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FEBRUARY 16 - 22, 2017

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GPS leading to problems with some city roads Page 4

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Painting with light: The art of Stephen Knapp Page 23

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February 21-24

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Kirk A. Davis President Kathleen Real-Benoit Publisher x331 Walter Bird Jr. Editor x322 Elizabeth Brooks x323 Photographer Joshua Lyford x325, Tom Quinn x324 Reporters Tom Matthews x326 Reporter and Social Media Coordinator Sarah Connell, Brendan Egan, Brian Goslow, Janice Harvey, Jim Keogh, Jim Perry, Jessica Picard, Corlyn Vooorhees, Contributing Writers Lillian Cohen, Diana Holiner, Cassidy Wang, Editorial Interns Don Cloutier Director of Creative Services x141 Kimberly Vasseur Creative Director/Assistant Director of Creative Services x142 Matthew Fatcheric, Becky Gill, Stephanie Mallard, David Rand Creative Services Department Helen Linnehan Ad Director x333 Diane Galipeau x335, Rick McGrail x334, Ryan Prashad x336, Media Consultants Kathryn Connolly Media Coordinator x332 Michelle Purdie Classified Sales Specialist x433 Worcester Magazine is an independent news weekly covering Central Massachusetts. We accept no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. The Publisher has the right to refuse any advertisement. LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES: Please call 978.728.4302, email sales@centralmassclass.com, or mail to Central Mass Classifieds, P.O. Box 546, Holden, MA 01520

T

insidestories

he winter months are upon us, but that doesn’t mean you should just sit inside in front of a cozy fire watching your favorite shows on Netflix. Well, yeah, you can do that. But you should also try to get a little exercise in – you know, burn off the lazy pounds that can so easily accumulate. But overall health and wellness is more than just exercising. It’s taking care of the whole body. What we eat, how we treat our eyes, the medical advice and care we seek – all are key to maintaining overall health. With our annual Health & Wellness issue, Worcester Magazine looks at being pregnant and exercising, the relatively new obsession with kettlebells and a lot more. Are you a vegetarian? Vegan? Omnivore? We talk with a nutritionist who breaks down what you need from each diet. Why are people living longer? We look at how modern technology and medical advances are letting more kids meet their great-grandparents. Which sports are best for staying fit? We’ve got that. Why your eyesight may be failing if your day job has you sitting in front of a computer? Check. Better still, you can read all about it without spiking your heart rate or breaking a sweat. Actually, those things can be good for you, so after you’ve read through this issue – with all the other stuff you want from Worcester Magazine – hit the gym, go for a brisk walk or hit your local supermarket for some kale and tofu. Read first. That’s good for you, too.

- Walter Bird Jr., editor

DISTRIBUTION: Worcester Magazine is available free of charge at more than 400 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $1 each at Worcester Magazine offices. Unauthorized bulk removal of Worcester Magazine from any public location, or any other tampering with Worcester Magazine’s distribution including unauthorized inserts, is a criminal offense and may be prosecuted under the law. SUBSCRIPTIONS: First class mail, $156 for one year. Send orders and subscription correspondence to Holden Landmark Corporation, 22 West St., Suite 31, Millbury, MA 01527. ADVERTISING: To place an order for display advertising or to inquire, please call 508.749.3166. Worcester Magazine (ISSN 0191-4960) is a weekly publication of The Holden Landmark Corporation. All contents copyright 2017 by The Holden Landmark Corporation. All rights reserved. Worcester Magazine is not liable for typographical errors in advertisements.

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FEBRUARY 16, 2017 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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citydesk February 16 - 22, 2017 n Volume 42, Number 25

GPS leads to problems with some roads in Worcester Tom Quinn

T

he advent of personal GPS systems has had many wonderful benefits. Rather than consult a map or a gas station attendant, motorists can link up to a global network of orbital satellites to get directions, a practice so commonplace that some don’t leave the house without booting up the requisite smartphone app. But it is also leading to problems, with Granby Road on Worcester’s East Side serving as the latest example of perfectly functional GPS making neighborhoods go haywire. Granby Road is a short route - one of many connecting Shrewsbury Street to Belmont Street. It’s a narrow residential corridor that does not lend itself well to two cars at a time, let alone a tractor trailer, Shrewsbury Street Neighborhood Association President Gary Vecchio said. “It wasn’t constructed for tractor trailers, and we never had that problem before,” Vecchio said. “... it’s been noisy, and it’s not a safe situation.” District 2 City Councilor Candy MeroCarlson agreed, putting forward a petition that would install signage prohibiting trucks from entering Granby Street, and would enforce the new rules if and when the signs are in place. “This is really about a safety concern,” Carlson said.

This is not the first time Granby Road has been the subject of a Council order. Carlson previously filed a series of orders trying to get trucks off the street, including banning tractor trailers and buses, and requesting a sign that would prohibit turning from Belmont to Granby between 6-8 a.m. and 3-6 p.m. - when residents would most likely be competing with truck drivers for road space. Those petitions are currently pending on the Traffic and Parking Committee list, and have been since they were proposed in June 2016. “Nothing has happened in terms of us putting signage in there, in terms of us doing anything for the folks down on Granby Road,” Carlson said. “... The constituents once again are sharing their concerns. It’s wintertime, with the snow there – again, this is a safety issue.” The Worcester Public Schools previously dealt with complaints from Granby Road residents, including School Committee member and neighborhood resident Dianna Biancheria, who led what Vecchio said was a successful push to get the School Department’s transportation provider to get its drivers to stop using the shortcut, which is a convenient – for the drivers – way to get to Worcester Tech from Shrewsbury Street. “The school department has done their job,” Vecchio said. “I have not gotten one

Granby Street has become a cut-through for motorists following the guidance of GPS.

complaint, nor have I seen one full-sized school bus [on Granby] since then … It would be nice if the city side did their job.” The East Side of the city has been especially hard-hit by the rise of GPS as a crutch for tractor trailer drivers, since it plays host to the CSX rail yard, where much of the city’s

WOO-TOWN INDE X Crickets. That’s the sound you hear as Worcester has handled recent snowstorms pretty well. Now, if the DPW could get a handle on some of the streets that are dangerous even without snow. +2

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WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM • FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Congrats to the policeman and firefighters on their recent promotions. An extra point for the WPD’s first Latino lieutenant. +3

The Blizzard of ’78 Party came at a good time, right in between snowstorms. +2

truck traffic originates or ends up. Last year, local officials were able to get a sign on the Mass Pike redirecting drivers to the highway after Grafton Street residents complained of truckers accessing the freight yard by driving through residential zones. continued on page 6

-2

Total for this week:

A weekly quality of life check-in of Worcester

To the apparently handicapped man riding a scooter down Lincoln Street – going against traffic – during a snowstorm: really? -3

ELIZABETH BROOKS

Recent snowmobile deaths on frozen waterways highlight the need to know the area you are snowmobiling. Unfrozen patches and other hazards can spell tragedy in an instant. -5

As if an Auburn cop getting hit by a suspect wasn’t bad enough, police say a scammer has been trying to profit off the incident by soliciting donations. -5

Melissa Etheridge announces April show at Worcester’s Hanover Theatre. Don’t know why, but we’re pretty excited about that. We want to come over! +2

We are intrigued by discussion over whether to appoint School Committee members in Worcester. Is it the right move? It bears further study. +2


{ citydesk }

Bowditch & Dewey resolves to help women become empowered Sarah Connell

SARAH CONNELL

L

ast April, Worcester Magazine’s “Leading Lady” Christina Andreoli and her team of tireless organizers attracted more 800 attendees to The Worcester Women’s Leadership Conference. At the conference, CNN’s popular on-air commentator, Mel Robbins, credited her personal success to maintaining a contributor mindset. “You are not a helper!” Robbins cried, adding, “Nor are you competition for anyone here. There is enough room for everyone to succeed.” She urged Worcester’s women to not only be present but also participatory. We listened. In a monthly series leading up to this year’s April 13 conference, Worcester Magazine will check back with a few of the “Leading Ladies” who continue to foster a contributor mindset among the city’s youth, immigrant, professional, and creative communities. This week, we focus on Aivi Nguyen. Nguyen has long looked at her hometown of Worcester as a place that allows professionals to zero in on the markets that most compel them. Growing up as the only child in a traditional Vietnamese household, Nguyen always knew she wanted to stay close to her family, but she also recognized she wanted to live in a city that would allow her to eventually run a firm. All roads led to Worcester. At present, Nguyen is the youngest attorney ever elected to partnership at Worcester’s At right, Lynn Stromberg, Jessica Walsh and Amy Peterson (from forefront) join others at the networking event. premier law firm, Bowditch & Dewey. She has continued on page 6

FEBRUARY 16, 2017 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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{ citydesk } GPS continued from page 4

residents will have to wait until at least March 22 for a solution, when Carlson’s petition will next appear before the Traffic and Parking Committee. In the meantime, homeowners will continue to have to deal with stories like the one Vecchio recounted, in which the driver of an especially large tractor trailer drove down Granby, only to find himself unable to get out. After two hours, residents had to be called out to move their parked cars to give him room to maneuver, Vecchio said. “We felt bad for the guy,” Vecchio said. “He was just following his GPS.”

continued from page 5

quickly set herself apart from the crowd, as evidenced by this month’s Bowditch & Dewey Women’s Networking Event. Fifty-six women had been “tapped” by the ladies of Bowditch & Dewey to attend the event, held in the White Room at 138 Green St. “You’re here because we see you as leaders,” Nguyen said. Staring down the length of the two sprawling tables, any Worcesterite would have recognized a deluge of familiar faces.

The idea for this event had no doubt been spurred by the recent presidential election, but in her opening remarks, Nguyen reminded the group, “Regardless of where you fall politically, we need you to be vigilant about expressing our rights as women.” She went on to say, “Something that really sticks in my craw is that women are just as likely to hire a man over a woman as a man is to hire a man over a woman.” Nguyen made a conscious decision to

SARAH CONNELL

Reporter Tom Quinn can be reached at 508-749-3166 x324 or tquinn@ worcestermagazine.com with story ideas, feedback, or questions. Follow him on Twitter @bytomquinn.

By Elizabeth Brooks

1,001 words

In addition to taking the hard left turn where Shrewsbury Street meets Belmont Street, Vecchio said drivers could use Adams Street as a connector, since it has a traffic light. Granby Road does not, and has a steep rise where it meets Belmont that complicates the situation even further. “The problem is GPS signifies Granby Road as a cut-through from either Shrewsbury Street to Belmont Street or Belmont to Shrewsbury, for all sorts of vehicles,” Vecchio said. “… This time of the year, with snow piles – if there’s a tractor trailer coming up that street, no one else is coming up or down. People have to turn into driveways or side streets. We see it all the time.” While the snow has worsened the situation,

Dr. Malika Carter and Greta Kenney, right and left, respectively. Attendees included the likes of Dr. Malika Carter (City of Worcester), Lauren Lanier and Kim Golinski (Treehouse Brewing), Lynn Stromberg (Lettuce Be Local), Kate McEvoy (Harvard Pilgrim), Jessica Walsh (Worcester Wares), Greta Kenney (Holy Cross), Mary Feeney (Bowditch & Dewey) and Sherri Pitcher (Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce), among dozens of other incredible female leaders from across the region. That Nguyen was able to collect so many power players in a single room for an evening seemed a remarkable feat in its own right.

conundrum

contract female-owned vendors for the event, leaning on Barbara Cotter of Struck Catering for the menu, Amy Lynn Chase of Crompton Collective for the venue, and Virginia Orlando and Candace Atchue of Seed to Stem for the entertainment. “It’s not enough to be mentors,” Nguyen told the group. “We have to hire one another, promote one another, nominate, vote for, and elect one another.” In the hour that followed, everyone set to work tinkering with air plants during a “living wall art” workshop courtesy of Seed

Professional Hockey is Back in Worcester! The Worcester Railers Hockey Club hits the ice at the DCU Center in October 14, 2017!

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{ citydesk }

SARAH CONNELL

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NPWAW: Someone from

Deadspin stumbled across an article that mentioned the time the Canal District Alliance managed to get people to send 9,000 postcards to the Pawtucket Red Sox in an effort to lure them to the old Wyman-Gordon site, in an effort the irreverent sports site said was “like The Notebook or the first Harry Potter movie, except for a minor-league baseball stadium that would likely require public funding and would be three years away at minimum.” For those unfamiliar with Deadspin, they’re a brash child of Gawker, which means they foster an amazing comments section that puts the Telegram’s cesspool to shame. And by “amazing,” I mean even more of a cesspool. Here are some examples. “CF is a shit hole. The Bucket is like a vomit filled toilet. Worcester however, is BOTH,” reads one comment, using acronyms no doubt familiar to Rhode Islanders. “They are on par,” someone wrote in trying to compare Worcester and Pawtucket. “Both are effectively the Gary, IN of New England.” I don’t know what that means, but it doesn’t sound like they meant it as a compliment. Here’s a nice one: “I’ve been to Worcester a few times and I didn’t think it was bad. It should be noted I live in Springfield and a bucket full of feces would be considered an upgrade over Springfield.” OK, never mind. “If you think The Bucket is a shit hole, Worcester is like if Pawtucket had an anal baby with Central Falls,” reads another one. PSA: Don’t look up what that means. There were a few nice comments, although it seemed like most of them were grading Worcester on a curve. But hey – progress.

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Jack Barry Little League posted an interesting message on their website this week. “How do YOU treat a champion?” they asked. “In Worcester, city officials decide to STOP renovating the girl’s softball field – despite public promises to do so.” League president Dante Simone said he was turning that message into a flier to be distributed to league sponsors, in an effort to raise the money themselves. The whole thing stems from the partnerships the city engages in with private sports leagues, a practice Worcester Magazine wrote about last month. Phase 1 of the field renovation was completed with CSX mitigation money, but Simone said there is also a Phase 2 that was drawn up, and that is what he is upset about. Assistant Commissioner of Public Works and Parks Rob Antonelli confirmed the multiphase plan, but said the allegation of the city reneging on a promise was a misunderstanding. JBLL’s field is “no different from any of our other fields,” Antonelli said, in that the phases of the master plan are completed “as money becomes available.” As for how much money is needed to redo the field, Simone said the figure is in the thousands, while Antonelli threw out a $500,000 figure, based on the scope of the work. Simone had previously complained of the city charging his league for drainage maintenance costs, which were added on to the voluntary work and money the league provides to the city-owned land, and this week reiterated via email that “this is why there really is no share program, they like to call it that but it’s us doing all the work for the city and parks department.” Antonelli, true to his status as a city representative, struck a conciliatory tone, giving JBLL “kudos” for the fundraising push and saying the city is “more than willing to work with them on an opportunity to better our public parks.”

going to show you this, but there is a good deal of minutiae that goes into starting a sports team. The Worcester Railers hockey team, for example, needed somewhere to house their crop of young players. Pat Sargent of the Worcester Sun reported this week that the Railers had settled on a location – the Edge at Union Station, the college-student apartment building that longtime residents will remember as the Osgood Bradley building. The Edge itself is fairly new – apologies if I’m retreading ground covered in the original article, most of it is behind a paywall – opening last year with a marketing blitz aimed at drawing college kids downtown. The new location is within walking distance of the new ice center the Railers are building on


{ worcesteria } Harding Street, and is also in walking distance of the real pleasures of the Canal District and the theoretical pleasures of downtown Main Street.

VIDEO VIDEO VIDEO: Forgot this was still going on? In 2014, Gerald Jones alleged in a lawsuit, now-former Worcester Police Department officer Michael Motyka attacked him while he was handcuffed in a cell. At the time, Jones also claimed Motyka, who is white, made racist remarks to Jones, who is black, during the assault, although that charge has not survived the judicial process up to this week, where Motyka’s lawyer claimed he acted in self-defense. That’s according to the Telegram. The fact that Jones was handcuffed during the incident was a sticking point for some who otherwise give the benefit to the police in dust-ups, but Motyka is now claiming Jones “strikes Mr. Motyka in the face with the shackles” before Motyka struck back. A few things don’t look good for Motyka here. A current WPD officer is testifying against him, Motyka’s lawyer previously mentioned PTSD as a contributing factor (where self-defense was not mentioned), and the city of Worcester settled for $225,000, which doesn’t bode well if this was all part of the regular course of business. Working in favor of the former officer, whose pension is on the line, is Jones’ long criminal record, although prosecutors are trying to keep that info out of the case. Oh, and did we mention there is video from the area? We should put an allegedly in front of that, since as the Telegram notes, “Authorities have partial video of the incident but have declined to release it citing ongoing prosecution.” Wait a second, what? Can’t release it before it goes to court, won’t release it after the case is probably settled, and aren’t going to release it now? Is this a planetary alignment thing, where there is a window every seven years where the video becomes available?

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BILLBOARD DETECTIVE: Last month, Worcester Magazine did a retrospective on some unsolved murder cases in Worcester county. This week, Worcester residents saw a new billboard in the West Boylston Street area asking for information on Travis Monroe. Monroe was killed 10 years ago in what police say was a hit and run – a narrative Monroe’s mother, Christi Berry, finds hard to swallow. Monroe was 17 years old when he was found dead at Gunnarson Road and Fales Street, and the billboard features a photo of him and a tip line number. “Somebody knows what happened to me,” read the message. “Stand up. Speak up.” ERROR DNS SERVER: District 5 Councilor Gary Rosen tested out a new stand-up routine on his fellow councilors this week. Rosen had proposed an annual public hearing “to discuss the overall quality of service, customer service and price points of Charter Communications.” Given the constant complaints about Charter and their monopoly of the Worcester internet market, among other things, which seems to sap their will to provide consistent service, it was assumed the order was giving residents a chance to air grievances. But Rosen cheekily suggested that people might go in another direction. “Maybe people would line up to tell Charter they’re doing a great job,” Rosen said, to muffled guffaws. Rosen also riffed on Esther Howland’s greeting card company and handed out pocket U.S. Constitutions in what seemed like an attempt to prolong the meeting to avoid doing anything for Valentine’s Day. The meeting still got out well ahead of average – better luck next time. A NON-CRISIS: I’m often curious about dentists, mechanics and the like – people whose

jobs rely on problems. If everyone took their advice and took care of their teeth and/or car, surely they would lose business? Such is the plight of the City Council, which sometimes seems like it is in search of a problem to solve. The Council voted 10-1 against At-large Councilor Konnie Lukes in her push to add a line about HUD regulations governing political activity to organizations getting HUD grants. “I’m not sure what problem we’re trying to solve,” City Manager Ed Augustus Jr. said at one point. Chief Development Officer Mike Traynor also gave an explanation of why this was superfluous, that I’m going to choose to explain in relatable terms. HUD doesn’t ban political activity – it just says you can’t use their money for those activities. So the city tracks money they disburse to organizations. Think about it this way – if your mom gives you $10 for an ice cream cone, and then watches you buy that ice cream cone and gets your receipt afterwards, they know that any money you spent on heroin came from a different source. Not good enough, according to Lukes, who nonetheless could not convince any of her colleagues of her way of thinking.

A BETTING MAN: Doug Arbetter, a bio-statistician who ran for School Committee two

cycles ago, has officially thrown his hat in the ring for the District 5 City Council seat, challenging incumbent Gary Rosen. He joins former mayor Joe O’Brien and Worcester Daily News writer Todd Williams, both for at-large, as the only people we’ve heard of who have said they will run. Everyone else is playing coy. What is it – the lack of an “open” seat, the bad weather, a growing dislike of the media? If you know someone who is running for Council, send them this way. Reporter Tom Quinn can be reached at 508-749-3166 x324 or tquinn@worcestermagazine.com with story ideas, feedback, or questions. Follow him on Twitter @bytomquinn.

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slants/rants Editorial

To elect or appoint is question in Worcester

S

hould Worcester appoint or elect its School Committee members? It is a worthwhile discussion to have, with both merits and disadvantages. The first thing to look at is the city’s form of government. Under the current Plan E system, Worcester’s mayor is without any real powers. The position is more ceremonial than anything else, yet past and present mayors have striven and shown to be influential in certain affairs. Indeed, in his inaugural addresses, current Mayor Joe Petty has laid out ambitious plans that really carry no weight. In truth, whatever plans the mayor wants to unfurl require approval of a City Council or School Committee (the mayor chairs both). Not to mention the city manager, who is really the architect of what gets done in Worcester, under the direction and instruction of his bosses on the Council, including the mayor. In that regard, the mayor does carry some sway. If he can garner a majority on the Council on one issue or another, which Petty usually can do given the current make-up of the Council, he has the chance to push the city manager on his own agenda. One could argue an appointed school board makes more sense under a strong mayor form of government. One boss, one person making the decisions. Some have suggested a hybrid of elected and appointed officials. Another idea is to have both the mayor and city manager pick the panel. An appointed School Committee holds appeal in at least one sense. The lack of diversity as it is currently constituted is alarming. Elections often turn into popularity contents, or a battle of who stands out the longest holding a sign, or who buys the most air time on local radio. Party politics can and do come into play, with one side or the other touting its “slate” of candidates. The mayor would be expected, and in an ideal position, to choose a greatly diverse group of committee members. That the political scene in Worcester is largely non-representative of its community base is no secret. A chance to shake that up would be welcome, and would serve the city well. An elected committee, meanwhile, is seen as the very backbone of democracy. It has worked, to varying degrees of success, this long, one might argue – why tinker with the process? Well, because someone else would contend it has not worked as well as could be. The idea of a system of appointments is intriguing, particularly if in so doing, the appointing authority convened a group of community representatives – who would be ineligible from consideration – to help create a strong list of candidates. The suggestion here would be to lean heavily on the immigrant community — the legal immigrant community — along with local clergy, business owners, activists, crime watch groups and others. These are the people with their ears closest to the road. They know their communities as well as, and probably better than, most. It might work best if voters themselves had a say in whether to elect or appoint School Committee members. The thinking from this vantage point is that a strong mayor system is more conducive to having an appointed governing body such as School Committee, but that does not mean it could not work. The other suggestion from this corner is to expand the length of service, with staggered terms for committee members. One could make the argument for doing so across the board, including City Council. Some conservative-leaning folks, however, would likely balk at stretching out the time of service. It would fly in the face of the notion of term limits. However, increasing a school board member’s term from two to, say, four years, as is the case in Boston, allows for a much greater opportunity to have real, lasting impact on the city’s most precious commodity: its students. It also puts some distance between the time of election and campaigning, which under the current system pretty much starts soon after you’re elected. There are pros and cons to an elected or appointed body. Perhaps the city will stay with what is in place now. A good discussion, however, never hurts.

