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WORCESTER January 31 - February 6, 2013

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Regional dispatch center slow to emerge in Worcester Page 4

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Big Eyed Rabbit Page 18

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Flora in Winter returns Page 19

WORCESTER’S MANY OPEN MICS OFFER A COMMON CURE FOR STAGE FRIGHT


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WORCESTERMAG.COM • JANUARY 31, 2013


Kirk A. Davis President Kathleen Real Publisher x153 Brittany Durgin Editor x155 Steven King Photographer x278 Walter Bird Jr. Senior Writer x243 Vanessa Formato, Janice Harvey, Jim Keogh, Josh Lyford, Taylor Nunez, Matt Robert, Gary Rosen, Barbara Taormina, Al Vuona Contributing Writers Colin Burdett Editorial Intern Corey Olivier Photography Intern Don Cloutier Production Manager x380 Kimberly Vasseur Art Director/Assistant Production Manager x366 Becky Gill x350, Morgan Healey x366, Stephanie Mallard x350, Graphic Artists Christopher Grubert x 557, Helen Linnehan x147 Lindsay Chiarilli, Account Executives Amy O’Brien Sales Coordinator x136 Carrie Arsenault ClassiďŹ ed Manager Worcester Mag is an independent news weekly covering Central Massachusetts. We accept no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. The Publisher has the right to refuse any advertisement. LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES: Please call 978.534.6006, email sales@centralmassclass.com, or mail to Central Mass ClassiďŹ eds, Leominster Plaza, 285 Central St., Suite 202B, Leominster, MA 01453 DISTRIBUTION: Worcester Mag is available free of charge at more than 400 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $1 each at Worcester Mag ofďŹ ces. Unauthorized bulk removal of Worcester Mag from any public location, or any other tampering with Worcester Mag’s distribution including unauthorized inserts, is a criminal offense and may be prosecuted under the law. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $47 for one year, third class mail. First class mail, $125 for one year. Send orders and subscription correspondence to Worcester Mag, 101 Water St., Worcester, MA 01604. ADVERTISING: To place an order for display advertising or to inquire, please call 508.749.3166. Worcester Mag (ISSN 0191-4960) is a weekly publication of The Holden Landmark Corporation. All contents copyright 2013 by The Holden Landmark Corporation. All rights reserved. Worcester Mag is not liable for typographical errors in advertisements.

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{insidestories stories}

etting up in front of a crowd under any circumstance can be an unsettling experience. It doesn’t matter whether it’s in a packed room, a barely attended event or being interviewed one-on-one for a shot at a much needed employment position; most people aren’t naturally comfortable when unfamiliar eyes are staring them down. That’s why the many open mic events that take place in Worcester’s bars, restaurants, radio stations and performance spaces make an important contribution to the city’s fabric. Be it a poetry reading, musical open mic, playing in a band, performing in a theatrical presentation, singing at the urging of friends after a few drinks at a karaoke bar or a job interview, they’re opportunities to cast aside your social awkwardness and feel more comfortable in public settings. Think of this week’s cover story as more than a music piece — it’s about shaping your identity and ďŹ nding your place in the world, wherever it may be. The hosts of these open mics are welcoming to both seasoned performers and those playing or reading in front of a crowd for the ďŹ rst time. They offer plenty of free helpful advice and the opportunity to make new friends, both temporary and lifelong. And who knows? Maybe next week it’ll be you up there.

-Brian Goslow, Contributing Writer

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4 7 8 8 9 13 16 17 20 22 30

City Desk Worcesteria Harvey 1,001 Words Cover Story Night & Day Film Eat Beat Venues/Clubs/Coffeehouses ClassiďŹ eds 2 minutes with‌

ABOUT THE COVER Jack Rollins performs at the First Baptist Church open mic night. Photo by Steven King Design by Kimberly Vasseur

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JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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{ citydesk }

January 24 - 30, 2013 ■ Volume 38, Number 21

Regional dispatch center slow to emerge in Worcester

Walter Bird Jr.

says the town administrator in Boylston has shown interest. That is a far cry from what the city expected, even if hope remains that the more reluctant towns will eventually warm up to the idea. “We’ve gone through various meetings with communities,” City Manager Mike O’Brien says. “We’re close to agreements with two and then we’ll go forward with the regional communications center. All’s on track.” O’Brien disputes the contention that only two towns are involved. “It’s much more than that,” he says. “We need one, maybe two, signed to go forward. I suspect once those two are complete the others will see those examples.” That is a likely scenario, adds Clemons. “I don’t think we’ll get all 10,” he says. “It is very hard for communities to take its dispatchers and move them to something they can’t see and touch.” Still, it has been well over a year and a half since officials in neighboring Leicester signed a letter of intent. While it is not uncommon for a regional dispatch center to take time to be developed, Worcester has been “one of the slower ones,” according to Frank Pozniak, executive director of the state 911 Department. “It is a very slow process and it takes time. It doesn’t happen overnight. It isn’t like it’s extraordinary. We’ve seen a number that are slow. But Worcester is still pushing ahead.” That is important, especially with the contract for a $1.6-milion PSAP development grant set to expire June 30. The city has already been given at least

he number of towns seriously considering the switch to a regional emergency dispatch center in Worcester has plummeted from 10 to two, but officials remain hopeful, citing the need for just a single partner to allow the city to become one of fewer than 20 Regional Public Safety Answering Points (PSAP). Progress, however, has gone at a snail’s pace and the $750,000 building on Coppage Drive that was bought with the center in mind remains empty, save for a handful of equipment trailers labeled “Public Health Support” on the property. “Yeah, I honestly did,” Dave Clemons, the city’s director of Emergency Communications, says when asked whether he expected the center to be operational by now. “I think a lot of the delay is we are dealing with towns making sure the [host] community has everything they need. The perception is, by going regional towns are losing control, if you will.” Clemons remains confident that what started with a state grant application more than two years ago will bear fruit in the near future. “Absolutely,” he says. “It takes really just one town to sign an agreement.” Getting one on board has proven challenging. When the idea first came forward, the belief was 10 towns plus Worcester would comprise the center. Now, according to Clemons, only Leicester and West Boylston appear close to signing an agreement, although he

T

STEVEN KING

The building on Coppage Drive that was bought with the PSAP in mind remains empty. one extension, Pozniak says. Another extension would most likely be awarded if requested, he adds. The city currently receives a $659,180 support grant as one of the state’s 256 PSAPs (There are 16 regional centers). That money can be used for personnel and various equipment purchases. If a regional center The number of unarmed is established, an incentive grant would security personnel in each increase the amount, depending on how many communities and personnel are Worcester high school brought on. One of the reasons some towns may be reluctant to climb on board, according to Pozniak, is the city’s size. “Some of the smaller departments might think they’ll get lost in the shuffle,” says Pozniak.

D A M N E D LI E S and STATISTICS

continued on page 6

1

4

A weekly quality of life check-in of Worcester

Dodge Park Rest Home named “Caring Star” of 2013 based on consumer ratings and reviews posted on Caring.com. +1

The freshman class of state lawmakers elects its leadership, but Central Mass. is shut out. No Mary Keefe? The positions were all filled by reps from the South Shore, Boston-area and western Mass. -1

First the Patriots fall miserably flat, the Boston Celtics go into a tailspin and then Mother Nature wreaks havoc with the weather. All in all, not a great time in New England. -2

WORCESTERMAG.COM • JANUARY 31, 2013

Matt Caranci, known to some for his radio show on WCUW, is helping Stone Soup put together a PC lab. He is looking for unwanted computers that can be rehabbed for use by Stone Soup. +1

Maryann Tivnan, Business Service Officer at Leominster Credit Union, named Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce ambassador of the month. +1

Derek Evers and Katherine Evans are appointed constable and Citizens Advisory Council member, respectively. +2

Less than a week after Lt. Gov. Tim Murray’s surprise announcement that he would not run for governor, it is learned he has become part of an investigation he initiated into alleged campaign finance law violations. The matter is currently being reviewed by Attorney General Martha Coakley. -3

Quinsigamond Community College (QCC) officially opens its renovated North Wing, which houses a math education center, TRIO Student Support Services space and general-purpose classrooms. +1

The Wilson sisters, aka ‘70s and ‘80s rock band Heart, land in Worcester at the Hanover Theatre, on the heels of learning they have been voted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. +2

Total for this week:

+2 +1 -1 -2 +1 +1+2 -3 +1+2 WOO-TOWN INDE X


{ citydesk } State snub on Willis contracts still a sore spot

Walter Bird Jr.

he Henry Lee Willis Community Center closes its doors for good in less than a week, but don’t expect the lights to be turned off just yet on the hurt, frustration and anger some city ofďŹ cials and community leaders still feel over the state’s decision to shutter the longstanding, local institution. “There’s been an injustice,â€? says Brenda Jenkins of the Mosaic Cultural Complex at the YMCA on Main Street. “We need to address that injustice and do it in strong numbers.â€? Jenkins is just one of many people asking questions about why the center lost all of its state contracts late last year. One of the more pressing issues is why some local agencies were shunned in favor of outside organizations when it came to divvying up the state contracts that were abruptly pulled from the center last month. Minority advocates also are disturbed over the perceived lack of racial

T

and cultural diversity among some of the companies that will be taking over the services long provided by the Willis Center. For example, Framingham-based Advocates, Inc., which is taking on two contracts to continue providing substance abuse treatment, counts no minorities among its executive leadership team, only one or two in senior management and just two on its Board of Directors. President and CEO Bill Taylor says the organization is ďŹ lling a vacancy on its executive team and is seeking a qualiďŹ ed minority. The Board of Directors is also recruiting a third minority member, he says. As for the rationale behind choosing which providers would take on the Willis Center contracts, the state Executive OfďŹ ce of Health and Human Services (EOHHS) has told city ofďŹ cials that licensing in some cases made a difference. The state has said the licensing process is complex and can require more than two months to complete. As a result, according to a

V E R BATI M

recent memo from the EOHHS, agencies with an established track record were chosen. In the case of Advocates, Inc., however, Taylor says the organization was not already licensed for the services it will be taking on. “We expect to have everything in place well before Feb. 6,� Taylor says. “The DPH (Department of Public Health) is ready to issue the license as soon as we have the permits in hand.� Multiple phone calls to and messages left with two other agencies picking up state contracts –The South Middlesex Opportunity Council (SMOC) and Spectrum Services, which is based in Worcester – were not returned. District 4 City Councilor Sarai Rivera, in whose area many of the Willis Center’s services were offered, is among those who believe an effort should have been made to involve more Worcester-based agencies in the contracting process. SMOC is an outside organization that is picking

I’m like the Darth Vader of the Worcester Public Schools.� – Rob Pezzella on his role as school safety liaison for the school system.

continued on page 6

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{ citydesk } DISPATCH continued from page 4

Worcesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dispatch center is staffed by 52 employees, according to Clemons. Another catch is that once a town joins a regional department, there is no guarantee funding would be available should that community decided to withdraw and bring its dispatch operations back under its control. In fact, in Leicesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s case the police chief has reportedly said his department would be closed to the public if dispatching were done elsewhere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In each case when someone initially decides to join and then decides they want to back out, the state 911 department has to review the case,â&#x20AC;? according to Terrel Harris, communications director for the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Executive OfďŹ ce of Public Safety and Security (EOPSS). Harris says that has happened three times and each is currently under review. Clemons notes that a regional dispatch center also would be unable to take on a lot of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ancillary workâ&#x20AC;? many dispatchers in smaller towns are able to absorb in addition to their regular duties. That is one of the hang-ups in Leicester, at least for Selectman Chairman Doug Belanger, who notes the different roles dispatchers ďŹ ll at the

6

police department. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We use dispatchers as a public point. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of my big concerns,â&#x20AC;? Belanger says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How do you staff that if, in essence, your dispatchers are gone? How do we solve that?â&#x20AC;? The town is reaching out to constables and the Worcester County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department in that regard, he says. An additional challenge is how to monitor the inmates kept in lock-up at the station. Each cell has a monitor that is watched by dispatchers. Belanger, who has yet to decide whether he supports the move, points to what he believes has been a â&#x20AC;&#x153;good, working relationshipâ&#x20AC;? with Worcester in recent years. The town, for example, is involved in a regional health partnership with the city. A public forum in Leicester to discuss the regional dispatch center is set for Wednesday, Feb. 27, 6:30 p.m., at Leicester Town Hall. The closest regional dispatch center to Worcester is in Rutland, which is joined by Oakham, Hubbardston and Barre.

Have a news tip or comment? Contact Walter Bird Jr. at 508-749-3166, ext. 243, or email wbird@worcestermag.com.

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WILLIS CENTER continued from page 5

up several contracts, including substance abuse and housing. Spectrum Services is picking up two substance abuse contracts, and does operate in Worcester. Still, Rivera could think of at least one local agency that should have been included STEVEN KING

The Willis Center property at 15 Northampton St., Worcester. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know CHL (Community Healthlink) has licensing and my understanding is they have more experience and exposure in some of these issues than Advocates,â&#x20AC;? Rivera says, adding the latter company does not â&#x20AC;&#x153;really have a past of providing concrete services in Worcester. When you look at consumer care, there are local organizations that â&#x20AC;Ś need growth. Why not grow organizations in our community? Are we getting cultural competency?â&#x20AC;? Deb Ekstrom, president and CEO of Community Healthlink, says the state never reached out to her agency, outside of an informal conversation with â&#x20AC;&#x153;somebody at DPH which helped me to understand they were not going to be reaching out to towns.â&#x20AC;? Community Healthlink has six contracts through the DPH and several with at least seven state agencies. Asked whether she felt slighted in this instance, Ekstrom says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We would have been happy to provide services.â&#x20AC;? Juan Gomez says his organization, Centro Las Americas, will be taking on a contract for intensive foster care once it becomes licensed. The organization was not among those listed in the EOHHS

memo to city ofďŹ cials. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were very critical of how they strategized to address [the transfer of services]. They did not involve us at ďŹ rst,â&#x20AC;? he says. Ultimately, Gomez adds, the organization â&#x20AC;&#x153;realized the uniqueness of what had to happen. A lot of different populations were involved, a lot of different components.â&#x20AC;? That said, Gomez says if the state at that point does not welcome Centro into the process once it obtains licensing, â&#x20AC;&#x153;then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make some noise.â&#x20AC;? For now, he says the track record of Advocates, Spectrum Services and even SMOC - which does not enjoy a good reputation in Worcester - speaks to the level of care that will be provided to former clients of the Willis Center. For his part, Taylor says he is eager to introduce himself to the community and to answer any and all questions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not completely new to Worcester, but no doubt this is our ďŹ rst [foray] in Worcester proper running a program,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to do that right. As soon as weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there we would like the opportunity to meet with councilors.â&#x20AC;? Community advocates might also want to meet with them and questions of racial and ethnic composition could arise. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all try to be real polite,â&#x20AC;? says Keesha LaTulippe, a former Willis Center employee, of addressing issues of race. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This issue is about the representation of people of color, not just a couple, but a signiďŹ cant amount in management and upper management. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to badmouth anybody, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just an observation.â&#x20AC;? LaTulippe relayed her own experiences of attending meetings where she was the only minority. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[This] is about a lack of power and voice,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my concern. Over the last however many years, I go to these meeting ... there are no people of color there. All the ridiculous meetings I hated going to, but it was important to be there because nobody else was going to be there. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only the few of us scrambling around.â&#x20AC;? Have a news tip or comment? Contact Walter Bird Jr. at 508-749-3166, ext. 243, or email wbird@worcestermag.com.

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{ worcesteria }

For a daily dose of Worcesteria, visit worcestermag.com/blogs/dailyworcesteria. Have an item for Worcesteria? Call Walter Bird Jr. at 508-749-3166, ext. 243, or email wbird@worcestermag.com.

Walter Bird Jr.

CALL 911: Dave Quist

lost his father in a car accident on April 26, 2010. Robert Quist was driving a Lincoln Town Car when he was struck and killed by a Ford F-650 driven by Arthur Scanlon, who then fled the scene before turning himself into police about 38 hours later. Turns out Scanlon had a history of leaving the scene of accidents as well as OUIs and several refused Breathalyzer tests. He did his time (with time served at the date of his sentencing, it amounted to two and a half years) and was released in July last year. He remains, however, on probation for 10 years and Dave Quist plans on doing his part to make sure Scanlon, whose license was revoked, does not get behind the wheel of a car and kill someone else. He has mailed out laminated, oversized postcard bearing two different photos of Scanlon to 10,000 homes and businesses in Leicester and Sutton, where he believes Scanlon splits his time. The front of the postcard carries the headline: “Call 911 if you see this man driving.” It appears above a photo taken at Scanlon’s 2010 arraignment. Quist snapped another photo, which appears on the back of the postcard, in 2012 upon Scanlon’s release from jail. Says Quist: “My intent is not retaliation, not a social sentence. This is an advisement for people.”

RE-DISTRICTING: The city’s Economic Development chief doesn’t want all the talk about the proposed new Theatre District to revolve around one issue, but even Tim McGourthy knows there’s no such thing as bad publicity. McGourthy and Worcester Business Development Corporation President and CEO Craig Blais, along with Skip Smallridge of the design firm CSS, welcomed well over 100 folks to the upper concourse at Hanover Theatre last week. Not all, but a good number of people were there to make sure the Worcester Public Library doesn’t get a raw deal in planning a district to complement the ongoing CitySquare project. As McGourthy joked in assessing the large crowd in attendance, “All you have to do is create a little buzz, a little controversy in the paper.” The words “hockey rink” came up a few times, but mostly when speakers referenced the library they talked about preserving its integrity and keeping the parking in place. Last week’s was the first mass, public unveiling of the final draft master plan. It still must go to the council and a subcommittee for further discussion.

