standing at the top of the boat, I caught a photo of the captain’s wife as we headed towards the farm community. It was low tourist season and we were the only boat on the water, which was so still we could see the reflection of the limestone cliffs hovering in the wake as we passed. As we made our way through La Han Bay, we passed local fisherman making their living. When the sun began to set, I sat back in my wooden boat seat and thought about the morning. It felt like each section was a whole day in itself. I looked over at Julia, who was smiling to herself as she took in the boats around us. No Excel spreadsheets here for my rule-follower friend — just beautiful water and fish for sale. E

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COMING SOON

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January 15, 2017

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The Eagle - Jan 15 2017 Your Source For The Latest Midwest LGBT News - The House That Love Built  

In this edition, our featured story is about the future home of Indiana Youth Group. IYG has purchased, and will renovate, an abandoned offi...

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