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Cheers to spring! With spring weekend just around the corner, I am surely not the only one looking forward to some sunshine and warmth. The month of August has been the coldest and wettest I’ve experienced in a long time and I can’t wait to designate all my thermal underwear, wool­ len socks, jerseys, scarves and coats to the back of the cupboard. In September we not only celebrate spring, but also Heritage Day, better known to many as Braai Day. Our diary on page 3 is jam­packed with festi­ vals and special events that herald the arrival of spring and honour South Africans’ favourite pas­ time. On page 6 you can also read all about the Bot River Spring Festival. If you have not made the ac­ quaintance of this delightful valley and its down­to­ earth winemakers, the spring weekend is the ideal opportunity to treat yourself.

What’s New We ran two competitions in last month’s edition of Winederous. The lucky winner of a copy of Deon Meyer’s Dirt Busters – a guide to adventure motorbiking is Joy E Malherbe from Strand. The winners of Dine van Zyl’s popular Boere­ kosboek 2 are Merencia Cornelissen from Paarl (English edition) and Mr H C Mathews from Paarl, who won a copy of the Afrikaans edition. Congratulations – your prizes will be on their way to you soon. COVER: Luddite Wi­ nes, Bot River.

SA olyfolies van topgehalte Die beoordelaars van die agste SA Oli­ ve­toekennings moes vanjaar ’n re­ kordaantal olyfolie­inskrywings proe en beoordeel. Uit ’n totaal van 100 in­ skrywings, het 43 uitsonderlike olyf­ olies op 21 Augustus goue SA Olive­ medaljes ontvang. Altesaam13 olyfolies het goud gewen in die kategorie vir intense olyfolies, 24 in die kategorie medium olyfolies en 6 delikate olyfolies. Voorts het 39 inskrywings silwermedaljes ontvang en 14 is met bronsmedaljes beloon. Die toppresteerder was Porterville Olives, wat nie minder nie as vier goue medaljes verower het. De Rustica, Rio Largo en Marbrin Farm is elk bekroon met drie goue medaljes, Oakhurst met twee goud en twee silwer, Tokara met een

goud en drie silwer, Zaamheid met twee goud en een silwer, en Morgenster met een goud en twee silwer. “Wanneer ’n verbruiker ’n bottel Suid­Afri­ kaanse olyfolie koop, veral een met die SA Olive CTC seël daarop, is hy verseker van hoogstaande kwaliteit,” sê Nick Wilkinson, SA Olive se voor­ sitter. Die Commitment to Compliance­seël verseker die verbruiker dat die inhoud 100% Suid­Afri­ kaans is, dat die etikettering eerlik en deursigtig is in terme van die inhoud en varsheid, en dat dit inderdaad ’n Ekstra Suiwer olie is en nie bloot ’n Suiwer of ’n geraffineerde olyfolie nie. Vir nadere besonderhede omtrent die kompe­ tisie en die volledige uitslae kontak SA Olive by tel 021 870 2900, epos info@saolive.co.za of besoek www.saolive.co.za.

DIEMERSDAL SAUVIG­ NON BLANC IS KAM­ PIOEN JONGWYN: Die beoordelaars by van­ jaar se SA Jongwynskou het die hout verouderde Diemersdal Sauvignon Blanc aangewys as die waardige ontvanger van die Generaal Smuts­ tro­ fee vir die beste jongwyn van die skou. Hier spog Mari Branders en Thys Louw van Diemersdal met hulmtrofee. Vir die volle­ dige uitslae, besoek www.youngwines­ how.co.za. Lees ook meer oor die Breedekloof se Jongwynskou­wenners op bl. 6.