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WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

• FEBRUARY 16, 2017

commentary | opinions

Harvey

It only hurts when I don’t laugh Janice Harvey

G

uffaw. Chuckle. Snort. Giggle. Give laughing a try, because it’s better than crying. It may not be the best medicine, but it’s better than relying on Prozac to survive the next four years. Think of humor as a placebo for the soul. There’s been an uptick in visits to therapists and physicians since November 2016, when many Americans waking up to Donald Trump as the 45th president became utterly despondent. Moments of hope sprung if not eternal, at least lasting long enough to lift serotonin levels slightly, when massive protests gave us a feeling that change could occur. Healthcare professionals have suggested everything from deep breathing to reading poetry to remembering to eat well; seems we’re forgetting to hydrate, too. From day to day,hope waxes and wanes; with the approval of each unqualified cabinet nominee, it becomes more and more difficult to see anything good coming out of this administration. When the clown car overflows, it’s time to send in the jesters. Enter the late-night hosts and their defiant writers, men and women who help craft monologues that slice and dice the Trump administration on a daily basis. From Jimmy Kimmel to Stephen Colbert to Trevor Noah to Seth Meyers, no bizarre or absurd action by Trump & Co. has been left un-poked (Jimmy Fallon still needs to woo himself back into my good graces after cozying up to candidate Trump). Meyers, in particular, is relentless in his scathing segment “ A Closer Look,” peeling back the layers of lies that often coat news from the White House. After 42 years on the air, “Saturday Night Live” has righted its own floundering vessel. Once the premiere showcase for political humor, SNL has famously lost and found and lost again its oars over the years. Its writers scratched a winning lottery ticket when Hillary

Clinton lost the election, however, and it’s clear the president’s bashing of Alec Baldwin’s devastatingly funny impersonation began the show’s current ratings surge. Thank you, sir, may I have another? I remember well leaving clubs and parties to race home before 11:30, back when SNL featured Gilda, Chevy, John and Dan. Now I’m dozing on the sofa from 9 p.m. until showtime, with the alarm set, so that I won’t fall asleep during the cold open. Sure, I could catch it all online Sunday morning, but the thrill of live TV still exists for me, and I suspect I’m not alone. Performers like the incredibly talented Kate McKinnon are keeping my eyes wide open. I find it intriguing that even as we cast a wary eye at news organizations, we have thoroughly embraced comedy to deliver us an honest assessment of daily events. If Jon Stewart can be seen as the daddy of satirical “news,” its granddad is SNL’s “Weekend Update.” Our most cherished right, that of free speech, has always been challenged by staunch conservatives and triumphantly exercised by television pioneers like Jack Paar. When I watch Lewis Black, arguably the most explosively funny man on the planet, sputter and bark over Trump’s gaffes and setbacks, I can almost feel my own blood pressure drop. Black may spontaneously combust, and if he does, it will be a patriotic sacrifice on his part. My acupuncturist, Clovis Padilha, tells me I mustn’t allow my outrage to damage my health. Clovis is treating me for stress and tension that caused my jaw to lock up and my shoulders to become solid blocks of cement. “You can’t change the bend in the river, you can only build a better boat,” he tells me. To that end, I’m drilling holes in my ship to let in the funny and let out the steam. My advice to fellow sufferers? Stay tuned.

Have something on your mind? Letters to the editor are a great way to share your thoughts and opinions with thousands of readers and online viewers each week. We reserve the right to edit for length. If handwritten, write legibly - if we cannot read it, we are not running it. A full name and town or city of residence are required. Please include an email address or phone number for verification purposes only. That information will not be published. Please note that letters will run as space allows. Send them to Worcester Magazine, 72 Shrewsbury St., Worcester, MA 01604 or by email to editor@worcestermagazine.com.


commentary | opinions

Some things do get lost in translation Lynne Clark

A

merica is full of immigrants, as humanity came out of Africa. Immigrants worked hard to build this wonderful country. Most people [in the early days] came to this country for religious freedom. Many others came over to make a new life – to prosper [regardless of religion]. All my ancestors were not Englishspeakers; in fact, many of them hated the English [French, Irish, Scottish]. What they all did was learn English so they could fit in and get a job to prosper [for themselves and their children, and their children]. My son had a friend in grade school whose whole family had recently come over. Even the grandfather was learning English. I won’t say from what country, because it doesn’t matter. The important thing was they learned English and got a job. What we have here is so much better than many parts of the world. The reason is that all those diverse people learned the common language and worked their butts off to get ahead. Unfortunately, many lost their prior language, customs and traditions in that effort to “not be different.” I hope we have gone beyond that and can meet people as people, regardless of where they come from, what they call God, or what their skin color is. Since we can all breed together and transfer blood [except for type], we are al human, all earthlings, etc. This country is wasting a lot of money because we have people here who do not want to fit in; maybe they think they are better than our non-English ancestors. I don’t know, I don’t care. All I know is that a lot of money and time are being wasted catering to these people. Government information must be put out in many languages, the driver’s test is in several languages [but the street signs aren’t], companies had to hire extra people just to translate for the people they hired. If you don’t speak/understand the common language, you are at a great disadvantage. When I was growing up, there was a family of immigrants down the street. I used to worry about the mother, because she would not learn English nor allow it to be spoken in the house. She could not answer the door or the phone. What if there was an accident and the authorities were trying to give her directions, an evacuation route maybe? She would not have understood.

What if she had been out shopping and there was a fire? Again, she would not have understood any directions. If someone offered her help, she would not understand. Her husband and children all learned English, and she could have taken one of them if she needed too. But in the case of an emergency, so she would not have a translator with her. I can understand that in the fields of medicine and religion, there are many specialized terms that are not heard anywhere else, so it would be a good thing to have translators for those times. But for every day use, learn the language. If I went to live in another country, the first thing I would do is learn the language. This opens up the country for you to learn about and enjoy. The British came across the same problem when they “colonized” other countries.

Your Turn India is a prime example. The natives had a prophesy that the Brits would rule for only 100 years, and when that time came close they were planning all kinds of actions right out in public, but the Brits had no idea because they had not learned the language. And they were out in 100 years. America has been likened to a melting pot. I think pea soup: everything is the same, how boring, uninteresting. I like to think of America as a stew: every piece adds to the whole, but as it takes something from the whole, it also keeps its own identity. A piece a meat is still a piece of meat, a piece of potato is still a piece of potato. But they have picked up the gravy of the whole, blending in while standing out. This is what we need: learn the common language, contribute to the prosperity of the whole while retaining your previous language, customs, traditions, clothing, religion, etc. I think it is a shame when grandchildren and grandparents can’t talk to each other because the oldsters didn’t learn English and the second generation didn’t learn the old language. Some things do get lost in the translation. All of this is just one person’s opinion. Lynne Clark resides in Worcester.

{slants/rants}

That’s What They Said

“The light has gone out of my life.”

“...We all became family to each other and have spent numerous, countless times in each other’s home, in each other’s lives, with our families, our children.” - Steven Weiss of Westborough, on surviving a snowmobile accident in New Hampshire that claimed the lives of two of his friends, as told to the Telegram & Gazette. “I’m always one of the first people to defend Worcester people.” - Doug Arbetter, talking to Worcester Magazine about why he is running for City Council in District 5. “We need patients to be their own advocates as well … and really try to negotiate how you manage pain … in a way that isn’t going to kind of get you down the wrong road.”

- Per CNN, what former President Teddy Roosevelt wrote in his diary the day his wife died during childbirth, Feb. 14, 1884.

- City Manager Ed Augustus Jr., on battling the opioid abuse crisis, during a Facebook Live appearance with the Telegram & Gazette.

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Health & Exercising while pregnant: the do’s and don’ts Walter Bird Jr.

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egan Gallagher knows one thing: this time around she isn’t letting up on exercising. Twenty-five weeks pregnant with her second child, Gallagher said she was much more conscious during her first pregnancy when it came to exercising. As someone who has tried to stay fit, she found herself easing up and avoiding certain exercises, such as lifting weights. Now into her second trimester, Gallagher is doing the opposite this time.

should be exercising, women in their 20s, 30s and 60s should be exercising, and certainly pregnant women should be exercising throughout their pregnancy. There are very few women who should not be exercising. Most of our pregnant patients, we encourage them to exercise. Sometimes we discuss how to modify that.” There are rare occasions on which DeMone said she would caution a pregnant patient against exercising. A bleeding condition, problem with the placenta or pre-term labor might draw a warning to cut back on exercising, DeMone said. JESSICA PICARD

Dr. Jaimee DeMone, forefront, and Dr. Dina Deldon-Saltin. Both are with Women’s Health of Central Massachusetts.

“I had a lot more discussion [with her doctor], and she encouraged me to keep doing what I was doing,” Gallagher said. “I’ve tried to do a lot of extra research online, too, and this time I really want to keep doing some weight-bearing exercises, mostly avoiding anything that’s like a crunch or targeting the middle area of my stomach. Just lighter weights and more reps. I feel better. I feel more comfortable.” Gallagher’s doctor, Jaimee DeMone, of Women’s Health of Central Massachusetts, and Dr. Dina Deldon-Saltin, also with WHCMA, concur: exercising while pregnant isn’t just OK, it is highly recommended. “Frankly,” Deldon-Saltin said, “exercise is great throughout your entire life. Teenagers

12

WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

Other signs that exercising while pregnant might be unsafe, according to UMass Memorial Health Care, include cervical problems, leaking of amniotic fluid, shortness of breath, dizziness and/or fainting, decreased fetal activity, increased heart rate and certain health problems, such as high blood pressure or heart disease. Outside of those instances, however, pregnant women should feel free to continue exercising as they were before becoming pregnant. Those who were not as active before becoming pregnant are also encouraged to exercise, although a doctor might instruct them to start off slowly. “We really would love women to be thinking about [exercising] long before

• FEBRUARY 16, 2017

they get pregnant,” DeMone said. “If you know you’re someday going to hope to have children, the benefits of exercising during pregnancy are going to be much more robust if you’re already doing it long before you get pregnant … but I certainly don’t discourage someone from exercising. Restrictions are pretty rare.” The benefits, DeMone said, are many. Reduced risk of constipation, reduced weight gain, reduced risk of C-section and reduced complications of high blood pressure and diabetes are among the positive outcomes of exercising while pregnant. “A lot of women who are exercising come in and say, ‘I held off until my first visit,’” DeMone said. “They’re often surprised to hear that exercising while you’re pregnant actually reduces the risk of miscarriage.” Don’t buy into the idea that, if you weren’t exercising before pregnancy, you shouldn’t start, Deldon-Saltin added. “That’s a huge myth,” s he said. “If you were a vigorous exerciser before pregnancy, you can continue to exercise vigorously. If you are somebody who never exercised before … there’s no reason that, by the end of your pregnancy, you can’t be at least a moderate exerciser.” There are certain exercises to be avoided while pregnant. DeMone and Deldon-Saltin both listed contact sports such as soccer, football and rugby as sports to avoid. Skiing and rock climbing also are no-no’s. In addition, umassmemorial.org lists horseback riding, scuba diving, exercises that can cause a serious fall, exercising on your back during the first trimester, vigorous exercise in hot, humid weather and exercise involving holding one’s breath during exertion as activities to be avoided. DeMone also said pregnant women should not take part in hot room yoga, and should stay out of hot tubs and saunas. Other than that, the consensus among health providers is: go for it. The benefits are well worth it, beyond the obvious physical ones. Exercising during and after pregnancy, DeMone said, has been proven to help with postpartum depression. There is another, perhaps lesser known reason for the mom-tobe to exercise. “There’s been some recent studies that show children’s activity level is most strongly correlated with mom,” DeMone said. “Dad can exercise up the wazoo, but kids are typically going to model themselves after what mom

JESSICA PICARD

Megan Gallagher hoists her 2-year-old daughter, Maddie, into the air. Gallagher is 25 weeks pregnant, and has been exercising throughout her pregnancy. does. If they see mom doing this as part of regular life, what a great kind of lesson to instill in their kids, to see that it’s just part of what we do to take care of ourselves.” Gallagher hopes to accomplish a couple things by exercising through her second pregnancy. “Last time, I just more did the walking and the stretching,” she said. “This time, I try to run as much as I can. I just feel like I have more energy. Like, last time, I had to have a couple different pregnancy wardrobes. This time, I’m hoping to keep it one size.” “I also had a pretty long labor the first time around,” Gallagher continued. “I’m hoping, this time, it’s easier.” That is a strong possibility, according to DeMone, who said a woman’s ability to move around and tolerate labor is improved if she possesses good muscle tone and fitness. Women carrying extra weight while pregnant may experience a harder time during delivery. “Certainly, at least anecdotally, I do notice women who are fit just tolerate labor better,” DeMone said. “Also, there’s a certain aspect to labor that you can almost approach as an athletic [event]. I like women to kind of think about it as almost a challenge, something to look at as not something to fear, but as a challenge, something they can almost approach as being an active participant in this.” Walter Bird Jr. may be reached at 508-7493166, ext. 322 or at wbird@worcestermag.com.


Wellness

Kettlebells: the ‘little ball with a handle’ takes off ELIZABETH BROOKS

Walter Bird Jr.

Y

ou want to join a gym and start working out. You know you want to incorporate weight lifting into your regimen. Simple enough. But wait. You see dumbbells and barbells, the stuff Arnold Schwarzenegger pumped. It worked for him. But what are those funny-looking round balls with a handle on them? Should you use those or stick with the free-weights? Good questions, all of them. And if you’re lucky enough to join a gym with certified instructors for both traditional weights and those “little balls with handles,” chances are you can make an educated choice sooner than later. Left to your own devices, some experts say you should stick to the traditional weights. That ball with a handle – it’s called a kettlebell – isn’t as simple as it looks. You can pick up a 10- or 20-pound dumbbell and start curling. You could do the same with a kettlebell, but that is not what it is designed for. And if you start using it without knowing what you’re doing, you could hurt yourself. You may also be doing yourself a disservice if you simply ask yourself which is better: the barbell/dumbbell or the kettlebell? The answer is a little more complex, although it may just come down to what your own personal goals are. One thing is certain: those who train in kettlebells, or incorporate them into their workouts, swear by them. What originated in Russia has, in recent years, exploded in popularity here. Cross-fit training generally gets the nod as the impetus for the growing use of kettlebells. If you’re looking for an allaround, total-body workout, kettlebell trainers – biased they may be – say those little balls with handles are the way to go. “I feel that people are looking for a workout that they can get the most bang for their buck,” said Tracy Riley, an instructor and trainer at Worcester Fitness, 440 Grove St., Worcester. “You can spend thousands of dollars on big pieces of equipment. A kettlebell set is fairly inexpensive, and you get a full-body workout with just a few movements.” That’s where kettlebells may hit their mark for some: if you’re looking to lose weight, while getting in shape, traditional weights just don’t cut it. Apparently, neither do other popular exercises, such as running and elliptical equipment. “You probably burn in 20-30 minutes, the

Tracy Riley, an instructor and trainer at Worcester Fitness, leads a class using kettlebells. same calories you do working on a treadmill or elliptical for an hour,” Riley said. One of her colleagues, Kate Littlejohn, another instructor at Worcester Fitness, concurs. “I think it’s something like 22 calories burned per minute for a 140-pound female,” she said. “It’s something like seven calories [per minute] for running and nine for cycling. You’d have to do that cycling class, then go lift. If you’re doing this for 30 minutes, that’s 22 times 30.” In other words, you’re looking at 660 calories burned in a 30-minute kettlebell workout, versus roughly 210 by hitting the treadmill. More than that, say kettlebell advocates, it is the total-body workout kettlebell training provides that is drawing attention. While traditional weights focus more on single-joint motion, kettlebell workouts involve multiple joints. They are typically more dynamic, explosive workouts. Even the slower kettlebell exercises incorporate multiple joints and different muscle groups.

“Kettlebell promotes joint alignment,” said Evan Marcantonio, owner of Worcester Kettlebell Club, 86 Shrewsbury St., Worcester. “You use it as a ballistic, explosive exercise, or it can be a grind, which is slow.” Squats, dead lifts and the Turkish get-up fall into the latter category. Swings, cleans and snatches are the more ballistic exercises with a kettlebell. No matter which exercise you do with a kettlebell, Marcantonio said, it requires a strong core. Traditional weights, meanwhile, typically focus on a single joint movement and specific muscle group. A simple curl, for example, exercises the elbow joint and bicep. You can modify your lifts to target different muscles, but for a full-body workout with traditional weights, you will use several different pieces of equipment. “They have similarities, but are also very, very different,” Littlejohn said of traditional weights and kettlebells. “Traditional dumbbells and free weights almost target one muscle group. You can make it dynamic,

but kettlebells are just meant to target a very dynamic movement. They’re ballistic. It’s movement-based.” Riley, Littlejohn and Marcantonio all agree: neither is necessarily better than the other. Each has its due purpose, and depending on individual goals, one may be preferable over the other. “If you’re doing purely strength or physique,” Riley said, “then barbells and dumbbells do have a purpose. Also, if you have a lot of injuries, you probably don’t want to do a lot of high-intensity workouts.” According to greatist.com, a health and fitness website, kettlebells are best for dynamic movements, a more varied workout, improving grip strength and adding an extra challenge. Dumbbells, meanwhile, work best for basic movements, newcomers to weight lifting, general fitness and progressing in weight. There is, Marcantonio acknowledged, a tug of war over which exercises are better, which may miss the point. “Of course there is,” he laughed. “You’ll have people that will do nothing but Zumba, people who want to do yoga or Pilates, and that’s what works for them … It’s finding a program that’s going to work best for you. That’s the most important part.” Well, almost. When it comes to any cons of using kettlebells, Riley could think of only one. “If you’re going to a box gym,” she said. “You want to make sure they’re trained. With kettlebells, technique is everything. People walk in and expect instructors to be trained or properly certified.” That is not always the case. Littlejohn said, in fact, if more trainers were “kettlebellsavvy,” it might encourage people to use them more. “That’s when it can go south,” Marcantonio said, adding it is the same for traditional weights. “When people look at the bar, they want to load it up as heavy as the can. They don’t have the prerequisite experience. With kettlebell … they don’t know, really, what they’re doing. So, with proper instruction, I think it’s all safe.” Walter Bird Jr. is editor of Worcester Magazine. He may be reached at 508-7493166, ext. 322. You may email him at wbird@worcestermag.com. Follow Walter on Twitter @walterbirdjr. Don’t miss Walter every week on “Rosen’s Roundtable,” aired on WCCA TV 194.

FEBRUARY 16, 2017 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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{Health&Wellness} ELIZABETH BROOKS

Playing sports to stay healthy: which are best? Owner Tom Willett said that is the major difference between his business and “big box” gyms: customization and individual attention eople play sports for a variety of from personal trainers who can teach people different reasons. Some enjoy the thrill the best way to prepare for their lives, rather of competition; others just need a than a hands-off approach that may work for hobby. Whether it’s a side effect or the main some people. And while functional training is goal, there is one benefit common to all almost a cliché in the industry, he said, it is athletic competition: fitness and exercise. still the best way to get ready for a sport. Worcester Physical Therapy on Glennie “Instead of just lifting a weight in a corner, Street may be known for the eponymous recovery programs, but the facility also houses you train people in kinesiology, in the body movements they use in the sport,” Willett the Kinetix Athletic Training and Fitness said. “You don’t always have to get them Center, where personal trainer D.J. Reed in a scrum [for rugby], but I need to get focuses on “functional training” and getting individuals in the body positions and work people fit by focusing on exercises related against resistance or stress doing that.” to their chosen sport, rather than boilerplate weightlifting or cardio. “That’s more the way the fitness industry is leaning currently,” Reed said. “People want to Worcester Physical Therapy find a reason to come lift. They want to find owner Tom Willett something relatable in their daily life.” Tom Quinn

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• FEBRUARY 16, 2017

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{Health&Wellness} While the center caters to a wide range of demographics, from high school baseball players to 35-year-old rugby enthusiasts, Willett said one interesting group is “fitness athletes,” people who choose to get involved in exercises others do to get ready for sports, but solely for the exercise benefits. “You could become a fitness athlete, if that’s what you want to be, and not play any sport, and be very fit,” Willett said. “Contrarily, you could play a sport and be, depending on your talents, pretty good and not very fit. Witness the third baseman [Pablo Sandoval] last year for the Red Sox.” But the question remains: if you want to get fit, which sport is the best? True to their professional roots, Willett and Reed said there are nuances to that question, meaning it can’t be easily answered. For example, some sports are better for strength training, while others will benefit people looking more for conditioning. “Things like baseball and golf are actually pretty similar as far as energy needs are concerned – a lot of standing around but doing things one time as hard as you can,” Reed said. “But if you look at a sport like soccer, where it’s a repetitive, almost nonstop jogging motion, the training needs are going to be different as far as the aerobic endurance goes, training your cardiovascular system,

doing a lot of jogging, a lot of running.” For overall fitness, Reed suggested hockey or soccer as full-body workouts. Willett put forth rowing as a good choice. Both said if you’re playing sports to get or stay healthy, diversity is key. “That’s why we don’t like people doing one sport year-round,” Willett said. “An athlete should, and they benefit by doing more than one, so you’re not doing the same repetitive motions all the time.” On the flip side of which sports are best for fitness is the question of which sport is the most dangerous. Rugby gets a bad rap, Willett said, since football players have a higher concussion rate even with helmets and extra padding. People underestimate basketball’s potential for harmful collisions. And one disturbing trend, Reed said, is a rise in female soccer injuries. “We’re seeing a large, large increase in prevalence of female ACL blowouts in soccer,” Reed said. “It’s a weird trend to keep an eye on. I think the girls are getting faster, but they’re not getting stronger. They’re able to move more quickly … I see that as a growing issue in sports, not having the stability to go along with the speed of movement.” continued on page 17

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{Health&Wellness} SPORTS continued from page 15

Willett, while agreeing there has been a rise in those injuries, said there were other factors that go into it. A rise in the popularity of the sport has led to a rise in injuries, he said. “You’re got more girls playing, you’ve got more people reporting,” Willett said. “Same thing with concussions – more people are

“One-hundred percent of what we do here is injury prevention,” Reed said. “Keep them healthy, keep them on the field. If you’re sitting on the sidelines, your parents are spending a lot of money and you’re not having a lot of fun.”

