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TEENS & ADULTS

QUIET TIME

with Commentary

One-Year Daily Devotional

FOR


Helpful Hints for a Daily Quiet Time The purpose of this Quiet Time is to meet the needs of spiritual growth in the life of the Christian in such a way that they learn the art of conducting their own personal investigation into the Bible. Consider the following helpful hints:

1

 Give priority in choosing your quiet time. This will vary with each individual

in accordance with his own circumstances. The time you choose must: n have top priority over everything else. n be the quietest time possible. n be a convenient time of the day or night. n be consistently observed each day.

2

Give attention to the procedure suggested for you to follow. Include the following items: n Read God’s Word. n Mark your Bible as you read. Here are some suggestions that might be helpful: a. After you read the passage put an exclamation mark next to the verses you completely understand. b. Put a question mark next to verses you do not understand. c. Put an arrow pointing upward next to encouraging verses. d. Put an arrow pointing downward next to verses which challenge you spiritually. e. Put a star next to verses containing important truths or major points.


n Meditate on what you have read (In one sentence, write the main thought).

Here are some suggestions as guidelines for meditating on God’s Word: a. Look at the selected passage from God’s point of view. b. Though we encourage quiet time in the morning, some people arrange to have their quiet time at the end of their day. God emphasizes that we need to go to sleep meditating on His Word. “My soul shall be satisfied and my mouth shall praise thee with joyful lips: when I remember thee upon my bed, and meditating on thee in the night watches” (Psalm 63:5,6). c. Deuteronomy 6:7 lists routine things you do each day during which you should concentrate on the portion of Scripture for that day: – when you sit in your house (meals and relaxation) – when you walk in the way (to and from school or work) – when you lie down (before going to sleep at night) – when you rise up (getting ready for the day)

n Apply some truth to your life. (Use first person pronouns I, me, my, mine).

If you have difficulty finding an application for your life, think of yourself as a Bible SPECTator and ask yourself the following questions: S – Is there any SIN for me to forsake? P – Is there any PROMISE for me to claim? E – Is there any EXAMPLE for me to follow? C – Is there any COMMAND for me to obey? T – Is there a TRUTH for me to embrace?

n Pray for specific things (Use the prayer sheets found in the My Personal

Prayer Journal section).

3 4

Be sure to fill out your quiet time pages. This will really help you remember the things the Lord brings to your mind. Purpose to share with someone else each day something you gained from your quiet time. This can be a real blessing for them as well as for you.


QUIET TIME

WITH COMMENTARY

My Personal Prayer Journal PRAY FOR YOUR UNREACHED FRIENDS “You have 100 times more influence on your friends than a stranger does!” - Dare 2 Share The CAUSE CIRCLE is a simple tool that will help you be more intentional about sharing Jesus’ message with your friends. It’s built around three simple priorities that Jesus lived out during His earthly ministry. These same priorities will help you effectively share your faith: Prayer. Care. Share. You will see a reference to this later in your daily prayer pages. DARE 2 SHARE CAUSE CIRCLE STRATEGY PRAYER: Asking God to prepare my friend’s heart to hear the good news of Jesus. CARE:

Asking God to help me love my friend by listening to them and caring for them.

SHARE:  Asking God to help me lovingly share the gospel message clearly and confidently with my friend.


UNSAVED FRIENDS DATE / REQUEST

DATE / ANSWER

DARE 2 SHARE CAUSE CIRCLE STRATEGY PRAYER: Asking God to prepare my friend’s heart to hear the good news of Jesus. CARE: Asking God to help me love my friend by listening to them and caring for them. SHARE: Asking God to help me lovingly share the gospel message clearly and confidently with my friend.