FOTO: LIONEL BESTERFIELD

Discover hidden gems on the Franschhoek Artisan food route Artisanal refers to anything that is handmade, ive oil; La Cotte Inn (Fromages de France), normally in small quantities, and in the style of importers of fine French artisan cheese; La Motte Wine Estate for their stone ground an artisan, or skilled craftsman. Work your way through the ABC of this popu­ flour homemade breads; Maison offers deli­ cious chorizo, pickled Shii­ lar route and treat your taste take mushrooms, preserves buds to some of the finest and more; Noble Hill is olives, cheeses, charcu­ home to a beautiful chili gar­ terie, artisanal breads and den, olives and olive oil; The dreamy chocolate: Afri­ Really Interesting Food can Chocolate Company is the perfect Dreams; Allée Bleue stopover for food gifts and im­ Estate for olives, olive oils, ported ingredients; Sacred fresh herbs and pesto; Ba­ Ground for breads, cakes bylonstoren to stock up and coffee; SalmonBar for on fresh produce, breads, fresh Franschhoek trout and charcuterie, cheeses and salmon dishes; Solms­ preserves; Bread & ­Delta is home to the Dik­ Wine, renowned for some Get your cheese fix at Dale­ Delta culinary gardens, of the country’s finest char­ wood Fromage, the award­win­ which includes indigenous cuterie and breads; Café ning artisanal cheese producer. produce. BonBon for olives, breads If time is not on your side though, opt for the and preserves; Dutch East is all about freshly roasted and grounded coffee; Franschhoek short cut route at the Franschhoek Village Market Medicinal Herb Garden; Gooding’s on Saturdays showcasing many of these fine Groves produces tasty olives and olive oil; Hu­ foods. For more information, contact the Fran­ guenot Fine Chocolates; The Jam Jar; La schhoek Wine Valley office on 021 876 2861 Bourgogne for olives and various styles of ol­ or visit www.franschhoek.org.za.


What’s happening FRIDAY 6, 13 & 20 SEPTEMBER: BRANDY FRIDAYS AT VAL DE VIE Enjoy warm brandy cocktails and live music by performers such as Gerald Clark and Jason Reolon at the Polo Club restaurant & lounge bar overlooking the pristine polo fields of Val de Vie wine estate every Friday from 16:00 to 20:00. This relaxed bistro­style restaurant also offers a dinner special – enjoy any starter plus main course or main plus dessert for the price of one main course. Val de Vie is situated on the R301 between Paarl and Fran­ schhoek. For more info and to book, call 021 863 6174. SATURDAY 7 SEPTEMBER:

SMACKDOWN AT THE SMALL Join The Robertson Small Hotel at 12:00 when this luxury 5­star retreat adds a tantalising twist to the ultimate South Africans pastime with Smackdown at The Small, also de­ scribed as “an interactive braai bootcamp in the heart of the Breede River Valley”. Hone your braai skills in preparation for National Braai Day (on 24 September) with celebrity chef Re­ uben Riffel and the hotel’s executive chef, Tiaan van Greunen, who will be sharing their smoking hot braai secrets while guid­ ing you through the art of gourmet grilling. The Smackdown in­ cludes a sumptuous four­course feast, a team cook­off and a fun­filled tasting experience offered by a certified sommelier. The cost is R485 per person, all inclusive. Seating is limited and bookings are essential. Guests are also invited to linger longer – a booking for a two­night stay at the hotel during the weekend of the Smackdown at The Small, earns one a complimentary ticket to the event. Contact The Robertson Small Hotel at 023 626 7200 or email reservations@therobertsonsmallho­ tel.com

SATERDAG 7 SEPTEMBER:

WATERBLOMMETJIEFEES Hierdie eiesoortige Suid­Afrikaanse kossoort word vanjaar weer gevier by die vyfde Waterblommetjie­ fees wat gesamentlik deur Windmeul Kelder en Rhebokskloof­landgoed in Agter­Paarl aangebied word. ’n Groot verskeidenheid vars waterblomme­ tjie­geregte en musiek deur bekende kunstenaars vorm deel van die fees, asook kindervermaak wat ponieritte, vierwielmotorfietse, klimrame en spring­ kastele insluit. Die fees skop by Windmeul om 08:00 af saam met die maandelikse Windmeul­ plaasmark en ­ontbyt, gevolg deur die beoordeling van die waterblommetjie­potjiekoskompetisie en die aankondiging van die wenners. Om in te skryf vir dié kompetisie, kontak Liezl Vermeulen by 021 869 8100 of liezl@windmeul.com. Rhebokskloof se akti­ witeite geskied van 10:00 tot 16:00 en sluit ’n vlooimark en waterblommetjiegeregte­en­wyn­ paring in. Daar sal ook vanjaar ’n Mej. Waterblommetjie­kompetisie wees vir meisies tussen 4 en 6 jaar. Vir meer inligting, kontak Windmeul by 021 869 8100 / windmeul@iafrica.com of Rhebokskloof by 021 869 8386 / info@rhebokskloof.co.za.