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Kinetix Athletic Training and Fitness Center personal trainer D.J. Reed watching for them.” But whether it’s soccer, football, rugby or any of the dozens of other sports played in Worcester County, one thing everyone can agree on is the necessity of preparation to stay healthy while getting fit.

Reporter Tom Quinn can be reached at 508-749-3166 x324 or tquinn@ worcestermagazine.com with story ideas, feedback, or questions. Follow him on Twitter @bytomquinn.

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{Health&Wellness}

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2/10/2017 9:38:39 AM

the job posting and I was so excited. I knew after a two-hour interview it went well. Most dietitians in a supermarket say it’s their dream job. It’s a little bit of everything. You get to do counseling one one one, get out in the community and teaching people what to do with things.” On any given day, Hersey will teach nutrition classes to children, talk to kids and adults at hospitals, or work with customers within

egardless of your dietary intake, there is no question that getting the proper nutrition daily is important to health, wellness and longevity – specifically a healthy, happy sort of longevity. But there have long been questions on what sort of benefits or detriments various standard diets can have, whether that is a standard omnivorous intake, vegetarianism or PHOTO SUBMITTED veganism. With recent findings, advances in nutritional studies and a fresh eye on intake needs, Americans are finding entirely new ways to live healthy and regardless of your diet, what you put in your body is supremely important. Julie Hersey is a nutritionist for Stop & Shop New England. She is a registered dietitian, and is passionate about healthy eating and nutritional intake, and her day-today life is never quite the same. Whether she is in-store working with customers to maximize their health through dietary intake, or out on the road working on events or at hospitals, she always has her mind set on healthy lives through healthy diets. “I grew up in a big Greek family and we’ve always loved food,” said Hersey. “That’s the center of Julie Hersey MS, RD, LDN, Stop & Shop New my family. We always had garEngland Division Nutritionist dens as kids, and we’d be in the kitchen making a salad together. I grew up surrounded by home her home store. She also works with the mecooking. In high school I was an athlete, and dia team doing events, and has worked in the realized the impact of not eating correctly, past with the Patriots, Red Sox and more. how that would affect me playing soccer and While vegetarianism and veganism have running for 90 minutes. I learned to make existed for as long as humans had the ability that connection. I took one bio chem class in to make decisions on their intake, rather than high school and really loved the idea of how what they could forage or hunt around them, food impacts your body.” the past decades have seen an uptick in indiHersey went on to attend Syracuse Unividuals classifying themselves as each. versity, where she received her bachelor’s For those unaware, vegetarians do not eat of science in dietetics and clinical nutrition services before an internship at the University meat, while vegans don’t eat meat or any other animal product, such as eggs and dairy. of Connecticut led to her master’s of science There are myths surrounding each. That it is at the same school. While nutrition at the time wasn’t as popular an interest as it would impossible to maintain healthy nutrition as become, it was something she said she always either is a common belief, and while that can felt passionate about, and landing in her cur- be true without proper intake, vegetarianism, rent role as nutritionist at Stop & Shop was a veganism and being omnivorous can all be healthy or unhealthy lifestyles. dream come true. “You kind of have to sit down and talk to a “This was my dream job,” Hersey said. “I dietitian to figure out what you’re getting and had gotten to work at supermarkets when I what you might be missing out on,” explained was an intern. I wanted to work in the super markets. After I finished my master’s I saw continued on page 20


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{Health&Wellness}

Caring for vision in the digital age

TOM QUINN

Tom Quinn

O

ptometrists are not a new phenomenon. The eye care industry has been around for centuries, diagnosing vision problems and prescribing solutions. But in recent years, as computers and cell phones were invented and popularized, new vision problems have arisen and old ones have become worse. “Don’t sit too close to the TV” seems like an antiquated reminder of the past when most people have their heads stuck in a smartphone for most of the day, but experts say there is still hope that technology can correct some of the problems it has caused. Dr. Brian Thamel, an optometrist who runs Vision Source on Park Ave – as well as a location in Spencer – has been practicing more than 27 years. He said he has seen an uptick in problems since the proliferation of computers, smartphones and other devices. “We see a lot of patients come in with eye strain, blurry vision, tired eyes, dry eyes, headaches, because they’re in front of these screens for so many hours,” Thamel said. The problem is especially pronounced with children, Thamel said. Previous generations grew up playing outside and getting all their screen time from the TV, but these days middle schoolers are growing up with smartphones, tablets and home computers. “Definitely, there are more kids that are progressing with nearsightedness and myopia quicker, because they’re doing so much near work,” Thamel said. “Their distance, they tend to hold their devices within 4 or 5 inches, when they should be out 14 to 15 inches. They’re putting an additional strain on the accommodative system or the focusing system, as well as the convergence system, because when you’re looking up close your eyes need to come together. And if your eyes don’t have the natural ability to sustain that, they’re going to fatigue as well.” Dry eyes were a vision problem before the advent of computers, but Thamel said it has become worse since people started spending so much time with screens. You may not notice it, but you blink less when looking at a monitor, reducing moisture and worsening an already annoying problem. “A lot of people have dry eye, but the dry eye is exacerbated by digital use, because your blink rate goes from every 3 to 5 seconds to 10 to 15 seconds,” Thamel said. “So now you’re staring, and if you have a little dry eye, it becomes symptomatic and you have red or irritated eyes.” One deceptively easy trick – that doesn’t involve switching off the computer – is to leave a reminder to blink somewhere so that people don’t forget what the cause of their dry eye is.

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Dr. Brian Thamel, a Worcester optometrist, said he has seen an uptick in eye problems in the digital age. “Put a sticky [note] on the computer that just says ‘blink,’” Thamel said. “It stops them to get a few good blinks every so often. If they don’t prevent the dryness throughout the day, come three or four o’clock they’re just rubbing their eyes, and it’s too late at that point. So if they can program themselves to blink, that’s helpful.” Another remedy is the 20-20-20 rule, a quick way to reset and rejuvenate. “Every 20 minutes, take a 20 second break and look 20 feet away,” Thamel said. “Throughout your day, you’re stopping, you’re looking out, you’re relaxing your eyes. If you do that throughout the day, you’re going to function much better, rather than waiting until you’re completely fatigued.” There are more serious concerns than irritation, though. Researchers are currently looking into the side effects of blue light wavelengths emitted from screens, and whether they could cause permanent damage. “A lot of research is showing that longterm cumulative effects can affect the macula and possibly cause long-term macular

• FEBRUARY 16, 2017

degeneration,” Thamel said. Bigger problems require bigger solutions, and Thamel touted glasses and contacts that can help control some of the unwanted wavelengths from TVs or computer screens. “[They have] a blue filter that blocks some of the blue wavelengths that are emitted,” Thamel said. “There are also new lenses that have different powers that relieve fatigue from the monitors. It’s not like a bifocal, it just softens the near vision without blurring the distance vision. It’s really new … but patients we’ve put into it seem to be really enjoying it.” Another remedy Thamel specializes in is vision therapy, where a trained doctor will teach people how to properly focus their eyesight, among other things. Children are the usual target, but it can also be used in the digital age for people experiencing problems in that arena. “Typically, we do it with children that are having learning problems in school, with double vision or they can’t track,” Thamel said. “So we can re-teach the child how to

make the eyes do what they should have figured out by going through different instruments and exercises. Well, those same things can help people that are having focusing problems at computers. It’s all nearpoint. Your eyes need to converge, and you’re focusing on a target for a duration of time.” One thing is for sure, through the arms race of problems and solutions – screens aren’t going away anytime soon, so people have to find vision solutions that work for them. “As we get more digital, there’s no going back, obviously. We have to find ways to help people performing their jobs and not go home and be totally wiped out,” Thamel said. Reporter Tom Quinn can be reached at 508-749-3166 x324 or tquinn@ worcestermagazine.com with story ideas, feedback, or questions. Follow him on Twitter @bytomquinn.


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{Health&Wellness}

Life, longevity and modern medicine the people to keep infants in appropriate cribs and have them sleep on their backs. He also helped test lifesaving therapy for premature baedicine has come a long way. With bies that made a dramatic increase in the sureach generation, new improvements vival odds of infants born 10-14 weeks early. and discoveries are made and those “I feel like I’ve kind of had a front-row seat improvements only come more quickly as to a lot of these interventions,” said Flotte. science and medicine continue to advance. It wasn’t so long ago that bloodletting was con- “Some of them are simple. Infant car seats is a big one. Some of them have been more comsidered a viable option, and now afflictions plex, but they’ve all made a big impact on the such as cancer, heart disease and vaccinehealth and survival of infants in this country.” treatable illnesses are losing ground to Flotte noted there has been a marked medical improvements. Have these advances improvement in some of the major causes of extended the average lifespan of Americans adult death as well. and what does that mean for us as a society? “The major causes of death go back to Worcester Magazine spoke with Terence when I started this in the mid ’80s,” said Flotte, dean of the school of medicine and Flotte. “There wasn’t all that much we could provost and executive chancellor of the do when someone had a heart attack. We UMass Medical School, to find out. “I think that the answer would be yes, there didn’t have stents. They were just barely being developed. It wasn’t that common to be able are a variety of reasons that I would say that to have someone with a dying heart muscle, is the case,” Flotte said when asked whether where you could whisk them into the hospital modern medicine has expanded our lifespan. room and save their heart muscle. Now it’s “I focus on the early years of life and obvialmost kind of routine to be able to whisk you ously if you decrease infant mortality, you’re going to increase the average lifespan because in with a certain type of blockage and bring you won’t have a certain percentage of babies you to the lab and put in the stent and then you’re heart muscle is saved. That, in and of not surviving. Just those innovations from pediatric research have had a very substantial itself, has been a huge achievement.” There are other areas where improvements effect on infant mortality and thereby those have been made as well, specifically in cancer have an effect on lifespan.” treatment and strokes. “On the further end, we do see, clearly, a “Heart disease, cancer, strokes, all very mamarked improvement in some of the major jor inroads are happening,” said Flotte. “Even causes of death,” Flotte continued. with adult cancer, more than 50 percent of Flotte became interested in science and cancer now has some kind of effective treatmedicine early on, but knew he wanted to ment that causes a substantial response.” help people directly. Flotte earned his underWhile extended lifespans and medical graduate degree in biological sciences at the University of new Orleans and his medical de- advances have improved dramatically in the gree from Louisiana State University School of years since Flotte finished his education, there Medicine. He served his residency in pediatrics are interesting nuances in that shift. People tend to utilize healthcare more commonly and completed a pediatric pulmonary fellowthan before, for example. Does this additional ship and postdoctoral training in molecular utilization create a strain or burden on the virology at Johns Hopkins University. healthcare industry? “I’ve been practicing medicine since 1986, “I don’t think it’s a negative. The fact is 31 years, and in that short period of time in that people do use more healthcare as they get the care of infants and children we have seen older, but many many are using healthcare some tremendous breakthroughs at that end in ways that help them sustain their qualof the lifespan that have created dramatic impacts on reducing the burden of disease and ity of life,” Flotte said. “For instance, people did not used to typically want knee replacereducing mortality in infants and elsewhere,” ment surgery after age 60. Well now, if you’re Flotte said. “When I was in training in the 60, you’re still going to be out there moving ‘80s, the things that kept us most busy in around. That’s a good thing. We’re maintaining the hospital were treating severe invasive healthy active lives much further. There’s more bacterial infections and the specific types of bacteria that caused these problems. The main healthcare being used, but I don’t think that’s a bad thing. I think that clearly there’s something culprits are now preventable with vaccines.” related to the demographics that might need As a pediatrician (Flotte maintains his own to be thought of with how we pay for that and pediatric practice) he has seen advances in the who pays into it or benefits from it.” care of infants and youth in addition to other Unfortunately, there are areas that have life-extending medical advances. Some are not had the same leaps-and-bounds adcomplicated, but others are straightforward, as vancements. Alzheimer’s Disease and other is the case with Sudden Infant Death Synneurological conditions, such as ALS and Pardrome, or SIDS. In that case, it was a public kinson’s, remain elusive to medical treatment. health intervention getting information out to However, socioeconomic disparity and access 22 W O R C E S T E R M A G A Z I N E . C O M • F E B R U A R Y 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

Joshua Lyford

STAYING HEALTHY continued from page 18

JOHN GILLOOLY/PEI

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Terence Flotte, dean of the school of medicine and provost and executive chancellor of the UMass Medical School to healthcare, exercise and healthy food, is another major area of concern. “One of the things we’re very mindful of here is understanding why there are disparities in the outcomes for individuals of different backgrounds,” Flotte said. “In other words, racial and ethnic healthcare disparities. Many of which, almost all of which, seem to connect to the ability to access care and another factors that are more socioeconomic based. The ability to have access to other areas of healthy lifestyles, like green spaces or the ability to exercise or the availability to get to fresh healthy food. It’s a really interesting problem to have these disparities. Certain people can have a much higher life expectancy than other people living in the same state or the same city. Part of it is about access to medical care, but also access to other factors that relate to nutrition, exercise, lifestyle, quality of housing, education. These all play into the spectrum of health.” While there are still major hurdles to overcome and steps to take, that we in American society have a generally longer life expectancy than in some generations past is a net positive. “I certainly believe that it’s greatly to the benefit of our families and societies to have that extended lifespans,” said Flotte. “My kids have had the benefit to meet their great-grandparents. Their great-grandfather is 95 and a World War II veteran. They’ve had firsthand accounts of that. That’s really an enriching experience.” Reporter Joshua Lyford can be reached at 508-749-3166, ext. 325, or by email at Jlyford@worcestermagazine.com. Follow Josh on Twitter @Joshachusetts and on Instagram @Joshualyford.

Hersey. “Are you lacto-ovo? Do you have dairy? You might be OK with calcium and vitamin D. Are you eating eggs? You can be OK with B12. Not only vegetarians are deficient in vitamin D. Calcium is always a controversial one. A lot of dark veggies have calcium. Tofu is fortified in calcium. There are ways to get calcium in those diets, but also exercising is a good way to maintain your bone health.” The issue isn’t whether or not any of these options can be healthy — they can — it is tailoring your intake to match your nutritional needs. For instance, vegetarians and vegans can get iron from plants, but that iron intake should be paired with vitamin C to be properly absorbed. Omega 3 Fatty acids are another area vegetarians and vegans may need help with, but they are not alone in that. “Vegans and vegetarians aren’t alone in needing omega 3 fatty acids,” said Hersey. “If you aren’t eating fish, you are getting it from plant-based sources like flax seeds and tofu and walnuts. The plant-based versions are a little tougher to convert. Fats are making a big comeback, picking the anti-inflammatory fats. They’re really good for digestion and your joints.” While an omnivorous diet is the most versatile, and from a convenience perspective offers the most straightforward path to proper nutrition, there are difficulties inherent in that diet as well. “We’re trying to get people to be more conscious of the portion sizes of meat and also the quality,” explained Hersey. “Thinking of protein more as a topping rather than the bulk of the dish. Think about the vegetables first. Breakfast is an occasion that most omnivores are not getting enough protein in the morning. We’re a carbohydrate-heavy nation at breakfast. Bagels, waffles, bread, cereal. Protein in the morning helps your blood sugar not spike so high. We need to get more protein in that breakfast, whether that’s eggs, or Greek yogurt or nuts.” Regardless of your diet, the choices you make in what you put in your body are still the most crucial components, and according to Hersey, that is the number one thing those looking to enhance their nutrition must come to terms with. “I think really, getting back in touch with the fact that food is your fuel,” said Hersey. “You are what you eat. Really understanding that. If you don’t put good gas in your car, it doesn’t run well. If you don’t put any in, it wont run at all. Your mood, your organs and your skin, everything is affected. I think, mostly, I try to teach people just to live a better life, longer. Not just living long, but living healthy in that long life. You really want to be generally healthy your whole life.” Reporter Joshua Lyford can be reached at 508-749-3166, ext. 325, or by email at Jlyford@worcestermagazine.com. Follow Josh on Twitter @Joshachusetts and on Instagram @Joshualyford.


PHOTO SUBMITTED

art | dining | nightlife | February 16 -22, 2017

night day &

t h g i l h t i w g n i t n i a P

Joshua Lyford

Stephen Knapp started his artistic career as a photographer, but the path into creative expression would eventually manifest itself in something entirely new and unique.

Knapp calls his work “light paintings,” and he utilizes glass, light, colors and angles to create works of art that are unlike anything you’ve ever seen before. From small-scale to absolutely massive, Knapp is on the cutting edge of the visual spectrum and for the artist, the journey has been part of the joy of creation. “I didn’t have any interest in [art] as a kid, really, but I picked up a camera in college and it was something creative for me to do,” Knapp explained from his home in snowy Princeton. “It’s been an amazing journey going from photography to large ceramic murals, etched metal walls. I’ve cut marble in Japan, I’ve cut glass in Germany, I’ve done lots of different things over the years. It’s been a long evolution of taking that background in history, and doing research, and learning, and digging, and being curious. It’s been a long evolution of being creative and doing cool stuff.” It is hard to explain Knapp’s work without a visual aid. He utilizes the way lights, often colored lights, play through glass, and the sharp visual splash these can produce. His work is at once groundbreaking and somehow inherently tribal. Humans have long been drawn to light, whether it be the glow of a friendly fire or utilizing the sun’s energy.

“I was trying to decide what might work with the glass that makes it more exciting,” said Knapp. “It’s not the glass that’s exciting, it’s the light. By skimming the wall and casting light on the wall, the whole wall becomes a canvas. That makes it exciting.” When those new to Knapp’s work first lay eyes on it in person, the reaction is always the same. “There’s always the exact same response every single time, no matter what culture it is,” Knapp said. “The first response is a variation of, ‘Oh, wow.’ The second is, ‘I’ve never seen anything like this before.’ It’s very cool. It’s amazing. The more I look at art and the more I do this work, the more I realize how fortunate I was to have discovered [something] so unique. It only happens a few times in a lifetime. it’s been a very special journey.” That Knapp has dedicated his life to his work isn’t a surprise. He spent some time working for a large company, but decided it wasn’t the path he was built for. He has worked on his art on his own, but with the support of his family, for 45 years. “I really just wanted to do more large-scale public works, which meant different mediums. I’ve always done research. I’ve always dug,” said Knapp. “When I got to acrylic, glass and light, I wanted to take it to the next step. My wife and I, we’re in our 50s. We said, ‘Let’s take this as far as we can go,’ and it’s been amazing ever since.” There was something about light and the way it plays with glass and angles that was attractive to Knapp, but he said it wasn’t immediately apparent this was the direction the art would manifest itself in. continued on page 24

FEBRUARY 16, 2017 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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night day &

PHOTO SUBMITTED

{ arts }

continued from page 23

“I saw the glass, I saw people use it as artists, but they tend to put it in windows and let light hit it,” Knapp said. “When I first had a commission with it, I played with hanging it and using high-intensity lights and what have you. One day, I put a light up on the side of the wall and said, ‘Eureka, there’s something cool there.’ My first commissions were large-scale, using other fabricators to make the glass. Then I said, ‘If I could learn how to cut and shape and polish glass, we could really do something with it.’” Knapp purchased an expensive diamond saw and an inexpensive glass polisher, and learned how to craft the glass himself, to his own specifications. Presumably, that personal ability to create helps in his process, as the pieces change and grow as he visualizes and crafts them. “I’m not actually drawing it beforehand,” Knapp said of his work. “I walk in with an idea that I want to work on, whether the piece is gray and mid-tones, or the piece is geometric or has different organic shapes. Then I assemble a lot of glass. My assistants are normally cutting and polishing a lot of pieces. Once you’ve mounted the pieces, you can’t take them off. When it’s

“You can’t sit there and wait for the muse to come talk to you,” he said. “I firmly believe that, yes the muse can come, and yes you can get transported, and yes all of that magic stuff can happen, but you can’t sit there and wait for it. You’ve got to go out there and meet it head on. You have to work. You have to work to do it, and you have to work to get it out to the public. It’s great if you have all the money and time in the world, but if you want to keep affording to create and work and have it out there, you have to be willing to do that stuff too.” You can find out more on light painting artist Stephen Knapp, including his portfolio, upcoming projects and shows and a brief documentary on his work, online at lightpaintings.com. Knapp has an exhibit in New England at The Art Gallery at Eastern Connecticut University in Windham, Connecticut running through Feb. 21. there, it’s there. I’ll get them all assembled and get started with the angle of light that I want. I get the angle of light right and slowly start to build from there. It’s a very physical process.” While Knapp has shown in a multitude of

galleries and museums and had massive pieces shown on the sides of buildings around the world, he says the process takes constant work and attention. To sit and wait for the creative glow to rise would be a detriment to the individual pieces.