MISSIONARIES DATE / REQUEST

DATE / ANSWER


PHILIPPIANS BIBLE BOOK INTRODUCTION

Each of Paul’s epistles has a unique element embedded in the greeting. Those unique elements are designed by Paul to give the reader needed context for interpreting that specific epistle. Philippians is no exception. Paul includes a rather enigmatic little phrase, “with the bishops and deacons,” at the end of verse 1. Were this the only letter Paul wrote, one could rightly assume that it was a bit of a call-out to that specific group within the church. However, this is the only letter in which Paul includes anything close to this wording. The challenge for the interpreter is to understand the broader message of the book in such a way that makes this specialty phrase meaningful. Most commentaries have rightly acknowledged that this book is a joyful, thank-you note from Paul to a church that has faithfully shared their physical possessions with him. At the same time, most would also admit that Paul wants to offer all believers instructions on how to excel even more in their spiritual growth. A static faith is a shrinking faith. No believer can or should rest on his or her laurels. That message would explain Paul’s opening words. It is not as though any of us has arrived at a terminal degree spiritually. Even those who have achieved much and been appointed to positions of leadership are still pilgrims on the road of life. Paul wants to thank and praise the church at Philippi, but he does not want them to put their feet up and slide into apathy. The believer’s walk is new every day and every day comes with its own set of opportunities. No one is immune to the influences that the world will try to impose on him or her. All are but a step away from failure. But for the gracious provision of an awesome God, we would all find ourselves

alone and broken. Thus, this letter explores the proper perspective when the waters of opposition are as calm as can be. Given that there are many commentaries that cover the details so well, throughout this study we will attempt to see the book in a more theological framework. We suggest as a theme: Putting Present Joy in Perspective. Yes, we are using the word present as a play on words. The book is about a physical gift or present that was given to Paul by the Philippians. However, it is also about the gift that God has given to the Philippians and therefore all believers. At the center of Paul’s theology is the question as to the source of spiritual blessing. Is “joy” a behaviorbased experience or is it a grace-based experience? Since Paul has already included it as a fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22), one should assume that it is a matter of grace not of works. If it is a matter of grace then it must also be a work of the Spirit, and as such it must be cultivated in a faith model. Such a model often operates with the exact opposite dynamic than one might expect. Outline I. Introduction (1:1-11) II.  Message: Putting Present Joy into Perspective (1:12 - 4:20) a.  Genuine Joy Thrives in Suffering (1:12-30) b.  Genuine Joy Thrives in Service (2:1-30) c.  Genuine Joy Thrives in Sacrifice (3:1-21) d.  Genuine Joy Thrives through Submission (4:1-20) III. Conclusion (4:21-23)


Philippians 1:1-7

SUNDAY

WEEK 1

What is the writer saying?

How can I apply this to my life?

PRAY

Pray for those who teach in your church to be faithful to the Word.

All of Paul’s letters, with the possible exception of Hebrews, open with a similar but not identical greeting. Both factors are important. Paul always mentions grace and peace. This is not a formality but a required theological reminder. Yes, grace is the common Greek greeting and peace is the common Jewish greeting, but in Paul’s mind this is a theological foundation for all that he says. Grace and peace are always to be assumed as the theological bedrock of all that Paul writes. All spiritual blessing flows by grace and because we are at peace with God all events of life are friendly gifts from that gracious God (Romans 5:1-11). Paul includes a bit of turbulence in the greeting by singling out the “bishops and deacons.” This is meant to help avoid the thought that “joy” was a privilege of position. Each believer has equal access

to the abounding joy that God offers freely. A person in leadership has no more right to these “benefits” than the first time attender; otherwise, it would no longer be grace. Earned grace is an anomaly and a dangerous direction for any believer to step. Notice the words that Paul uses to reinforce this message: “offering prayer with joy,” “participation in the Gospel,” “affection of Christ,” and “partakers of grace with me.” Verse 6 is particularly powerful. Paul wants them to understand that the work begun by God in the believer’s life at justification will continue to be the work that He does until such time as we meet Him face to face. Paul’s message is affectionate but firm: “Don’t trade grace for works as you consider the impact that this gift has had on my life.”

We often “feel” good about ourselves after we do right. That feeling should never be elevated to a spiritual benefit. The “joy” that matters is a constant theological “joy” not a fickle behavior-based “joy.”


Philippians 1:8-14

MONDAY

WEEK 1

What is the writer saying?

How can I apply this to my life?

PRAY

Cayman Islands – For Christians to spread the Gospel to the millions of tourists that pass through each year.