Central Community Branch 766 Main St., Worcester 508-755-6101

AND THE RACE IS ON: The heat should

turn up right about now as all eyes in Massachusetts shift to a June 25 special election to replace US Sen. John Kerry, who is as you know by now, has been confirmed the new US Secretary of State. The Secretary of State’s office also announced an April 30 primary, which gives candidates less than two months to do the campaign thing before squaring off – assuming, of course, there are primaries. So far, Democratic US Rep Ed Markey is the lone sure bet to run. Rep. Stephen Lynch had not committed, as of earlier this week. Of course, what the diehard political junkie really wants to know is whether now-you-see-him-now-youdon’t former US Sen. Scott Brown, the Republican who was steamrolled by thencandidate Elizabeth Warren, will throw his hat in the ring.

BULLY PULPIT: South High Community School will be the site of the comprehensive Bullying Prevention and Education Conference Thursday, Feb. 28 from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Attorney General Martha Coakley will deliver the keynote address. The free conference (lunch will cost you) is being presented by Worcester Public Schools, in conjunction with YOU, Inc., the District Attorney’s office, juvenile court, police and probation departments. The conference will address the state’s anti-bullying laws and preventative interventions. Complimentary copies of “The Bully Project” DVD will be distributed. The deadline to register is Friday, Feb. 15. (In the event of snow the conference will be held Wednesday, March 6). “GERMAIN” TO THE DISCUSSION: A blue moon, the Cleveland Indians in the

playoffs and City Councilor Mike Germain arriving to a council meeting before his colleagues. All are things that happen rarely. When they do, folks tend to take notice. So it was no surprise that Germain, who is regularly late in arriving to – and early leaving – council meetings, took some good-natured ribbing from a colleague or two after he took his seat in the council chamber before any other councilors showed up Tuesday night.

508-835-6855

Tue 10-6 ‡ Wed & Thur 10-8.30 ‡ Friday 10-6 Sat 9-4 ‡ Sun & Mon Closed

www.puccisjewelers.com JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

7


{slants&rants}

commentary | opinions The Rosen

Report

Letters

To the Editor:

The article, ‘A Body of Evidence’ (WoMag 1/24), is excellent. I commend the many individuals and groups involved in our city’s Community Health Improvement Plan. An effective step that CHIP can take to advance the goal of “making Worcester the healthiest city in New England by 2020” is to promote veganism. On January 11, 2013, on WGN.TV, Chicago mayor, Rahm Emanuel, encouraged residents to go vegan as part of “our whole wellness plan for the city and lowering our health care costs and extending our life expectancy.” Many socially responsible organizations have put this doctrine into practice. YEA Camp (Youth Empowered Action), being held this summer in OR, CA and Charlton, MA, serves 100 percent vegan foods - desserts, snacks, breakfast, lunch and dinner. CHIP’s Behavioral Health goals could be met by encouraging citizens to adopt a vegan lifestyle. Public health concerns of MRSA and swine (H1N1) and bird (H5N1) flu pandemics, as well as salmonella and E.coli outbreaks, are linked to the mass production and slaughter of food animals. African-American physician, Milton Mills of PCRM (Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) spoke to the Vegetarian Society of Hawaii on comparative anatomy of carnivores, omnivores and herbivores. He points out that we are, naturally, herbivores and when we, instead, eat like omnivores a large percentage of the population becomes plagued with diseases and disorders. In his book, ‘The World Peace Diet: Eating for Spiritual Health and Social Harmony,’ Dr. Will Tuttle proclaims that what we sow in our treatment of animals, we will reap in our lives. For example, as we hyper-confine, overly medicate, fatten up and separate the families of trillions of sentient beings at livestock auctions, factory farms and slaughterhouses, filling them with fear, terror, anxiety, loneliness, sadness and depression, we have a growing epidemic of obesity, mental illness, drug use and violence. Albert Einstein explained in a letter dated in 1950 that we are one, intertwined consciousness. When we hurt others, we’re actually hurting ourselves, and when we extend love and respect to others, these also are reflected back at us. Animals qualify as ‘others’ because they, like us, possess sentience and consciousness. Other famous vegans, Dexter and Coretta Scott King said that animal rights would be the next “logical extension” of MLK’s philosophy of non-violence and justice. In the film, ‘Peaceable Kingdom: The Journey Home,’ bovine and goat dairy farmers in Mendon, MA recount their transition to veganism, which seeks to avoid exploiting and commodifying females and killing their kids and calves. Because we’ve enacted laws that protect some animals, while other animal species receive no legal protection, this has created ‘unequitable treatment.’ CHIP’s prioritized Health Equity/Health Disparities program can succeed by incorporating principles of veganism. In the Fall, 2012, issue of New England’s holistic magazine, Spirit of Change, editor Carol Bedrosian wrote an excellent article, “Animals Deserve the Golden Rule Treatment.” Last November, Australian philanthropist and former VP of Citibank, Philip Wollen, stated, “Animal rights today is now the greatest social justice issue since the abolition of slavery.” Radical social reformers such as Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, F. Douglass, Emerson and Thoreau, all who delivered their speeches at Worcester’s Mechanics Hall, understood the connection of animal rights to human rights. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics confirmed that we don’t need to eat animals or their mammary and ovulatory secretions for nourishment. Just as we’ve evolved and renounced the American traditions of subjugating blacks and women, we can abjure this carnist habit. Compassion and health are two sides of the same coin.

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MAR LENE N A RROW North Brookfield WORCESTERMAG.COM

• JANUARY 31, 2013

Worcester’s seniors would choose pot over pain Gary Rosen

Q: What do you call a pothead who doesn’t inhale? A: Mr. President (As seen on several marijuana joke websites and Twitter feeds.) Bill Clinton notwithstanding, times sure have changed. For decades I have been proud that I have never smoked marijuana but, in these enlightened times, I’m a bit embarrassed to admit to being such an uncool geek. My pot abstinence goes back to freshman orientation several decades ago when a WPI administrator cited the lure of marijuana as a major reason why one-third of our class would not graduate from that fine institution. I can still hear the hum of the projector that day as we watched a movie not unlike the 1936 cult film, “Reefer Madness” (originally titled “Tell Your Children”). This propaganda film was shown to warn us engineers-to-be that unsavory stoners, many of whom probably were liberal arts students, would try to get us to descend into madness by enticing us with marijuana. In any case, it was not the pot of those times that stole our innocence. Three months into my freshman year, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. And soon after, President Lyndon B.Johnson proceeded to escalate the Vietnam War. In opposition to that costly and unwinnable war, sober students and stoners across America united in often-violent but effective protests. I remained drug-free, beat WPI’s graduation odds and became a chemistry teacher at Worcester’s Doherty Memorial High School where, over the years, many of my students were higher than their grades. Now retired and the President of the Friends of Worcester’s Senior Center, I spend many volunteer hours among fascinating seniors who also have never used marijuana. Many of them are surprised at the inroads being made across America to legalize the use of marijuana for recreational purposes.

But would elders who suffer the excruciating pain of cancer, or other dreaded diseases, consider using medical marijuana if other prescription pain medications failed to provide relief? The answer from those that I’ve talked to is an overwhelming yes. In fact, many seniors joined the 63 percent of Massachusetts voters in passing last year’s ballot initiative (law that went into effect January 1, 2013) that allows qualifying patients to use and purchase marijuana produced and distributed by new stateregulated dispensaries. Unfortunately, many elected officials across the Commonwealth and the country are balking at allowing medical marijuana dispensaries in their communities. Their use of misinformation and scare tactics is reminiscent of the ridiculous arguments that were used decades ago to terrify young people. And their lack of compassion toward individuals in severe pain is baffling. Here in Worcester, At-large City Councilor Konnie Lukes has been the most outspoken leader against state-sanctioned medical marijuana dispensaries. Lukes has asked for a moratorium on their siting here. She’d like to use local zoning ordinances to keep Worcester medical marijuana-free at least until the state comes up with rules governing these potfor-pain clinics. Although well-intentioned, Lukes fortunately does not have the support of her council colleagues in her anti-cannabis crusade. Everyone knows that since our country was founded, millions of pain-free Americans have used pot recreationally. President Thomas Jefferson once wrote, “Some of my finest hours have been spent on my back veranda, smoking hemp and observing as far as my eye can see.” And President Ronald Regan, a B-movie actor who never would have appeared in Reefer Madness, said, “Government exists to protect us from each other. Where government has gone beyond its limits is in deciding to protect us from ourselves.” Prohibition just doesn’t work. Worcester has many package stores, a few Hookah bars, at least one strip joint and a busy abortion clinic. Now it’s time for our leaders to cut the ribbon welcoming the city’s first medical marijuana dispensary.

Correction

In last week’s column “Hell hath no fury like a woman swindled” it was incorrectly stated that Café Mazi on Shrewsbury St. is owned and operated by Bill Mazi’s son Chris. The eatery is owned and operated by Bill Manzi’s son Brian.

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STEVEN KING

Brielle Stovall performs “House of the Rising Sun” at the First Baptist Church open mic night.

{ coverstory } Sarah Bousquet, 15, a sophomore at David Prouty High School in Spencer, has been writing since “the fourth or fifth grade” but making up stories in her head far longer than that. She’s been encouraged to get out and read her work at one of the area’s open poetry mic events as a way of getting her work out to people, but has yet to take the plunge.

Worcester’s many open mics offer a common cure for stage fright Brian Goslow

“I hadn’t really thought of it as an option until recently,” says Bousquet, who thinks of herself as a novelstyle writer rather than a poet, but tries to experiment with other genres and formats. “I felt that my writing was too big and long to be read aloud to people. Even then, I felt that I wasn’t good enough to be up there. I was scared I would get booed off the stage.” She’s recently gotten more comfortable with the thought of sharing her works behind a microphone. “It was only a little while ago, when I was reading Shakespeare and the ability to read things hit me. I could read this, so I could read my own work too,” Bousquet says. “It’s now only a matter of learning how to emote when I read the words.” The Worcester region has no lack of opportunities for those who want to share their talents with the world, whether through the spoken word at poetry open mics, songs and lyrics they’ve composed at music open mics or just taking the challenge to get up and sing in front of friends at a karaoke night. “Everyone has a different reason for wanting to get up and do that,” says Gabriel Navarre, who hosts a singersongwriter open mic at The Raven on Pleasant Street in Worcester. On a below zero wind chill night in late January, Brian Dickens, 21, of Winchendon drove down to the Raven with his father, Jeff, to perform four of his original compositions: “Big Fish,” “Toxic Concept,” “That’s Cash” and “My Muse and My Reason,” the latter namedropping Jack Kerouac. He’s well composed onstage for his age, with a catchy song-telling delivery that easily and warmly pulls you into his subject matter. “I got that from listening to Iron and Wine (real name Samuel Beam), a singer-songwriter who has an abstract way of storytelling,” Dickens says. “I took his comfort in storytelling and added in my love of Beat Culture and Kerouac.” Dickens first performed in his preschool church choir. “I’ve pretty much always been singing,” he says. Dickens got past an early feeling of discomfort onstage by taking advantage of performing any place that offered him the opportunity. “I’m comfortable at open mics,” Dickens says. “Some people like to crap on them but the best way to get started is to go to 100 open mics and play 100 crappy shows. You get good from being bad. It’s all just practicing and keeping it honest with yourself. Know what’s inside your self.” Jessica Lovina O’Neill first stepped onstage as a guitarist with her band Oversoul at the Espresso Bar on James Street in 1995 when she was 17. “I remember we were all terrified,” she recalls. “My bandmate and I were talking about the line that you cross when you step from being in the audience to being onstage, and how we were afraid to cross that line.” continued on page 10

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These days, she’s more apt to appear solo performing her own compositions (most recently at the sober open mic at Everyday Miracles in Worcester) or singing her heart out to the music of a newly discovered favorite at a karaoke night at Café Neo on Worcester’s Millbury Street. “It (the fear of getting onstage) is worse when you’re performing alone as opposed to in a group, because all the pressure is on you and there’s no one to cover your mistakes,” O’Neill says. “On the other hand, I think emotionally you can relate to people on a more personal level when it’s a solo performance, and even more so if it’s a smaller, more intimate crowd.” O’Neill found a disconnect with audiences that she wasn’t expecting. “Once you’re onstage behind that microphone or with that instrument in your hands, you’re in your own little world, and you’re inviting everyone else COREY OLIVIER

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COREY OLIVIER

{ coverstory } in,” she says. “The crowd becomes this thing, this entity, a mass of faces and eyes in the dark. If you look out and make eye contact with one person, that can be a little scary. If you start overthinking things like ‘oh, they look bored’ or something, it can get inside your head and make you self-conscious about your performance.” She solved that problem by adopting a technique she remembered from her high school speech class: scanning the crowd, seeing who was attentive, then focusing on the wall behind their heads. “If people are interested and if you have their attention, that can create a really positive energy that you can feed off of and use to fuel your performance,” O’Neill says. “That definitely kills the nervous feeling.” Nicholas Davis, co-host of the Dirty Gerund Poetry Show held at Ralph’s every Monday night, was introduced to live poetry when his uncle took him to the Java Hut in Webster Square when he was in the sixth grade. “I was a troubled

• JANUARY 31, 2013

Above: Audra Finch performs at Ralph’s Diner. Below, left: Fran Drobot performs at NU Cafe. youth and he thought it might give me some direction,” says Davis, who soon returned to read aloud himself. “It was a really good feeling being able to do it,” he admits. “It was the place I was looking to find. If you want to perform, you know it.” His Dirty Gerund co-host, Alex Charalambides, made his stage debut at St. Spyridon Greek Orthodox Cathedral. “I was going to Greek school and we had a Greek Independence Day pageant and had to memorize poems,” he recalls. “I remember being very uncomfortable because I had to wear this Greek-kind of kilt, a Fustanella. Being a young boy, I wanted to be playing Little League baseball and instead here I was wearing what I felt was a kilt.” It would be another decade and a half until he made his local reading debut, in 2000, at the Java Hut. Then in his mid20s, Charalambides had wanted to be a playwright or screenwriter; he had been working on some raps and poems but didn’t know where to find collaborators to work on them with. Then he saw the film “Slam,” and more specifically, Saul Williams, whose mix of poetry and alternative hip hop sent him looking for similar poetry slams and coffeehouse events in the city. “I saw a listing in Worcester Magazine and took my writing to the Java Hut for a Sunday night Poets’ Asylum reading,” Charalambides says. “I ordered a small cup of coffee and waited for my name to be called. I read two of my poems and got a nice response. I don’t remember what I expected but when I got home to consider what I had done, I realized I had made a major decision in my life and it became my thing.” Charalambides has paid back the warm of the crowd that night repeatedly. While his individual accomplishment of making it to the International World Poetry Slam Championship shows his personal level of accomplishment, it’s his contribution to his craft in the form of working with those following in his shoes (and sneakers) that

is especially noteworthy. He founded the Worcester Youth Poetry Slam, which sent area teams to Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Chicago and New York and currently is a “teaching artist,” in area classrooms to encourage the next generation to bare their souls. “You already have your political consciousness at that age,” Charalambides says. “The poems are not as much rebellious, as standing up for who you are as a person. It’s a validation of voice, viewpoint and worldview — there are a lot of love poems. My first year of poetry I wrote about how much I love poetry. They’re writing about their self-discovery of poetry and discovering something important to them. They’re discovering this new instrument and it’s their voice.” He’s also working on the Louder Than a Bomb Youth Poetry Slam that will take place in Boston in May. “Last year we had 100 teens who wrote poems. This year we expect 200, almost doubling in size in our second year. It’s a dream come true.” Charalambides offers to talk with anyone considering making his or her stage debut, or just to help with his or her writing. “The only way to really jump in is to jump in,” he says. “The only way to practice is practice out loud in front of a mirror or friends. Work on your editing. But the only way to truly to prepare for the first time with strangers watching you is to take that leap of faith.” It's a snowy Monday night outside Ralph's Diner, but inside Charalambides and Davis begin the ritual of preparing the downstairs’ portion for the Dirty Gerund Poetry Show (“Purveyors of the Finest Ruckus”). Those taking the stage utilize iPods, iPads, notebooks, paper hurriedly gathered and yes, even memory itself in presenting their compositions. If they don’t have anything of their own to share, there’s plenty of inspirational starter material surrounding the stage: endless neon, a jukebox, stuffed boar heads, mounted fish, moose heads, crows and numerous other dead things.