Reporter Joshua Lyford can be reached at 508-749-3166, ext. 325, or by email at Jlyford@worcestermagazine.com. Follow Josh on Twitter @Joshachusetts and on Instagram @Joshualyford.

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night day &

{ music }

Backwards Dancer pays it forward

Joshua Lyford

True to its ‘Heart of the Commonwealth’ moniker, Worcester has long had its own musical heartbeat. Whether that be the strong community of the area decades past, or the consistent hardcore and punk scenes that have maintained through multiple life cycles, or the current emo-revival that has sprung up, Worcester has held its ground.

think I was looking for a positive role model, but it kind of ended up being that.” Having positive influences in his personal life held weight with Shaw and with Backwards Dancer and the growing platform they stand upon today. Shaw said being a positive role model himself is an important component of the band’s makeup. “We have a powerful platform to get our point across in so many ways,” said Shaw. “I think I always want to be a role model for younger kids, especially kids coming up and doing this. I think it’s important that this DIY punk rock thing stays alive. It’s an important part of our culture, especially here. Our culture is going to shows, PHOTO COURTESY OF EQUAL VISION RECORDS going to VFW’s and going to the Palladium and hanging out in shitty warehouses. For me, that taught me so much about friendship and how to be responsible for yourself and respect others and be a respectful person. “It’s really important to me for kids listening to my band aren’t just angry and using aggression, more so than learning how to be a better person or how to treat a person better. How can I practice my politics? I think that’s important, for kids to be self-aware in that way.” That platform and ability to reach new fans and friends was already growing organically before the Equal Vision/ Rory Records signing, but that signing will most certainly extend the band’s reach even further. The Worcester scene helped shape the band, but they hope to get their message out well beyond the Bay State, while me a lot of different bands. She showed maintaining the belief system formed here. me Saves the Day, Green Day. As cliche an “I like to look at it like we’re not just a answer as it is, I think Green Day was the first Central Mass band. We’d like to reach beyond band that I looked at and said, ‘I want to do that as artists, but I’m proud to be from that.’” Worcester,” Shaw said. “There seems to be The timing of Shaw’s discovery of the music that would help propel him to write and a consistent music scene here, whether that is the hardcore scene or whether that be the create was integral. kind of shoe-gazey, emo rock scene. That’s “‘American Idiot’ had just came out and kind of where we’re coming from. It’s a nice my parents had just gotten divorced. I really community, everyone’s really supportive and latched on to that as an angry little kid lookhelpful. It’s important for us to remember ing for some kind of solace or comfort and a that. I never want to have a hot shot attitude positive role model,” recalled Shaw. “I don’t whole camp is amazing. and I can’t wait to be playing shows every night and doing what we set out to do at 10 years old. Finally, it’s coming to fruition and it’s super humbling. We’re honored to be a part of EVR [Equal Vision Records] and this whole tour. I can’t believe I get to be in this position.” Backwards Dancer formed in 2014, after Shaw’s departure from fellow Worcester act The Hotelier (under The Hotel Year banner at the time), but Shaw and company’s path would start much earlier. “I got a guitar for my birthday when I was 10,” said Shaw. “My dad got it for me. My big sister is super, super intellectual. She showed

When Equal Vision Records announced imprint label Rory Records had signed Worcester emo-indie rock act Backwards Dancer this February, it came as little surprise to those familiar with the band’s honest approach to songwriting. “It’s a humbling thing,” vocalist and guitar player Zack Shaw said, taking a brief hiatus from packing the van before departing for Houston, Texas to begin a tour with Eisley and Civilian. “Seeing bands that you grew up listening to putting their hand out and guiding you along this path is great. Their 26 W O R C E S T E R M A G A Z I N E . C O M • F E B R U A R Y 1 6 , 2 0 1 7

toward things. I think that’s a Massachusetts thing, it’s a Worcester, Boston attitude. You want to stay humble around the other artists that are trying to do the same, trying to make it in the world.” How Backwards Dancer linked up with Equal Vision and Rory Records is an interesting story on its own. At the time, Shaw was managing a local Pizza Hut and opened up the band email account when his shift was complete. “I got off from my shift one night and we had an email from Max Bemis from Say Anything,” Shaw recalled. “I was really confused, it was like, is this spam? It was 12 o’clock at night, and he asked if he could give me a call and get a feel for what we think about things. Two days later he linked me up with Dan from EVR.” Three days after that, Shaw would fly to Texas to spend time with the Bemis family, and the rest is history. The band is already familiar with a stringent touring schedule and work ethic and while they head to Houston to begin the Eisley and Civilian U.S. tour, things will likely continue to build for the band. The way Shaw and company see it, live music and sharing their message is an important aspect of what they do. “It’s a release for me personally, but also, I love being able to feed off people’s energy in the crowd when they respond,” said Shaw. “You can tell when people are moved by it, or not. Playing live music is the only way to tell if people are receptive of it. I love having that force of having a loud band behind me. It’s like a magic trick , if you do it right. If you are performing well, it can make you feel so much. I can talk about things I wouldn’t normally talk about in my day to day life. It’s like therapy, kind of. It’s a release.” You can find out more on Backwards Dancer, including upcoming shows, online at Backwardsdancer.com. You can follow the band on Facebook and Twitter. For more information on Equal Vision Records and imprint Rory Records online at Equalvision.com. You can check out a video for their song, “Breathe Life Into Beauty,” from their forthcoming album on YouTube.com. The band plans a homecoming show in Worcester for April, following their return from the Eisley and Civilian tour. Reporter Joshua Lyford can be reached at 508-749-3166, ext. 325, or by email at Jlyford@worcestermagazine.com. Follow Josh on Twitter @Joshachusetts and on Instagram @Joshualyford.


night day &

{ film }

WORCESTER

Toys will be toys Jim Keogh

At about the midpoint of “The Lego Batman Movie” I shut my eyes — an experiment of sorts. Through my closed lids I could “see” the flashes of light signifying the seizure-inducing thrusts of action on screen, edited so frantically that it was like watching the Aurora Borealis designed by a higher being with attention deficit disorder. The details of those sight gags were lost, but I could still hear all the one-liners, double entendres and repartee like it was being fired at my face with a bazooka.

So yes, “The Lego Batman Movie” is a penetrative experience for the ears and eyeballs, an hour-and-forty-minute animated tsunami of movement and sound in service of pitching two commercial products: a popular children’s toy and the darkest of knights. Sometimes you ride the wave, and other times you pull out and let it race by. We are at least spared the retelling of Mom and Pop Wayne’s murder in a Gotham City alley, a story that, together with Superman’s crash landing on the Kent farmstead, constitutes the comic-book equivalent of the Big Bang. Surely parricide has its place in a kids’ movie — Walt Disney built an empire by assassinating at least one parent in many of his beloved pictures — but recreating the crime scene in a Lego motif seems a bit immature. Batman is voiced by Will Arnett (channeling the gravelly deliveries of Christian Bale and Michael Keaton), who also played the Caped Crusader in 2014’s “The Lego Movie.” In a film where everything was awesome, he was the awesomest. The inside joke here is that Batman is both a raging narcissist and a font of pop-culture references that cover the character’s prior iterations, from his Detective Comics days, through the

Adam West camp-fests (including a priceless nod to Bat Shark Repellent), to Keaton’s angry hero (“You wanna get nuts? Let’s get nuts!”), to Bale’s apocalyptic warrior. This self-aware Batman, whose greatest love is for his own well-defined abdominal muscles, distances himself from human contact other than with his faithful butler Alfred (Ralph Fiennes). At night our superheroic brooder sits alone in Wayne Manor snacking on Lobster Thermidor and watching romantic comedies (his stash includes “Jerry Maguire” and “Serendipity”). He won’t admit it, but he yearns. His accidental adoption (long story) of perky Dick Grayson – aka Robin (Michael Cera), a partnership with the new police commissioner Barbara Gordon (Rosario Dawson) and an emerging bromance with the Joker (Zach Galifianakis), who wants to be hated just like in the old days, shakes our hero out of his funk and sets him on a villain-battling spree. His foes are a collection of baddies from across the entertainment universe, and include King Kong, Eye of Sauron, the Matrix agents, the flying monkeys from “The Wizard of Oz,” and, of course, an army of DC criminals. Director Chris McKay and a host of writers seemingly have gone back and forth to determine whom they most want to please: children, their parents, or Bat geeks. To cover their bases, they’ve become the cinematic equivalent of carnies - erecting an amusement park with just enough stuff to satisfy all tastes. Thing with an amusement park is you get to pick and choose your rides, and you can leave at any time. Here, it’s like being strapped into the Tilt-a-Whirl after eating too much fried dough — cheap thrills are replaced by vague nausea. Take this review from someone whose relationship to the Lego has evolved. I played with Legos as a boy, yelped when I stepped on them as a young parent, and today never think about them except when I attend a movie in which they are the stars. And that state of thoughtlessness is where I’ll return the moment I finish this sentence.

Chris Brubeck’s

TRIPLE PLAY

Saturday, Feb. 25, 2017 Mechanics Hall, 8 PM MusicWorcester.org

Brubeck 2_16 quarter page.indd 1

1/31/2017 2:36:55 PM

Mount Wachusett Community College’s

Presents

February 24, 25 March 3, 4 at 8pm March 5 at 2pm (sold out) Purchase tickets online or by phone: www.mwcc.edu/tam 978-630-9388 FEBRUARY 16, 2017 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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Viriditas

&

{ dining}

FOOD HHHH AMBIENCE HHH SERVICE HH VALUE HHH 6 Waldo St., Worcester • 508-848-4300

On the Go at Viriditas Sandra Rain

It took me more than one visit to Viriditas on Waldo Street before I could figure out why this new cafe isn’t the sort of place where a lot of people stick around on account of the free wifi and caffeine. With four large tables, elegant tin ceilings, cherry furniture, rustic wooden floors, tasteful product displays, and a cheerful staff, I thought I had stumbled upon Worcester’s latest gem.

But, in Viriditas’ haste to provide quick, on-the-go service, they gave the impression again and again that they would prefer if you wouldn’t linger. On my first visit, I asked for a latte and a cup of soup to stay, and both were prepared in

cardboard to-go cups accompanied by plastic utensils. An unwelcoming aura of to-go packaging considerably reduces the perceived value of even the most delicious meal. I sat down anyway and enjoyed my creamy potato soup ($4), made fresh and topped with thick crumbles of crispy bacon and fiery red pepper. The latte ($3.45) was brewed with almond milk to my specifications. Almond milk can be tricky because it’s difficult to steam and curdles easily, but the latte was impeccably prepared. Another customer walked through the door during my meal, toting a baby carrier. The barista behind the counter cooed over the little one, lifting her up over the bar and carrying the smiling child around the kitchen. The two women gossiped about servers at a local restaurant and the state of an adjacent bar before the barista handed the baby back across the counter. I liked the quiet neighborhood vibe and decided that I’d stop back later in the week to grab something more substantial for dinner. Perhaps it would be busier later in the day. When I returned on Friday at 5 p.m., a flag reading, “Welcome” waved out front, but the storefront was dark and the door was locked. I cursed the quarter I’d spent on a meter -

ELIZABETH BROOKS

parking can be hard to come by near the DCU - and got back in my vehicle to find an alternative spot for a quick dinner. An online search indicated that Viriditas was to be open until 6 p.m. and I was frustrated I had gone out of my way to no avail. I work downtown on the weekends, so I checked the website again to see if Viriditas would be open Saturday or Sunday; I planned to treat my colleagues to lunch. Google indicated they would be closed both days, so I resolved to return during the week. On Monday evening, I stopped in for a late lunch. Like my first visit, I was the only patron in the restaurant. I selected a grapefruit Spindrift from a display case. I ordered a Mozzarella and Sun Dried Tomato pressed sandwich ($7) to stay. It took about

10 minutes to prepare, so I set up shop at a table and listened to the barista sing along beautifully with the radio as she worked her way about the kitchen. A man I assumed was another customer arrived at that point and ordered a custom sandwich, but then, like the baby from a week before, he nonchalantly made his way behind

Brunch ... with a French twist. 7 DAYS 7AM-3PM 259 PARK AVE. WORCESTER 508.767.1639 28

WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

• FEBRUARY 16, 2017


night day

BITE SIZED

&

the counter. “Pat told me to close early,” the barista told him. She pulled out a magic marker and scrawled, “Closed! Sorry for the inconvenience,” and taped the sign to the front door. It was only 4 p.m. and Viriditas’ regular hours indicated they would be open until 6 p.m. When she brought over my sandwich, once again served in a to-go container, I unpacked the parcel and ventured a bite. The bread was warm and crusty, filled with sun dried tomato spread, garlic aioli, fresh mozzarella, basil leaves, baby spinach and thick slices of tomato. I could eat that sandwich everyday for lunch, but I won’t, because the distinct possibility that Viriditas will be closed outweighs my craving for even the highest quality sandwich. The “Open” flag waved out front with a gust of winter wind, taunting a group of MCPHS students who were passing by. I would simply like to remind Viriditas it’s hard for success to find you if you keep locking the doors. Potential customers shudder at inconvenience. All truths be told, if I’m ever in the neighborhood when the lights are on, I’ll have a hard time resisting the temptation of a stellar latte and lunch on the go. Should you be so lucky, don’t let the opportunity pass you by either.

WHISK(EY)ED AWAY

Julio’s Liquors is gearing up for its 12th annual “GO! Whisk(e)y” Weekend, which actually runs

Wednesday, Feb. 22 through Sunday, Feb. 26. The five-day event attracts hobbyists and experts alike from all over the country. The highlight is the Loch 7 K(e)y Society’s Grand Dram Tasting Sunday, Feb. 26, 1-4 p.m. The free tasting serves up a variety of more than 400 Drams from around the world. “At Julio’s, we love whiskey,” said Julio’s Liquors owner Ryan Maloney. “We are world renowned for our whiskey selection, so what better place to hold the largest whiskey tasting event in New England?” The event kicks off with a free preview minitasting Wednesday, Feb. 22 of some of the whiskies that will be available to taste over the weekend. A tasting event sponsored

by Skinner Auction will be held Thursday, Feb. 23, followed by an Ardbeg tasting and dinner Friday, Feb. 24 featuring master distiller Mickey Heads. Whiskey seminars will be held Saturday, Feb. 25. For more information, call 508366-1942.

krave

wines in both still and sparkling styles, made from Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. The cost is $75 each. Buy tickets at nichehospitality.com.

TASTE OF THE TOWN

Enjoy a Bodegas Faustino Vertical Tasting Dinner Monday, Feb. 27, 7 p.m., at Bocado Worcester, 82 Winter St., Worcester. The $100-allinclusive event features five courses paired with exceptional wines. Buy tickets at nichehospitality.com.

GREAT GRAPES

Sign up now for the “Grapes of Champagne” wine dinner at The Citizen/The People’s Kitchen, 1 Exchange St., Worcester, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 7 p.m. The four-course menu will pair

Great Food . . . Great Entertainment . . .

All Close to Home!

Karaoke every Friday Night Feb. 18 - On The Rocks Feb. 25 - Far From Eden March 4 - Take Two March 11 - Drums & Wires

March 18 - Nashville Recording Artist Lyle Pierce • 8-11 pm March 25 - Petty Larceny Band

Sushi • Gluten Free Entrees Available

Function Rooms • Gift Certificates Take-Out • Keno 176 Reservoir St. Holden • 508.829.2188 • www.wongdynasty-yankeegrill.com

FEBRUARY 16, 2017 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

29


night day &

{ listings}

will appreciate your incredible sense of humor? Maybe you have some secret talent that you’re ready to share with the world (or at least your local coffee house). Drop in for Open Mic! Full Sandwich Menu Desserts Coffee & Espresso BYOB beer & wine only $0. 7-10 p.m. Cake Shop Cafe, 22A West St., Millbury. 508-865-9866 or cakeshopcafe.com Open Mic @ The Blue Plate. Show off your musical >Thursday 16 talents, collaborate, or just listen to some cool tunes in a laid back Open Mic Most Thursdays @ Barbers North. To check atmosphere. Most Thursdays. PA provided. Free. 7-10 p.m. Blue Plate the schedules and open slots visit: Bill McCarthy’s Open Mic World on Facebook Bill McCarthy (originator of the “Half-Hour Sets!”) is your host Lounge, 661 Main St., Holden. 508-829-4566. Sean Ryan. 7-11 p.m. The Mill 185, 185 West Boylston St., West at another great Open Mic Night! Email Bill McCarthy to reserve it at: Boylston. 774-261-8585. openmcc@verizon.net (make sure you put “open mic” in the email’s “subject box”). Check the schedules and open slots visit Facebook. Any Bob Moon & Friends. “There will be many musical guests joining slot marked as “open” usually is! Free! 6:30-9:30 p.m. Barbers Crossing Bob to play the greatest hits from the 50’s 60’s 70”s 80’s and 90’s. Rock, Blues, Country, Bluegrass, Americana and Jazz. Come on down (North), 175 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-8438. and relive all your favorites, Thursday Feb 2nd and Feb 16th.” $5. 8 Safe Homes Glee Chorus. A brand new program for Greater p.m.-midnight Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. Worcester LGBTQ youth (ages 14-23) and their straight allies to John Brazile. 8-11 p.m. Quinn’s Irish Pub, 715 West Boylston St. explore their musical, artistic, and social self-expression through 508-459-2025. choral performance in an inclusive, supportive, and nurturing Kevin Shields. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The GazBar Sports Grill, 1045 environment. No experience necessary ~ open to new and Central St., Leominster. experienced singers of all abilities Free. 6:30-9 p.m. Safe Homes Open Mic hosted by Michael Rivelis. 8-11 p.m. Mr. Dooley’s Worcester, 4 Mann St. 774-239-8563 or safehomesma.org Olde Irish Country Pub, 303 Shears St., Wrentham. Safe Homes Worcester ~ Glee Chorus. A brand new Peter HIFI Ward & electric blues. George Dellomo and Bob program for Greater Worcester LGBTQ youth (ages 14-23) and Berry join Peter Ward playing the blues and some country too. No their straight allies to explore their musical, artistic, and social selfcover. 8-10 p.m. Dunny’s Tavern, 291 East Main St., East Brookfield. expression through choral performance in an inclusive, supportive, and nurturing environment No experience necessary ~ Open to new Red Rock and Friends - Acoustic Duo. None. 8-10 p.m. The and experienced singers of all abilities Free. 6:30-9 p.m. Safe Homes Ballot Box, 11-17 Kelly Square. 774-243-1606. Sam James Performs at Loft, Thurs at 8. 8-11:59 p.m. Loft Worcester, 4 Mann St. 774-239-8563. 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177. Night of Opera. 7-9 p.m. Anna Maria College, Payer Hall, 50 Sean Fullerton and his Mad Loops Laboratory. Sean Sunset Lane, Paxton. 508-849-3300. Fullerton specializes in Acoustic Blues, Rock, Folk, Memphis Soul Open Mic. Attention Performers- Amateurs and Experts! Do and Fingerstyle Guitar using 6 String, 12 String and resonator guitars, you sing or play an instrument? Are you looking for a crowd that

music

Free! 6:30-9:30 p.m. Barbers Crossing (North), 175 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-8438. AMC/MIT Collaboration Concert. 7-9 p.m. Anna Maria College: Zecco Performing Arts Center, Zecco Performing Arts Center, 50 Sunset Lane, Paxton. 508-849-3300, ext. 410. Chris Reddy Acoustic Loops from Hell. 7-10 p.m. Compass Tavern, 90 Harding St. 508-304-6044. Derek Varnum. The cover band master plays his own songbook! 7-10 p.m. Homefield Brewing, 3 Arnold Road, Fiskdale. 774-242-6365. Bret Talbert - Live & Acoustified! Singing and strumming a multitude of popular favorites, a fun night for all! 7:30-10:30 p.m. Tavern on the Common, 249 Main St., Rutland. 508-886-4600. Dave Harrington. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. South Side Grille & Margarita Factory, 242 West Broadway, Gardner. 978-632-1057. Katie Obrien. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Mill 185, 185 West Boylston St., West Boylston. 774-261-8585. Live Bands. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Blacksheep Tavern, 261 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-0255. National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine, Alexei Grynyuk Pianist. Formed by the Council of Ministers of Ukraine in November of 1918, the National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine is considered to be one of the finest symphony orchestras in Eastern >Friday 17 Europe. Free pre-concert Talk at 7 PM in Washburn Hall at Mechanics Peach Eaters and Gary Backstrom. 21+ with proper ID GAR Hall. Program Verdi - Overture to La Forza del Destino Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 3 Dvorak - Symphony No. 9 in E minor “From Hall, Bull Mansion, 55 Pearl St. the New World” Alexei Grynyuk Kiev-born pianist Alexei Grynyuk Thank Friday it’s Nat! 5:30 to 7:30; then Cara Brindisi at 8:30pm. No Cover. 5:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, displayed tremendous interest in music from his early childhood and at just six years old started giving his first concerts. Gramophone 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. declares Grynyuk “among the finest” Subscriber tickets starting Pamela Hines. 6-9 p.m. Bistro, Bull Mansion, 55 Pearl St. 5086/18; single tickets on sale from MusicWorcester.org starting on or 755-6070. Bill McCarthy Every Friday at Barbers Crossing North. before July 1. $49 adults, $17.50 students, $7.50 youth. 8-10:30 Now catch Bill McCarthy playing his heart out every Friday at Barbers p.m. Mechanics Hall, 321 Main St. 508-754-3231, ext. 205 or North (Sterling, MA) @6:30pm Visit: BillMcCarthyMusic.com for info. musicworcester.org

harmonicas, guitar looping, Bose and UltraSound sound systems. Sean performs in a wide variety of venues and events throughout New England year-round as a solo musician, as well as with his Acoustic Beatles tribute called Beatle Wood, and his Acoustic Folk tribute called Creeque Alley. Dinner, Drinks, Music and Fun. 8-10 p.m. Wachusett Mountain Ski Area, 499 Mountain Road, Princeton. 978-464-2300 or seanfullertonmusic.net Troy Gonyea. 21+ with proper ID 8 p.m.-midnight GAR Hall, Bull Mansion, 55 Pearl St. Audio Wasabi. 8:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. DJ/Karaoke. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Padavano’s Place, 358 Shrewsbury St. 774-823-3022. Grade “A” Fancy. No Cover. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Karaoke. DJ Nancy, of Star Sound Entertainment. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385. Karaoke Party with DJ Matt! 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Padavano’s Place, 358 Shrewsbury St. 774-823-3022. DJ XKALIBER Performs at Loft, Thurs at 11. 11-11:59 p.m. Loft 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177.