Paul wraps up his introduction in verses 8-12 of today’s reading. He sets forth a pattern that may in some ways offend the Philippians. They might be tempted to say, “Paul, why can’t you just say, ‘Thank-you,’ and let us feel good about ourselves for a few moments at least?” Instead, Paul prays that a pattern be established in their lives that would bring them into a totally different understanding of joy. The pattern does not start with joy but with love. That love must be controlled by knowledge and discernment. This will allow the believer to discern (approve) the excellent and not fall victim to a substitute “joy.” This pattern will allow the fruit of the Spirit to be evidenced in the believer’s life. Love always comes first and joy follows. In both Testaments love is almost exclusively a reference to “covenant loyalty.” An accurate understanding of the promises will always lead to a proper

experience of the promise. Joy always flows from love and love can only exist where there is knowledge and discernment. At verse 12, Paul dives into his first major point: Genuine Joy Thrives in Suffering (1:12-30). He points out that even the imprisonment that he was enduring was not a matter for concern since it was producing a harvest of souls. Paul understood the Gospel was the main thing. Joy is but a by-product of the main thing. It is not a matter of a glass half-full or half-empty; it is a matter of completely full or completely empty. Paul embraced the danger because of the opportunity that was afforded to those who were without hope in a dark and hopeless world. He knew the truth; he “loved” the truth; he embraced the truth. His suffering was interpreted by his faith and not the other way round.

Worldview always controls reactions. Love is a worldview not a feeling. Our loyalty must be founded in truth. Do we believe that all things are working together for good, even if it is the good of others?


Philippians 1:15-21

TUESDAY

WEEK 1

What is the writer saying?

How can I apply this to my life?

PRAY

Slovakia – For church planting to be successful in bringing the Good News to many unbelievers.

Believers sometimes have a strong tendency to respond to intentions more so than simple behaviors. If an “accident” happens, we tend to shrug that off as a part of God’s providential plan. However, when the suffering is caused by someone who intends to hurt us, we are not so passive. Government tends to be one of those entities with which we often allow our frustrations to get out of hand. Like the children of Israel in the wilderness we begin to complain. Paul was imprisoned and to make matters worse, there were those who were using the Gospel to further their own selfish ambitions. This is a type of double whammy. If there was any occasion to be righteously indignant, this was surely it! However, Paul refused to cave. He knew the promises that God had promised. The Gospel is not empowered by any human emotion or endeavor. It is, in and of itself,

the power of God unto salvation (Romans 1:16). As long as the Gospel was preached Paul was a happy man. Why? Because as long as the Gospel is accurately presented, the Spirit can open hearts to believe and respond to that Gospel. Opportunity is not enhanced or lessened by the intentions of the presenter. The power of the Gospel is with the Spirit not with the person who delivers the message. In verses 18-21 Paul takes this discussion to the big picture. This is not only true at the level of one incident, it is true for the whole of life. All true life is derived from Christ. It is given for the purposes of others not for selfish advancement. Even when it is a matter of life and death, the mission is always the same. If Christ comes first, then others always come second. If this is true then we will never be disappointed because God has given us His absolute promise.

Paul has never wavered from this teaching. He has always equated life and ministry. As long as we live, there is always ministry to be done. Let’s buckle up because it will definitely be a fun ride.


Philippians 1:22-30

WEDNESDAY

WEEK 1

What is the writer saying?

How can I apply this to my life?

PRAY

Jamaica – For Jamaican churches to have a hunger for God’s Word and a passion for missions.

Paul wraps up his teaching on suffering in today’s passage and moves into a brief section of encouragement. Each chapter in the book follows this pattern: a doctrinal section and a brief section of specific encouragement. The opening verses enlarge a concept raised yesterday. What does Paul mean by, “To live is Christ and to die is gain”? Is he encouraging assisted suicide? Far from it. He is enjoining believers to live meaningful and joyful lives. As long as we are entangled with the affairs of this life, we can never truly participate in the new life. New life is Jesus-interest based; old life is self-interest based. In the old life death was to be feared; in the new life it is a friend. The sting is gone. That does not mean we should live with careless abandon; it means we should live with a different set of priorities. If believers can see death in perspective, they should be able to put life into perspective.