{ coverstory } STEVEN KING

A two-piece band composed of guitarist Mark Leighton and drummer Derek Meads provides space age psychedelic jazz-rock backing sounds. “The way I process my world is through my lyrics,” announces Stu “Dr. Gonzo” Esty, before working through “Do Wop Diddy” and “The Queen of Punk” for inclusion in his RoadKill Orchestra’s repertoire. Charalambides reads Jack McCarthy’s “Catholics and Car Keys” after describing how the recently-passed poet came to Worcester in 2000 and became a mentor to many in the city; Davis holds the mic like a jazz crooner while introducing “recently crowned iron poet Mr. Bobby Gibbs” before the night’s headliner, Lucia STEVEN KING

STEVEN KING

Above left: Kryngle Daly sings during the open mic at the Fiddler’s Green Pub. Above right: Jim Heacox performs at the First Baptist Church open mic night. Below: The Red Rock Band plays at the First Baptist Church open mic night. exposing yourself to people,” Navarre this adrenaline rush. I discovered I was a Misch of Montreal, takes the stage. says. “It takes a lot to talk about things huge ham and felt the stage was where I Where many open mic events just have that are personal – and I tend to write belonged.” a single microphone and speaker, the about personal things, mainly about love; He played for real for the first time at Raven has a booming public address (PA) I also get material from books, movies, the system. “Some people are a little skiddish,” a blues jam at the Chicken Bone Saloon media.” in Framingham. “I was able to be there Navarre says. “It can be a bit unsettling to At the Raven, he tries to create a with my family because they served food,” go from a coffeehouse to a club setting, welcoming atmosphere for newcomers Navarre says. He went on to try to work on a raised stage, with lights shining so they feel at ease when they take the with other musicians, but found the band into your eyes. It’s less intimate (than a stage. “It’s about getting over your nerves; setting unsatisfactory. “I worked with coffeehouse), but it can be stimulating.” they can be a big hurdle,” Navarre says. people who weren’t prepared and realized Navarre began playing music “at 10 or “It can feel like you’ve got horse blinders I didn’t want to be in that position.” 11,” growing up in a musical family. “The on. Your heart is pounding and a voice is He set out on his own and now has 80 very first time on stage was at a junior coming out of this big speaker that doesn’t original songs to choose from. high talent show,” he says. “I got up and sound like you think you sound. It can be Playing his own material is a big step lip-synched; I was into heavy metal at the disorienting. The key is getting back to up from playing songs made popular by time. I remember I felt really confidant the place you were when you wrote the someone else. “It feels like you’re really and when I got on stage, and there was songs.” Bill McCarthy has been hosting open mic nights locally since starting out at Tom Foolery’s in Shrewsbury in April 1998 - “In the last century,” McCarthy laughs. He grew up in a theatrical family; so being onstage came natural to him. “Then I discovered the Beatles and was in bands all through high school,” McCarthy says. “So I’ve been onstage in front of a microphone forever. I’ve also done thousands of radio commercials and a few TV ones. I’m a big ham.” McCarthy’s a one-man sound crew as he arrives at Greendale’s Pub on West Boylston Street for his weekly Tuesday night open mic. Carrying a small Bose speaker, mic stand and small duffle bag, he declines an offer of help. “It’s pretty much a two-trip deal,” he says. Eric Hart of Charlton, the night’s first performer, tunes his guitar before announcing he’s going to be “playing some songs I haven’t played for a while.” He opens with “The City of New Orleans,” made famous by Arlo Guthrie via Steve Goodman, and sung with a sweet deeptone voice. He’s immediately competing continued on page 12

JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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{ coverstory }

COREY OLIVIER

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with the sounds of a pool game, a couple of women talking on their cellphones and the Celtics and Jeopardy on the large TV screens. Hartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice sends you back to late â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s Greenwich Village and the early â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s when singer-songwriters took control of the airwaves, performing songs by Jonathan Edwards' â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunshine,â&#x20AC;? Pink Anderson's â&#x20AC;&#x153;Travelinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Man,â&#x20AC;? and a sped-up version of the Grateful Deadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friend of the Devil.â&#x20AC;? Like McCarthy, Hart got his stage acclamation in the theater; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been playing music for the past 20 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My family was in theater so I have no problems behind the mic,â&#x20AC;? he admits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I did TV stuff, commercials and some professional acting.â&#x20AC;? The ďŹ rst time was under his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s direction in Providence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a little nervous and he told me, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to enjoy you.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? On this evening, a regular of McCarthy's open mics, Joel Siegelman, who at 66 has become a familiar face at local blues jams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;About a year ago, a woman encouraged me to do karaoke,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interested, but I went along with it because I was interested in her.â&#x20AC;? Things immediately escalated from there â&#x20AC;&#x201D; onstage. Siegelman performed a Joan Baez, pre-Animals version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;House of the Rising Sunâ&#x20AC;? that had been part of his repertoire when he played guitar in high school, a half-century earlier, accompanied

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by guitarist Scott Marshall and a laptop with lyrics, at Dunnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in East BrookďŹ eld. He returned to Dunnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three days later to sign the same song at their weekly blues jam. Less than a year later, his Sundays are regularly spent ďŹ rst at Dunnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, then at Greendaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, participating in their respective open stage blues jams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I started singing, I was nervous,â&#x20AC;? Siegelman says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Karaoke was pleasant because the words were lit up for me. Playing with live bands, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about remembering to sing at the right time and remembering the lyrics. To get ready, I listen to the song a thousand times, write down the

Above: Jack Ill performs at Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diner. Below: Tom Nolan sings at the open mic night held at the Fiddlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Green Pub. lyrics and memorize them.â&#x20AC;? In late January, he took a personal big step by performing at Greendaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet Fire,â&#x20AC;? his own band assembled to play the songs he selected. Many of the three dozen or so people in the room STEVEN KING were there to see Siegelman and a few took to the dance ďŹ&#x201A;oor. Before starting, he announced he had two pieces of paper â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one a set list, the other notes on parts to play with individual songs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was afraid Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d forget what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m supposed to do,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once I started in, I regained my conďŹ dence.â&#x20AC;? While his Facebook page has him billed as â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Song and Dance Man,â&#x20AC;? Siegelman is thinking about getting a keyboard, taking keyboard lessons, re-learning the guitar, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;becoming a real musician.â&#x20AC;? Fret not Joel fans. He hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forgotten what has made him a fast fan favorite and that his current popularity was a long time coming. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am a socially awkward person; a lot of performers are like that â&#x20AC;&#x201D; they express themselves behind the microphone,â&#x20AC;? Siegelman says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easier for me than social conversation. I do love being behind the mic.â&#x20AC;?


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MCUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EDUCATION LINE OF CREDIT... Through the Credit Union Student Choice program, MCU now offers a low-cost Education Line of Credit to help fill funding gaps not covered by federal aid. â&#x20AC;¢ Lower Rates! â&#x20AC;¢ ZERO Origination Fees! Plan NOW â&#x20AC;¢ Flexible Repayment Options! for your future! â&#x20AC;¢ On-line Applications! PLANNING AND PREPARING FOR COLLEGE â&#x20AC;¢ Approval in minutes!

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JANUARY 31, 2013 â&#x20AC;¢ WORCESTERMAG.COM

17


night day

To B or Not To B?

&

18

art | dining | nightlife | January 31 - February 6, 2013

Matt Robert

“I’m not going to say the B word,” says guitarist/vocalist Jon Short about Big Eyed Rabbit, the trio he shares with bassist Jeff Burch and drummer Duncan Arsenault. Listeners may be tempted to categorize them under that genre that starts with a B and even draw comparisons to that two-piece Akron band named after the ebony part of a piano and that Detroit duet named after a stripe. The band, which plays a bill with local jam outfit WHAT at Green Street’s Lucky Dog Music Hall on Saturday, February 9, is protective of its identity and careful about how they are cast in print. But Big Eyed Rabbit, which does draw at least some of its form from the conventions of that music, is

STEVEN KING

only blues the way the Black Keys are blues, or Medeski, Martin and Wood or Dub Apocalypse are jazz. Then again, it’s hard to play guitar-based music in America with the 20th century right in the rearview mirror without knowingly or unwittingly paying homage to blues. Titles aside, though, Big Eyed Rabbit plays a loud, joyful and visceral stew of John Lee Hooker groove built on Jeff’s deep bass and Duncan’s swinging, forceful drumming, underpinning Jon’s analog tube amp growl, rife with open-note harmonics and reliable alternating thumb-picked bass notes, while he sings about matters of love or relationship entanglements. The story is in the behind-the-scenes aspects of the band: the vetting process that brought this particular lineup together, the approach to the stage act and recording, and a general philosophy that, though backed by unshakable conviction on the part of the band members, can nevertheless be difficult to articulate. continued on page 21

From left: Jeff Burch, Duncan Arsenault and Jon Short of Big Eyed Rabbit.

WORCESTERMAG.COM

• JANUARY 31, 2013


night day &

{ music }

A Midwinter’s Dream

Taylor Nunez

With the recent biting cold and whipping wind, it is difficult to imagine the fresh scents and sights of flowers. Bringing a teasing taste of spring to the Worcester community for its 11th year, the Worcester Art Museum and Tower Hill Botanic Garden present Flora in Winter: A Midwinter’s Dream for a brief four-day event. Displaying arrangements inspired by artistic works from the Worcester Art Museum, floral designers’ interpretation of masterworks brings a reprieve from the monochromatic winter landscape.

Being two of Worcester’s cultural institutions, Worcester Art Museum and Tower Hill Botanic Garden have shared much in common outside of collaborating for Flora in Winter for over a decade. Michael Arnum, director of marketing and public relations at Tower Hill Botanic Garden, recalls Flora in Winter’s origins noting, “The genesis for Flora was the need for horticultural knowledge. The [Worcester] Art Museum first approached us to provide garden training to their docents so they could give more informative tours about the flower arrangements on display - to understand where some of the flowers came from, how they grow, and why they are special.” That training, provided when still located in the Horticultural Hall on Elm Street, sparked the now beloved event. Once Tower Hill Botanic Garden was opened in Boylston, the organization finally had the natural venue where floral arrangements could become apart of the visitors’ experience. Today Flora in Winter takes place at both Worcester Art Museum and Tower Hill Botanic Garden. Michael Masseur, spokesperson for Worcester Art Museum, notes just how celebrated the event has become since its inception. “Flora in Winter is a four-day event that has grown to become traditional in the community, and is successful for a couple reasons. Viewing fresh floral arrangements in the middle of winter is an uplifting, rejuvenating feeling for anyone who comes to visit the museum, and the arrangements are simply breathtaking.” Selecting a large variety of works from their inventory, Worcester Art Museum offers floral designers an array of pieces to choose and interpret for their arrangement. Some of the pre-selected works include, “The Last Supper and the Agony in the Garden,” “The Brooding Woman,” and “Paul Revere Silver Cases.” Kicking off this year’s event on Thursday, January 31, Worcester Art Museum will host Flora Euphoria! where guests will time travel back to the 1960s and ‘70s

to experience the true meaning of “flower power.” This opening event of Flora in Winter will coincide well with Worcester Art Museum’s current exhibit “Kennedy to Kent State: Images of a Generation.” The exhibit, which ends the same day as Flora in Winter, takes a closer look at powerful American photographs taken between 1958 and 1975, documenting monumental national moments such as John F. Kennedy’s assassination and the Vietnam War. Tower Hill Botanic Garden will commence the festivities, as well. On Friday, February 1, Tower Hill will host a Candlelight Choir at 7 p.m., presented by Lori Diamond and Fred Abatelli. With a title alluding to William Shakespeare’s play, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” this year’s Flora in Winter exhibitions will pay homage to the revered playwright and poet. Citing lines from the aforementioned play, Arnum explains that many of Shakespeare’s works offered floral interpretations as he references plants and flowers throughout his writing. For example, the following lines from “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” as noted by Arnum: “I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine: There sleeps Titania sometime of the night, Lull’d in these flowers with dances and delight.” Throughout the weekend, between looks at the 1960s and interpretation of Shakespearean works, there will be live performances, living sculptures and demonstrations. One floral demonstration, “From the White House to Your House,” includes a presentation by master floral designer Ruth Loiseau who will walk visitors through her design work done for five administrations: Reagan, Bush, Clinton, Bush and Obama. This exclusive look at floral design mastery is already sold out. However, there is also “Interpretative Challenge Class from the Male Perspective” and a demonstration for kids of all ages, “Origami and Psychedelic Flowers.” Concluding the event, Clark University’s the Clark Bars and the Shrewsbury High School Women’s Choir, under the direction of Michael Lapomardo, will perform a Flora in Winter concert, including musical pieces from the ’60s. Both Tower Hill Botanic Garden and Worcester Art Museum hope that visitors embrace the unique art form. “We hope that they come away with an appreciation of nature and a connection to it, and for the creativity of humans in using it to communicate a concept or feeling,” states Arnum. Echoing Arnum’s hopes, Masseur expresses that the Worcester Art Museum wishes for visitors to experience art in a new way and to overall, create a memorable experience. For more information on Flora in Winter: A Midwinter’s Dream visit Worcester Art Museum’s website at worcesterart.org or Tower Hill Botanic Garden’s website at towerhillbg.org.

Monday – Friday 10am– 6:30pm Saturday 10am– 4pm ˆ Sunday 1pm– 4pm

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Check knitscape.biz for more details on sales, events and classes JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

19


night day &

{ theater}

“American Idiot” comes to Hanover Ben Ryland

The Hanover Theatre is presenting the Tony Awardwinning Broadway National Tour of Green Day’s “American Idiot” this weekend for five performances. This modern stage musical had a long run on Broadway and has been a sold-out hit on the road. Last year it was close to impossible to get a ticket to the Boston run, and many other venues. With the popularity, the tour has been continued into a second year.

When “American Idiot” the CD was released in 2004 it sold 12 million copies and won a Grammy for rock album of the year. The composer, Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day, believed it could work as a stage show. Approached by Spring Awakenings Director Michael Mayer to make it happen, “the story of American

20

“Disillusioned, they all end up back youth wanting to improve their lives,” home asking ‘is this the beginning or the was an idea that was perfect for the end?’” says actress Alyssa Dipalma. stage. After being created at the Berkeley A BFA graduate of Philadelphia’s Repertory Theatre it moved to New York. Arts University, Dipalma plays What’s Broadway audiences of all ages will Her Name, and says she is very excited respond if the show is good and touches the emotions. Whether you are PHOTO BY LITWIN familiar with Green Day’s music or not, you will be astounded by its power and energy. The lyrics are accessible and tell the narrative story mostly as sungthrough. Johnny, aka The Jesus of Suburbia, questions, “is this the way we want our life to be,” according to Mayer, and decides to head for the big city with two friends. Upon arrival in this industrial-style in-your-face blitz of stimuli he falls in love to be in the show traveling across the with “What’s Her Face.” He also meets United States after London. When asked evil in the form of St. Jimmy who is a if the show ends on a sad note DiPalma drug lord. St. Jimmy is the dark and the explains, “it depends on how you look woman he loves is the light in Johnny’s at it. Everyone kind of gets a second world. The character Tunny is attracted to chance but there are pretty bad things that the military and another friend goes back happen on the way. It’s like the glass halfhome with his pregnant girl.

full sort of thing.” The songs are integrated into the story without effort; including the blockbuster title song “American Idiot.” Several of the songs are from other Green Day CDs, plus one formerly unreleased tune “When It’s Time.” The tour is played on the Broadway set by Tony Award-winning Christine Jones. The very atmospheric industrialstyle set with 3 dozen television monitors lit by Tony winner Kevin Adams adds to the excitement of the music and story. When asked what her dream acting role would be, Dipalma’s response is surprising for someone so young and just starting out on her musical theater career. “I’m playing it. When I first saw the show I said I have to play this part. It’s a really important role and I have to do it.” According to Dipalma, the Worcester audience should “be prepared to have their faces completely knocked off. It is a wild show and a lot of fun to play.” See “American Idiot” on Feb.1 at 8 p.m., Feb. 2 at 2 p.m. or 8 p.m., Feb. 3 at 1 p.m. or 6:30 p.m. at The Hanover Theatre, 2 Southbridge St. thehanovertheatre.org.

Advertise to parents of children that attend either day or overnight camps? E-mail us at camps@baystateparent.com for a media kit and special offer.