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night day &

Scott Babineau. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The GazBar Sports Grill, 1045 Central St., Leominster. Sean Fullerton. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Happy Jack’s, 785 North Main St., Leominster. 978-466-3433. The Flock returns to the Cove! Come get your dose of 80’s mayhem when The Flock returns to the Cove! 21+ Doors at 8pm Show at 9pm $10 at the door $10 at the door. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Cove Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or find them on Facebook. Karaoke. 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Foodworks, Route 20. 508-752-0938. Live Music. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. Desolate Highway. Southern Fried Rock ‘n’ Blues...Desolate Highway is a band of old friends who have played together under many different names and musical styles over the past 30 plus years. Influenced by Southern Rock, Blues, & Classic Rock n’ Roll, we play tunes that are fun to play and dance to! Come check us out and spread the word! The Highway rocks! $5. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877 or desolatehighway.com Jack Rabbit Slim. $5. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350. Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Partner’s Pub, 970 South St., Fitchburg. 978-345-5051. Key Performance. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Jillian’s - Worcester, 315 Grove St. 508-793-0900. Sam James. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Frank’s, 274 Shrewsbury St. 774-4202253. The Royal Furs. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Whiskey on Water, 97 Water St. Tim Pacific. 9 p.m.-noon Quinn’s Irish Pub, 715 West Boylston St. 508-459-2025. Lavender Restaurant Karaoke. Join Magic Mike Entertainment DJ’s for Karaoke Night every Friday & Saturday Night! Free. 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Lavender Restaurant, 519 Boston Post Road, Sudbury. magicmikeentertainment.com

DJs. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508-755-0879. DJs. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Compass Tavern, 90 Harding St. 508-304-6044. DJ 21+Canal. Live Dj pushing out all the latest hits for you’re listening and dancing pleasure! N/A. 10:30 p.m.-1:40 a.m. Canal Restaurant & Bar, 65 Water St. 508-926-8353.

>Saturday 18

Dan Burke & The Royal Treatment. 21+ with proper ID Electric Haze, 26 Millbury St. 508-799-0629. Arms and Armor: Salem Trayned Band. This re-enacting group accurately recreates a 17th-century English colonial militia unit from Salem, Massachusetts. The militia organization in Salem dates back to 1628 and was a continuation of typical European Head on up to Worcester Regional Airport, 375 Airport military practices of the day. Dressed in period clothing and equipped Drive, Sunday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and give blood to with historically correct arms and armor, the Salem Trayned Band the American Red Cross. All donors will receive a free will show you how our colonial ancestors defended themselves. Wachusett Mountain Ski Lift Ticket, along with a (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. $5 Amazon gift code (vie email). Walk-ins are welcome, but 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Conference Room, appointments are recommended. Sign up at redcrossblood. 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. Or call 1-800-REDCROSS. For more information, visit Sip & Stitch! No Cover. 1-5 p.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 redcrossblood.org, email katherine.lawler@redcross.org or call Millbury St. 508-753-4030. 781-439-0513. Hip Swayers Trio. BYO supper and sample the 3cross brews while enjoying many swayful sets of hip and happenin’ tunes! 6-9 p.m. 3cross Brewing Company, 26 Cambridge St. 508-615-8195. DJ Joe T Performs at Loft, Friday at 11. 11-11:59 p.m. Loft Jean Mancini and Joey D’Angelo. 6-9 p.m. Bistro, Bull 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177. Mansion, 55 Pearl St. 508-755-6070. Safe House Radio Show. This is a live radio broadcast with 2 Open Mic. Open to musicians, poets, comedians or anyone with a living DJs hoping to drag you out of your lonely IPods and phone talent! Hosted by Stephen Wright. 6-9 p.m. Nu Cafe, 335 Chandler St. apps to hear the local & national metal, thrash, screamo, punk and 508-926-8800 or nucafe.com alternative you wont hear on mainstream radio. Tune into WCUW Smith & Ryder. 6-9 p.m. Homefield Brewing, 3 Arnold Road, 91.3FM in the Worcester and surrounding areas. Or stream live on Fiskdale. 774-242-6365. wcuw.org (hit the listen live button in the upper left corner of screen) New England Weather, talented duo. Rob and Jared of New Join your DJs Summi and Momma Bear for an hour of metal, thrash, England Weather, are a very talented duo who play a wide genre of screamo, punk & alternative. You’re not alone in your digital world. music. Just like their namesake, you never know what’s happening Were out here live! Call in to let us know your listening @ (508)753- next! Come on down and enjoy the storm... N/A. 7-10 p.m. Canal 2284 after 11pm. Hope you tune in to hear local and national metal Restaurant & Bar, Bar/Lounge, 65 Water St. 508-926-8353. and more! 91.3fm or wcuw.org It’s your community radio! So enjoy it Outrageous Greg’s Crazy Karaoke. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. Martys pub, already! Sheesh! 11 p.m.-midnight Online on Facebook. 225 Canterbury Street, . 508-373-2503. The Lester Rawson Band Live! We’ve been enjoying working

{ listings}

up new material for this show, pushing the boundaries of a set list that ranges from Rodney Crowell to Sam Cooke, from Phish to Tom Waits, and from Muddy Waters to Dire Straits. A portion of our concert will be broadcast live. Advance tickets are only $8 and are available now at brownpapertickets.com/event/2831124. Two-for-one tickets are available for WCUW members. (Tickets are $10 at the door) You are welcome to bring your favorite covered dish and beverages to share. Find out much more and hear some tunes at thelesterrawsonband.com $8 Advance - $10 Door / 2 for 1 for WCUW Members. 7-10 p.m. WCUW 91.3 FM - Worcester’s Community Radio Station, 910 Main St. 508-753-1012 or bpt. me/2831124 Vicki Ethier and Mike Mongeon. In the mood for some inspiring music (and a few great stories)? Come check out Vicki Ethier! Mike Mongeon will round out the second set with some cool Blues and Jazz! $5 Donation. 7:30-10 p.m. !Cafe con Dios!, Main Room, 22 Faith Ave., Auburn. 508-579-6722. Brian Chaffee. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Mill 185, 185 West Boylston St., West Boylston. 774-261-8585. Chris Reddy Acoustic Loops from Hell. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The GazBar Sports Grill, 1045 Central St., Leominster. DJ Karaoke with DJ Fenton. None. 8 p.m.-midnight The Ballot Box, 11-17 Kelly Square. 774-243-1606. Live Bands. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Blacksheep Tavern, 261 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-0255. Musclecah, Inman and SEMI at the Cove. Musclecah returns to the Cove! $7 at the Door 21+ doors at 8pm $7 at the door. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Cove Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or find them on Facebook.

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Two Timers Performs at Loft, Saturday at 8. 8-11:59 p.m. Loft 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177. Whitney Doucette. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. South Side Grille & Margarita Factory, 242 West Broadway, Gardner. 978-632-1057. Zack Slik. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Happy Jack’s, 785 North Main St., Leominster. 978-466-3433. Juke Joint 5. No Cover. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Live Music. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. Sean Fullerton and his Mad Loops Laboratory. Sean Fullerton specializes in Acoustic Blues, Rock, Folk, Memphis Soul and Fingerstyle Guitar using 6 String, 12 String and resonator guitars, harmonicas, guitar looping, Bose and UltraSound sound systems. Sean performs in a wide variety of venues and events throughout New England year-round as a solo musician, as well as with his Acoustic Beatles tribute called Beatle Wood, and his Acoustic Folk tribute called Creeque Alley. Dinner, Drinks, Music and Fun. 8:30-11:30 p.m. Rye & Thyme, 14 Monument Square, Leominster. 978-534-5900 or seanfullertonmusic.net Key Performance. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Jillian’s - Worcester, 315 Grove St. 508-793-0900. On The Rocks. Classic rock with some dance and country music thrown in the mix No cover charge. 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Wong Dynasty and Yankee Grill, 176 Reservoir St., Holden. 508-829-2188. Sam James. 9 p.m.-noon Quinn’s Irish Pub, 715 West Boylston St. 508-459-2025. Soup. $5. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508853-1350. Stacy’s Mom. Opening for Beyond the Blur come check out Stacy’s Mom- we’ve got it going on! The ladies of Stacy’s Mom bring you the best in Classic Rock, Alternative and Pop the way only Stacy’s Mom can, $5. 9-10 p.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. Teter Todders. 9 p.m.-midnight U.S Marine Club- Marine Corps League Worcester Detachment, 181 Lake Ave. 508-612-5639. That Dam Band. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Frank’s, 274 Shrewsbury St. 774-420-2253. Lavender Restaurant Karaoke. Join Magic Mike Entertainment DJ’s for Karaoke Night every Friday & Saturday Night! Free. 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Lavender Restaurant, 519 Boston Post Road, Sudbury. magicmikeentertainment.com Lost Artifacts. 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Partner’s Pub, 970 South St., Fitchburg. 978-345-5051. That Dam Band. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Frank’s 274 Shrewsbury St. Worcester, . Beyond the Blur. Beyond the Blur is the hottest band in MetroWest, with their own take on covers and originals tunes. Based out of Framingham, band members are Helene Botzer (Bass), Dave Levenson (Drums), Neil Johnson (Guitar and vocals), and Andy Wigglesworth (Lead Vocals). $5. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. DJs. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508-755-0879. DJs. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Compass Tavern, 90 Harding St. 508-304-6044. DJ 21+Canal. Live Dj pushing out all the latest hits for you’re listening and dancing pleasure! N/A. 10:30 p.m.-1:40 a.m. Canal Restaurant & Bar, 65 Water St. 508-926-8353. DJ Joe T Performs at Loft, Friday at 11. 11-11:59 p.m. Loft 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177.

>Sunday 19

Meredith Rose. 2-5 p.m. Homefield Brewing, 3 Arnold Road, Fiskdale. 774-242-6365. Blue Plate Sunday Jam featuring The Gear. Come on down, bring your guitar, bass, sticks, harp, sax, voice, or whatever instrument you’d like and join in on the jam. Each week a local band from the area will host the event, providing a full band set-up (PA,

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Drums, amps, microphones). All types of music are welcome. This week’s feature band is The Gear, featuring Arizona Doug Urqhuart, David Niles, Scott Marshall, and Mark Cherrington. 3-7 p.m. Blue Plate Lounge, 661 Main St., Holden. 508-829-4566. Open Mic Sundays @ Plaza Azteca! To check the schedules and open slots visit: Bill McCarthy’s Open Mic World on Facebook

Kaipainen Gibbons, is dedicated to learning, sharing, and performing music from the rich and varied Judaic cultures of Israel and the Jewish Diaspora. Founded in 2011, the chorus is open to all people regardless of ethnicity or religious background. Tickets may be purchased at the door, or ahead of time from a chorus member. Shir Joy Chorus is an independent nonprofit funded by Jewish Federation

The National Symphony Orchestra of Ukraine, formed in 1918, is considered one of the finest symphony orchestras in Eastern Europe. You can catch the NSO, with pianist Alexei Greynyuk, Friday, Feb. 17, 8-10:30 p.m., at Mechanics Hall, 321 Main St., Worcester. Tickets are $49 adults, $17.50 students, $7.50 youth. For more information, visit musicworcester.org, email ethan@musicworcester.org or call 508-754-3231, ext. 205.

Bill McCarthy (originator of the “Half-Hour Sets!”) is your host at another great Open Mic Night! Email Bill McCarthy to reserve it at: openmcc@verizon.net (make sure you put “open mic” in the email’s “subject box”) To check the schedules and open slots visit Facebook. Any slot marked as “open” usually is! Free! 6-9 p.m. Plaza Azteca, 539 Lincoln St. Bach & Beer with cellist Steuart Pincombe. name-yourown-ticket-price (plus the cost of beer). 7-9 p.m. Wormtown Brewery, Shrewsbury St. 774-239-1555 or musicinfamiliarspaces.com The Sunday Jam with feature artist Johnny Bluehorn! (Guest host Jim Perry!). Mikey Lynch’s Sunday Jam with a great feature artist each week and open jam session. All are welcome. No cover. 7-11 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350. Andy Cummings! No Cover. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Karaoke. DJ Nancy, of Star Sound Entertainment. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385. Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Partner’s Pub, 970 South St., Fitchburg. 978-345-5051. Karaoke with DJ Soup. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Whiskey on Water, 97 Water St.

>Monday 20

Open Mic/ Open Decks. 21+ with proper ID Electric Haze, 26 Millbury St. 508-799-0629. Music Together at Pakachoag in Sterling - winter session, week 1. Music Together at Pakachoag Music School Open registration begins December 1st. Winter session classes in Sterling begin January 9th. Classes also available in Auburn, Sturbridge, West Boylston, and Worcester. Ages birth-5, and big kids 5-7. For complete information visit us at pakmusic.org, email info@ pakmusic.org, or call 508-791-8159. $175. 10-10:45 a.m. 1835 Old Town Hall, 31 Main St., Sterling. pakmusic.org Blue Mondays - Live Blues. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. Shir Joy Chorus Winter Concert: Love Songs & Lullabies. Come hear beautiful love songs and sweet lullabies from ancient to modern times in Ladino, Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. Shir Joy, an adult community chorus under the direction of Nan A.

• FEBRUARY 16, 2017

of Central MA, the Westborough Cultural Council (which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council), the Worcester Arts Council, and private supporters. For more info visit shirjoychorus.com or “Shir Joy Chorus & Fans” on Facebook. $15. 7-8:30 p.m. Congregation B’nai Shalom, Westborough, MA, 117 East Main St., Westborough. Karaoke. DJ Nancy, of Star Sound Entertainment. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385. Trivia Night! No Cover. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030.

>Tuesday 21

Twister Tuesday. 21+ with proper ID Electric Haze, 26 Millbury St. 508-799-0629. Mauro DePasquale vocalist/pianist and guest. Worcester’s Own Mauro DePasquale and guest perform “The sweetest music this side of heaven” Every Tuesday accompanied by a fantastic Chicken Parm special, “Cool and Refined music” on Shrewsbury Street has returned! No Cover. 6:30-9 p.m. Padavano’s Place, 358 Shrewsbury St. 774-823-3022. Tuesday Talent Showcase. “Unsung Heroes” Featuring Kevin Kvein & more. 7-11 p.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. Tuesday Open Mic Night @ Greendale’s Pub with Bill McCarthy Local Musicians Showcase! To check the schedules and open slots visit: Bill McCarthy’s Open Mic World on Facebook Bill McCarthy (originator of the “Half-Hour Sets!”) is your host at another great Open Mic Night! Email Bill McCarthy to reserve it at: openmcc@verizon.net (make sure you put “open mic” in the email’s “subject box”) Network * Collaborate * Learn. Over sixty different musicians regularly support my open mic nights all are friendly and supportive -- and many are: * Former or currently signed recording artists * Award-winning pro’s or semi-pro’s * Regularly gigging paid-performers * Published songwriters * Recording studio owner/operators * Combinations of any and/or all of the above. To check the schedules and open slots visit Facebook. Any slot marked as “open” usually is! Free. 7:30-11:30 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350 or find them on Facebook. Dam Chick Singer. No Cover. 8:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Boogie Chillin’. Bluesy, bluegrassy, acoustic band with a twist. Jon Bonner - Guitar & Vocals Fernando Perez - Percussion Zack

Slik - Mandolin & Vocals Dan Villani - Violin/fiddle Rose Villani - Bass Free! 9 p.m.-midnight Vincent’s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439 or find them on Facebook. Karaoke. DJ Nancy, of Star Sound Entertainment. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385.

>Wednesday 22

Friendship: A Human Male. 21+ with proper ID Electric Haze, 26 Millbury St. 508-799-0629. The Motown Jukebox. Join “Motown Tom” Ingrassia-Worcester’s very own Agent Double-O Soul--every Wednesday morning from 9 am to noon for The Motown Jukebox on WCUW 91.3FM for 3 hours of Motown music and the stories behind the hits. “Motown Tom” is a Motown historian and author. His current book--Reflections Of A Love Supreme: Motown Through The Eyes Of Fans was named the Best Music Book of 2016 by the National Indie Excellence Awards. “Motown Tom” has twice been named Best Radio Personality in local media polls. WCUW streams live online at wcuw. org. 9 a.m.-noon WCUW 91.3 FM - Worcester’s Community Radio Station, 910 Main St. 508-753-1012 or wcuw.org Mauro Depasquale. 6-9 p.m. Bistro, Bull Mansion, 55 Pearl St. 508-755-6070. Open Mic Wednesdays at CJ’s Steak Loft in Northborough. To check the schedules and open slots visit: Bill McCarthy’s Open Mic World on Facebook. Bill McCarthy (originator of the “Half-Hour Sets!”) is your host at another great Open Mic Night! Email Bill McCarthy to reserve it at: openmcc@verizon. net (make sure you put “open mic” in the email’s “subject box”) Network * Collaborate * Learn. Over sixty different musicians regularly supportive my open mic nights all are friendly and supportive -- and many are: * Former or currently signed recording artists * Award-winning pro’s or semi-pro’s * Regularly gigging paid-performers * Published songwriters * Recording studio owner/ operators * Combinations of any and/or all of the above. To check the schedules and open slots visit Facebook. Any slot marked as “open” usually is! Free! 6-9 p.m. CJs Steakloft, 369 W. Main St. (route 20), Northborough. 508-393-8134 or find them on Facebook. Amanda Cote. 8-11 p.m. Quinn’s Irish Pub, 715 West Boylston St. 508-459-2025. Trivia Night. 8:30-11 p.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508755-0879. AriBand! No Cover. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-753-4030. Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Partner’s Pub, 970 South St., Fitchburg. 978-345-5051. Karaoke with DJ Soup. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Whiskey on Water, 97 Water St. Wednesday Night Mayhem. Mayhem Entertainment, The Twisted Minds Behind the FBW present a completely ridiculous writing tournament with lots of audience participation. Learn more at thefbw.com Doors open at 5pm, show starts at 9 pm. A bracketed style tournament designed to push burgeoning writers to their limits. The wrestling-themed, dance party-infused, bracketed improv writing competition you know and love is back! And now you can be the star! $5. 9 p.m.-midnight Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877 or thefbw.com

arts

ADC Performance Center (@ The Artist Development Complex), 18 Mill St., Southbridge. 508-764-6900 or adcmusic. com Anna Maria College, 50 Sunset Lane, Paxton. 508-849-3300 or annamaria.edu ArtsWorcester, “Dresses: Fight or Flight” by Alicia Dwyer, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through July 15; “Monday Mosh Monsters” by Adam Cutler and “Faces All Around” by Tim Evans, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through


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March 3; The 13th Annual College Show, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through March 3. Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 1-4 p.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday - Friday, 1-4 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Free. 660 Main St. 508-755-5142 or artsworcester.org Asa Waters Mansion, Admission: $3 for guided tour $7-10 for tea. 123 Elm St., Millbury. 508-865-0855 or asawaters.org Assumption College: Emmanuel d’Alzon Library, 500 Salisbury St. 508-767-7272 or assumption.edu Booklovers’ Gourmet, “Winter Palette” annual group art show, Through Feb. 28. Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 55 East Main St., Webster. 508-949-6232 or bookloversgourmet.com Clark University: University Gallery, Hours: noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, noon-8 p.m. Wednesday, noon-5 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. 950 Main St. 508-793-7349 or 508-7937113 or clarku.edu Clark’s Cafe and Art On Rotation Gallery, Hours: 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday - Saturday. Admission: Free for gallery. 310 High St., Clinton. 978-549-5822 or 978-365-7772 or aorgallery.com College of the Holy Cross: Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Art Gallery, Last Frontier / Última Frontera: La Subjetividad del Territorio, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through April 13. Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Friday, 2-5 p.m. Saturday. 1 College St. 508-793-3356 or holycross.edu Danforth Museum of Art, Hours: noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, noon-5 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday - Saturday. 123 Union Ave., Framingham. 508-620-0050 or danforthmuseum.org EcoTarium, Turtle Travels, Sundays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Sept. 17 - May 7; Winter Vacation: City Critters, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Feb. 21 - Feb. 24. Hours: noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. Admission: $15.00 adults; $10 for children ages 2-18, college students with ID & senior citizens. Children under 2 & EcoTarium members free. Additional charges apply for Tree Canopy Walkway, Explorer Express Train, planetarium programs & other special event. 222 Harrington Way. 508-929-2700 or ecotarium.org Fisher Museum Harvard Forest, 324 N. Main St., Petersham. 978-724-3302 or harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu Fitchburg Art Museum, Hours: noon-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, noon-4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. 25 Merriam Parkway, Fitchburg. 978-345-4207 or fitchburgartmuseum.org Fitchburg Historical Society, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday - Tuesday, 10 a.m.-midnight Wednesday, closed Thursday - Saturday. 50 Grove St., Fitchburg. 978-345-1157 or fitchburghistory.fsc.edu Fitchburg State University: Hammond Hall, 160 Pearl St., Fitchburg. fitchburgstate.edu Framed in Tatnuck, Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. 1099 Pleasant St. 508-770-1270 or framedintatnuck.com Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Road, Harvard. 978-4563924 or fruitlands.org Gallery of African Art, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday - Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Donations accepted. 62 High St., Clinton. 978-265-4345 or 978-598-5000x12 or galleryofafricanart.org Highland Artist Group, 113 Highland St. highlandartistgroup.com Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, Hours: 12:30-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. 414 Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org Museum of Russian Icons, Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday - Friday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Adults $10; Seniors (59 +), $7; Students, $5;

Children 3-17, $5; Children <3, free. 203 Union St., Clinton. 978598-5000 or 978-598-5000 or museumofrussianicons.org Old Sturbridge Village, Hours: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday - Saturday. Admission: $14 - $28 charged by age. Children under 3 free. 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Sturbridge. 800-733-1830 or 508-347-3362 or osv.org Park Hill Gallery, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday - Friday, closed Saturday. 387 Park Ave. 774-696-0909. Post Road Art Center, Hours: closed Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday - Saturday. 1 Boston Post Road, Marlborough. 508485-2580 or postroadartcenter.com Preservation Worcester, Hours: closed Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5

p.m. Monday - Friday, closed Saturday. 10 Cedar St. 508-754-8760 or preservationworcester.org Prints and Potter Gallery: American Arts and Crafts Gallery, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 142 Highland St. 508-7522170 or printsandpotter.com Quinebaug Valley Council for the Arts & Humanities, the Arts Center, Hours: 2-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Friday, 2-4 p.m. Saturday. 111 Main St., Southbridge. 508-346-3341 or qvcah.org Rollstone Studios, Hours: 11-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. Admission: free.