September Diary SATURDAY 14 SEPTEMBER:

FORK & CORK WELLINGTON WINE FESTIVAL Wine, food, live entertainment, a fresh goods market boasting Wellington’s ample larder of specialities and surprises, and a cook­off between celebrity chef Sonia Cabano and local chef Johan van Schalkwyk promise a day of fun for the whole family between 10:00 and 17:00 at Kleinevalleij. The Radio Kalahari Orkes and Bottomless Coffee will entertain patrons whilst they lounge on the terraced lawns sipping award­ winning wines, or sampling the signature delicasies of six local restaurants. Both the cook­off and a food and wine pairing showcasing the best the district has to offer will be hosted at Festa at Kleinevalleij and carry an addition­ al fee of R30 per person per event. Children will be cared for in a designated play area at no extra cost. Entry to the festival area is R120 per person and includes a tasting glass and a booklet of tasting coupons. Entry for children 17 and younger is free. Tickets are available from Computicket. Space is limited and booking is essential. For additional information refer to http://wellington.co.za/forkcork/

SATURDAY 14 & TUESDAY 24 SEPTEMBER: HIDDEN

VALLEY GOUR­ MET BRAAI & WINE FESTIVAL Join Hidden Valley for a gourmet braai experience that’s guaranteed to make you re­evaluate all you think you know about braaing. The first date of 31 August is already sold out, but there are still two more dates left, so bring the family and friends for a unique taste experience. The party starts from 12:00. Tickets are R350 p/p and R50 for kids under 12. Each ticket gets you a gourmet braai feast, cooked to perfection by the legendary chef Bertus Basson and his Eat Out Top 10 restaurant team at Overture; a Hid­ den Valley wine tasting of their award­winning wines; a bottle of Hidden Valley Pinotage or Sauvignon blanc to share on the day; all­day entertainment for adults and children; live mu­ sic by Natasha Meister, and Janie and the Beard. To book, call 021 880 2646, send an e­ mail to info@hiddenvalleywines.co.za or visit www.bit.ly/braaiwine

FRIDAY 20 ­ TUESDAY 24 SEPTEMBER: TWO OCEANS HER­

MANUS WHALE FESTIVAL Hermanus is synonymous with whales and there is no better time than springtime to celebrate Walker Bay’s magnificent marine life and fabulous fynbos. As the only enviro­arts fes­ tival in South Africa, the annual Hermanus Whale Festival combines cultural and theatri­ cal entertainment with craft stalls, marine expos, food, wine and craft stalls. The Whale Festival is followed by the Hermanus Flower Festival at Fernkloof Nature Reserve from 26 to 29 September, and a variety of sporting events that include the Whale Half Marathon and Fun Run. For info, contact the Whale Festival office on 028 313 0928 or the organiser Leon Theron on 071 606 3261, or visit www.whalefestival.co.za.

TUESDAY 24 SEPTEMBER: DELHEIM SNOEK

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 7 & 8 SEPTEMBER: FRANSCHHOEK UN­ CORKED Say goodbye to the grey moods of winter and celebrate the start of spring as wine farms in and around Franschhoek welcome the warmer weather by showcasing their exciting new vintages and releases. A popular fun festival, now in its fifth year, there promis­ es to be something for everyone, which includes cellar and vineyard tours, barrel tastings, food and wine pairings, live entertainment, art exhibitions and a fresh food market. As an added extra each farm will have one wine available for purchase at a discounted price, for the duration of the weekend only. An Uncorked Weekend Pass costs R120 per person and in­ cludes a tasting glass and free wine tastings of select wines at these wineries for the duration of the weekend. Available through www.webtickets.co.za. For more information contact the Franschhoek Wine Valley office on 021 876 2861 or visit www.franschhoekuncorked.co.za.