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Sending your child or children to day or overnight camps this summer? Our March issue is now larger and more comprehensive and indispensable. p

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• JANUARY 31, 2013

EXPANDED TO INCLUDE CAMPS WITHIN 200 MILES


BIG EYED RABBIT continued from page 19

“I wanted to be able to stand up and play electric and stretch out,” says Jon, “but I needed my thumb to be able to be where it needed to be and I needed to find the kick drum.” The band’s origin goes back 10 years to when Jon and Jeff played together in a “funk-jazz” group called The Late Messengers. “I pretended that I knew how to play keyboards with [Jeff] on bass it worked out all right,” says Jon. The rest of the story happened at The Dive Bar, where Duncan’s Thursday night series became sort of a Minton’s Playhouse for Worcester, bringing together a growing circle of varied players in a low-risk cauldron that patiently produced numerous lineups, several of which have since been concretized into stable bands. “Jon came to do many Thursdays,” says Duncan, “and … sometimes Jeff would play bass ... and it was becoming apparent, the more we played, that, boy! When Jeff is there, when it’s that combination, something different happens that – you can kind of just tell when a band is sort of clicking.” “We did a lot of gigs here,” says Jeff, “and even played the Open Road [Festival], I think it was a couple of years ago, and didn’t have a name yet, and then it was even probably a good six months after that that we decided, you know what, we should probably just put a name on it.” “The thing for me,” says Jon “– when Duncan first called me to come down here to do Thursdays, I said, ‘I’d love to, but no bass player and no rehearsal.’” “I was sincerely interested in developing that kind of organic relationship with another musician, and that’s one of the things that I felt I had developed with Jeff,” Jon adds. “That was a part of growing those legs back with The Late Messengers … It was about the experience of being there, about playing.” “I don’t think that we ever really talked about stuff, or that we ever really had to have conversations about stuff,” says Jon, noting the chemistry the three felt when they played together. “I think the only conversations that I have with Duncan sometimes is, ‘Hey! This song, tonight, that groove that we had, that’s the one,’” adds Jeff. “All of a sudden it clicks and it’s like, ‘Yeah! That’s the one.’” “That’s essentially the spirit of the Thursdays in the first place,” adds Duncan. “Within the first verse we’ve said enough to each other musically that we know where we’re going to go.” The band first appeared as Big Eyed Rabbit “at The Lucky Dog the weekend after Scott [Ricciuti] died,” says Duncan, in April of 2012, but Jon says that he knew well before “that these were the guys I wanted to play with. I was set … When I get to play with these guys it’s something else for me. It draws something else out.” With a gig booked for Vermont’s Tweed

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{ music }

River Music Festival for the summer of 2012, Big Eyed Rabbit needed a recording. Pressed for time, they rented The Lucky Dog for a night and brought in friend and engineer Paul Dagnello of the band Huck, who scrambled to rent the best gear he could find. They spent the night cutting essentially live tracks in the empty club, a radical departure in this day of albums produced with the benefit of limitless tracks and editing on digital workstations. The result is a six-track CD

of spirited romps through warm, hugesounding grooves that form a pretty good representation of the band’s live sound: reckless, confident, and youthful, and at once new and fresh and utterly familiar. They aren’t so much looking back or looking forward, but looking around, making use of years of acquisition of a musical catalogue, chops, and ears. The CD is indicative of the age and experience of these musicians – fulltimers with a lot of collective years in the

business, who have brought a lot of high quality music to the local scene and have, through the age-old process of hard work and continued effort, arrived in the same place at the right time to create a shared musical vision that embodies their musical and extra-musical philosophies. And that’s the kind of relationship anybody can understand. Catch Big Eyed Rabbit at Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green Street on Saturday, February 9 at 9 p.m.

Congrats !

Chef’s Winning Dish Chef Maykel’s Judges Dish

A Braised Wagyu Short Rib accompanied by a Maple Sweet Potato Rye Cake, Parsnip puree, Crispy Sauerkraut and a Thousand Island infused Demi Glace. (pictured right) 5 0 8 - 4 5 9 - 4 24 0 | w w w . e v o d i ni ng . c om

JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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WORCESTERMAG.COM

• JANUARY 31, 2013

{ film }

A man with a neck scrotum walks into a bar … Jim Keogh

The best thing about reviewing only one movie a week is that I enjoy the luxury of seeing mostly good stuff. Even flawed films generally have enough interesting moments so that I can leave the theater not feeling like I’ve been cinematically waterboarded. Then there’s “Movie 43.” A bunch of A-list to C-list to no-list Hollywood talent signed on to this anthology comedy that begins with a sketch featuring Hugh Jackman as a guy with a set of testicles dangling from his neck and, believe it or not, gets worse from there. Les miserables, indeed. Each skit in “Movie 43” is like the final 20 minutes of every “Saturday Night Live” you’ve ever seen, when the sketches that should have been rejected are tossed into the broadcast to pad out the show. I mean, let’s face it — by now you half expect already to have seen a man sporting a scrotum-goiter, at least on basic cable. Twelve short films are strapped to the framing device of a wannabe screenwriter played by Dennis Quaid, who is desperately pitching his crappy movie idea to a studio executive played by Greg Kinnear. As Quaid describes his increasingly ridiculous storylines, the film cuts away to the demented scenes percolating in his brain that involve feces, menstrual blood, cat piss, and a discursive lesson on the size of Supergirl’s vagina. Hey, I like gross-out humor. Love dirty jokes. Ever see “The Aristocrats,” about the filthiest joke every told? Hilarious. But to be funny, the gross stuff has to be grounded in some sort of recognizable human behavior. You tell me what’s funny about a 15-year-old girl (Chloe Grace Moretz) experiencing her first period at a friend’s house, and, as she stands off in a corner, mortified, blood seeping through her (white) pants, her friend’s older brother (Christopher MintzPlasse) runs around the house screeching in horror as he frantically hunts for sponges, a mop, or anything else to sop up the offending mess. Wow. Just … wow. As I watched “Movie 43” it became clear that it was made specifically for teen and preteen boys, even if the R rating means a hunk of them will be excluded from seeing the movie until it becomes available on demand. How else to explain a recurring commercial parody

about the “iBabe,” which is basically an iPod housed inside the body of a lifelike female sex doll (played by a real naked woman in the movie – tee-hee)? Richard Gere plays the executive behind the iBabe, and even the former American Gigolo looks embarrassed fiddling with the controls. I know exactly why all the actors decided to participate in “Movie 43.” For most, their roles likely required only one day’s worth of work and let them play against type to show the world their wacky side. Real-life couple Liev Schreiber and Naomi Watts were probably weary of fighting Nazis and surviving

tsunamis onscreen, so why not play a couple who homeschools their teenage son by replicating all the humiliations he would be facing in a real high school, including that awkward first kiss? If the goal was to make us squirm when junior made it to first base with mom, then mission accomplished. There are plenty of familiar faces here: Halle Berry, Kate Winslet, Seth MacFarlane and Uma Thurman among them. And, oh, Gerard Butler. That poor bastard. I thought “Playing for Keeps” was his career low, but here he plays twin leprechauns — that’s Butler’s face computerized onto leprechaun bodies — battling Johnny Knoxville and a bloated Seann William Scott for a pot of gold. There is typically little to recommend a comedy dumped into theaters during the no-man’s-land of late January. I expected something pretty bad, and my expectations were met beautifully.


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Michael’s Bridge Diner

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{ dining}

FOOD ★★★1/2 AMBIENCE ★★★★ SERVICE ★★★★ VALUE ★★★1/2 56 Main St., Lancaster • 978-368-0630

Get stuffed! Kambria Lovejoy

A good restaurant is one often recommended by a friend or coworker, which is what brought us to Michael’s Bridge Diner for the first time. What made us return, was everything about it.

Michael’s is about a 25 minute drive from Worcester on the Route 70 ClintonLancaster line, not surprisingly, by a bridge. The wood-framed building is inviting, but the inside is where the charm lies. We chose to seat ourselves at a table near the open kitchen window, rather than on the stools at the counter. Overlooking our table were two large stuffed moose heads. But that’s not where the taxidermy ends. Bears and bear cubs, deer heads, bob cats, mountain lions and other animals that we were unsure of were mounted on the walls. Along with the taxidermy are signs all over the walls such as “Young at

heart, slightly older in other places” and “Because nice matters.” At one point, we had to stop reading everything on the walls and focus on the menu which states “Get

Make Your ay Valentine’s D s n o ti a Reserv Today!

side of bacon. The New York Sirloin was cooked more well-done than the medium she requested and could have used some seasoning, while the scrambled eggs were cooked to my liking (as Maude’s not a fan of eggs). The kiddo went on the simple side with eggs, toast, home fries and bacon. She scoffed up her breakfast in-between texts and tweets to her friends about the animals that joined us for breakfast. During my previous visit I had the veggie omelet and loved it, but this time I went out of my comfort zone and ordered the Stuffed French Toast ($6.99) with strawberries. My first encounter with stuffed French toast proved to be a good one. The whipped cream cheese that filled the two slices of toast was creamy and the top was smothered in strawberries and whipped cream. The only downfall was that the strawberries seemed to be frozen rather than fresh. We all finished our breakfast, declaring we were stuffed and couldn’t take another bite. We’ll return again, most likely on a Saturday when the fryer is going and try a few of the lunch items.

Sweetheart Martini

Valentine’s Day Specials

$5

AUTHENTIC CAJUN SPECIALS

DINNER

HURRICANES

• Lazy Lobster • Double Cut Lamb Chops with Cabernet Sauvignon Demi Glaze • Prime Rib • & Much More

DESSERTS • Chocolate Moulton Lava Cake with Fresh Whipped Cream • Four Layer Red Velvet Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting

BEADS &MASKS

Come join the big ga us to watch six big scrme on our een Big Game TVs! Buffet!

64 Barre/Paxton Road • Route. 1222 • Rutland CHEF OWNED

stuffed, you only live once. Eat well.” Michael’s offers the usual suspects: omelets, sandwiches, burgers, and even faux ham, bacon and sausage for our vegetarian friends. The list of specials was long and intriguing, but to our surprise was all breakfast-related. Being a Sunday, I guess they give the fryer a day of rest. No French fries, onion rings or any other fried food for us. Although our friendly server did inform us that if we’d like any lunch items, it would not be a problem (as fries could be substituted for chips, coleslaw or other items), we decided to stick with breakfast. Maude, a true meat-eater, chose the Steak and Eggs served with home fries and toast ($9.99), along with a

508-886 - 477 1 www.laddsrestaurant.com

Come & Play

K ENO

DANCING & LIVE MUSIC from Slippery Sneakers Zydeco Band 139 GREEN STREET WORCESTER, MA 01604

TUESDAY 6PM-11PM

FEBRUARY 12th JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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Swish

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BITES ... nom, nom, nom CELEBRITY CHEF DINNER

EVO Dining hosts its first Celebrity Chef Dinner Party on Monday, February 4. The

Raising a glass to wine everywhere

Savoring sauvignon blanc Al Vuona

f you could find a well-balanced white wine that was not only aromatic and delicious but food-friendly too, would you go ahead and buy it? If your answer is yes, then I have just the wine for you. A sauvignon blanc is without a doubt your wine. Crisp, clean, food-friendly and widely available, this is a wine to try. Best of all it’s produced all over the world so you have many choices in terms of style and price. I often refer to sauvignon blanc as the all season go-to wine. It’s refreshing in spring and summer and lip-smacking delicious in fall and winter. The most salient characteristic of sauvignon blanc is its distinctive aroma, which can evoke scents of grapefruit, lime, green melon, gooseberry, passion fruit and bell pepper. Sauvignon blanc is often fermented in stainless steel to accentuate the wine’s crisp, zesty qualities. The end result is a very versatile wine that can complement everything from shellfish and salad to poultry and aged cheese. Of course, prices will vary from one producer and region to another. While a New Zealand sauvignon blanc may cost $20, a Pouilly Fume from France may cost upwards of $50. The flavor profile from region to region is quite distinct as well. Whereas Pouilly Fume is reminiscent of a smoky, gun metal flavor, New Zealand sauvignon blanc is more citrus and tart fruit flavored. Here in America, very good sauvignon blanc is produced on both the east and west coasts. These wines are modern in style with ample fruit and crisp acidity. Most are readily available and the prices are reasonable. I must admit I love sauvignon OF THE WEEK blanc regardless of where it originates from. You can’t help Kim Crawford noticing from the very first sip how utterly exuberant this wine is. Sauvignon Blanc, So savor the moment with a chilled glass of sauvignon New Zealand $19 blanc. You’ll thank me later.

WINE

Come Make Your Valentines Day Special at Carmella’s Italian Kitchen.

CHOOSE FROM SINGLE LOBSTER, PRIME RIB, FILET MIGNON, BAKED STUFFED SHRIMP, BAKED STUFFED HADDOCK OR GRILLED SALMON and many others... INCLUDES SALAD, POTATO AND DESSERT.

$ 30 minutes from Worcester 10 minutes from Sturbridge

4999 per couple

VIN BIN GOES RED

The Vin Bin hosts its annual Go Red for Women

fundraiser event on Friday, Feb. 1 at its Marlborough location. A portion of all sales made that day will be donated to the American Heart Association. The Vin Bin, 91 Main St., Marlborough. thevinbin.com.

! ment m o c a rs Leave what othe . y e Se to sa have www.worcestermag.com

Not your everyday newspaper.

&RQWHVWV Photo Galleries &LW\'LQLQJ

e m lla’s r a C Italian Kitchen

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OPEN 7 DAYS Sun. 12 Noon-9pm; Mon.-Thurs. 11am to 9pm; Fri. & Sat. 11am to 10pm www.carmellasitaliankitchen.com

WORCESTERMAG.COM

• JANUARY 31, 2013

Boy Scout Troop 9 of Worcester hosts its annual pancake breakfast fundraiser event on Sunday, Feb. 3 with two seatings; the first 7:30-10 a.m. followed by the second from 10:45-11:30 a.m. The homecooked breakfast includes pancakes, bacon, sausage, orange juice, coffee and tea. Tickets $8 for adults or $7 for those 10 or younger and seniors 65 and older. Greendale Peoples Church, 25 Francis St. troop9worcester.org.

News and Blogs

WORCESTER { news | arts | dining | nightlife

55 South Maple St., Brookfield, MA 508-867-5475

PANCAKES FOR THE BOYS

Stay Fresh.

.com

Take Out Available

Corner House Cookies, a bakery in Charlton, is now taking orders for specialized Valentine’s Day cookies. Orders can be mailed via FedEx or picked up at Isador’s Organics in Oxford. Gift sets and cookie favors are available. Find out more and place an order at cornerhousecookies. com. Want to decorate your own cookies? Corner House hosts two

worcestermag.com mag

I

event will feature EVO’s own CoOwner and Executive Chef Albert Maykel III as well as award-winning Chef Barry Sexton who has appeared on Food Network’s show “Dinner Impossible.” The event begins at 6:30 p.m. with cocktails and continues at 7 p.m. with dinner and wine pairings with consulting sommelier Christine Zecker. Clark University’s student a cappella group Clark Bars will perform as guests arrive and enjoy cocktails. Proceeds from the event benefit the UMass Colorectal Cancer Fund. Single tickets $75, table for two $150, table for four $300. Cocktail attire is recommended. To purchase tickets visit EVO Dining, 234 Chandler St. evodining. com.

COOKIES FOR THE HEART

EVERYTHING KNOW ABOUT

YOU NEED TO

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IN ONE CLICK!


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cookie decorating classes on Monday, Feb. 11 at the First Congregational Church of Leicester. The first, held 6:15-6:45 p.m., is for children ages 3-6. A Valentine’s Day story will be read, followed by each child given the opportunity to decorate two cookies with icing and sprinkles. Cost is $6 per child. The second class, held 7-7:45 p.m., is for kids ages 7-12. Each participant will be given four cookies to decorate with icing, stencils, edible ink markers and sprinkles. Cost per student is $12. A bakery box will be provided to students of both classes to bring cookies home in. To register for a class visit cornerhousecookies.com.

NEW NAME

The Mexican restaurant Playa del Carmen in Holden will soon be called Mexicali Fresh Mex Grill. The Brambila family, who own both the Holden restaurant and Mexicali Grill in Spencer, will call both eateries by the same name in the future. The family is said to be opening another location in Ware, Mass. this March. Mexicali Fresh Mex Grill, 700 Main St., Holden.

LOVE, FOOD, MUSIC

Point Breeze Restaurant hosts a Valentine’s Dinner and Dance event on Saturday, Feb. 9

from 8-11 p.m. The band She’s Busy with Lisa, Selena, Kenny and Brett will be joined by Tom Poddles on drums. Guests are asked to either pay $5 or donate a nonperishable food item that will benefit the Webster-Dudley Food Share. Point Breeze Restaurant, 114 Point Breeze Rd., Webster. pointbreezeonwebsterlake.com.

FORK IT OVER

Area chefs compete to create the best, most original appetizers and desserts using Girl Scout cookies when the annual event Fork It Over returns on Tuesday, Feb. 5 from 5-7:30 p.m. at Coral Seafood. Participants, including Peppercorn’s, Pepper’s Fine Catering, Sweet T Southern Kitchen, WPI Dining Services and others, will be judged in two categories: sweet and savory. Attendees of the event will vote for People’s Choice award. Live Music will be performed by local acoustic duo The TwoTimers and a raffle will take place featuring items from Worcester-area businesses. Tickets are $30 per person in advance or at the door on the day of the event. Those who purchase in advance may buy two tickets for $50 at yourtimewellspent.org or by calling 800-462-9100. All proceeds from the event benefit Girl Scouts in grades K-12 throughout central and

Woo-rritos A wrap-up of Worcester’s burritos

Moe’s Southwest Grill Kendra Lapin

Moe’s Southwest Grill

western Massachusetts. Coral Seafood, 225 Shrewsbury St.

Hot Chocolate and coffee will also be available. Snow date is Sunday, Feb. 10. Chaffin Congregational Church, 155 Shrewsbury St., Holden. For more information call 508-829-2146.

CHOCOLATE EXTRAVAGANZA

The fifth annual Valentine’s Chocolate Extravaganza will be held on Saturday, Feb. 9 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Chaffin Congregational Church in Holden. The event offers chocolate treats for sale including cakes, cookies, fudge, candy and other food items with a chocolate theme.

Great Food . . . Great Entertainment . . .

All Close to Home!

February 2: Auntie Trainwreck February 9: High Octane

February 16: Rugged Road February 23: Blue Honey

Karaoke Every Friday Night ~ Must be 21 or older ~

Sushi • Gluten Free Entrees Available Function Rooms • Gift Certificates

Take-Out • Keno 176 Reservoir St. Holden • 508.829.2188 • www.wongdynasty-yankeegrill.com

61 Boston Tpk. Rd., Shrewsbury 508-797-6637 moes.com FOOD ★★★ AMBIENCE ★★★1/2 SERVICE ★★★★ VALUE ★★★ COREY OLIVIER

Moe’s Southwest Grill is easy to use and convenient. They offer a great online ordering system and even a nutrition calculator for those interested in eating healthy and ordering their burritos with an eye on calories, fat, and carbs. We used the nutrition calculator and the online ordering to make this trip extremely convenient (and somewhat healthful). Upon arrival, all I had to do was pick up the food and toss in any additional salsa we wanted.