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633 Main St., Fitchburg. 978-348-2781 or rollstoneartists.com Salisbury Mansion, Hours: closed Sunday - Wednesday, 1-8:30 p.m. Thursday, 1-4 p.m. Friday - Saturday. 40 Highland St. 508-7538278 or worcesterhistory.org SAORI Worcester Freestyle Weaving Studio, 18 Winslow St. 508-757-4646 or 508-757-0116 or saoriworcester.com Sprinkler Factory, Admission: free. 38 Harlow St. sprinklerfactory.com Taproot Bookstore, Hours: noon-5 p.m. Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 1200 West

Inspire us. Digital Multimedia Representative The Holden Landmark Corp., a growing multimedia publication group of over 15 years, seeks an inspiring Digital Multimedia Representative. One with expertise in sales delivering effective multimedia sales strategies, and building determined goal-achievements. Our new representative will be a digital powerhouse, finding effective ways to attract new dollars through new products and services, building stronger relationships with influential clients of all sizes, and showcasing an understanding of what makes our market and its business community thrive.

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Boylston St. 508-853-5083 or TaprootBookstore.com Tatnuck Bookseller & Cafe, Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday - Thursday, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday Saturday. 18 Lyman St., Westborough. 508-366-4959 or tatnuck.com The Foster Gallery, 51 Union St. 508-397-7139 or thefostergallery.com Top Fun Aviation Toy Museum, Hours: 1:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday. 21 Prichard St., Fitchburg. 978-342-2809 or 978-297-4337 or topfunaviation.com Tower Hill Botanic Garden, Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. Admission: $12 Adults, $9 Seniors & $7 Youth, free to Members & Children under. 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111 or towerhillbg.org Worcester Art Museum, Facing the World: Modernization and Splendor in Meiji Japan, Through April 16; Helmutt on the Move, Sundays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Sept. 1 - Aug. 31; Jeppson Idea Lab: Renoir’s The Jewish Wedding, Through March 26; KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley, Through Sept. 9; Mary Cassatt, Through April 2; Master Series: Mary Cassatt’s “Reine Lefebvre Holding a Nude Baby (Mother and Child)”, Thursday; Zip Tour: Gold Incan Cup, Saturday. Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Free for members, $14 adults, $12 seniors, free for youth 17 and under. Free for all first Saturdays of each month, 10am-noon. 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or worcesterart.org Worcester Center for Crafts, Exhibition: Bandits and Heros, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through March 11. Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Saturday. 25 Sagamore Road. 508-753-8183 or worcestercraftcenter.org Worcester Historical Museum, Hours: closed Sunday Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. 30 Elm St. 508-7538278 or worcesterhistory.org Worcester Public Library, Hours: 1:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday - Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. 3 Salem Square. 508-7991655 or worcpublib.org WPI: George C. Gordon Library, 100 Institute Road. wpi.edu

Players invites you to A one of a kind Valentine’s Celebration Love Letters By A.R Gurney The story of a relationship told through a lifetime of correspondence Directed by Kevin T. Baldwin Music Accompaniment by Kris Layton Featuring Angelica Morin and Jake Lewis Accompanied by a selection of love songs Performed by members of the theater And Delightful desserts and beverages, All included with your ticket! Reservations are strongly recommended In the event that severe weather forces the cancellation of a performance, please contact the theater for information. $22 or $40 for two. 5-7 p.m. Barre Players Theater, 64 Common St., Barre. Call 978-355-2096 or visit barreplayerstheater.com Comedy Show - Saturday, February 18. 21+ with proper ID 8 p.m.-midnight GAR Hall, Bull Mansion, 55 Pearl St. They’re back! The Flock returns to the Cove Music Hall, 89 Green St., Worcester, Friday, Feb. 17, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Cost is $10 at the door. Doors open at 8, show starts at 9. For more information, find The Cove on Facebook or email CoveJimmy@ gmail.com.

The Cover of Life - Sunday, February 19. Gateway Players Theatre presents “The Cover of Life”, by R.T. Robinson. Show dates are February 10,11,17,18 and 19. Friday and Saturday performances are at 7:30pm, the Sunday matinee is at 2pm. Tickets are $14 for adults, $12 for under 18 and over 60. Tickets are available at the box office by calling 508-764-4531 and will be available soon online at brownpapertickets.com/event/2759888 Directed by Lou-Ellen Corkum and produced by Kathi Grenier. The cast includes: Lynn Boucher, Sydney Campbell, Melissa Earls, Caitlyn Gaughan, Angela Grove and Gwen O’Brien. Presented by permission through special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. Gateway Players is thrilled to kick off season 42 with this sweetly funny, nostalgic play. Be sure to get your tickets early. Synopsis: Tood, Weetsie, and Sybill are brides in rural Louisiana in 1943. Each married a Cliffert brother. The men are off to war and a local news story about these young wives keeping the home fires burning intrigues Henry Luce. He decides that they belong on the cover Life Magazine and assigns Kate Miller to the story. She has been covering the war in Europe and, though she views doing a “women’s piece” as a career set back, she accepts because it will be her first cover story. Kate spends a week with the Cliffert women and her haughty urban attitude gives way to sympathy as she begins to understand them while coming face to face with her own powerlessness in a man’s world. Filled with charm and fun, Dick’s Beantown Comedy Escape at Park Grill & Spirits The Cover of Life is a deeply affecting story about the struggle for - Fridays, Saturdays, Saturday, September 18 - Tuesday, December self worth. Adults $14, Seniors & Youth 17 and Under $12. 2-4 p.m. 31. Dick Doherty’s Beantown Comedy Escape at Park Grill & Spirits Gateway Players Theatre Arts Barn, 111 Main St., Southbridge. Call 257 Park Ave Worcester MA 01609 Dick Doherty’s Beantown Comedy 508-764-4531 or visit gatewayplayers.org Clubs Showtimes: Friday 9pm-Saturdays 8pm -$20pp Reservations Recommended at 800-401-2221 Prices: $20 Fri/Sat pp except Special Events Drinks and Appetizers available in the show room Full Dinner Available before Show in Restaurant $5off with College ID and >Thursday 16 Reservations 2 for 1 Active Military or Veterans and Reservations $4 1st BASS with Michael Savant. 21+ with proper ID Electric off with Dinner Receipt and Reservations. Fri & Sat Feb 17th & 18th Haze, 26 Millbury St. 508-799-0629. Dan Crohn Don Zollo and Friends Fri & Sat Feb 24th & 25th Al Park Alex Giampapa and Friends. Dick’s Beantown Comedy Escape at Park >Friday 17 Grill & Spirits Great Food and Fun Make Reservations Early at 800Airspray: Queer Dance Party! 21+ with proper ID Electric 401-2221 or online at dickdoherty.com Haze, 26 Millbury St. 508-799-0629. Greater Tuna - Saturdays, Saturday, February 11 - Saturday, February 18. A Comedy by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears, and Ed Howland $20 regular admission, $17 students/seniors. 1-3 p.m. Calliope Productions Inc, 150 Main St., Boylston. Call 508-869-6887 >Thursday 16 – Thursday 23 or visit calliopeproductions.org Art Carts: Family Fun - Coat of Arms. During the Middle Greater Tuna - Friday, February 17. A Comedy by Jaston Williams, Ages a coat of arms was used for identification. Back then, many Joe Sears, and Ed Howland $20 regular admission, $17 students/ people could not read and heraldry became a method of identification seniors. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Calliope Productions Inc, 150 Main St., of individuals, institutions and states. We associate heraldry with Boylston. Call 508-869-6887 or visit calliopeproductions.org Knights, for whom the tradition was started, but it a system that Love Letters by A.R. Gurney - Saturday, February 18. Barre

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became more broadly used. Come learn basic heraldry and design your own arms! (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Medieval Gallery, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

>Friday 17

Art Carts: Family Fun - The Roman Empire. Did you know that our Roman collection includes art from five different countries, spread across ten centuries? Why are there so many heads without bodies? And how can you recognize an emperor or god from just his face (or feet)? Learn about Europe’s first great empire, and use one of our maps to discover where our objects came from. (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. 1-2 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court by Roman Gallery, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

>Friday 17 – Friday 24

Art Carts: Family Fun - Arms and Armor. Knightly armor is nice and shiny, but how does it feel? How heavy is the armor? Is it comfortable? How and why did they decorate it? Discover the answers to these questions and more with our hands-on armor activity! (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Medieval Gallery, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

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Learn how to recognize words and names and how Egyptian writing is different from our alphabet. Then, write your own name in hieroglyphs to take home!(Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. 2-3 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Egyptian Gallery, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

>Monday 20

February Vacation Fun: Small Animal Crafts. Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester invites you to Small Animal Crafts, a drop-in craft and activity day! From 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM, on Monday, February 20, we’ll be offering crafts and coloring pages for children of all ages and parents. Children must be accompanied by parent at all times. Free. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Annie’s Book Stop, 65 James St. 508-7965613 or find them on Facebook. Kheyma Night. The monthly event features a menu of kheyma (Armenian style uncooked ground beef mixed with bulgur - cracked wheat- , tomato sauce and spices), peta bread, salad, dessert. Takeouts are available and a cash bar is open to all of legal age. Reservations required. See flyer. $10 per person. 6-8 p.m. Suney’s Pub & Family Restaurant, 216 B Chandler St. 774-261-0108.

>Tuesday 21

Kinder and Preschool Info Session @ WFP 130 Leeds St. 01606 Worcester. Worcester Family Partnership, 130 Leeds Family Winter Tracking Walk. Instructor: Ann Marie Pilch St. 508-799-3136. Join for an outdoor exploration of animal tracks and signs. Learn Art Together: All Shapes and Sizes, 3-5 Years w/Adult. to recognize basic track patterns and how animals adapt to the Take a look at the colorful shapes in KAHBAHBLOOOM and create lean winter months. Pre-registration required, max 25 people/5 a colorful composition using an assortment of shapes and different families Member: $15/family, Nonmember: $20/family plus cost sizes. In the studio, make works of art together to boost your child’s of admission. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 self-confidence and model life-long learning skills. Members $20 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111, ext. 124 or towerhillbg. / Nonmembers $25. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, 55 thankyou4caring.org Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Art Carts: Family Fun - Fun and Games. Discover the past February Vacation Fun: Astronomy. Annie’s Book Stop of by playing games! Learn to play chess medieval style, checkers with Worcester invites you to Astronomy Crafts, a drop-in craft and activity no kings, plus classic games such as Nine Men’s Morris and Mancala! day! From 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM, on Tuesday, February 21, we’ll be (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. offering crafts and coloring pages for children of all ages and parents. 2-3 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court Balcony, 55 Children must be accompanied by parent at all times. Free. 11 a.m. Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. to 3 p.m. Annie’s Book Stop, 65 James St. 508-796-5613 or find Tour of the Month - The Psychology Behind the Art. them on Facebook. Looking at art spanning the Renaissance to Impressionism, and explore how the artist was influenced by the times, the people, their >Wednesday 22 surroundings, and their contemporaries. Tour begins in the Lancaster Anima Adventures. Worcester Family Partnership, 130 Leeds St. Welcome Center. Free with Museum admission. 2-3 p.m. Worcester 508-799-3136. Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. February Vacation Fun: Sing-Along and Little Monsters. Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester invites you to our Sing>Sunday 19 Along and Little Monsters Craft Day, Drop-in to join Selina as she Arms and Armor: Knight’s Tale. The Knight in shining armor sings favorite childhood tunes or create crafts of little monsters! From conjures a thousand images and captures the imagination. What 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM, on Wednesday, February 22, we’ll be singing were the strengths of armor? What were its weaknesses? Learn and offering crafts and coloring pages for children of all ages and about all the different kinds of arms and armor that were used by parents. Children must be accompanied by parent at all times. Free. knights and soldiers of the past in this interactive program. Follow 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Annie’s Book Stop, 65 James St. 508-796-5613 or this with a visit to the Medieval Galleries and immerse yourself find them on Facbeook. in the world of chivalry! (Programming subject to change) Free Art Carts: Family Fun - Fun and Games. Discover the past with Museum admission. 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Worcester Art by playing games! Learn to play chess medieval style, checkers with Museum, Conference Room, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. no kings, plus classic games such as Nine Men’s Morris and Mancala! (Programing subject to change) Free with Museum admission. >Sunday 19 1-2 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court Balcony, 55 Family Snowshoe Walk. Instructor: Alice Puccio Explore the Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. quiet world of winter in the gardens and trails of Tower Hill on a Art Carts: Family Fun - Antioch, the Hunt Mosaic & family-friendly walk. Wear layers and dress warm. Snowshoes WAM. Ever wonder how our wonderful collection of mosaics got provided. Pre-registration required, max 25 people/5 families here? How they were made? Where they came from? Where is Members: $10/family, Nonmember: $20/family plus cost of Antioch? Learn about all this and try your hand at making a mosaic! admission. 1-2 p.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, (programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. Boylston. 508-869-6111, ext. 124 or towerhillbg.thankyou4caring.org 2:30-3:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court, 55 Art Carts: Family Fun - Egyptian Heiroglyphs. Ever wanted Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. to read hieroglyphs? Take a look at our three Egyptian inscriptions. Family and Friends Informational Program. AdCare’s

>Saturday 18

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minimum enrollment 3 days prior, it will be cancelled. Students will have the option of transferring their ticket to another class or receiving a refund. Please provide us with both a contact number & email to ensure you are properly notified of course changes. Class complimentary Family Programs are designed to educate love ones Requirements: Appropriate shop clothing: (natural fiber clothing, long about substance use and provide support for family members. Family sleeves/ jeans is typical minimum recommended) closed toe shoes Programs are open to anyone concerned with the substance use of a (leather steel toe boots recommended). No experience necessary. family member or friend. Complimentary. 6-7 p.m. AdCare Outpatient How to find us! Turn in at the Blue Hive parking lot (233 Stafford St.) Services, 95 Lincoln St. 508-799-9000 or adcare.com drive to the back of the lot and turn right to go behind the building. There will be a large garage door. The entrance to the WorcShop is the door on the right with the blue awning. $70 WorcShop Members / $85 Non-Members. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The WorcShop, 243 Stafford >Thursday 16 St. 774-545-0720 or eventbrite.com Third Week Wonders Preschool Series: Snow Rabbit, Intro to 3D Printing with Kent Flowers. Have you ever Spring Rabbit. If you are between the ages of 3 and 5, bring wanted to learn how to 3d print? In this class you will learn how to your favorite adult for a thematic hour of a story, an activity, and a setup, run and troubleshoot a 3d printer. You will also touch on cad naturalist-led walk. Choose from the third Wednesday, Thursday, software that can be used to create your own designs and websites or Saturday of each month. Be prepared to go outside. For more that offer already designed parts that you can print. Each student information and to register, call 508.753.6087. $3 Child Members, $4 will get their own 3d printed part (pickup a week after the class) Child Nonmembers. 10-11 a.m. Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Minimum Enrollment to run: 2 Maximum Number of students per Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Road. class: 6 Class will be cancelled if it does not meet the minimum 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org signup requirement by 2/16/17 Students will have the option of Intro to Product Photography. In this 2 hour class, learn the transferring their ticket to another class or receiving a refund. Please basics of product photography. You will learn basic staging and 2 provide us with both a contact number & email to ensure you are different options for lighting your product. You will need to bring your properly notified of course changes. How to find us! Turn in at the own camera (camera phones welcomed), and you will be responsible Blue Hive parking lot (233 Stafford St.) drive to the back of the lot for knowing how to use your camera. Please feel welcomed to and turn right to go behind the building. There will be a large garage bring samples of your work to practice on! Limit 10 Students $60 door. The entrance to the WorcShop is the door on the right with the WorcShop Members / $80 Non-Members. 3-5 p.m. The WorcShop, blue awning. $60 WorcShop Members / $80 Non-Members. 10 a.m. Studio 12 - True Life Photography of MA, 243 Stafford St. 774-293- to 2 p.m. The WorcShop, Classroom Side B, 243 Stafford St. 7748165 or eventbrite.com 545-0720 or eventbrite.com Accelerated MBA Information Session. Join Program Third Week Wonders Preschool Series: Snow Rabbit, Director Eric Drouart who will discuss key benefits of the MBA Spring Rabbit. If you are between the ages of 3 and 5, bring program. 5:30-7 p.m. Assumption College: Testa Science Center, 500 your favorite adult for a thematic hour of a story, an activity, and a Salisbury St. graduate.assumption.edu naturalist-led walk. Choose from the third Wednesday, Thursday, Crocodile River Music Concert and Workshop. Crocodile or Saturday of each month. Be prepared to go outside. For more River Music will give a concert for adults at 6pm and a workshop information and to register, call 508.753.6087. $3 Child Members, $4 for children of all ages at 6:30pm. Free. 6-7 p.m. Trinity Evangelical Child Nonmembers. 10-11 a.m. Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Lutheran Church, Jeppson Hall, 73 Lancaster St. 508-753-2989. Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Road. Sushi Making Class. $45. 6-8 p.m. Baba Sushi Sturbridge, 453 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org Main St., Fiskdale. eventbrite.com In Living Color. Presenter: Joann Vieira, Director of Horticulture Many of the gardens at Tower Hill have been purposefully designed >Friday 17 to allow the professional staff a chance to paint a fresh scene, and Intro to Photography. Learn 4 photography basics to give your create a new mood, each year with artful plant combinations. These images a little boost! This class will cover auto vs no flash mode, the annual and seasonal changes require all the skills that define the rule of thirds, limb chop dos & don’ts, and a brief look at how light field of horticulture - the combination of the art and science of placement affects shadows. You will get a small take-home book growing plants. It’s not enough to simply choose colors that look that also has some at-home exercises to help practice what you’ve good together in the nursery in April - many other factors go into learned. All DSLR users welcomed, as well as point & shoot cameras, selecting combinations that will go from alluring in April to aweand even camera phones! Please be familiar with your camera before inspiring in August. Spend an hour with Horticulture Director, Joann taking this class. A minimum of 2 students needed to run this class, Vieira learning about where the horticulture team at Tower Hill derives with a limit of 10 students. $100 WorcShop Members / $125 Nontheir inspiration for fresh displays; how they balance the science of Members. 6-9 p.m. The WorcShop, Studio 12 - True Life Photography growing plants with the art of color and texture; and how space and of MA, 243 Stafford St. 774-293-8165 or eventbrite.com time influence their choices. Free with Admission. 1-2 p.m. Tower Hill PlantNite - Tropical Terrarium In A Glass Jar - Enjoy & Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111, ext. 124 Create! Come “Enjoy” an evening with your friends & “Create” a or towerhillbg.thankyou4caring.org “Tropical Terrarium in Glass Jar” tabletop garden, and your night will Intro to the Lighting Studio. The Lighting Studio is a resource bloom... Come early and enjoy one of our dinner specials prior to the designed for rental by artists to document 2D and 3D artworks. event. See Webpage Link. 7-9 p.m. Canal Restaurant & Bar, 65 Water Within the studio you will find the tools and equipment to stage, St. 508-926-8353 or plantnite.com light and capture high quality images of artworks, both on film and digitally. This workshop will cover the proper use and care of the >Saturday 18 associated equipment, as well as three basic lighting scenarios for Forge a Rail Road Spike Knife with Jason Scott. In this 2D and 3D artworks. The guidelines and policies for independent one day class, students will learn the basic techniques of making rental of the Lighting Studio will be covered as this workshop is a a blade, using a railroad spike. The importance and safety aspects pre-requisite to access the studio via independent rental. $25. 1-4 of being able to properly hold onto hot metal will be discussed. p.m. Worcester Center for Crafts, Lighting Studio, 25 Sagamore Road. Students will have the opportunity to make one knife of their own, 508-753-8183, ext. 301 or register.worcestercraftcenter.org as well as gain the knowledge of modifying and making more in the future 10 am to 4 pm (½ hour lunch break) Minimum of 3 student >Sunday 19 required to run the class & a maximum of 6. If class does not reach Tune Into Me: A Couples Yoga Experience. Based on the

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teaching of mindfulness practice and love by Thic Nhat Hanh, join real couple Jenn Coode and Walter Iwanicki as they utilize yoga, breathwork, music, and partner/couple yoga and attunement exercises to increase intimacy, communication, and attunement skills. This 3 hour workshop will allow couples to have fun while using movement and wellness to form a deeper connection with each other. Each couple will receive a copy of “How to Love” by Thic Nhat Hanh as part of the experience, as well as some mindful wellness essentials! Please note this workshop is limited to 6 couples. Couples of all kinds are welcome and encouraged! $50 per couple. 9 a.m.-noon Union Street Yoga, 25 Union St., 3rd Fl. 508-317-2323 or unionstreetyoga.com Opening Your Heart To The Sky with Michael Doering. You will leave this all-levels workshop feeling lighter and peaceful, as you move slowly, breaking down alignment in more detail and exploring the feeling of opening your heart with some familiar and some new and old poses. Yoga emphasizes letting go of physical and emotional tension which will allow your heart to open and stay open for all of life’s challenges and joys. Modifications will be given. $30 (Early Bird) / $35 (Day of Event). Noon-2 p.m. Metrowest Yoga & Training Center: Worcester, 91 Prescott St. 508-752-1533 or metrowestyoga.net Learn to Shoot in Manual Mode. In this 3 hour class you will learn all about the exposure triangle, and how your ISO, shutter speed, and f-stop work together to create the images you want. There will be free time at the end of the class for questions and practice. You’ll also get a small booklet to take home with exercises and tips that will help you practice shooting in manual mode. Class Requirements, if any: You must know how to operate your camera, and it is recommended that you bring your manual. $100 WorcShop Members / $125 NonMembers. 1-3 p.m. The WorcShop, Studio 12 - True Life Photography of MA, 243 Stafford St. 774-293-8165 or eventbrite.com

$265 Child Non-members. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org Daily Drop-in Crafts. Join us each day for a winter themed craft. All ages, must be accompanied by adult. Free with Admission. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111, ext. 124.