Verse 27 begins the brief section of encouragement. The message is simple. Let the Gospel control feelings and behaviors. See the whole world as a greenhouse under the care of a compassionate Father. Understand that all events are not designed to cause any to perish but to give all an opportunity to be saved. See the grace of God poured out in infinite waves upon a needy world. Be a part of the solution not the problem. Even the opposition needs what Christ has to offer. Love bears the total cost of the relationship and as such believers must love their enemies. Life without love is life without joy. The true enemy is not the one on the outside; it is the heart that longs to live by experience and not by faith. Conflict and suffering are not the exception, they are the norm.

We sometimes say, “Don’t cry over spilt milk.” That is close to Paul’s message in these verses. Life comes at us fast and there is way too much pain for us to handle alone. Fortunately, we are not alone. The same Spirit that indwelt and aided Paul also indwells and helps us.


Philippians 2:1-8

THURSDAY

WEEK 1

What is the writer saying?

How can I apply this to my life?

PRAY

Sweden – Pray for a new awakening for this spiritually struggling nation. Recent signs indicate that young people are moving back toward more traditional values.

Beginning at 2:1 Paul shifts his focus from suffering to service. The discussion revolves around three examples: Jesus, Timothy, and Epaphroditus. Notice how he begins the section. He lists a number of theological truths that must be denied for a believer to lose joy in any given situation. Paul takes that a step further when he suggests that the joy of others is a source of joy for him. No man is an island unto himself. All believers live in a spiritual family and as such are able to affect those around them. Joy is not solely or even mainly an individual event. It is always a community event. When Paul writes, “make my joy complete,” he clearly implies that there are degrees to one’s joy. When he referred to suffering, Paul invoked outreach to the world; now he invokes the believer’s responsibility to the family.

Paul calls on each believer to have the same mind or attitude that Jesus had. Jesus did not consider any cost short of His deity too high. He willingly divested himself of the use of many of his attributes (those incompatible with being human) in order to minister to those who had lost all at the Fall. His decision did not take into consideration His own personal interests but considered each and every one of us as more important than His own comforts. It says in Hebrews 12:2 that because of the “joy that was set before Him” He endured the cross. Is there any greater joy than that a man lay down his life for a friend? (John 15:13) Joy, like love, requires an interpersonal commitment. We were not left here to be served but to serve and give our lives to God for His service. True joy can only be experienced in serving the needs of others.

Too often the interpersonal relationships within the family of God go ignored. We live separate lives that barely intersect a couple of times a week. Our joy cannot be complete until we break free from our own felt needs and begin to provide solutions for others.


Philippians 2:9-16

FRIDAY

WEEK 1

What is the writer saying?

How can I apply this to my life?

PRAY

Dominican Republic – Praise for a major increase in the planting of evangelical churches.

Joy is a mutually inclusive commodity. It can exist in a stand-alone environment but it thrives in a mutual-ministering society. We can see this if we peek ahead to verse 18. Today’s passage opens with the climax or conclusion of Christ’s commitment. His life was not wasted but it produced a final victory that all who trust in Him will enjoy. It is the great dividing event of all eternity. It brings all things into perspective. There is no person who can escape the consequences of this one life. It matters more than any other life lived on this planet because “every knee should bow … and every tongue should confess.” This one act of commitment and service became the wellspring for all the benefits that even those who reject Him enjoy. All will know it at some point in the future but believers can know this reality today. It is not how much a person gets out of life that matters but how much he pours in.

Verses 12 and 13 are a bit of a recap. Keeping the balance between personal responsibilities and corporate responsibilities can be confusing. It is each person’s responsibility to work out their own salvation experience in an intensely focused way. Faith is the believer’s clear and singular requirement. To falter here is catastrophic to a believer’s well-being. The resulting faith-based transformation is a work of the Spirit not a work of the flesh. It is God at work in us. Believers must first be obedient to the faith principle and allow the Spirit to produce the fruit in one’s life. Any complaint about one’s life is a complaint about God and His work. Believers must be both individual lights and community lights. By this will all men know that we are disciples.

Be careful not to misunderstand today’s passage. “Holding forth the word of life” is foundational to the faith-love-joy triad. Why? Because “faith comes by hearing and hearing by the word of God” (Romans 10:17). The Word is central for the whole of the Christian experience.


Philippians 2:17-23

SATURDAY

WEEK 1

What is the writer saying?

How can I apply this to my life?