We ordered the burrito Moe’s is best known for, the Homewrecker, and the slightly smaller sized “Joey Bag of Donuts.” However, after specializing the orders, both ended up being $8.49 and $8.48, respectively. That puts them around average for value; both burritos were filling enough and they came with chips. As for taste, they were OK. There was absolutely nothing wrong with them, but there was nothing outstanding. There was a solidly good flavor; the beef and chicken had a decent texture (not melt-in-your-mouth, but not overdone or stringy, either.) Black beans had more flavor than pinto beans, and there was a lot of salt. The best parts were the guacamole and the fresh salsas. So, if you’re looking for a solid meal for a reasonable price and is very convenient, Moe’s will work for you. JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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Upload your listings at worcestermag.com. Click the Night & Day toolbar, then choose Calendar to place your event listing in both our print and online weekly calendar.

{ listings}

music >Thursday 31

HumanArts: The Bach Consort of Worcester. The Bach Consort of Worcester, will perform as part of the 2013-2013 HumanArts series. The Consort, under the guidance of Artistic Director Michelle Graveline, will perform the “Winter” and “Spring” concertos from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, with Peter Sulski as violin soloist. The Consort will also perform J. S. Bach’s Concerto for violin and oboe. Free and open to the public. Noon-1:30 p.m. Assumption College: Chapel of the Holy Spirit, 500 Salisbury St. 508-767-7304. Coffeeland’s Open Mic Night, hosted by Sean Fullerton. Please bring your musical, poetic, and stand up comedy talents out to Coffeeland Espresso Cafe’s brand new Open Mic. Drinks, Music & Fun. 7-9 p.m. Coffeelands World Gifts Espresso Cafe, 50 High St., Clinton. 978-733-4275 or seanfullertonmusic.net. Ricky Duran. 7-10 p.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508755-0879. Zack Slik. 7-10 p.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. Night Train (Roots/Blues, LIVE MUSIC). No Cover. 7:159:45 p.m. The Mill at 185 West Boylston Street, 185 West Boylston St., West Boylston. themill185.com.

STEVEN KING

Karaoke Thursdays! Every Thursday Night! Hosted by DJ Fast Track! 18+ No Cover! Come Rock the Mic Every Thursday Night at Karaoke! 8:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Club Remix, 105 Water St. 508-756-2227. Cara Brindisi and the Feather Merchants. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Vincent’s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439. Metal Thursday! 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. The 80’s tribute band The Flock Of A-Holes with VERY special guests THE SHOP! Great cover band “The Shop” plays a long set before the Flock tonight. $5. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or facebook. com/groups/TheFlockOfAssholes.

>Friday 1

J.S. Bach The Complete Solo String Work, Part Four. Peter Sulski. Violin/viola Continuation of a twelve part concert cycle of the entire solo works of Bach for violin and viola. Free and open to the public. Noon-1 p.m. Clark University: John and Kay Bassett Admissions Center, 3 Maywood St. 508-793-7356. Open Mic Night! Every Friday night we have an open mic hosted by Patrick McCarthy. Come in and show us your talents or enjoy great performances by local artists! Our menu features craft beer and wine as well as great food options sure to please. No Cost. 6:30-9:30 p.m. NU Cafe, 335 Chandler St. Worcester, MA. 508-926-8800 or nucafe.com. Joe Macey, chart topping acoustic soloist, lights up the stage with his mix of classic rock and country tunes. 7:30-10:30 p.m. The new Women-Owned Small Business Contracting Tavern on the Common, 249 Main St., Rutland. Program will be explained at a free lecture at the Center for Women 508-886-4600. & Enterprise on Friday, Feb. 1 from 10 a.m.-noon. The U.S. Small Patty Biernacki. Patty is an anointed singer/ Business Administration has expanded federal contracting opportunities songwriter. You will be absolutely blessed and lifted for women-owned small businesses and this talk will explore the changes. with her music. Free. 7-9:30 p.m. Mill Church Cafe, To register call 508-363-2300 or email info.worcester@cweonline.org. 45 River St Millbury MA, Millbury. 508-865-1517 The Central Mass Center for Women & Enterprise, 50 Elm or millchurch.org. St. cweonline.org. Sean Fullerton with Tom Gilmartin: Acoustic Blues & Rock. Specializing in Acoustic Blues, Rock ‘n’ Roll and Fingerstyle Guitar using 6 & 12 String guitars, a Dobro for slide guitar, various Havana Night Salsa Thursday with Joselito y su Harmonicas, stomp box guitar effects, live guitar looping and Combo. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Cantina Bar & Grill, 385 Main St. 508a vocal harmonizer, Sean performs in a wide variety of venues 459-5325. facebook.com/events/309608915813772/ and for many weddings, parties, charitable and corporate events Open Mic Thursdays @ Park Grill with Bill throughout New England. Sean’s live shows are fun, exciting, Mccarthy. Visit myspace.com/openmicworld for info and the and audience participation is always encouraged! Dinner, Drinks, latest sign-up schedules. Email Bill McCarthy to reserve a spot Music & Fun. 7-11 p.m. Guiseppe’ s Grille, 35 Solomon Pond Road, at Openmcc@verizon.net. Free. 7:30-11:30 p.m. Park Grill and Northborough. 508-393-4405 or guiseppes-grille.com. Spirits, 257 Park Ave. MySpace.com/OpenMicWorld. MySpace. Tower Hill Botanic Gardens Presents: Lori Diamond com/OpenMicWorld. and Fred Abatelli - Floral in Winter. Free to Members, Audio Wasabi with host Brian Chaffee. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. $12 Non Members. 7-8 p.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. Drive, Boylston. 978-365-2043 or towerhillbg.org. Chris Reddy Acoustic Loops from Hell. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Josh Briggs. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Mill, 185 West Boylston St., Black Sheep Tavern, 261 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422West Boylston. 8484. Karaoke. Karaoke by Star Sound Entertainment. 8 p.m.-12:30 Nat Needle’s “Worcester Potholes” CD Release a.m. Chooch’s Food & Spirits, 31 East Brookfield Road, North Party & Concert. Nat will sign CD’s & perform the songs with Brookfield. 508-867-2494. song-sheets so you can sing along! No Cover, but plan to buy Live Music. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., CD at party discount price of $10. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-7534030. The annual Antique Sleigh Rally happens this Saturday, Feb. 2 at Thursday Open Mic W/ Ed Sturbridge Village at 11 a.m. Drivers of vintage sleighs, pulled by horses, will Sheridan. An unassuming and compete in different classes, including “Sleigh Dog” and “Currier & Ives” divisions. supportive environment to share your The rally is open to the public and free with museum admission. Old Sturbridge music and build great new relationships Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Rd., Sturbridge. osv.org. to further your playing and singing. Free! 8-11 p.m. Blue Plate Lounge, 661 Main St., Holden. 508-829-4566. Dan Kirouac & Sarah Gengel. Gardner. 978-669-0122. dankirouac.freeservers.com. Dan from BEATLES FOR SALE and Live Music in the Pub - Juke Box Junkies. The Jukebox Sarah from the GROOVE STREET BAND join forces for this Junkies are a 3 piece band - resonator guitar, bass, and drums. acoustic duo! Free. 8:30-11:30 p.m. Texas BBQ Company, We play songs that were on jukeboxes in the 1950s, 60s, and 309 Main St., Northborough. 508-393-4742 or facebook.com/ 70s such as, “I Feel Fine” by The Beatles, and, “What a Day For A events/408909075829243. Daydream” by the Lovin’ Spoonful. We have beautiful harmonies

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• JANUARY 31, 2013

Nat Needle performs musical numbers from his new CD “Worcester Potholes” at Nick’s Bar on Thursday, Jan. 31 beginning at 8 p.m. The release party is free, but bring money as there will be copies of the CD for sale for $10. Nick’s Bar, 124 Millbury St.

and encourage crowds to sing along to familiar songs while chatting with friends. Free. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Fiddlers’ Green Pub & Restaurant, 19 Temple St. 508-792-3700. Moonshine. Country Rock band. Covering Grace Potter, Susan Tedechi, Gretchen Wilson, Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert, Pink, and much more. $5. 8:30-11:30 p.m. Blue Plate Lounge, 661 Main St., Holden. 508-829-4566. Orange Diesel, Little War Twins, (CD Release party), Lesser Known Contender and 1st is Boom! Said Thunder. $7. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green

HOW BIZARRE. $5. 9:30 p.m.-1:25 a.m. Jillian’s - Worcester, 315 Grove St. 508-793-0900. DJ One-3. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Perfect Game Sports Grill and Lounge, 64 Water St. 508-792-4263. Orange Television. 10 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877.

>Saturday 2

Lets Get Rocked - Def Leppard. Speakers Night Club, 19 Weed St., Marlborough. 508-480-8222 or speakersnightclub.net. Outrageous Fortune in Concert. Outrageous Fortune is an acoustic vintage jazz Northampton alternative rock band Orange Television takes the and blues trio. 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Harvard Public stage at Beatnik’s on Friday, Feb. 1 at 9:30 p.m. The band’s music Library, Volunteers Hall, 4 Pond Road, Harvard. has been described as being influenced by the sounds of Radiohead 978-456-4114 or harvardpubliclibrary.org. and Led Zeppelin. Tickets $7. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. facebook.com/ Charity for Jeff’s Place. Please join us along orangetelevision. with your friends and family for a night of great food, drinks, raffles, live entertainment, dancing and giving. Jeffs place is a child centered family focused, community based bereavement program that welcomes St. 508-363-1888 or facebook.com/events/186734131466557. all families regardless of race, creed, or socioeconomic status. Bon Jersey- The Premier Bon Jovi Tribute. Break out 4 p.m. Guiseppe’s Grille, 35 Solomon Pond Road, Northborough. the lighters and tease that hair high! Bon Jersey, the premier Bon Jovi tribute, returns to JJ’s this February! $5 cover, get here early to 508-393-4405. Joe Macey, chart topping acoustic soloist, lights up get a good spot! 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m. JJ’s Sports Bar and Grill, 380 the stage with his mix of classic rock and country Southwest Cutoff, Northborough. 508-842-8420. tunes. 8-11 p.m. Stakes Sports Bar, 1281 Pleasant Street, Doctor Robert. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Rye & Thyme, 14 Monument Worcester, MA. 508-755-2925. Sqare, Leominster. 978-534-5900. Sopranopalooza! Join us for our third annual fund-raising NEW! “High Voltage Friday’s” High Energy Hardcore event, which combines raffles, a silent auction, and refreshments with DJ Chananagains! Every Friday Night! 18+ $10, 21+ $5. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Club Remix, 105 Water St. 508-756-2227. highlighted by a concert performed by a dozen wonderful The Field Effect is back at Ralphs! w/The Rationales, soprano and mezzo-soprano singers. Expertly accompanied by Olga Rogach, this year’s singer roster includes Tara Alcorn, and Grand Evolution! 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Karen Amlaw, Connell Benn, Erin Conley, Elaine Crane, Elisabeth Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. Gondek, Christine Petkus, Mauri Tetreault, Angeliki Theoharis, Top 40 Dance Party. Our Top 40 Dance Party returns to Rebecca Ufema, Lisa Woods and Lydian DeVere Yard. $5. 7-9 Speakers! Come in and dance the night away with the hottest DJ p.m. Briarwood Community Center, Birches Auditorium, Briarwood in the MetroWest Area, DJ Norm. Free. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Speakers Circle. greaterworcesteropera.org. Night Club, 19 Weed St., Marlborough. 508-480-8222 or Cafe’ con Dios. Donation. 7:30-10 p.m. Faith Baptist Church, speakersnightclub.net.


Upload your listings at worcestermag.com. Click the Night & Day toolbar, then choose Calendar to place your event listing in both our print and online weekly calendar. Main Auditorium, 22 Faith Ave, Auburn. 508-579-6722. Steak, Chicken, Ham, etc..... fun on a Sunday afterNoon then stay Chad Clements. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Mill, 185 West Boylston St., for the Blues Jam with Jim Perry and guests afterward! ! ! Free West Boylston. except for raffles you want to buy. 2-5 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 Worcester Stands Against Tar Sands! Benefit Show W Boylston St. 508-853-1350. and Dance Party. Join us for a night of music in solidarity with Big Jon Short - solo acoustic country blues. Free. 5-8 the Tar Sands Blockade and hometown pipesitter Matt Almonte. p.m. Vincent’s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439. Matt was recently released from jail after he and his comrades Blues Jam W/Jim Perry. Jam every sunday with Jim Perry successfully stopped pipe construction for a day by climbing into and a featured performer every week. Donations accepted. 7-11 the pipe and barricading themselves between 600 lb. concrete p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350. blocks. Email departmentoflostprofits@gmail.com for more The NEW 90’s PARTY BAND “How Bizarre” featuring information/directions. $10 suggested donation/pay what you can. members of The Flock, Squeezer, The Vig and Neon 8 p.m.-2 a.m. The Shop, Webster Square. https://facebook.com/ Alley. You LOVE the 90’s? It’s the latest decade-driven band to events/316313625139171/?ref=2. hit the Lucky Dog. Members of The Flock, Squeezer, Neon Alley Invaders at the Rt.56 Roadside. 8:30-12:30 p.m. Route and more bands all combine to bring songs by EMF, Dee-Lite, 56 Roadside Bar & Grill, 24 Leicester St., North Oxford. 508-987Chumbawumba, STP, Alannis Morissette, C+C Music Factory, 8669. Right Said Fred, The Cardigans, OMC, Nirvana, Len, The B-52’s Live Music. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., and even Billy Ray Cyrus to life! They do lots of tunes. All in Gardner. 978-669-0122. costumes, VERY fun and silly! $5. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Scott Babineau. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Rye & Thyme, 14 Monument Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or facebook.com/pages/HowSqare, Leominster. 978-534-5900. Bizarre/451955381512926. The ultimate JOURNEY tribute band: “Scarab” and guests, 90’s tribute “Gladstone”. The Seelos Film Series at Holy Cross is back for the spring semester. See “SCARAB...The Journey Experience”, “Lawless,” a film about three brothers who try to run a successful bootlegging business is the closest re-creation you will during the Prohibition era, on Friday, Feb. 1 or Saturday, Feb. 2 at 7 p.m. The see to the Supergroup of the 70’s film “Farewell, My Queen” is a drama portraying the last days of monarchy during the and 80’s. All the sights and sounds beginning of the French Revolution; it shows Wednesday, Feb. 6 at 3 and 8 p.m. All of your favorite songs live in concert. films in the series are free and open to the public. Holy Cross, Seelos Theater, 1 Come experience “SCARAB” live and College St. holycross.edu. “Don’t Stop Believing”. Sean Volpetti - Vocals Scott Philie - Keyboards / Vocals Brett Parker - Guitars / Vocals Kevin Blackwell - Bass / Vocals David Calder - Drums $10. 8:30 >Monday 4 p.m.-2 a.m. Lucky Dog Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or Karaoke. Karaoke by Star Sound Entertainment 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m. facebook.com/events/124279834406621. London Billiards / Club Oasis, 70 James St. 508-799-7655. Dave Crespo’s After Party, 33 Leaves, Van Burens Blue Mondays - Live Blues. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale & Ryan Jackson Troika! LIVE at Ralph’s! 9 p.m.-2 a.m. House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. Ralph’s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543. Bop & Pop Jazz Organization. Classic Hammond No Alibi. One of the area’s best and baddest party bands is back Organ Quartet grooves every Monday night at the Dive. Free. 9 to rock your world! No Cover! 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m. JJ’s Sports Bar p.m.-midnight Dive Bar, 34 Green St. https://facebook.com/ and Grill, 380 Southwest Cutoff, Northborough. 508-842-8420. Rocky & The Pressers, Brooks Thomas. 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. BopNPopJazzOrganization. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. >Tuesday 5 The Red Riders. The Red Riders return with honking Jeff Open Mic With Bill McCarthy. Newcomers welcome. Giacomelli on sax! we’re usually playing the third Sat of the month Free. 7:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. at Sahara but Feb we needed to flip a few band dates around- join 508-853-1350. us for some jumpin’ & swingin’ fun! 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Sahara Cafe First Tuesday Jazz Night with Lou Borelli Octet. Lou & Restaurant, 143 Highland St. 508-798-2181. Borelli Octet plays mostly original arrangements from the Dave Pell “Tantrum Saturdays” Dance Party Every Saturday Octet No Cover, but tips are appreciated. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Nick’s Bar Night with DJ Tony T. If you are 21+ and get here before 10 and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-752-6213. p.m., you won’t have to pay the cover charge. Watch for a surprise contest each week. 18+ only $10 21+ only $5. 10 p.m.-1:45 a.m. Open Mic Night w /Bill McCarthy. Book your half-hour set in advance at myspace.com/openmicworld. Email Bill McCarthy Club Remix, 105 Water St. 508-756-2227 or remixworcester.com. DJ Reckless. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Perfect Game Sports Grill and Lounge, 64 Water St. 508-792-4263.

The THE BAND Band, a tribute band to music legends The Band perform at The Bull Run on Friday, Feb. 1 at 8 p.m. The group will perform classic songs including “The Weight,” “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and “Up On Cripple Creek.” Tickets $14 in advance or $18 at the door. The Bull Run, 215 Great Rd., Shirley. tickets. bullrunrestaurant.com.