BRAAI Celebrate Heritage Day on a legendary wine farm steeped in it, by joining Delheim Estate for a laid­back snoek braai with Victor Spelling, the son of patriarch Spatz Sperling, pioneering legend and co­ founder of the Stellenbosch wine routes. Delheim offers the perfect Braai Day retreat for fami­ lies and friends who want to revel in the ultimate South African pastime – without having to light a fire or lift a tong. Victor and his braai­comrades will treat guests to a home­grown braai feast complete with fresh snoek on the coals, tradi­ tional roosterkoek, mealies, sweet potatoes and braai sal­ ads with a twist. For the children, Delheim’s chef Christine Claasen will prepare a special sausage­on­a­skewer served with fresh fruit. Dessert will be Delheim’s famous mascar­ pone cheesecake with berry coulis for adults and a passion fruit sorbet cone for the children. Bookings for the Delheim snoek braai are essential as seating is limited. It costs R145 p/p (adults) and R65 for children under 12, which in­ cludes the the braai buffet but excludes beverages and ga­ tuity. Fires will be lit at 11:00 for 12:00. For more info or to book, contact Delheim at 021 888 4607; send an email to restaurant@delheim.com, or visit www.delheim.com.


Get married on a wine estate Along with the growth in the South African wine industry, especially over the last 20 years, wine estates have become an ever more popular option as wedding venues. The winelands provides the most romantic and idyllic setting for the day of your dreams. In addi­ tion to exquisite views of the mountains and vine­ yards, many wine farms have historic Cape Dutch homesteads – or dramatic modern architecture – and picturesque gardens that provide the perfect backdrop for gorgeous wedding photos. Whether you prefer rustic charm and an intimate atmos­ phere or chic sophistication on a grand scale, there will be a wine estate that offers you exactly what you’ve always dreamed of. There may even be a chapel on the premises,

or a gazebo and scenic outdoor area where the guests can be seated and the nuptials conducted. Having a one­stop destination simplifies the ar­ rangements and makes the big day more conven­ ient for all involved, as it eliminates the need for two separate venues for the wedding ceremony and the reception. There will be ample secure park­ ing and no to and fro travelling. Most wine estates that cater for weddings and functions also have accommodation options for the bride and her party, relatives and wedding guests, and a honeymoon suite for the happy couple. This also adds to a more relaxed atmosphere – instead of the wedding being a stressful event, the occasion can be turned into a joyous celebration stretched out over a weekend. And yet the main reason for choosing a wine estate as your wedding venue is probably the food

and wine, which is such an important component of your day. Excellent wine will be readily availa­ ble, and the estate restaurant or function venue will be able to create a menu tailor­made to suit your taste and budget. This will include advice on the choice of wines and vintages to complement the menu. You will be able to choose from various options, ranging from a cocktail or buffet setting to a din­ ner­dance. For a summer wedding you could opt for a mar­ quee to keep the festivities outside, or the reception could be held in the estate restaurant, cellar or

special function venue. The amenities and services offered by the wine estate may also include a PA system, music, decor and flowers. If the wine estate can co­ordinate your whole wedding from A to Z it will take a load off your shoulders and eliminate the need to negotiate with different role players. It is, after all, a day to be celebrated, enjoyed and cherished. For more information, consult the following websites: www.wine.co.za/mywedding/ www.wineroute.co.za/weddings/asp/ www.winelands.co.za/wedding­and­function­ venues/ and www.saweddings.co.za/venues/