PRAY

Zambia – Pray that Christians might cast off all ties to the spirits and live pure and holy lives that depend on God alone for spiritual empowerment and blessing.

As we begin to read today’s passage we cannot help but be impressed by Paul’s reaffirmation of the mutuality of joy. Paul envisions joy as a two way street with benefits flowing in both directions. Just before these verses he emphasized our personal responsibility to believe, but now he returns to the joy factor. Personal joy always flows over into shared joy which in turn flows back as increased joy. Our responsibility to God is faith, but our responsibility to one another is love enriched by joy. In verse 19 Paul introduces his second example: Timothy. Jesus was a conveyor of joy in a direct sense. Without a relationship with Jesus there is no joy, period. Each person must have this direct relationship by faith before anything else matters. Timothy is a servant in the secondary sense. Paul commends him as one who is able to model and communicate joy in a community

setting. Paul says that Timothy is a kindred spirit who will genuinely be concerned for your welfare. The dynamics here are confirmed elsewhere in the Scriptures. No one has seen God at any time (John 1:18). The Son accurately displayed the mind/ attitude of God during the incarnation. This attitude of Christ is reproduced in the attitude of those who totally yield to Him as did Paul. That process can be repeated. Thus, a young man like Timothy could exhibit a like-mindedness with Paul and thus with Christ also. This likemindedness that Timothy has contains the joy component. Thus, Paul sends Timothy to Philippi as an example. This life that we have in Jesus was never meant to be stored; it was always meant to be shared. This is possible because the same Spirit who started this work in Paul and continued it in Timothy is also at work in us.

The cycle of spiritual life never stops. It is designed to be shared. Because it is of the Spirit, it is never diminished by its transference. The joy that Paul experienced and shared is still available to be shared today.


Quiet Time Schedule Options The following chart displays the Bible books and chapters for this year’s quiet times. All quiet times cover the same passages each day so the whole family can stay connected to God’s Word. Two schedules have been included or you can create your own for your group or family.