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Grill, 287 Main St. Worcester. 1-774-823-3131. Sam James. 8-11:30 p.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508-755-0879. Open Jam with Sean Ryan. Open Jam welcome to newcomers also Free. 8:30 p.m.-Noon Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350.

to book a spot at openmcc@verizon.net. Free. 7:30-11:30 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350. Open Mic Night. 8-11 p.m. Rye & Thyme, 14 Monument Sqare, Leominster. 978-534-5900. Jon Bonner. 9 p.m.-midnight Vincent’s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508752-9439.

>Wednesday 6

Dr. Lisa M. Giarrusso & Dr. Gregory Livanos

Open Jam w/Sean Ryan. Open Jam Free. 8:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350. OPEN MIC w/ FEATURE ACT. This Open Mic has been running for a year now. A great sounding room for acoustic performance. SongWriter’s Night the first Wednesday of every month. Great food and friendly staff. Hosted by Brett Brumby, all mics and cables supplied, just bring your instrument and love of music! Free. 7:30-11 p.m. Route 56 Roadside Bar & Grill, 24 Leicester St., North Oxford. 508-987-8669 or 56barandgrill.com. Taj Mahal Trio. Grammy Award winning Composer, multiinstrumentalist and vocalist Taj Mahal is one of the most prominent and influential figures in late 20th century blues and roots music. Born Henry Saint Clair Fredericks, Mahal has done much to reshape the definition and scope of blues music over the course of his almost 50 year career by fusing it with sounds from the Caribbean, Africa and the South Pacific. His current lineup with The Taj Mahal Trio is Taj on guitar, piano, and banjo, Bill Rich on bass and Kester Smith on drums. These guys have been playing together on and off for more than 30 years, and they draw on a long, shared history of Taj’s music. $75 advance; $80 day of show.. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Bull Run Restaurant, Sawtelle Room, 215 Great Road, Shirley. 978-425-4311 or tickets. bullrunrestaurant.com. Wednesday Night Open Mic/Local Musicians’ Showcase w/ Bill Mccarthy @ Guiseppe’s.Book your half-hour set in advance at myspace.com/openmicworld. Email Bill McCarthy to book a spot at openmcc@verizon.net. Free. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Guiseppe’s Grille, 35 Solomon Pond Road, Northborough. 508-393-4405. “Krazy Wednesday Jam Session” with The “Get On Up Band”. The music is hot motown/funk/swing/blues style,dancing,great club & staff, great people, we have some of the best players each week as special guest players..we offer a drum kit, bass rig and a full PA system for all to use, so bring what you play and “ get on up” Free. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Krazy Horse Bar &

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>Sunday 3

Revolution Sunday’s! Drag Show Extravaganza Hosted by Lady Sabrina and Bootz! Featuring The Remix Girls, Special Guests, and DJ Whiteboi Spinning Beats! 18+ $8 21+ $5. midnight-1:30 a.m. Club Remix, 105 Water St. 508-756-2227. Jazz Brunch with Chet Williamson. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. Flora in Winter Concert. The Clark Bars from Clark University and the Shrewsbury High School Women’s Choir under the direction of Michael Lapomardo will fill the Renaissance Court with memorable musical selections, including those from the 60s and 70s to commemorate the final day of our Kennedy to Kent State exhibition. Free with Museum Admission, no RSVP required. 2-3 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. Meat Raffle. That’s right come on down and win some MEAT! JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

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night day &

Upload your listings at worcestermag.com. Click the Night & Day toolbar, then choose Calendar to place your event listing in both our print and online weekly calendar.

{ listings}

The Worcester JCC hosts its annual fundraising event on Saturday, Feb. 2 at the Beechwood Hotel in Worcester at 6 p.m. The Red Carpet Casino Night & Auction will feature Madonna impersonator Melissa Totten, as well as photos on the red carpet, casino games, food and an auction. All proceeds from the event will beneďŹ t the JCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Youth Scholarship Program, which helps children attend summer camp, after school and other programs at â&#x20AC;&#x153;the J.â&#x20AC;? Tickets $95 per person or a block of 10 for $750. For more information and to purchase tickets visit worcesterjcc.org or contact Jody Fredman at jfredman@worcesterjcc.org. Beechwood Hotel, 363 Plantation St.

Wacky Wednesday Night Jam @JJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sport Bar. Open mic jam session, all are welcome. We offer a drum kit. bass rig and a full PA system for all to use. guitar players please bring your own amp, great club, great food, great drinks and great music. Free. 8:30-12:30 p.m. JJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sports Bar and Grill, 380 Southwest Cutoff, Northborough. 508-842-8420. Big Game KARAOKE! Every Wednesday Downstairs! and Big Game Trivia Every Other Wednesday before Karaoke! Music, Singing, Games, Contests, Prizes, and More! Free! 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Ralphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chadwick Square Diner, 148 Grove St. 508-753-9543.

arts

ARTSWorcester, Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 1-4 p.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday - Friday, 1-4 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Free. 660 Main St. 508-755-5142 or artsworcester.org. Bookloversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Gourmet, Photographic Potpourri - An Eclectic Collection of Images from the Blackstone Valley & Beyond, Through Jan. 31. Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 55 East Main St., Webster. 508-949-6232 or er3.com/book Clark University: University Gallery, Hours: Noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, Noon-8 p.m. Wednesday, Noon-5 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. 950 Main St. 508-793-7349 or 508-793-7113 or clarku.edu. Clarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cafe and Art On Rotation Gallery, Hours: 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday - Saturday. Admission: Free for gallery. 310 High St., Clinton. 978-549-5822 or 978-365-7772 or aorgallery.com. College of the Holy Cross: Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Art Gallery, Transnational Ikat: An Asian Textile on the Move, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Jan. 24 - March 1. Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Friday, 2-5 p.m. Saturday. 1 College St. 508-793-3356 or holycross.edu/departments/cantor/website. Danforth Museum of Art, Hours: Noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, Noon-5 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday - Saturday. 123 Union Ave., Framingham. 508-620-0050 or danforthmuseum.org. DZian Gallery, Hours: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday

- Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday - Saturday. 65 Water St. 508-831-1106 or dzian.net. EcoTarium, Playing Together: Games, Sundays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through March 31. Hours: Noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. Admission: $14 adults; $8 for children ages 2-18, $10 college students with IDs & senior citizens. Children under 2 & EcoTarium members Free. Additional charges apply for Tree Canopy Walkway, Explorer Express Train, planetarium programs & other special programs. 222 Harrington Way. 508929-2700 or ecotarium.org. Fisher Museum Harvard Forest, 324 N. Main St., Petersham. 978-724-3302 or harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/ museum.html. Fitchburg Art Museum, Hours: Noon-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, Noon-4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. 25 Merriam Parkway, Fitchburg. 978-345-4207 or ďŹ tchburgartmuseum.org. Fitchburg Historical Society, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday - Tuesday, 10 a.m.-Midnight Wednesday, closed Thursday - Saturday. 50 Grove St., Fitchburg. 978-345-1157 or ďŹ tchburghistory.fsc.edu. Framed in Tatnuck, Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. 1099 Pleasant St. 508-770-1270 or framedintatnuck.com. Higgins Armory Museum, P> WOO Card good at Higgins Armory Museum, Through Dec. 31. Hours: Noon-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. Admission: General Admission: $12 for Adults, $10 for Seniors (age 60+), $8

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for Children (age 4-16), Children 3 and under are Free. 100 Barber Ave. 508-853-6015 or higgins.org. Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, Hours: 12:30-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. 414 Massasoit Ave. 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org. Museum of Russian Icons.Imaging the Invisible: Angels, Demons, Prayer and Wisdom, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Oct. 23 - April 27; Series of One Icon exhibitions, Through Aug. 20; Take it To the Curator, Friday. Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 11-3 a.m. Tuesday - Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, 11-3 a.m. Friday, 9-3 a.m. Saturday. Admission: Adults $7, Seniors (59 and over) $5, Students (with ID) & children (3-17) $2, Children under 3 free, Groups (any age) $. 203 Union St., Clinton. 978-598-5000 or 978-598-5000x17 or museumofrussianicons.org. Old Sturbridge Village, Antique Sleigh Rally, Saturday. Admission: $7 - $20 charged by age. Children under 3 fre. 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Sturbridge. 800-733-1830 or 508-3473362 or osv.org. Post Road Art Center. Hours: closed Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday - Saturday. 1 Boston Post Road, Marlborough. 508-485-2580 or postroadartcenter.com. Preservation Worcester, Hours: closed Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Friday, closed Saturday. 10 Cedar St. 508-7548760 or preservationworcester.org. Prints and Potter Gallery, American Contemporary Art & Craft Gallery, Mondays through Saturdays, through Dec. 31. Hours: closed Sunday, 10-5:30 a.m. Monday - Tuesday, 10-7 a.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 10-5:30 a.m. Friday, 10-5 a.m. Saturday. 142 Highland St. 508-752-2170 or printsandpotter.com. Quinebaug Valley Council for the Arts & Humanities, the Arts Center. Hours: 2-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Friday, 2-4 p.m. Saturday. 111 Main St., Southbridge. 508-3463341or qvcah.org. SAORI Worcester Freestyle Weaving Studio, 18 Winslow St. 508-757-4646 or 508-757-0116 or saoriworcester. com. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, Flora in Winter, Thursday Sunday; Guided Garden Tour, Sundays, through Dec. 30. Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. Admission: $10 Adults, $7 Seniors & $5 Youth, FREE to Members & Children under . 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-

6111 or towerhillbg.org. Westboro Gallery, Westboro Gallery Art Opening, Through April 21. Hours: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday - Saturday. 8 West Main St., Westborough. 508-870-0110 or westborogallery.com. Worcester Art Museum, Georges Rouault, Through March 14; Jill Slosburg-Ackerman, Through March 31; Kennedy to Kent State: Images of a Generation, Through Feb. 3; Looking at the Stars: Prints by Imamura Yoshio, Through May 30; Winter/Spring Adult Open House, Thursday; Zip Tour: Monetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waterloo Bridgeâ&#x20AC;?, Saturday; Public Tour, Sundays, through April 28. Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Free for members, $14 adults, $12 seniors, Free for youth 17 and under. Free for all ďŹ rst Saturdays of each month, 10am-Noon. 55 Salisbury St. 508-7994406 or worcesterart.org. Worcester Center for Crafts, This Narrow Distance: A Portrait Show, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Jan. 17 - Feb. 9. Hours: closed Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, closed Saturday. 25 Sagamore Road. 508-753-8183 or worcestercraftcenter.org Worcester Historical Museum, Game On!, Through The Fight For Silence Tour stops at The Palladium on Friday, Feb. 1 with bands For Today, Memphis May Fire, The World Alive, Upon A Burning Body and Gideon. The event is downstairs. Doors 6 p.m. Tickets $18 in advance or $20 day of the show. The Palladium, 261 Main St. thepadlladium.net.

March 2; In Their Shirtsleeves, Through Dec. 31; Stories They Tell, Through Jan. 1, 2013. Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday - Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday - Saturday. 30 Elm St. 508-753-8278 or worcesterhistory.org. Worcester Public Library, Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday - Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday Saturday. 3 Salem Square. 508-799-1655 or worcpublib.org.

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Do you have PAIN and have used METHADONE or SUBOXONE? A new research study at UMass Medical Center is exploring links between opioid addiction and chronic pain. Can you help us ďŹ nd the answers? Participation will take about an hour and participants will be compensated for their time. If you are interested in participating in this study or need more information, please contact: 508-334-2153 Docket#H-13904

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J A N U A R Y 3 1, 2 0 13 â&#x20AC;˘ W O R C E S T E R M A G . C O M

29


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Home Of The Free, Thanks To The Brave MILITARY HERO OF THE WEEK Is there a special service person in your life? The Central Mass Classifieds would like to feature members of our Armed Forces on a regular basis. If you have a special service person in your life, please email carsenault@centralmassclass.com with some information, photo, brief summary of his/her service, and we will be happy to recognize them in the Central Mass Classifieds. The brave men and women of the United States Armed Forces should be remembered all year long.

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30

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• J A N U A R Y 3 1, 2 0 13

Takes a Village”--feeling a little blue? Los Angeles Times “It Sunday Crossword Puzzle

JONESIN’

- By Matt Jones Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

18 Fish-eating 113 Surprise 83 Suave duck success competitor 20 She was the ten 84 Panama Canal DOWN 1 That is, to Nero bash? ACROSS in “10” 1 Giants’ home, 89 Capp and 1 Charge for 24 Broncos’ org. 6 “All-American Girl” Margaret familiarly Kaline 26 Pie slice feature unlimited use, 2 “The Lawrence 92 Joey’s mom 30 Leonardo’s cosay U.S. Navy squad 9 Elite Welk Show” 93 __ Mawr star in “The 8 Nice woman sisters’ surname 95 Equip anew Aviator” 13 Dines lavishly 14 It’s struck from a book 3 Loud parties in 96 Amoxicillin 31 Halloween 19 Go back over 15 Connecticut “Whadja say?” target Georgia? gathering? 20 4 Blue eyes, e.g. 98locale Alliance 32 Snoop on“Survivor” Long 16 town 2005 5 It has a moral formed under 33 Pennzoil letters Island Sound 6 Green prefix 35 Do surgery, in a 21 was all __” 17 “It Big book of storiesHST 7 Eternally, to way 22 About to deliver 99 Great Basin 19 Garden Sean oftool thefor“Lord cap. of the Blake 36 __ golf 23 8 Starve, to 100 His name is 37 Invigorating, as unexpected Rings” series Shakespeare Spanish for air situations? 9 1974 hit sung “fox” dishes? 38 Pres. advisory 25 20 Escargot He’s always dropping entirely in 101 Punt navigator team 26 Start the day 22 NBA Peppermint Pattie brand Spanish 102 Highland 40 Controversial 27 one10 Muddy area scoundrel? baby food 23 pointers Gargantuan Brit. 11 Bit of computer 106lexicon At a moment’s ingredient 28 Ayres who memory notice 41 Major leagues, Dr. 24 played Uneventful 12 Omaha-to108 Relents in baseball Kildare 26 Barone’s Nick at ___ 109 Most exposed Milwaukee dir. lingo 29 13 Statistical input 110 Author Prosper 43 Crotchety sort superior 29 “Sands of ___ Jima” 14 It’s Dreyer’s __ who wrote 44 Rebuke 30 Ridge west of the on 45 Party enforcer 31 superiors 32 Pvts.’ Komodo dragon or“Carmen,” Tasmanian Rockies which the opera 46 Stop 33 Start of many 15 SFO info is based 47 OR hangers California city devil 16 Routes for liners 48 Eurasian range 111 Old cinemas names 36 Ore-___ (tater tots brand) 17 Show particular 50 Early 5th112 Orchard Field, 34 N.Y. neighbor interest nowadays century year 35 Hardly ever area that’s 37 laugh? Bedroom useful to 37 PowerShot have around? maker 39 ___ 39 Up Wafers 4 Average fool 42 school 41 Elite Constrictive critter 43 Welcomes at 5 Things out of reach? doorauthor Asimov 42 the Sci-À 44 Drive aimlessly 6 Neapolitan layer, for short 43 Annoy He has a corny sense of hu45 with 7 Laurie on “House” complaints mor? 48 Mentalist Geller 8 “I just remembered...” 49 a __!” 46 “Just Deadlock 50 Nickels and 9 Detoxifying place 47 dimes Dutch beer 10 Top vs. bottom-seed shutouts, 51 Reason for a 48 few ID-assigning org. nicks? for instance 54 49 Some Chip’s pal sopranos 11 Low choral part 50 Spies “Theon, Kids 55 in ain the Hall” bit 12 Grizzly’s hangout way 52 Runs Blueamok ball on the table 56 13 Destroyed a destroyer 60 54 Thought: FashionPref. legend Christian 61 “Tales From the 18 Actress/model/socialite ___ horror 57 __”: Guy’50s who trimmed Dad’s Hearst-Shaw comic beard? 62 Small toy? 21 Griff and D’s Public Enemy 64 GreenA&M genre athlete 63 Al Texas 65 Blisters cohort 67 e.g. 65 Apples, Doesn’t lose it 25 Recording studio sign 68 “What __!”: 66 “Yawn!” Crosses (a river) 26 Silent killer? 69 Plumber’s 67 assessment? One of seven: abbr. 27 Turn of phrase 72 68 Closely A few extra pounds watched index 28 Peace conference events 69 Abbr. Pecanusually and walnut 73 30 Liberty’s org. by a 70 preceded Torn of “Men in Black” comma 31 Reasons for insoles 76 71 AMEX It follows either word in the adjustments 33 Mazda model fourTenured long answers 77 coll. 34 “GarÀeld: ___ of Two Kitties” employees Down 78 Walks casually 35 School for French students 79 Golfer on Garcia 1 Apple a desk 81 Sch. fundraising 37 She portrayed Kahlo gp. name for Boone or Web2 Short 38 Thanksgiving items 82 Scandinavian stercapital 40 Biker’s exit line xwordeditor@aol.com 3 Query to Brutus2/17/13

“BEGONE!” By MIKE PELUSO Across

51 Authority 52 A mystery, metaphorically 53 Aging pro, maybe 55 Arduous journeys 57 Vulcanized rubber inventor’s unsteady gait? 58 Guilder replacements 59 Ton 61 Light cigar wrapper 62 Response from Fido 63 Ins. plans 66 Five-time MLB All-Star Cooper 67 Oslo Accords signer: Abbr. 68 “I get it,” wryly 70 Author Sinclair 71 Gillette razor word 72 Parliament member 73 Seer’s alleged gift 74 Like many apartments 75 Piling coating

78 Business sch. major 80 Day-__ 81 Thickness 85 Cincinnatibased retailer 86 Look over 87 Octagonal road sign, in Arles 88 El Amazonas, por ejemplo 90 Actress Sobieski 91 More like a spring chicken 93 Dots that may beep 94 Some colas 96 What a slash may mean in some scores 97 “It’s __ for!” 98 City served by Gardermoen Airport 99 Dumbfound 100 Writer __ Neale Hurston 103 Chicken general? 104 “Veep” network 105 Cheer word 106 Apt. divisions 107 Sushi fish

44 Go berserk 45 Date on some food packaging 49 The back, in medical textbooks 51 Weapon often seen on “24” 53 Nest residents 54 Nutty 55 Composer Stravinsky 56 Shrek, e.g. 58 Spittoon noise 59 Org. for seniors 60 “On & On” singer Erykah 61 MIT grad, maybe 62 Hazard for a hull 64 Ending for heir or host

Last week's solution

©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

©2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #608


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SIZE PER BLOCK 1.75 X 1.75 8 weeks ........... $31.50/week = $252 12 weeks ......... $26.75/week = $321 20 weeks ......... $25.20/week = $504 36 weeks ......... $23.60/week = $850 52 weeks ......... $22/week = $1144

Minimum commitment of 8 weeks. ASK about double blocks (size 3.75" x 1.75") and COMBO pricing into our other zone and reach 50,000 households in 26 towns in Central Mass each week. FREE line ad included with each block purchased.