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Celebrate life with Overberg Cap Classiques FRIEDA LLOYD No excuse is needed to pop the cork, fill the cham­ pagne flutes and drink a toast to life! Why not do sowithaglassofWalkerBaybub­ bles? As the number of local pro­ ducers increase slowly but very surely, we are spoilt for choice. Wildekrans, just out­side Bot River, produced the first Méthode Cap Classique (MCC) in the Overberg and did so using Chenin blanc grapes. Although it is traditional to use Pinot noir and Chardonnay grapes, it has been saidthatinorderfortheCapClas­ sique producers to grow this cate­ gory as a unique South African offering they should experiment withothervarieties.Thisiscertain­ ly something that Wildekrans has been doing very well since 2002. The Wildekrans MCC is characterised by a rich layer of bubbles decorating the liquid with a concen­ tration of flavours. Undoubtedly something that wine­ maker William Wilkinson can be proud of. Staying in the Bot River area, former commercial pilot Melis­ sa Nelsen has added her flair to the bubbly offerings by fulfill­ ing her dream of making Méthode Cap Classique. With the help of partner, winemaker Leon Engelke and the late vint­ ner Ross Gower, she produced her first bottle of sparkles in

2008, and named it Genevieve. Genevieve MCC is produced from Chardonnay grapes only and it can be described as a rich and creamy mouthful with flavours of pear and brioche – rich buttery yeast dough – encouraging a lingering finish. This elegant bubbly is characterised by lighter alcohol content and “weighs” in at 10%. Closer to Hermanus and along the Hemel­en­ Aarde road, Domaine des Dieux has not one but two Méthode Cap Classiques produced in the traditional style using Chardonnay and Pinot noir grapes. This blend enhances lon­ gevity due to the combination of lively acids and fruit flavours which develop during maturation. Domaine des Dieux translates aptly as “place of the gods”. The current vintage of Domaine des Dieux Claudia 2008 is made with 24% Pinot noir and 76% Chardon­ nay. Rose of Sharon is a Brut Rosé packaged in a clear and see­ through bottle to show off the very light salmon­pink colour that hints at its fine, soft and rich bubbles. Hermanuspietersfontein produces a very small quantity of traditionally styled MCC which is made from Pinot noir, Chardonnay and Pinot meunier grapes sourced from Sondagskloof and Hemel­en­Aarde. This fes­ tively wrapped bubbly depicting the Hermanuspie­ tersfontein mascot sheep holding a sparkle is only available at their popular Saturday morning wine & food market where it can be enjoyed with the local cuisine. Production started in 2007 in winemaker Bartho Eksteen’s garage. With the help of his wife Suné they

produced their first kombuisbruis (kitchen bubbly) and have maintained a small pro­ duction of 300 to 1 800 bottles ever since. Also on the Hermanus Wine Route is Mount Babylon, where Johan and Yolanda Holtzhausen create a Pioneer Brut Reserve which is soft on the eye with a peach­pink colour alluding to Turkish de­ light aromas hidden in the tiny, persistent wave of bubbles. At Sumaridge The Wayfarer is the lat­ est addition to the local MCC production and winemaker Gavin Patterson’s intention was to create diversity around his favourite

grape varieties: Pinot noir and Chardon­ nay. Pinot noir dominates this bubbly of which the name was inspired by British owners Holly and Simon Bellingham­Turn­ er’s visit to the Maluti mountains. It was while admiring the views that they looked down on an inscription in a rock that says “Wayfarer, pause and look upon a gate­ way of Paradise”. This message gripped Holly’s heart and motivated an investment in South Africa and the purchase of Sumaridge. This purchase can now be cel­ ebratedannuallywith3 000bottlesofCap Classique in their South African paradise.


5 reasons to visit Bot River

1. Bot River Spring Festival The upcoming spring festival from 31 August to 1 September is the perfect op­ portunity for lovers of the road less trav­ elled to head down the Houw Hoek Pass and spend the spring weekend among the eclectic winemakers of the delightful Bot River Valley. With the motto “drink yourself pink”, all the participating wineries will dis­ play pink barrels at their entrance and you will find a unique range of offerings at each. Now in its third year, the festival is unique to this unpretentious and laid­ back wine community where warm­ hearted country hospitality goes hand­ in­hand with the production of hand­ crafted top quality wines. Rivendell will be dishing up old­ fashioned fun with festive music, good food and superb wines. On Saturday there will be a potjiekos competition with wonderful prizes to be won and on Sunday the bistro will be open for lunch and wine tasting. For entries and bookings, call 028 284 9185. At Barton Vineyards there will be olive pip spitting, tractor rides, kettie shooting for the kids and their annual wine blending competition on Saturday and Sunday. Relax at Barton’s outdoor wine tasting lounge with snacks and braai packs from the Aphrodisiac Shack. They also offer accommodation in three luxury villas that each sleeps 6­8 people. Call 028 284 9283. At Maremmana you can “hook and cook” your own trout served with their delicious wine on Saturday and Sunday. Contact 028 284 9661. Benguela Cove will be offering their classic cheese and wine tasting on both days to keep visitors going before their next stop. At Wildekrans visitors can enjoy wine and food pairings throughout the day on Saturday, and in the evening there will be a braai and live music. They