>Tuesday 21

February Vacation Week - Tuesday. Need something to do during school vacation week? Come to Broad Meadow Brook where we will explore the sanctuary by foot or even snowshoe if the weather cooperates! Every day will feature a new theme, and this week promises to be filled with new discoveries and new friends as well! Parents will be sent additional information upon registration. Children will need to have a medical form on file, and they will need to bring a snack, lunch and water bottle. If you sign up for all five days you will receive a discount price. For ages 6 to 11. For more information and to register, call 508.753.6087. $48 Mass Audubon Child Members, $58 Child Non-members. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org Comic Book Art, 8-10 Years. Start creating a comic book! Design amazing characters with “POW,” write scripts with a “BANG,” and make drawings with “ZIP-ZAP!” Focus on drawing techniques using pen, pencils and markers to develop personal style $25 Nonmembers/ $20 for WAM Members. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-793-4333 or educationreg.worcesterart.org

>Tuesday 21

Drawing the Clothed Figure 14-17. Learn the basic forms, proportions, and anatomy of the human figure. Drawing from a February Vacation Week - Monday. Need something to do clothed model, you will learn techniques to capture the action of during school vacation week? Come to Broad Meadow Brook where the pose. Work with charcoal, conte, or pencils to practice quick we will explore the sanctuary by foot or even snowshoe if the weather gesture drawings and move on to a longer pose studying form using cooperates! Every day will feature a new theme, and this week light and dark. Members $45 / Nonmembers $55. 10 a.m. to 2:30 promises to be filled with new discoveries and new friends as well! p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or Parents will be sent additional information upon registration. Children educationreg.worcesterart.org will need to have a medical form on file, and they will need to bring a Optical Illusions, 11-13 Years. Learn how to manipulate line, snack, lunch and water bottle. If you sign up for all five days you will shape, and pattern to see the ways that different illusions can trick receive a discount price. For ages 6 to 11. For more information and the eye. Images from the book “The Wizard of Op” may serve as to register, call 508.753.6087. : $48 Mass Audubon Child Members, inspiration as you draw black and white optical illusions. Members $58 Child Non-members. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mass Audubon: Broad $20 / Nonmembers $25. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, 55 Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org Stories in Art, 5-7 Years. Hear great children’s literature and Dino Plant Holders. Instructor: Alice Puccio What is a succulent see the accompanying artwork done by Ed Emberley in the Museum. and what makes them unique from other plants? Come learn about Then, enjoy time in the studio creating works that tell a story using this special type of plant as you create and decorate a dinosaur plant tempera paint and collage. Members $20 / Nonmembers $25. 10 holder to grow your own succulent in. Fee includes all materials and a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or is per child. Ages 10+ Pre-registration required, max 12 Member: educationreg.worcesterart.org $18, Nonmember: $28, includes cost of admission for child. 1-2:30 All Kinds of Lines, 5-7 Years. Explore one of the basic p.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869- elements of art lines! Visit KAHBAHBLOOOM and see the types of 6111, ext. 124 or towerhillbg.thankyou4caring.org lines used in Ed Emberley’s works of art. Back in the studio create a work of art using line that expresses movement and feelings. $25 >Monday 20 – Thursday 23 Nonmembers/ $20 for WAM Members. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Worcester Storytime in Conservatories. Join us each morning during Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-793-4333 or educationreg. vacation week in the conservatories to hear stories about plants, the worcesterart.org seasons and the natural world around us. Free with Admission. 11:30 Manga and More, 11 - 13 Years. Create interesting and a.m.-noon Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. innovative illustrations while learning some tricks and tips cartoonists 508-869-6111, ext. 124. use to tell stories through images. Create a Manga-style comic and turn your story into the next great graphic novel. Members $20 / >Monday 20 – Friday 24 Nonmembers $25. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 February Vacation Week - Full Week. Need something to do Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org during school vacation week? Come to Broad Meadow Brook where Painting with Mixed Media. Visit our galleries to learn how we will explore the sanctuary by foot or even snowshoe if the weather artists use color and light to create shape, show movement, or cooperates! Every day will feature a new theme, and this week express emotions. Then, work with an array of mixed media and promises to be filled with new discoveries and new friends as well! paint types to create a colorful work of art. $25 Nonmembers/ $20 Parents will be sent additional information upon registration. Children for WAM Members. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 will need to have a medical form on file, and they will need to bring a Salisbury St. 508-793-4333 or educationreg.worcesterart.org snack, lunch and water bottle. $215 Mass Audubon Child Members, Painting with Mixed Media, 8-10 Years. Visit our galleries

>Monday 20


night day &

to learn how artists use color and light to create shape, show movement, or express emotions. Then, work with an array of mixed media and paint types to create a colorful work of art. Members $20 / Nonmembers $25. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Teen Drawing in Conservatories. Instructor: Suzanne Hauerstein Observe conservatory plants and discuss plant anatomy. Talk about different shapes, colors and botanical drawing techniques. Use graphite and color pencils. Fee includes all materials and is per child. Ages 13+ Pre-registration required, max 12 Member: $20, Nonmember: $28 includes cost of admission for child. 1-3 p.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111, ext. 124 or towerhillbg.thankyou4caring.org Kabablooom Afternoon- Ed Emberley Art. Join artist & Worcester Art Museum Faculty Member, Jaime Buckmaster, as he explores Ed Emberley’s many artistic forms. Recommended for school age children (6-12). Help us celebrate more than 60 years of imaginative picture book illustration in WAM’s exhibition KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley. Free. 2-3 p.m. Worcester Public Library, 3 Salem Square. 508-799-1655. Worcester Historical Highlights by Jane Johnston. Worcester Historical Highlights narrated by Jane Johnston with photography by Jan Perry. Travel through the streets of Worcester to learn location, history and facts of the many outstanding landmarks our city has to offer. Featuring places such as Bancroft Tower, Worcester Auditorium, Elm Park and more. Open to the Public. 2-3 p.m. Briarwood Continuing Care Retirement Community: Birches Auditorium, 65 Briarwood Circle. 508-852-9007 or briarwoodretirement.com School Counseling Information Session. Join Program Director Theresa A. Coogan, Ph.D., NCSC, NCC, who will discuss key benefits of the School Counseling program. 4:30-6 p.m. Assumption College: Carriage House, 500 Salisbury St. graduate.assumption.edu Intro to MIG welding. MIG welding is one of the most common and useful welding techniques in use today. It is fairly easy to learn and has wide application for every-day repair and fabrication. In this class you will learn: Equipment setup and safety. Basics of GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) Use of personal protective equipment associated with welding. Part preparation. Welding techniques for various positions (flat, vertical, horizontal, overhead). Weld bead inspection and analysis. Limit 4 students Minimum enrollment 2 students. If your class does not reach minimum enrollment by 2pm on the date it is set for, your class will be cancelled. Class Requirements: Appropriate shop clothing: (natural fiber clothing, long sleeves/ jeans is typical minimum recommended) closed toe shoes (leather steel toe boots recommended). No experience necessary How to find us! (see images below) Turn in at the Blue Hive parking lot (233 Stafford St.) drive to the back of the lot and turn right to go behind the building. There will be a large garage door. The entrance to the WorcShop is the door on the right with the blue awning. $45 WorcShop Members / $60 Non-Members. 7-9 p.m. The WorcShop, 243 Stafford St. 774-545-0720 or eventbrite.com

>Wednesday 22

February Vacation Week - Wednesday. Need something to do during school vacation week? Come to Broad Meadow Brook where we will explore the sanctuary by foot or even snowshoe if the weather cooperates! Every day will feature a new theme, and this week promises to be filled with new discoveries and new friends as well! Parents will be sent additional information upon registration. Children will need to have a medical form on file, and they will need to bring a snack, lunch and water bottle. If you sign up for all five days you will receive a discount price. For ages 6 to 11. For more information and to register, call 508.753.6087. $48 Mass Audubon Child Members, $58 Child Non-. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org Acrylic Painting, 14-17 Years. Study the process of painting and learn to use color, light, and composition in your work. Study the masters in the galleries and use acrylic paint to build skills. Use

{ listings}

and build these skills to create a painting on canvas. Members $45 / Nonmembers $55. 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Once Upon A Time, 3-5 Years w/Adult. Come discover stories from around the world. See KAHBAHBLOOOM and hear a fantastic tale. Take your imagination to the studio and paint your own imaginary scene. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Anna Maria College’s Zecco Performing Arts Center, 50 Sunset Lane, Paxton, hosts the AMC/MIT Collaboration Concert Friday, Feb. 17, 7-9 p.m. For more information, email dwackell@annamaria.edu. Painting Without a Brush, 5-7 Years. What kinds of lines and shapes can you paint without a brush? Tour the Museum’s art galleries, and then experiment and paint with materials including cardboard, combs, and sticks. Members $20 / Nonmembers $25. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Pop-Up Books, 8-10 Years. Visit WAM’s galleries where you will view landscape scenes, abstractions, and portraits. Lean how to translate what inspires you into scenes made out of paper. Make your artwork jump off the page! Members $20 / Nonmembers $25. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Printing with 3 Colors 11-13 Years. Be like Ed Emberley and create a print using just three colors. From simple methods to advanced techniques, this workshop will focus on monotype printmaking techniques back in the studio. Members $20 / Nonmembers $25. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org “From Book to Movie” brown bag lunch. Join us for a “brown bag” lunch and a discussion of Roald Dahl’s fantasy novel “The BFG,” followed by a viewing of the Disney film. For ages 12 and under. free. noon-1:30 p.m. Worcester Public Library, 3 Salem Square. 508-799-1655. Rainbow Lunch Club. The Rainbow Lunch Club meets the 2nd & 4th Wednesdays of each month and offers LGBTIQA seniors age 60+ a nutritious meal and an opportunity to socialize with friends and enjoy various activities including programs, entertainment and educational series. Advance reservations are required. Please call or email by the previous Wednesday: (508)756-1545 ext.404 or wlen@eswa.org All are Welcome: LGBTIQA 60 years old and older; younger partners, friends, and allies! $2.50 suggested donation for those age 60+; the fee for younger individuals is $5.50. Noon-2 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church of Worcester, 90 Holden St. 508-7561545 or meetup.com Computer Comics. Do you like to draw your own characters? Do you ever dream about creating your own cartoon? In this workshop learn how to create an exciting storyboard and an animated sequence on the computer. $25 Nonmembers/ $20 for WAM Members. 12:302:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-793-4333 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Computer Comics, 11-13 Years. Do you like to draw your own characters? Do you ever dream about creating your own cartoon? In this workshop learn how to create an exciting storyboard and an animated sequence on the computer. Members $20 / Nonmembers $25. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org Emberley’s Animals, 5-7 Years. Discover images of our friends with fins, feathers and fur in KAHBAHBLOOOM. View some of Ed Emberley’s most popular images and be inspired by his works of art. In the studio, learn techniques to draw animals. Members $20

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37


night day &

{ listings}

/ Nonmembers $25. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406 or educationreg.worcesterart.org What’s in a Name? 8-10 years. Turn your name into a work of art using a mixture of mixed media. Learn how typography can change the “look and feel” of words. Look at Ed Emberley’s ABCs for inspiration. Members $20 / Nonmembers $25. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. Nature Journal Making. Instructor: Suzanne Hauerstein Create hand-dyed papers, and use other art journaling techniques to make a hard bound book to use for nature sketching and weather tracking. We will take it outside and try it out- weather permitting. Fee includes all materials and is per child. Ages 10+ Pre-registration required, max 12 Member: $20, Nonmember: $30 includes cost of admission for child. 1-3 p.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111, ext. 124 or towerhillbg.thankyou4caring.org Figure in Context #18. 3 hour figure workshop held by Void’s Creations at The WorcShop Featured model: tba Set design: tba This is not just your average nude model on a stand, we will be staging an environment for the model to pose in (local artists are welcome to volunteer to bring to life a different creative setting each session) The event will be recurring biweekly on Wednesday evenings from 6-9pm starting May 25th. 6-630 pm gesture 6:30-9 pm long pose All mediums are welcome, please bring your own easels and supplies. If you intend to use messy media please bring a drop cloth as well. No experience necessary. How to find us! Turn in at the Blue Hive parking lot (233 Stafford St.) drive to the back of the lot and turn right to go behind the building. There will be a large garage door. The entrance to the WorcShop is the door on the right with the blue awning. $15 general admission / $20 g.a. + reference pictures . 6-9 p.m. The WorcShop, Classroom Side B, 243 Stafford St. 774-5450720 or eventbrite.com

>Wednesday 22 – August 31

Helmutt’s Drop In Studio. Add to your museum visit experience by participating in Helmutt’s Drop-In Studio, offered in conjunction with the exhibition, “KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley.” Try your hand at some of the techniques Ed uses to create his colorful picture books, like thumbprint drawing, printmaking, and making pictures with color block shapes. New art-making activities weekly. Open hours: Wednesdays-Fridays, 11am-12noon, and 1-3pm; Sundays 2-4:45pm. Suitable for all ages; Helmutt’s Drop-In Studio is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Free with Museum admission. 11 a.m.-noon Worcester Art Museum, Studio 100, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

fairs/ festivals >Sunday 19

Feb. 22 @ NEWMAC Tournament Quarterfinal, TBA Becker Feb. 16 @ Daniel Webster, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 18 vs. Mitchell, 3 p.m. Worcester State Bay State Bank Staff Skate. Free Skate for Bay State Bank Staff Free Skate for Bay State Bank Staff. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Worcester Feb. 18 @ Westfield State, 1 p.m. Clark University Common Oval, 455 Main St. 508-929-0777 or worcesterma.gov Feb. 18 @ WPI, 3 p.m. Bay State Bank Day. Free admission to all, thanks to Bay State Anna Maria Bank. $3 for skate rentals with a $25 refundable deposit per skate rental. Free Admission. 1-6 p.m. Worcester Common Oval, 455 Main Feb. 18 vs. Rivier, 1 p.m. St. 508-929-0777 or worcesterma.gov

>Sunday 19 – Saturday 25

Ed Emberley’s Book Week. Celebrate 60 years of imaginative picture book illustration at your library, or at home! This February school vacation week, use WAM’s handy Ed Emberley Book Week website for ideas on projects for your children, curricula for your classrooms, or simply find out more about some great books to read with your families. Visit us online at: worcesterart.org/exhibitions/ ed-emberley/bookweek/ Share your great results with the hashtag #EdEmberley. Free. Worcester Art Museum, Virtual Event & Nationwide, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

>Monday 20 – Friday 24

February Vacation Week at the Ice Rink! Enjoy February vacation with some outdoor skating! The Worcester Common Oval Ice Rink will be open Monday through Thursday 1-6pm and Friday 1-8pm. Come see Trax from the Railers every day this week from 1-2 skate the rink. Free admission during Trax Power Hour. Admission for public skating is $5 (children 6 and under skate free) and $3 for skate rentals with a $25 refundable deposit per skate rental. 1-6 p.m. Worcester Common Oval, 455 Main St. 508-929-0777.

>Wednesday 22

Family and Friends Staff and Faculty Night. 1-6 p.m. Worcester Common Oval, 455 Main St. 508-929-0777 or worcesterma.gov

poetry >Wednesday 22

Shipwrecked & Sleeping, A Two-Part Poetry Writing Workshop Series with Heather J. Macpherson. This writing workshop will focus on two brilliant poets while focusing on two extremes, love & despair. Together, the workshop will engage in latitudinal poetry writing exercises while attempting to find a balance between the emotional sovereigns. This second session will focus on Pablo Neruda. Facilitator: Heather J. Macpherson writes from Central Massachusetts. Her work has appeared in The Broken Plate, The Heron Tree, Atomic, Niche Magazine, Spillway, Blueline, Pearl, and other fine publications. She is the executive director of Damfino Press. Free and open to the public. 6-8 p.m. Southborough >Thursday 16 – Friday 17 Used Book Sale. All of our 9,000 books will be priced at one dollar for Public Library, 25 Main St., Southborough. 508-485-5031 or hardcovers and fifty cents for paperbacks. Please note that there will not scribblehysteria.wordpress.com be a section with higher priced books at this sale. On Friday all books will be half-price. These books are primarily non-fiction representing a wide variety of academic disciplines, including a significant number about U.S. popular culture (movies, sports, TV, radio, music). 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Clark University: Goddard Library, 950 Main St.

fundraisers

>Sunday 19

college sports Men’s Basketball

Give Blood, Get Wachusett Ski Lift Tickets! The Worcester Regional Airport and the American Red Cross are hosting a community blood drive on Sunday, February 19th. All presenting donors at this event will receive a free Wachusett Mountain Ski Lift Ticket as well as a $5 Amazon gift code (via email). Walk ins are welcome, but appointments are recommended. You can sign up at redcrossblood.org, sponsor code airport, or call 1-800-REDCROSS. Free! 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Worcester Regional Airport, Airport Lobby, 375 Airport Drive. 781-439-0513 or redcrossblood.org

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Holy Cross Feb. 19 @ American, 12 p.m. Feb. 22 vs. Loyola, 7:05 p.m. Assumption Feb. 18 @ Saint Michaels, 3:30 p.m. Feb. 21 vs. Franklin Pierce, 7:30 p.m. Nichols Feb. 18 vs. U New England, 2 p.m Feb. 21 vs. Commonwealth Coast Conference (CCC) Quarterfinal, TBA WPI Feb. 18 vs. Clark, 3 p.m.

• FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Women’s Basketball

Holy Cross Feb. 18 vs. American, National Girls & Women in Sports, Senior Day, 1:05 p.m. Feb. 22 @ Loyola, 7 p.m. Assumption Feb. 18 @ Saint Michael’s, 1:30 p.m. Feb. 21 vs. Franklin Pierce, 5:30 p.m. Nichols Feb. 18 vs. U New England, 12 p.m. Feb. 21 vs. Commonwealth Coast Conference (CCC) Quarterfinal, TBA WPI Feb. 18 vs. MIT, 1 p.m. Feb. 22 @ NEWMAC Tournament Quarterfinal, TBA Becker Feb. 16 @ Daniel Webster, 5:30 p.m. Feb. 18 @ Mitchell, 1 p.m. Worcester State Feb. 18 @ Westfield State, 3 p.m. Clark University Feb. 16 @ Simmons College, 7 p.m. Feb. 22 vs. TBA, TBA Anna Maria Feb. 18 vs. Rivier, 3 p.m.

Men’s Ice Hockey

Holy Cross Feb. 17 vs. Army West Point, Senior Night, 7:05 p.m. Feb. 18 @ Army West Point, 7:05 p.m. Nichols Feb. 11 vs. Curry, 4:40 p.m. Becker Feb. 16 vs. Wentworth, 7:40 p.m. Feb. 18 @ Endicott, 2:50 p.m. Worcester State Feb. 18 @ Plymouth State, 6 p.m. Feb. 21 vs. Salem State, 8:30 p.m.

Women’s Ice Hockey

Holy Cross Feb. 16 vs. St. Anselm, 7:05 p.m. Feb. 18 vs. Franklin Pierce, Senior Day, 2:05 p.m. Nichols Feb. 17 vs. UMass Boston, 4:40 p.m. Feb. 11 vs. Castleton, 1:40 p.m. Becker Feb. 18 @ Colby, 6 p.m.

Wrestling

WPI Feb. 19 vs. NEWA Futures Tournament, 10 a.m.