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www.centralmassclass.com Items Under

$2013

Treasure Chest ofCENTRAL FREE Ads! MASS CLASSIFIEDS

FR EE!

HELP WANTED MERCHANDISE CEMETERY PLOTS

in the

SUBMIT ITEMS UNDER $2013 FOR FREE!

Here’s all you need to do! 3 ways to submit... 1. Mail completed form to Central Mass Classifieds, 285 Central Street Suite 202 Leominster 01453 2. OR FAX the completed form to 978-534-6004 3. OR Email the info with name/address/phone number to sales@centralmassclass.com

NO PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED FOR FR EE ADS PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY... We are not liable for misinformation due to ad being illegible:

TREASURE CHEST - ITEMS UNDER $2013

Have you advertised in the Central Mass Classifieds before? Please check one. ___ Yes ___ No Name ____________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________ Town ______________________________ Zip ______________ Phone _______________________ Email Address (optional) ______________________________________________________________ Ad Text: (approx 20 characters per line includes letters, spaces, numbers, punctuation) _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

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Maximum 4 lines (approx. 20 characters per line). We reserve the right to edit if ads come in that are too long. NO phone orders accepted. See ways to submit above. Merchandise Ads Only - NO autos, snowmobiles, RV’s, trailers, boats, ATV’s, etc. We have a special rate for these ads ($20 till it sells). NO business Ads accepted for this section. If we suspect the ads are being sent in by a business, we reserve the right to refuse. Limit 1 ad per name/address/phone number every 2 weeks. Ads will run for 2 weeks. Limit 1 item per ad (group of items OK if one price for all and under $2013) Price must be listed in ad. NO Cemetery Plots

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• J A N U A R Y 3 1, 2 0 13

North Central Human Services, Inc., a subsidiary of Alternatives, is a leading non-profit organization that provides support to people living with mental illness or substance abuse. For more than 30 years, people in the community have sought our help for a myriad of mental health issues, ranging from periodic emotional crisis to long-term medical treatment and support.

Fee-for-Service Clinician We are currently seeking a Fee-for-service Clinician to work in an outpatient setting in Gardner, MA. Fee-for-Service Clinicians on the North Central Human Services team are eligible for a competitive benefits package including medical, disability, and life insurance. Additionally, you are free to set your own schedule, manage your own caseload and take advantage of our generous paid time off. Our diverse, knowledgeable team creates a great work environment while providing services to a wide variety of people. We offer full support in regard to billing, paperwork, scheduling, training, staff meetings, and much more to our clinicians. Qualifications: • Massachusetts professional license (LICSW, LMHC, LMFT, PhD). • Post licensure experience in a multidisciplinary mental health or closely related setting. • Demonstrated ability to deliver treatment of the highest quality to a diverse population including seniors, adults, adolescents, and children. • Ability to take initiative and creatively approach obstacles. For more information please visit: www.alternativesnet.org We offer a competitive FFS rate and benefits package along with strong administrative and clinical support. North Central Human Services is an Equal Opportunity Employer and values diversity.

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EMPLOYMENT HELP WANTED LOCAL PCA needed ASAP Days and evenings, she is in a wheelchair and hoyer lift. $12.48/hour. 508-304-1392

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Paxton Memorial Park Garden of Valor, Sec. 88 sites 3&4 asking $3000.00. Call 508-721-9595 ITEMS UNDER $2,013 13" Color TV W/ VCR Unit. Cable ready. Exc. cond. $25.00 978-534-1956 Antique Oak/Glass China Cabinet Down to $690.00 or B.R.O. 978-534-8632 Electric Oak Fireplace 38"HX44"WX14"D Beautiful. $299.00 978-534-6727 French Provincial Sofa & Chair 1940’s-1950’s era. Needs refurbishing. $150.00 or B.O. 508-736-1839 Like new Lazy boy recliner, TV stand w/wheels and shoe rack, $200 or BO 978-602-7168 RCA 3.5" LED TV w/ Batt. & 18" Magnavox HD TV Both for $150.00. Call 508-265-2854 Truck Bed Aluminum Tool Box Full size, 12" deep, 24" wide. Good cond. W/keys. $100.00 508-829-3596 Upright Freezer 4’4"H, 24D, 24W Exc. cond. Frigidaire $100 508-829-4004 FREE Cabinet Record Player Good supply of records and albums. 508-865-2829 508320-1588 Lifestyle SX Aerobic Stepper FREE 978-534-4182 FURNITURE Mattress Set Brand New Queen Pillow Top Mattress Set $149 Still in Plastic. 774-823-6692

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Painting Unlimited Services Skilled, Reliable, Reasonable. Meticulous prep & workmanship. Interior/Exterior Painting/Staining, Powerwashing. Free Estimates. Fully Insured. HIC #163882 Call Tim: 508-340-8707

Genesis Club House Inc. seeks a Social Worker. Mail resume to: 274 Lincoln St., Worcester, MA

OTHER BINGO Bingo Tuesday’s First game 6:45 PM Our Lady of Perpetual Help 256 Hamilton St. Worcester 508-752-4174


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Real Estate â&#x20AC;˘ Jobs â&#x20AC;˘ Auto â&#x20AC;˘ Services

To Advertise In This Directory Call 978.728.4302 or e-mail us at sales@centralmassclass.com

Paula Savard

Gail Lent

ABR, CRB, CRS, GRI

ABR, CRS, GRI

Sandra DeRienzo ABR, GRI

Tracy Sladen

(978) 537-4971 â&#x20AC;˘ 1-(800) 924-8666 &OLQWRQ

3 bedroom 2 bath gambrel. Many updates. Large country kitchen , formal dining , livingroom and familyroom on main level. covered deck, fenced yard.  Aberman Assoc Inc. Paula Savard 978-537-4971 x 14 www.paulasavard.com

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5 unit multi family. 5 tenants currently on premises.. heat and hot water included for all.. ďŹ rst ďŹ&#x201A;oor right ($500) has electric included with the house meter. 2nd ďŹ&#x201A;oor right ($300) has rent reduced from $350 in return for shoveling.Annual Sewer is water and sewer. City of Fitchburg. Heat isgas and electric Unitil Aberman Assoc. Inc.  Paula Savard 978-537-4971 x14 www.paulasavard.com

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3 br 1 bath mulitlevel. Renovated 3BR 1Bath home with Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s porch,Vinyl siding, beautiful hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors, granite counter tops and new force hot air system. Convenient Location with Plenty of Parking. Aberman Assoc Inc Moises Cosme 978-537-4971 x23

Paula K. Aberman Associates, Inc. 2086 Main Street, Lancaster www.paulasavard.com

23(1+286(21'(0$1' OPEN HOUSE ON DEMAND 978 537 4971. 0 for the operator . We open ALL our houses to you EVERY Sunday from 11-3pm.  Just CALL FIRST and let us know which one you are interested in. All listings are viewable on www.paulasavard.com.  

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Young 3 bedroom split level freshly painted in neutral colors....wooded lot on side street, close to highways, shopping, restaurants, but off the beaten path! Two car attached garage with storage; ďŹ nished basement with half bath and walk out... Bright and sunny with a woodstove to supplement heat.....whole house fan to cool you in the summer....a great place to call HOME! Aberman Assoc. Inc 978-537-4971 x17

CL ASSIFIEDS

Yasmin Loft

Anna Mary Kraemer CRS

Moises Cosme

7RZQVHQG

/XQHQEXUJ

Custom built contemporary colonial with fully applianced new custom kitchen on 2.52 acres.3 or 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths. Living/dining room separated by ďŹ replace, 1st ďŹ&#x201A;oor laundry, oversized 2 car garage. Energy efďŹ cient propane heating system w/instant hot water. 3 room approved rental unit for income or in-laws, or HOME OFFICE with private entrance. Recent rent $575. Setback from street. Beautiful new 10 x 16 shed with loft and 54â&#x20AC;? double doors. New fruit trees and perennial gardens. Aberman Assoc Inc.  Anna Mary Kraemer 978-537-4971 x 25 www.annamarykraemer.com

Currier and Ives picturesque New England Cape Cod bursting with curb appeal. Beautifully set on corner lot this one owner home offers over 3000+- sf of living area. Spacious open kitchen/ fam. room w/ FP. Formal DR & LR. with HW ďŹ&#x201A;oors. First ďŹ&#x201A;oor MBR w/ private bath, jetted soaking tub, double vanity and shower. Second ďŹ&#x201A;oor with 3 spacious BRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, ofďŹ ce and game room plus bonus ďŹ nished room in basement. Walk in attic. Title V approved. Aberman Assoc. Inc. 978-537-4971 x 15 www.gaillent.eom

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4 br 2.5 bath colonial. Within a mile of historic Lunenburg center, this spacious 4 bedroom colonial has been contiually updated and functional. 2.98 acre hilltop setting . easy access to Rt 2.  Aberman Assoc Inc. Paula Savard 978-537-4971 x 14 www.paulasavard.com

Tara Sullivan

3 br 2 1/2 bath colonial. Sparkling, young hillside colonial. New granite kitchen upgrade 2009. Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s porch. Deck, two car garage. Aberman Assoc Inc.Paula Savard 978-537-4971 x14 www.paulasavard.com

+ROGHQ Warm and inviting best discribe this recently updated ranch with gleaming hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors, updated baths, two ďŹ replaces, three season room, two additional rooms ďŹ nished in walk out lower level. Siding, heating system, hot water heater all updated. Open concept kitchen, dining and living room. Town sewer connected and betterment is paid. Attached two car garage. Easy keeper with low fuel cost. Beautifully landscaped and waiting for a new owner. Aberman Assoc Inc. Gail Lent 978-537-4971 x 15 www.gaillent.com

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Gracious Victorian home situated on corner lot on West side. From the wrap around front/side porch, enter into foyer leading to 14x28 living rm w/decorative HW ďŹ&#x201A;ooring, stained glass window and grand ďŹ replace with side built in bookshelves and bay window. Formal dining RM w/ built in china cabinet. Applianced, eat in kitchen w/ gas range, laundry/pantry & 1/2 bath on ďŹ rst level. 4 bedrooms & full bath on 2nd level. Walk up to spacious attic w/ high ceiling, possible family/ game & sm rm. Aberman Assoc Inc Sandra DeRienzo 978-537-4971 x 42

Central Mass

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6 acres site with single story 11090 sf building built and used as a church. On site parking .. Easy access to Exit 26 I495 at Berlin town line .Conversions easily possible include ofďŹ ce building, restaurant (full kitchen and diningroom already on site. Gym..1800 sf included 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122; steel beam ceiling.. Aberman Assoc Inc 978-537-4971 x 14 www.paulasavard.com

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IT’S CAMP TIME! • Day Day Camp • Overnight Camp • Sports Camp • All Types Of Camps

3 1 0 2 Director y

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTO/TRUCK

AUTO/MOTORCYCLE

1990 Chevrolet 2500 8 ft bed, reg cab, standard, 350 motor, 4x4, 107K miles, new clutch & many new parts, exhaust, brakes & brake lines, runs good, 31" tires $2,995 978-8400058

2008 Honda Metropolitan Scooter Black and gray. Mint cond. 469 miles. Asking $1650.00. Includes helmet. 207-289-9362 OR 207-4501492. 2008 Suzuki GSX 650/K8. All black with silver and red trim. Less than 850 miles. Cover, new battery, and lock. $5500.00 508-7926080 2012 H.D. Heritage Soft Tail Classic Like new condition, only 1,200 miles. Pearl White, chrome mag wheels and white walls, after market exhaust, plus extras. Selling price was $22,700, asking $18,900 or B.O. 508-873-7309

2004 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 W/Extended Cab. 6 cyl. Rear cap. One owner. Nice. 71K miles. $8500.00 508-829-9123

2003 Acura 3.2 TL Excellent Condition, leather, moonroof, complete care record available, 105K miles, $7,490 508-7999347 and 508-754-6344 2008 Ford Fusion V-6 Sedan 28000 miles. Red ext/ $14,000 - 508-6889132 for appt. (Rutland)

35 Park Ave., Worcester, MA 01605 508-791-2383 • www.ToomeyRents.Com

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1993 Honda Accord New rebuilt 3k engine, clutch, tires, batt, new glass, full power. Must Sell! $2500 978-874-0546 or cell 978-602-6841.

2001 Cadillac Eldorado Touring Coupe, Rare car, loaded, mint condition. $7,995 508-875-7400

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AUTOS

1995 Infiniti G20 4 door, auto, black, leather interior, 176K miles needs a window motor. $1,200 or B.O. 978-840-0058

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Car For Sale?

2008 Pontiac Grand Prix Black, gray interior, 4 door, auto, A/C, Cruise, CD 72000 miles. $9,995 or B.O. 508-865-2690 2010 Chevrolet Corvette Metallic Red ext, Coupe, 438 HP, 6 speed manual, 5,200 miles, Adult owned. Perfect condition. $39,000 or B.O. 413-230-8470 2010 Mazda Miata MX-5 Excellent condition. 25K miles. Auto/AC/cruise/CD. Records available. $17,990 978-464-0279

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www.centralmassclass.com LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES Commonwealth of Massachusetts Worcester, ss. SUPERIOR COURT DEPARTMENT OF THE TRIAL COURT CIVIL ACTION No. 13-0086B

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Worcester, ss. SUPERIOR COURT DEPARTMENT OF THE TRIAL COURT CIVIL ACTION No. 13-0085A

To Wendy L. Hurd, Trustee of D.L.H. Realty Trust and Trustee of J.M.H. Realty Trust of the Town of Rutland, County of Worcester, Commonwealth of Massachusetts Joseph M. Howard, Jr., Trustee of J. M. H. Realty Trust of the Town of Millbury, County of Worcester, Commonwealth of Massachusetts AND TO ALL PERSONS ENTITLED TO THE BENEFIT OF THE SOLDIERS’ AND SAILORS’ CIVIL RELIEF ACT OF 1940 AS AMENDED: Hometown Bank, a Cooperative Bank, a banking institution with a usual place of business in Oxford, Worcester County, Commonwealth of Massachusetts claiming to be the holder of a mortgage covering property situated on Southwest Cutoff, Worcester, MA; Eskow Road, Worcester, MA; and, Cristo Lane, Millbury, MA, and being numbered 230-236 Southwest Cutoff, Worcester, MA; 22 Eskow Road, Worcester, MA; 25 Eskow Road, Worcester, MA; and, 7 Cristo Lane, Millbury, MA given by Michael R. Rizzo, as Trustee and for/on behalf of D.L.H. Realty Trust and Joseph M. Howard, Jr., as Trustee and for/on behalf of J.M.H. Realty Trust Hometown Bank, a Cooperative Bank dated June 5, 2006 recorded in Worcester District Registry of Deeds, Book 39115, Page 192, has filed with said court a Complaint for authority to foreclose said mortgage in the manner following: by entry on and possession of the premises therein described and by exercise of the power of sale contained in said mortgage. If you are entitled to the benefits of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of 1940 as amended, and you object to such foreclosure you or your attorney should file a written appearance and answer in said court at Worcester in said County on or before the twenty-seventh day of February next or you may be forever barred from claiming that such foreclosure is invalid under said Act. Witness, Barbara J. Rouse, Esquire, Administrative Justice of said Court this sixteenth day of January 2013 Dennis P. McManus, Clerk 1/31/2013 MS