will also be open for wine tasting on Sunday. For a great getaway, book into one of their 10 authentic farm cottages. Call 028 284 9902. Relax on the veranda of Gabriëls­ kloof and enjoy their fresh, delicious platters paired with each of their wines on Saturday. There will be a jumping castle to keep the kids entertained. At 18:00 guests are invited to enjoy the live music with sundowners and Over­ berg­inspired tapas. They will also be open for meals and wine tasting on Sun­ day. Contact 028 284 9865. At the historic Compagnesdrift farm, home to Beaumont Wines, visitors can indulge in a delicious plat du jour on offer at the cellar on Saturday. Their new vintages will be showcased along with Genevieve MCC. The original wa­ ter mill on the farm which has been fully restored is now a living museum and well worth a visit. Two renovated cottag­ ers offer authentic farm accommoda­ tion. On Sunday Beaumont will team up with Zest Catering to celebrate the first

day of spring with a festive barrel cellar lunch. Booking is essential. Call 028 284 9194. ) For more info, visit www.botriver­ wines.co.za 2. Botrivier Hotel At the heart of the tiny village of Bot River is the iconic Botrivier Hotel. Built in the 1920s, this hotel oozes character and slightly dilapidated charm. The pub is a favourite watering hole among the local farmers, with antique furniture, ar­ tifacts and memorabilia lending an air of nostalgia. The restaurant serves up breakfast, lunch and dinner and music entertainers often perform over week­ ends. There are 11 rooms, each with its own en­suite and balcony, and breakfast is included at R320 per per­ son per night. Call 028 284 9640. 3. The Shuntin’ Shed Right behind the Botrivier Hotel is the Shuntin’ Shed, a restaurant situated in a real train shed on the tracks of the

old Bot River train station, dating back to 1909. The atmospheric interior is made up of old railway benches and lanterns hanging from the rafters. Here owners Gustav and Christine serve real country fare along with live music and the kuierstoep with comfy couches, cushions and blankets invite patrons to linger and make themselves at home. The well­stocked bar serves beer on tap and a good selection of local wines along with delicious wood­fired pizzas. On Sunday Paardenkloof will be host­ ing a wine tasting, and visitors can stroll through the plaasmark and pick local products to take home. Call 028 284 9443. 4. Van der Stel Pass A visit to Bot River will not be complete without a drive up the Van der Stel Pass, from where various vantage points offer lovely views of the valley and the town below. It is also a favourite route among MTB enthusiasts. Along the way you will find KolKol Mountain Lodge,

where Canadian­style log cabins offer the perfect hide­away among fynbos­ clad mountains. The cabins are fully equipped and offer every comfort, from stone fireplaces and private decks with scenic views to a plunge pool heated by a wood­fired stove. Contact 028 284 9406. One of the boutique wine estates situ­ ated along the pass that are not­to­be­ missed is Goedvertrouw Wine Es­ tate and B&B, where Austrian wine­ maker Arthur Pillman’s widow Elrieda has continued the winemaking tradition of her late husband by producing a lim­ ited range of hand­crafted, hand­bot­ tled and hand­labelled wines. The thatched homestead is one of the oldest cottages in the area, built in 1820, and is surrounded by the most delightful country garden with an abun­ dance of roses. Visit Elrieda for wine­ tasting, breakfast, lunch, dinner or tea/ coffee by prior arrangement. Contact 028 284 9769. 5. Dassiesfontein A worthwhile visit while you are in the area is Dassiesfontein, a “farmstall” like few others situated at the Swartrivier Road turn­off to Gabrielskloof. Twelve years ago homemade goods were sold here from two wagons next to the N2. Then a farmstall was built and in 1996 a restaurant was added. This is the place to go to for traditional boerekos served seven days a week – large por­ tions and value for money. Dassiesfon­ tein will also make all born­to­browsers drool over the displays of antique col­ lectibles, leather goods, classic Victori­ an fireplaces, cast iron wood stoves, a boutique shop offering linen, vintage clothing and jewellery, shelves packed with tin cans, enamel ware, kitchen­ ware, pots, old kitchen utensils and of course jam, rusks, dried fruit, bokkoms and cheeses. They are open every day.