WEEKS 1 THROUGH 26 WEEK #

BOOKS - CHAPTERS

2018-19 ACADEMIC SCHEDULE

2019 CALENDAR SCHEDULE

WEEK 1

Philippians 1-2

Aug 26 - Sep 1

Dec 30 - Jan 5

WEEK 2

Philippians 2-4

Sep 2 - Sep 8

Jan 6 - Jan 12

WEEK 3

Job 1-13

Sep 9 - Sep 15

Jan 13 - Jan 19

WEEK 4

Job 14-42

Sep 16 - Sep 22

Jan 20 - Jan 26

WEEK 5

Psalms 104-105

Sep 23 - Sep 29

Jan 27 - Feb 2

WEEK 6

John 1

Sep 30 - Oct 6

Feb 3 - Feb 9

WEEK 7

John 2-3, Psalm 119

Oct 7 - Oct 13

Feb 10 - Feb 16

WEEK 8

Psalm 119

Oct 14 - Oct 20

Feb 17 - Feb 23

WEEK 9

John 4-5

Oct 21 - Oct 27

Feb 24 - Mar 2

WEEK 10

John 5, Psalm 119

Oct 28 - Nov 3

Mar 3 - Mar 9

WEEK 11

Psalm 119, John 1-6

Nov 4 - Nov 10

Mar 10 - Mar 16

WEEK 12

John 6-8

Nov 11 - Nov 17

Mar 17 - Mar 23

WEEK 13

John 8, Psalm 107

Nov 18 - Nov 24

Mar 24 - Mar 30

WEEK 14

Psalm 107, Ezekiel 1-3, 36

Nov 25 - Dec 1

Mar 31 - Apr 6

WEEK 15

Ezekiel 37-44

Dec 2 - Dec 8

Apr 7 - Apr 13

WEEK 16

Ezekiel 47, 1 Kings 1-6

Dec 9 - Dec 15

Apr 14 - Apr 20

WEEK 17

1 Kings 11-17

Dec 16 - Dec 22

Apr 21 - Apr 27

WEEK 18

1 Kings 18-21

Dec 23 - Dec 29

Apr 28 - May 4

WEEK 19

1 Kings 22, John 9-10

Dec 30 - Jan 5

May 5 - May 11

WEEK 20

John 10-11

Jan 6 - Jan 12

May 12 - May 18

WEEK 21

John 12, Psalms 114-115

Jan 13 - Jan 19

May 19 - May 25

WEEK 22

Psalms 116-118, Exodus 1-2

Jan 20 - Jan 26

May 26 - Jun 1

WEEK 23

Exodus 2-5

Jan 27 - Feb 2

Jun 2 - Jun 8

WEEK 24

Exodus 6-9

Feb 3 - Feb 9

Jun 9 - Jun 15

WEEK 25

Exodus 9-11, Ephesians 1

Feb 10 - Feb 16

Jun 16 - Jun 22

WEEK 26

Ephesians 2-3

Feb 17 - Feb 23

Jun 23 - Jun 29


Quiet Time Schedule Options WEEKS 27 THROUGH 52 WEEK #

BOOKS - CHAPTERS

2018-19 ACADEMIC SCHEDULE

2019 CALENDAR SCHEDULE

WEEK 27

Ephesians 4-5

Feb 24 - Mar 2

Jun 30 - Jul 6

WEEK 28

Ephesians 5-6, John 13

Mar 3 - Mar 9

Jul 7 - Jul 13

WEEK 29

John 13-15

Mar 10 - Mar 16

Jul 14 - Jul 20

WEEK 30

John 16-18

Mar 17 - Mar 23

Jul 21 - Jul 27

WEEK 31

John 18-20

Mar 24 - Mar 30

Jul 28 - Aug 3

WEEK 32

John 20-21, Exodus 12

Mar 31 - Apr 6

Aug 4 - Aug 10

WEEK 33

Exodus 13-16

Apr 7 - Apr 13

Aug 11 - Aug 17

WEEK 34

Exodus 16-17, Psalms 106, 108

Apr 14 - Apr 20

Aug 18 - Aug 24

WEEK 35

Exodus 19-32

Apr 21 - Apr 27

Aug 25 - Aug 31

WEEK 36

Exodus 32-40

Apr 28 - May 4

Sep 1 - Sep 7

WEEK 37

Romans 1-3

May 5 - May 11

Sep 8 - Sep 14

WEEK 38

Romans 3-6

May 12 - May 18

Sep 15 - Sep 21

WEEK 39

Romans 7-8, 2 Kings 1-2

May 19 - May 25

Sep 22 - Sep 28

WEEK 40

2 Kings 2-6

May 26 - Jun 1

Sep 29 - Oct 5

WEEK 41

2 Kings 6-17

Jun 2 - Jun 8

Oct 6 - Oct 12

WEEK 42

2 Kings 17-23, 2 Timothy 1

Jun 9 - Jun 15

Oct 13 - Oct 19

WEEK 43

2 Timothy 1-3

Jun 16 - Jun 22

Oct 20 - Oct 26

WEEK 44

2 Timothy 3-4, Revelation 6-7

Jun 23 - Jun 29

Oct 27 - Nov 2

WEEK 45

Revelation 8-13, 1 Peter 1

Jun 30 - Jul 6

Nov 3 - Nov 9

WEEK 46

1 Peter 1-3

Jul 7 - Jul 13

Nov 10 - Nov 16

WEEK 47

1 Peter 4-5, Revelation 14

Jul 14 - Jul 20

Nov 17 - Nov 23

WEEK 48

Revelation 15-17, Romans 9

Jul 21 - Jul 27

Nov 24 - Nov 30

WEEK 49

Romans 10-12

Jul 28 - Aug 3

Dec 1 - Dec 7

WEEK 50

Nahum 1, Malachi 1-4

Aug 4 - Aug 10

Dec 8 - Dec 14

WEEK 51

Revelation 19-22

Aug 11 - Aug 17

Dec 15 - Dec 21

WEEK 52

Romans 13-16

Aug 18 - Aug 24

Dec 22 - Dec 28

2018 Quiet Time with Commentary (Sample)  

Sample of the Quiet Time with Commentary. A daily quiet time for high school students and adults. All Word of Life Quiet Times share the sam...

2018 Quiet Time with Commentary (Sample)  

Sample of the Quiet Time with Commentary. A daily quiet time for high school students and adults. All Word of Life Quiet Times share the sam...