To Wendy L. Hurd, Trustee of D.L.H. Realty Trust and Trustee of J.M.H. Realty Trust of the Town of Rutland, County of Worcester, Commonwealth of Massachusetts Joseph M. Howard, Jr., Trustee of J. M. H. Realty Trust of the Town of Millbury, County of Worcester, Commonwealth of Massachusetts AND TO ALL PERSONS ENTITLED TO THE BENEFIT OF THE SOLDIERS’ AND SAILORS’ CIVIL RELIEF ACT OF 1940 AS AMENDED: Hometown Bank, a Cooperative Bank, a banking institution with a usual place of business in Oxford, Worcester County, Commonwealth of Massachusetts claiming to be the holder of a mortgage covering property situated on Southwest Cutoff, Worcester, MA; Eskow Road, Worcester, MA; and, Cristo Lane, Millbury, MA, and being numbered 230-236 Southwest Cutoff, Worcester, MA; 22 Eskow Road, Worcester, MA; 25 Eskow Road, Worcester, MA; and, 7 Cristo Lane, Millbury, MA given by Michael R. Rizzo, as Trustee and for/on behalf of D.L.H. Realty Trust and Joseph M. Howard, Jr., as Trustee and for/on behalf of J.M.H. Realty Trust to Hometown Bank, a Cooperative Bank dated March 26, 2007 recorded in Worcester District Registry of Deeds, Book 40882, Page 311, has filed with said court a Complaint for authority to foreclose said mortgage in the manner following: by entry on and possession of the premises therein described and by exercise of the power of sale contained in said mortgage. If you are entitled to the benefits of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of 1940 as amended, and you object to such foreclosure you or your attorney should file a written appearance and answer in said court at Worcester in said County on or before the twenty-seventh day of February next or you may be forever barred from claiming that such foreclosure is invalid under said Act. Witness, Barbara J. Rouse, Esquire, Administrative Justice of said Court this sixteenth day of January 2013 Dennis P. McManus, Clerk 1/31/2013 MS

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Worcester, ss. SUPERIOR COURT DEPARTMENT OF THE TRIAL COURT CIVIL ACTION No. 13-0084A To Wendy L. Hurd, Trustee of J.M.H. Realty Trust of the Town of Rutland, County of Worcester, Commonwealth of Massachusetts Joseph M. Howard, Jr., Trustee of J.M.H. Realty Trust of the Town of Millbury, County of Worcester, Commonwealth of Massachusetts AND TO ALL PERSONS ENTITLED TO THE BENEFIT OF THE SOLDIERS’ AND SAILORS’ CIVIL RELIEF ACT OF 1940 AS AMENDED: Hometown Bank, a Cooperative Bank, a banking institution with a usual place of business in Oxford, Worcester County, Commonwealth of Massachusetts claiming to be the holder of a mortgage covering property situated on Cristo Lane, Millbury, MA, and being numbered 7 Cristo Lane, Millbury, MA given by Joseph M. Howard, Jr., as Trustee and for/on behalf of J.M.H. Realty Trust to Hometown Bank, a Cooperative Bank dated May 1, 2009 recorded in Worcester District Registry of Deeds, Book 44194, Page 1, has filed with said court a Complaint for authority to foreclose said mortgage in the manner following: by entry on and possession of the premises therein described and by exercise of the power of sale contained in said mortgage. If you are entitled to the benefits of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of 1940 as amended, and you object to such foreclosure you or your attorney should file a written appearance and answer in said court at Worcester in said County on or before the twenty-seventh day of February next or you may be forever barred from claiming that such foreclosure is invalid under said Act. Witness, Barbara J. Rouse, Esquire, Administrative Justice of said Court this sixteenth day of January 2013 Dennis P. McManus, Clerk 1/31/2013 MS

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 508-831-2200 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION Docket No. WO13P0241EA Estate of: Lucille Flanders Date of Death: 12/29/2012 To all interested persons: A Petition has been filed by: Cynthia D Flanders of Worcester MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that: Cynthia D Flanders of Worcester MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before: 10:00 a.m. on 02/19/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, Hon. Denise L. Meagher, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 25, 2013 Stephen G. Abraham, Register of Probate 1/31/2013 WM

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• J A N U A R Y 3 1, 2 0 13

TOWN OF SUTTON ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS TO ALL INTERESTED INHABITANTS OF THE TOWN OF SUTTON In accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 40A, §11, the Zoning Board of Appeals will hold a public hearing at the Sutton Town Hall, on February 7, 2013 at 7:30pm on the petition of Thomas J. Finacom. The petitioner requests Special Permits from III(A)(4)(Table I) (A)(2) of the Zoning Bylaws to construct Multifamily units. The petitioner also requests a variance from III(B)(3)( Table II) of the town’s zoning bylaws for rear lot line setback relief. The properties that are the subject to this petition are located at: 56 Main Street, Assessors Map 54, Parcel #125 58 Main Street, Assessors Map 54. Parcel #121 The properties are located in the Village Zoning District. A copy of the petition may be inspected during normal office hours in the Town Clerk’s Office located in the Town Hall. Any person interested or wishing to be heard on this variance petition should appear at the time and place designated. Richard Deschenes Board of Appeals Clerk 01/24 & 01/31/2013 Town of Millbury Public Hearing The Millbury Board of Selectmen will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 7:15 p.m. in the Conference Room, Municipal Office Building, 127 Elm Street, Millbury, MA to act upon the application for a Change of Manager for the Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill and Bar, 70 Worcester/Providence Tpk., Millbury, MA. 1/31/2013

TOWN OF SUTTON CONSERVATION COMMISSION The Sutton Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, February 6, 2013 at 8:00PM, at the Sutton Town Hall, 4 Uxbridge Road, Sutton, MA. The purpose of this hearing is to review a Notice of Intent submitted to the Conservation Commission by Marcus Andrews, Upton, MA. The project consists of construction of a 12’ x 24’ permanent dock and associated ramp, on Map 47, Parcels 5, on 184R Manchaug Road, Sutton MA. This notice is publicized in accordance with the provisions of General Law Chapter 131, Section 40 commonly known as the Wetlands Protection Act, and the Sutton Wetlands and Riverfront District Administration Bylaw. 1/31/2013 MS

TOWN OF SUTTON CONSERVATION COMMISSION The Sutton Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, February 6, 2013, at7:30PM, at the Sutton Town Hall, 4 Uxbridge Road, Sutton, MA. The purpose of this hearing is to review a Request for Determination of Applicability submitted to the Conservation Commission by Matthew Sabourin, Sutton, MA. The project consists of removing four trees for septic upgrade and replanting four trees on Map 14, Parcel 32, for 5 Sunrise Drive, in Sutton. This notice is publicized in accordance with the provisions of General Law Chapter 131, Section 40 commonly known as the Wetlands Protection Act, and the Sutton Wetlands and Riverfront District Administration Bylaw. 1/31/2013 MS

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www.centralmassclass.com LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 Docket No. WO11P3176PM CITATION GIVING NOTICE OF CONSERVATOR’S ACCOUNT In the matter of: Marc S Dunford Protected Person/Disabled Person/Respondent Of: Worcester, MA To the named Respondent and all other interested persons, you are hereby notified pursuant to Rule 72 of the Supplement Rules of the Probate & Family Court, that the First account(s) of Muriel F Dunford of Millbury, MA, Kevin M Dunford of Auburn, MA as Conservator of the property of said Respondent has or have been presented to the Court of allowance. You have the right to object to the account(s). If you wish to do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this court on or before 10:00 A.M. on the return date of 02/12/2013. This day is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline date by which you have to object to the account(s). If you fail to file the written appearance by the return date, action may be taken in this matter without further notice to you, including the allowance of the account(s). Additionally, within thirty days after said return day (or within such other time as the Court upon motion may order), you must file a written affidavit of objections stating the specific facts and grounds upon which each objection is based and a copy shall be served upon the Conservator pursuant to Rule 3 of the Supplemental Rules of Probate & Family Court. You have the right to send to the Conservator, by registered or certified mail, a written request to receive a copy of the Petition and account(s) at no cost to you. IMPORTANT NOTICE The outcome of this proceeding may limit or completely take away the above-named person’s right to make decisions about personal affairs or financial affairs or both. The above-named person has the right to ask for a lawyer. Anyone may make this request on behalf of the above-named person. If the abovenamed person cannot afford a lawyer, one may be appointed at State expense. WITNESS, Hon. Denise L. Meagher, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 17, 2013 Stephen G. Abraham Register of Probate 01/31/2013 MS

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 Docket No. WO13P0117GD CITATION GIVING NOTICE OF PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF GUARDIAN FOR INCAPACITATED PERSON PURSUANT TO G.L. c. 190B, §5-304

In the matter of: Linda Marsters Of: Northborough, MA RESPONDENT Alleged Incapacitated Person To the named Respondent and all other interested persons, a petition has been filed by Department of Developmental Serv, of Shrewsbury, MA in the above captioned matter alleging that Linda Marsters is in need of a Guardian and requesting that Cooperative for Human Services of Burlington, MA (or some other suitable person) be appointed as Guardian to serve without surety on the bond. The petition asks the court to determine that the Respondent is incapacitated, that the appointment of a Guardian is necessary, and that the proposed Guardian is appropriate. The petition is on file with this court and may contain a request for certain specific authority. You have the right to object to this proceeding. If you wish to do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance at this court on or before 10:00 A.M. on the return date of 02/12/2013. This day is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline date by which you have to file the written appearance if you object to the petition. If you fail to file the written appearance by the return date, action may be taken in this matter without further notice to you. In addition to filing the written appearance you or your attorney must file a written affidavit stating the specific facts and grounds of your objection within 30 days after the return date. IMPORTANT NOTICE The outcome of this proceeding may limit or completely take away the above-named person's right to make decisions about personal affairs or financial affairs or both. The above-named person has the right to ask for a lawyer. Anyone may make this request on behalf of the above-named person. If the above-named person cannot afford a lawyer, one may be appointed at State expense. WITNESS, Hon. Denise L. Meagher, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 14, 2013 Stephen G. Abraham Register of Probate 01/31/2013 WM

Keep it Legal To place your legal ad in Central Mass Classifieds, please call Carrie 978-728-4302 or email sales@centralmassclass.com Deadline is Mondays at noon.

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 508-831-2200 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION Docket No. WO13P0252EA Estate of: Gladys Z Markarian Date of Death: 12/09/2012 To all interested persons: A Petition has been filed by: Diane L Markarian of Worcester MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that: Diane L Markarian of Worcester MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before: 10:00 a.m. on 02/26/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, Hon. Denise L. Meagher, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 25, 2013 Stephen G. Abraham, Register of Probate 1/31/2013 WM

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 508-831-2200 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION Docket No. WO13P0165EA Estate of: Edward P Cournoyer Date of Death: 12/15/2012 To all interested persons: A Petition has been filed by: Michele F Cournoyer of Millbury MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order of testacy and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. And also requesting that: Michele F Cournoyer of Millbury MA be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond. You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before: 10:00 a.m. on 02/12/2013. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an Affidavit of Objections within thirty (30) days of the return date, action may be taken without further notice to you. The estate is being administered under formal procedure by the Personal Representative under the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code without supervision by the Court. Inventory and accounts are not required to be filed with the Court, but recipients are entitled to notice regarding the administration from the Personal Representative and can petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, Hon. Denise L. Meagher, First Justice of this Court. Date: January 17, 2013 Stephen G. Abraham, Register of Probate 1/31/2013 WM

J A N U A R Y 3 1, 2 0 13 • W O R C E S T E R M A G . C O M

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Two minutes with...

Rob Pezzella As the safety liaison ofďŹ cer for Worcester Public Schools, it is Rob Pezzellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job to make sure the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more than 24,000 students can do what they come to school to do â&#x20AC;&#x201C; learn. Worrying? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his job. Pezzella coordinates emergency management services and networks with public safety agencies such as the police department, district attorney, state Department of Youth Services (DYS) and juvenile court. He also oversees the schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; long-term suspension program (it is the school departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practice not to expel students). At 56, Pezzella has been safety liaison since 1997, a little more than 15 years. Married with two kids, it would appear he is exactly where he should be â&#x20AC;&#x201C; working with kids in an urban environment where the challenges are many. A recovering drug addict, he is 27 years sober; he has faced the demons and challenges that can change your life in an instant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was given a second lease on life,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a given a gift.â&#x20AC;? Sitting inside the Gerald Creamer Center recently, Pezzella touches upon a number of subjects with Worcester Mag. He makes one thing abundantly clear: The safety of each and every student is nothing less than the school administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chief concern.

Which Worcester school is the safest? Which is the least? To me

theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all safe in my eyes. Every principal deďŹ nitely has set the tempo on school safety. I will say, this School Committee, they have been instrumental in making sure school safety is top priority.

Is there an unfair perception that Worcester schools are plagued by violence? I think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perception

for larger, urban schools systems that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not safe. You look at Boston, Worcester and SpringďŹ eld, there are the same concerns. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a melting pot of diversity. Everyday weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re challenged with different cultures coming into our city. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a misperception.

What is a typical day like for you? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll

get a call from a principal saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We had a ďŹ ght will you come up for mediation?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go to the school to talk with parents. If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another student involved Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll mediate with both parties. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go back to my ofďŹ ce,

another principal will say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had bullying going on and the parents are about to call you.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll explain our process for dealing with that. Today I went to a meeting about a big bullying conference that will be happening here on Feb. 28 at South High.

Do you carry a gun? No. Should you? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel insecure professionally to feel I have to carry a gun. There have been some hairy days, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never felt I had to carry a gun. Do you own a gun personally? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Two SC members have proposed hiring unemployed veterans to provide security in schools. What are your thoughts on that? We have unarmed security

guards in the schools. All but one high school has one unarmed guard. One of the guys with the company, that we contract our security guards through, approached me and said he worked with a group of veterans and asked whether we would want to use

them. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pending issue. The School Committee doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about it. I think you walk a ďŹ ne line with security guards. The current vendor has its own strict responsibilities, like you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t carry a weapon. You cannot discipline the students and there can be no type of body [contact].

So whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the point of having them? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re another eye and ear for the administration. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to have another set of eyes.

Who is allowed to get physical with a student if it is necessary? We have a

certiďŹ ed national course that we teach, Nonviolent Crisis Intervention Training. There are seven certiďŹ ed instructors. The focus of the training is to provide the teacher with verbal de-escalation skills. As a last resort, teachers have the ability to provide a physical intervention.

What is the most dangerous situation you have dealt with inside a Worcester school? It was actually very recently

and involved one student at a local high school. We were trying to explain to him and his mother he was going to be suspended. While explaining the policy he became agitated. He stormed out of the conference room and broke a hinge off the front door of the school. Within three to ďŹ ve minutes he wanted back in. Myself, the principal and the mother went out and he started pushing me and another assistant principal. We deemed him a security threat and in a state of rage he turned and pulled me and the assistant principal down to the ground. I went down pretty hard and the assistant principal fell on the student. There

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have been other situations when the parents have come in very upset. Sometimes it has resulted in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;no trespassâ&#x20AC;? order.

How do you think the local media have handled the issues of violence in Worcester schools? I think the media

is a valuable asset. I Know I have been able to be very vocal in letting the public know weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proactive with safety. We have tried to be very transparent with the public via the media. I believe weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re obligated to respond and let the media know.

Which current policy is least effective toward violence in schools? I think with

backpacks, cell phones in particular, but you pick and choose your battles. The policy is backpacks should be in lockers and cells phones should be off. Enforcing cell phones is difďŹ cult, but a backpack could have anything in it. Transparent backpacks are allowed. The School Committee is debating (the policies). They feel the Internet can be useful for education. I would like to see cell phones secured during school hours. If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reason to have cell phones on during a speciďŹ c class, I would leave it up to the teacher.

-Walter Bird Jr., Senior Writer

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269

Comp. $17.99

Comp. $5.99 YOUR CHOICE

25

$

SAVE $35

Comp. $400

(96 loads)

3.5 oz ea Bar Soap

The healthiest shoes you’ll ever wear! Asst sizes & styles

29

$

96 oz 3X Concentrated Laundry Detergent

Women’s Bodyworks Footwear

99

SALE! Reg. $299

WISK®

Comp. $7.49

AETREX

SAVE $100

Designer & Dept Store Label Women’s Better Coats

STORE HOURS: Mon-Sat 8am-9pm; Sun 9am-8pm

Ocean State

250

Tech 9 SNOWBOARDS Comp. $500

88

$

Tops or bottoms! Comp. $15-$18 & more

Suet Cake ............................................. 1 $ Scott’s Bird Bell .................................. 2 $

LOOK FOR MANAGER’S UNADVERTISED SPECIALS IN ALL OUR STORES EVERY WEEK!

7

$

ea

selection varies by store

Bindings

88

$

.......

We now accept Cash Benefit EBT Cards & All Major Credit Cards

VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.OCEANSTATEJOBLOT.COM FOR STORE LOCATIONS, MONEY SAVING COUPONS & COMING ATTRACTIONS!!

We warmly welcome

R

JANUARY 31, 2013 • WORCESTERMAG.COM

39


Introducing the new Ground Floor at Loft 266 – a beautiful, new dining room serving appetizers at half-price and 9.99 entrees every day!

Apps To Share ALWAYS Half-Price! GROUND FLOOR AT LOFT 266 Wed. – Sat. Open at 4:30 266 Park Ave 508-796-5177 loft266.com

ay D ’s e tinGO½tree, e n le BO one end entre* a y V n e Bu seco pric f l t ge at ha

* Valentine’s Day BOGO½: 2nd entree must be of equal or lesser cost. Cannot be combined with other offers or specials.

40

WORCESTERMAG.COM

JANUARY 31, 2013

Worcester Mag January 31, 2013  

Worcester Mag January 31, 2013