Breedekloof skitter by Jongwynskou “Die Jongwynskou is die hoogte­ punt van die jaar vir wynmakers en sommer direk ná die uitslae wil hul­ le dadelik weer nuwe dinge pro­ beer om beter te presteer,” sê Hen­ nie Hugo van Goudini Wynkelder. Goudini Goudini Wynkelder, gestig in 1948, is die oudste kelder in Breedekloof en hanteer tans die verwerking van 20 ledeplase se druiwe, sowel as die bemarking van die wyn. Hennie, wat reeds in 1984 die leisels oor­ geneem het as kelderbestuurder, sê Goudini is besonder trots op sy prestasie in die 2013 Jongwynskou, waar die Goudini Chardon­ nay as SA Kampioen Chardonnay bekroon is. Goue toekennings is ook behaal vir Goudini Colombar en Merlot, sowel as sil­ wer toekennings vir Chenin blanc, Semillon en Shiraz. Die Chardonnay, Colombar en Semillon is in die Worcester/Breedekloof­ streek as klaswenners aangewys. Die wynmaakspan sluit Hendrik My­ burgh, Tinus le Roux en Marius Prins in, en word ondersteun deur kwaliteitsbeampte Godknows Chiringamutambo. Met die oog daarop om hul wynreeks uit te brei met meer eksklusiewe wyne, het Goudini Kelder vanjaar die Goudini Mira­ bilis­reeks, vernoem na die Welwitchia Mi­ rabilis, en die Gevonden Hendrik de Wet Cape Hanepoot vrygestel. Hierdie wyn is berei van druiwe uit ’n wingerdblok wat na oorlewing reeds in 1882 geplant is en, sover vasgestel kon word, die oudste lewende wingerdblok in Suid Afrika is.

Merwida Merwida is ’n privaatkelder wat behoort aan die neefs Schalk en Pierre van der Mer­ we. Hulle pars jaarliks ± 15 000 ton met ’n verskeidenheid van 26 kultivars, 40% rooi en 60% wit. Die ander staatmakers in die Merwida­span is Magnus Kriel (bestuur­ der/wynmaker) en Sarel van Staden (wyn­ maker). “Die Jongwynskou plaaslik en nasionaal gee ons ’n goeie aanduiding van waar die kwaliteit van ons bulk­wyne lê in vergely­ king met ander kelders,” sê Magnus. “Om deel te wees van die beoordeling daarvan is weer opsigself goeie ondervinding vir ons wynmakers.” Dié kelder se nuwe Novelle 2013 sal teen middel September beskikbaar wees. Merwida is sedert 2010 een van die top­ presteerders in hierdie wynstreek en het in die afgelope vier jaar drie SA Kampioen­ toekennings vir drie verskillende wyne ge­ wen, en ook vyf streekskampioene opgele­ wer. Botha Kelder Botha Kelder, wat in 1949 deur 14 lede gestig is, bestaan nou uit 38 lede en vir die afgelope 64 jaar word die kelder deur ’n passievolle bestuurspan tot nuwe hoogtes gedryf. In 2013 is altesaam 3 7417 ton gepars en 29 miljoen liter wyn geproduseer, waar­ van ± 12 000 ton rooi en 25 000 ton wit kultivars. Die grootste wit kultivar is chenin blanc en die rooi kultivars sluit in cabernet sauvig­ non, shiraz en pinotage. Dit is egter die Mer­

Magnus Kriel, kelderbestuurder/wyn­ maker van Merwida. Dié kelder se ca­ bernet sauvignon is aangewys as die Jongwynskou se Worcester/Breede­ kloof­kampioen en die Novelle as die SA Kampioen in die kategorie Ander Wit Kultivar.

Gerrit van Zyl (kelderbestuurder), Willie Coetzee (wingerdboukundige), Michiel Visser (senior wynma­ ker) en Annamarie van Niekerk (wynmaker) van Bo­ tha Kelder met die Worcester/Breedekloof Jongwyn­ skou Alice Malan­trofee en die SA Kampioen trofee vir hulle wen­merlot.

lot wat onlangs aangewys is as die Jong­ wynskou se streek­ en SA­wenner, asook die Alice Malan­kampioenwyn van die Breede­ kloof/Worcester­streek. Ander wyne onder die Botha Kelder­han­ delsmerk is die Chardonnay Brut Vonkel­ wyn, Hanepoot Jerepigo, Rooi Jeripigo en Cape Vintage Reserve, sowel as die beken­ de Dassie’s­reeks. Botha Kelder se produksiespan sluit in Gerrit van Zyl (kelderbestuurder), Johan Linde (produskiebestuurder en 2012 se Worcester/Breedekloof Wynmaker van die Jaar), Michiel Visser (senior wynmaker), Annamarie van Niekerk (wynmaker) en Jan­Carel Coetzee (wingerdboukundige).

Tinus le Roux (wynmaker), Hennie Hugo (bestuur­ der/wynmaker), Hendrik Myburgh (wingerdboukun­ dige/wynmaker) en Marius Prins (wynmaker) van Goudini Wynkelder, wenners van die Worcester/ Breedekloof kampioen Chardonnay, sowel as die SA Jongwynskou kampioen Chardonnay.


Sosaties vir Braaidag LISE BEYERS Erfenisdag is die perfekte dag om Braaidag te vier. ’n Vakansiedag waar ons almal kan skoene uit­ skop en ons heeldag langs die braaivuur tuismaak. Dít is mos ons erfenis. Die probleem is egter: wat om te braai? Die keu­ se is eindeloos. Een van my gunstelinge oor die kole is stokkiesvleis, en nou nie die kommersiële gemors nie, maar self gemaak. Sosaties is nommer een, maar as die beursie ’n bietjie te leeg is vir ’n skaapboud, dan maak ek die volgende met varkvleis of hoenderborsies: Bestanddele 1 kg ontbeende varkboud of hoenderborsies in blokkies van ongeveer 2,5 cm gesny 1 groot ui in ringe gesny 2 eetl. matige kerriepoeier 3 suurlemoenblare, gekneus ½ koppie witwynasyn ½ koppie heuning 250 ml Bulgaarse jogurt 3 suurlemoenblare 2 uie in blokkies gesny 1 pakkie droë appelkosies Sout na smaak Metode . Maak eers jou marinade deur die uieringe stadig in ’n bietjie olie te braai. Wanneer hulle sag en deurskynend is, voeg die kerriepoeier by. Braai vir 2 minute en voeg dan die asyn en heuning by, asook die gekneusde suurlemoenblare. . Proe nou of die asyn­soet kombinasie reg is vir jou. Party mense hou van ’n bietjie meer soet as suur of andersom, so voeg óf nog asyn óf heu­ ning by na jou eie smaak. Laat afkoel en voeg die joghurt by. . Stort die marinade oor jou vleisblokkies, uie en appelkosies en laat staan in ’n koel plek vir minstens 12 uur. (Ek los dit vir 24 uur.)

. Ryg op bamboes­stokkies wat vir ’n halfuur in water geweek het, met die blokkies uie en appel­ kosies hier en daar tussen­in die vleis. Wees versig­ tig om nie die vleis te styf teen mekaar te ryg nie, dit belemmer die braaiproses. . En dan moet die stokkiesvleis nie dood ge­ braai word nie, net so tien minute oor matige kole.


Winederous sept 2013