Men’s Indoor Track & Field

Holy Cross Feb. 17 @ Boston University, Patriot League Indoor Championship, TBA Feb. 18 @ Boston University, Patriot League Indoor Championship, TBA Feb. 19 @ Boston University, Patriot League Indoor Championship, TBA Assumption Feb. 18 @ Northeast 10, Indoor Championships, Reggie Lewis Center

WPI Feb. 17 vs. New England D-III Championships Day #1, @ Tufts, TBA Feb. 18 vs. New England D-III Championships Day #2, @ Tufts, TBA Worcester State Feb. 17 vs. New England D-III Championships Day #1, @ Tufts, TBA Feb. 18 vs. New England D-III Championships Day #2, @ Tufts, TBA

Women’s Indoor Track & Field

Holy Cross Feb. 17 @ Boston University, Patriot League Indoor Championship, TBA Feb. 18 @ Boston University, Patriot League Indoor Championship, TBA Feb. 19 @ Boston University, Patriot League Indoor Championship, TBA Assumption Feb. 18 @ Northeast 10, Indoor Championships, Reggie Lewis Center WPI Feb. 17 vs. New England D-III Championships Day #1, @ MIT, TBA Feb. 18 vs. New England D-III Championships Day #2, @ MIT, TBA Worcester State Feb. 17 vs. New England D-III Championships, @ Tufts, TBA Feb. 18 vs. New England D-III Championships, @ Tufts, TBA

Mens Swimming & Diving Holy Cross Feb. 16 @ Patriot League Championship, TBA Feb. 17 @ Patriot League Championship, TBA Feb. 18 @ Patriot League Championship, TBA Clark Feb. 16, NEWMAC Championships, 5:30 p.m. Feb. 17, NEWMAC Championships, 10 a.m. Feb. 18, NEWMAC Championships, 10 a.m. Feb. 19, NEWMAC Championships, 10 a.m.

Women’s Swimming & Diving

Holy Cross Feb. 16 @ Patriot League Championship, TBA Feb. 17 @ Patriot League Championship, TBA Feb. 18 @ Patriot League Championship, TBA Assumption Feb. 16 @ NE-10 Championships @ SCSU Feb. 17 @ NE-10 Championships @ SCSU Feb. 18 @ NE-10 Championships @ SCSU Feb. 19 @ NE-10 Championships @ SCSU Clark Feb. 16, NEWMAC Championships, 5:30 p.m. Feb. 17, NEWMAC Championships, 10 a.m. Feb. 18, NEWMAC Championships, 10 a.m. Feb. 19, NEWMAC Championships, 10 a.m.

Men’s Lacrosse

Holy Cross Feb. 18 @ Vermont, 1 p.m. Feb. 21 vs. Harvard, 4:05 p.m. Clark Feb. 18 vs. Johnson and Wales, 1 p.m.

Women’s Lacrosse Holy Cross Feb. 18 vs. Iona, 4:05 p.m. Feb. 21 @ Brown, 6 p.m.

Baseball

Holy Cross Feb. 18 @ Central Connecticut, 1 p.m. Feb. 19 @ Central Connecticut, 1 p.m.


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PAINTING SERVICES

WINDOW REPLACEMENT

Mark’s Painting Quality workmanship at affordable rates Interior/ exterior. Commercial /residential Senior and veteran discounts For a free estimate, please call 508-498-5348 or email markadams5348@gmail.com

SNEADE BROS. VINYL SIDING & REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Fully licensed & Insured

Richard Sneade

508-839-1164

www.sneadebrothers windowandsiding.com

See more online at Real Estate • Jobs • Auto • Services

Central Mass

CL ASSIFIEDS

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www.centralmassclass.com FLOORING/CARPETING

HOME IMPROVEMENT

KITCHEN & BATH

SIDING

C & S Carpet Mills Carpet & Linoleum 30 Sq. Yds. $589 Installed with Pad. Free Metal Incl’d. Berber, Plush or Commercial. Call Tom: 800-861-5445 or 508-886-2624

C&R Remodeling Additions & all home improvements, 25 yrs exp. New & historic David 508-829-4581

Johanson Home Improvement Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling Over 20 years experience. Chad 508-963-8155 Lic/Ins HIC Registered

Sneade Brothers VINYL SIDING & REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Fully licensed & Insured Richard Sneade 508-839-1164 www.sneadebrotherswindow andsiding.com

FLOORING/CARPETING Creative Floors, Inc. Ceramic-Carpet-Vinyl Marble- Granite- Laminate Wallpaper Pre-finished Hardwood Sales-Design- Installation Residential & Commercial Free Estimates. Carpet Binding Financing Available Come visit our showroom! 508-829-7444 www.creativefloorsinc.com

HOME REPAIR/ RESTORATION Gary’s Home Repair Experienced building & grounds keeper looking for carpentry & painting projects. Nothing too small. Clean & neat. Holden native with references. Please call 508-274-1809

Cornerstone Masonry Master Stone Masons Brick & Block Stone Walls, Walkways, Patios, Fireplaces. We do repairs. 978-580-4260 Major credit cards accepted 30 Years Experience

Need it Fixed? General Home & Small Business Repairs Light Construction No Job Too Small Call Bob at 978-422-8632 or 978-790-8727 CELL email: fixit@callbobhill.com www.callbobhill.com

Interior Painting Only $159 Average 12x16 room. Prompt service. Reliable. Refs. Dutch Touch Painting 508-867-2550

KITCHEN & BATH

PAINT/WALLPAPER

Steven Ryan, Tile Contractor Backsplash Specialist/ Glass & Stone, Porcelain, Ceramic, Marble, Granite, Granite Countertops, Quarry, Slate, Mosaic. Installations & repairs. Fully insured. Free estimates. Est. 1987 N.G. www.stevenpryantile.com 508-839-9845, cell 508-326-0869.

Wachusett Painting Co. Let our skilled painters complete your painting needs. Exteriors & Interiors Call or email today for an appointment for your free estimate. 508-479-6760 Email: wachupainting@gmail.com Fully Insured & Registered Accepting Credit Cards www.wachupainting.com

HEATING & PLUMBING SCOTT BOSTEK PLUMBING & HEATING Small Jobs Is What We Do Residential Repair Specialist Water Heaters-DisposalsFrozen Pipes-Remodels & AdditionsDrain Cleaning-Faucets Ins. MPL 11955 Free Estimates 25 yrs Exp. Reliable 774-696-6078

MASONRY

SNOW PLOWING

Great prices on

Snow Plows and Sanders Call Mike 508-835-3190 or email mike@flaggrv.com 66 West Boylston St. West Boylston

PAINT/WALLPAPER

PLUMBING JOSH SHEA PLUMBING Master Plumber Lic.13680 Insured & 20 yrs. experience Drain cleaning sinks, tubs, toilets & main drains Credit cards accepted 508-868-5730 Joshsheaplumbing.com

SNOW PLOWING

ROOF SHOVELING Prevent damage before it occurs.

Hagman Maintenance | Rutland, MA

508-886-2252

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• F E B R U A R Y 16 , 2 0 17

TREE SERVICES

FOSTER PARENTS

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED Seeking families throughout Central Massachusetts who are interested in improving a child’s life. Call to inquire about our upcoming foster parent training. $1,000 SIGNING BONUS

Ross A. McGinnes Storm Damage, Tree Work, Stump Removals. Free estimates. Call 508-365-9602

Call for Details (Must mention this ad during inquiry)

688 Main Street, Holden, MA Toll Free (877) 446-3305

www.devereuxma.org HELP WANTED

LAWN & GARDEN LANDSCAPING & LAWN MAINTENANCE Lawn Care and Maintenance Routine lawn care and maintenance, spring/fall cleanups, trimming, pruning, etc. Reasonable rates, insured. Respectful, honest service. Call 508-320-3431 or email lashawaypc@gmail.com. Thank you. 508-320-3431 Burnham Maintenance Clean-ups. Lawn Maintenance. Shrub Pruning. Bark Mulch, Screened Loam & Compost. Patios & Walkways. Fertilization Programs. Deliveries Available. Please call 508-829-3809 or 508-400-4263

Devens, MA DC now hiring! Full-time Maintenance Tech Apply online: www.oreillyauto.com/careers Engineer, Storage (Worcester, MA) sought by UMass Memorial Medical Center, Inc. for Storage and Backup and Recovery systems. Assist small storage team responsible for configuration, management and support of t latest technologies including Hitachi, VSP, EMC DMX, Isilon, NetApp FAS, Snapmirror, Centera XIO, Rainfinity and various cloud storage. Must have Bachelor’s deg. in Computer Sci. or related and 5 yrs. rel. Apply to Leigh M. Corl, HR Operations Coordinator, UMass Memorial HR, HB791, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655. No phone calls.

Are you hiring? Our Readers make GREAT employees. Call or email us for more information. 978-728-4302 sales@centralmassclass.com

MULCH & LOAM Sterling Peat LLC Quality Screened Loam & Compost, Screened Loam/ Compost Mix, Mulches, Screened Gravel. Fill, Fieldstone. 978-422-8294

HELP WANTED LOCAL

EMPLOYMENT HELP WANTED Front Office Staff Looking for a part to full time office staff member. We are looking for someone who is personable and has good computer skills. Medical office experience is preferred. Duties include phone triage, appointment scheduling and dealing with families. Please email resume to employmentopenings206@ gmail.com

Expert Staffing in partnership with Injectronics is now hiring for 8 hour Shifts-1st, 2nd and 3rd. Production Associates and Process Techs. Apply at: Whitney Square, 40 Spruce Street, Suite 206 Leominster, MA 01453 978-798-1610 barbara.sidilau@expert-staffing.com

Walk-ins welcome!


www.centralmassclass.com On-spot Interviews

Tuesday, 21, 2017 HELPFebruary WANTED LOCAL 1:30 – 4:30 pm Devereux School Gym – 60 Miles Road Rutland Interviews MA 01543 On-spot

On-spot Interviews

Tuesday, February 21, On-spot Interviews Tuesday, February 21, 2017 2017 On-spot Interviews 1:30 – 4:30 pm Tuesday, February 21, 1:30 – 4:30 pm Full-Time & Part-Time, DayInterviews / Evening 2017 / Overnight Shifts On-spot Tuesday, February 21,Miles 2017 Road Devereux School Gym –pm 60 1:30 – 4:30 Devereux School Gym – 60 Miles Tuesday, February 21,Miles 2017 Road 1:30 –Gym 4:30 Rutland MA 01543 Local Jobs! Devereux School –pm 60 Road MA Devereux Rutland School –pm 60 Miles Road 1:30 –Gym 4:3001543

MA 01543 MA - Fitchburg,Rutland Leominster, Paxton, Rutland & Rutland MA 01543 Devereux School Gym – 60 Road Shifts Full-Time & Part-Time, Day / Evening / Overnight Webster. RI – Pascoag & Miles Woonsocket Rutland 01543// Overnight Full-Time & PartPart-Time, DayMA Evening Overnight Shifts Shifts FullTime & Time, Day // Evening Local Jobs! Therapeutic Foster Care FullTime & PartTime, Day / Evening / Overnight Shifts & MA - Fitchburg, Leominster, Paxton, Rutland Local Jobs! Local Jobs! Local Jobs! MA Holden, Springfield & Woburn RILeominster, –Local Pascoag &Paxton, Woonsocket Jobs! MA --Webster. Fitchburg, Rutland & MA - Fitchburg, Leominster, Paxton, Rutland & Webster RI - Pascoag &Shifts Woonsocket Full-Time & Part-Time, Day / Evening /•Overnight MA Fitchburg, Leominster, Paxton, Rutland & RI Warwick Therapeutic Foster Care MA -Webster. Fitchburg, Leominster, Paxton, Rutland & RI – Pascoag & Woonsocket Therapeutic Foster Care MA Holden, Springfield & Woburn Webster. RI –Local Pascoag & Woonsocket Therapeutic Foster Care MA - Holden, Springfield &Jobs! Woburn •Offer RI - Warwick RI - Warwick What Will Devereux You? & Therapeutic Foster Care Therapeutic Foster Care MA -MA Fitchburg, Leominster, Paxton, Rutland - Holden, Springfield & Woburn Great Full-Time Benefits MA -- Will Holden, & What Devereux Offer You? -Springfield Warwick MA Competitive Holden, Springfield & Woburn Woburn Webster. RI RI – Pascoag & Woonsocket Pay/ Career Advancement RI Full- Warwick Great Time Benefits Tuition Reimbursement/ Student Loan Forgiveness Eligibility RI - Warwick Therapeutic Foster Care You? Competitive Pay/ Career Advancement What Will Devereux Offer Comprehensive On-The-Job Training Tuition Reimbursement/ Student Loan Forgiveness Eligibility What Will Devereux Offer You? Great FullTime Benefits MA -Comprehensive Holden, Springfield & Woburn OnThe-Job Training National Non-Profit Organization Great FullTime Benefits WhatStable Will Devereux Offer Competitive Pay/ Career Advancement Stable National Non-Profit OrganizationYou? RIPay/ - Warwick Competitive Career Advancement Tuition Reimbursement/ Student Loan Forgiveness Eligibility Great Full-Time Benefits TuitionHS Reimbursement/ Student LoanMin Forgiveness Qualifications: Diploma/GED, Valid 21 years Fluent Comprehensive On-License, The-Job Training Qualifications: HS Diploma/GED, Valid Driver’s Driver’s License, Min 21 years old, old, Eligibility Fluent in in English English Competitive Pay/ Career ($1,000/year positions), ($1,000/year more more for forStable Fully Bilingual English/Spanish forAdvancement FT positions), & desire to help help others! Comprehensive OnThe-Job Training National Non-Profit Organization

What Will Devereux Offer You?

Tuition Reimbursement/ LoanOrganization Forgiveness Eligibility Stable NationalStudent Non-Profit

APPLY @ JOBS.DEVEREUX.ORG Great Benefits Qualifications:ONLINE HS Diploma/GED, Valid Driver’s License, MinTraining 21 years old, Fluent in English Comprehensive On-The-Job APPLY ONLINE @Full-Time JOBS.DEVEREUX.ORG

($1,000/year more Fully Bilingual English/Spanish for FT positions), desire to help others!EOE Qualifications: HSfor Diploma/GED, Valid Driver’s License, Min 21 years & old, Fluent inrequired. English Devereux is a drug-free workplace, drug screening Competitive Pay/ Career Advancement Stable National Non-Profit Organization ($1,000/year more for Fully Bilingual English/Spanish for FT positions), desire to help others!EOE Devereux is a drug-free workplace,&drug screening required.

CEMETERY PLOTS

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

Worc. County Memorial Park, Paxton Garden of Honor, 2 plots, Plot 17, Unit C, Graves 3 & 4. Today’s cost is $8,800 for both. Asking $2950 total for both. Call 978-582-9309

Invacare Series 9XT Wheelchair Invacare 9XT High Strength Lightweight Manual Chair. 20" urethane tires, electric red, 18"x18" Jaycare back seating and back support, rear ant tippers, footrests, full length adjustable arm rests. Purchased brand new $2450, used 2 weeks. Asking $1500 OBO. All original paperwork and receipt. 978-314-3270 for more info/ viewing.

C-13 Zeppelin Stamp Flag Cancelled $200. Got Stamp Questions? Call Ron at 413896-3324

Youth size fold away bed Red metal frame and mattress. $35. Call 774-364-4752

U.S. C14 Zeppelin Stamp (U) Flag cncl. $175. Stamp questions? Ron 413-896-3324

Kubota Tractor Model 1870, 4WD Diesel with bucket. Only 160 Hrs. $9800. 508-829-5494

FURNITURE

Worcester County Memorial Park - Paxton Garden of Serenity Two lots for sale. Present price $3495 for both, will sell for $900 each, totaling $1800. Call 801-294-7514

Radiators Cast iron - 8"x 20 x 36 (H); 5" x 10 x 24 (H); 5" x 10 x 36 (H) all 3 for $100. Baseboard Weil Mclain radiators - 2" x 9" x 24" - 2 pcs - $50. 508-847-4531 Corn Hole Game College size, 4 bags. $65. 978-798-1475

MA

FullT

Worcester County Memorial Park, Paxton MA Garden of Heritage II. 2 Lots w/vaults. Current value $8300.00 Asking $3950.00 for both or B/O. Call Jim 508-769-8107 Worcester County Memorial Park Paxton, MA Garden of the Cross Premier Location, Must sell Value $5250 Asking $4000 OBO 508-799-5678

Worc. County Memorial Park Paxton. Garden of Faith, 2 plots, Section #347-A 1&2. Today’s cost is $3,900.00 for both. Asking $1,500.00 total for both. Call 508-882-3421 or 909-714-0064

Underbed wood storage unit with 4 drawers. $100. 508-829 -5494 Gaiam Mini Stepper NEW11.5" L X 5" W -18 lbs. Resistance Cords, Counter Display. Mint. Negot. 508-754-1827

Corner Hutch Solid pine - 4 doors - 48" x 76". Accommodates 42" television. $250. Photo available. 508-829-6792 WANTED TO BUY

W Veteran Will Buy

Military Items American, German, Japanese, Italian etc. From Vietnam, 30" round frameless mirror T u i t Korea, WW2, WW1 and earlier. w/ beveled edge - 10 lbs. AskPlease call 978-928-1238. ing $100.00. 978-503-9753

EDUCATION Tuition Reimbursement/ Loan Forgiveness Eligibility Worcester Memorial Park APPLY ONLINE @Student JOBS.DEVEREUX.ORG Plus rear cargo mat. May also Paxton Garden of Honor, 2 Comprehensive On-The-Job Qualifications:ONLINE HS Diploma/GED, Valid License, MinTraining 21 years Q old, Fluent in English ual ificatio APPLY @Driver’s JOBS.DEVEREUX.ORG fit Audi A6. Protect against MUSIC INSTRUCTION plots, unit B, graves 3 & 4. ToHELP WANTED LOCALDevereux is a drug-free workplace, drug screening required. EOE Winter floor mats for Audi A7

($1,000/year more forStable Fully Bilingual English/Spanish ($ for FT positions), &MERCHANDISE 1,000/ desire to help others! year salt, etc $75. 508-865-9584. National Non-Profit Organization Devereux is a drug-free workplace, drug screening required. EOE day’s cost $8500 for both, asking $4000. Call 910-477-9081 Vocal, Instrumental & Amana ART104TFDW 14.3 CEMETERY PLOTS Jazz Improv Lessons Qualifications: HS Diploma/GED, Valid Driver’s License, Min 21 years old, Fluent in English cubic foot refrigerator/freezWorcester County Available on most instruments. ($1,000/year more for Fully Bilingual English/Spanish for FT positions), & desire to help others! er, bought new, excellent conWorcester County Memorial Devereux is a drug-free workplace, drug screening required. EOE Memorial Park - Paxton Lou Borelli 508-752-6213 dition, $375. 508-640-5888 Park Paxton, Ma. Lot Number Two lots, section 511, Garden 297-B Space 1 and 2, Garden of Valor. Asking $3500 OBO. Guitar Lessons/ Of Valor Section. Current value Brother HL-2170W Wireless 508-754-1188 is over $10,000 including 2 Most Instruments Laser Printer, bought new, Devereux is a drug-free workplace, drug screening required. EOE concrete burial vaults. All ages/25 years experience very good condition, $50 508Expert Staffing in partnership with Boutwell, Owens & Co., Inc. $3,000.00 or B/O 508-375Recreational Dept. Sterling FOR SALE 640-5888 0080 has several openings for 12 hour shifts-Days and Nights Lou Valentino 860-574-9467 Packers, Air Hammer Operators, Material Handlers, Utility www.yogavisionaries.com Oak Children’s Bed & Desk $15 Barron’s AP Biology test Worcester County Testimonials/Rates Persons, Conveyor Tenders, Sheeter Operators, Gluer Set Wooden chest, oak table, prep book, 3rd Ed, Incl 2 addiMemorial Park Paxton, MA. marble top table. Good condiOperators and Die Cut Operators. tional practice tests on CD, 2 Lots in the Garden of Faith. tion. Price is negotiable. 774OTHER orig price $30. 508-212-0178. $1500.00 for both. Near the 276-1047 feature. Mary 508-886-4334. Please apply at: Whitney Square, 40 Spruce Street, Suite 206, COMMUNITY Vintage wood rocking chair Leominster, MA 01453 Maytag Washer & Dryer 3 Worc. County Memorial Park w/upholstered seat & pillow. months old. Paid $649 each. barbara.sidilau@expert-staffing.com Paxton, MA Grave sites. 2 FLYING FIELD WANTED $85. Antique wood chair w/upMoving, must sell. Asking 978-798-1610 lots, Good Shepherd. Plot 147, Local RC club is looking for a holstered seat & pillow. $85 $1000. 508-886-6968 field to fly quiet, electric-only graves 3 & 4. $5000.00 each. 508-859-8170 model planes. Land owners B/O Call Kris 508-735-9996 Heavy Duty Prototype PVC who are willing to share their Pipes Hammock Frame w/1 Stunning Diamond space with hobbyists should Worcester County Memorial Our Readers Make Great cloth & 1 rope material, all acEngagement Ring Approx. contact 508-641-3787. Park - Paxton Unit C, section Employees! cessories. $75 978-537-9925 1.25 carats, centered among 8 Heritage II, plots 1 and 2. Tosmaller diamonds. ReplaceCall Michelle today to place day’s price is $6500, asking Golf clubs, bag, cart (used) ment cost $6585, asking your Help Wanted ad! $3500. 508-344-9626 Asking $250. 508-865-5726* $4495. 508-829-3363. 508-829-5981 ext.433

APPLY ONLINE @ APPL JOBS.DEVEREUX.ORG Y APPLY ONLINE @ JOBS.DEVEREUX.ORG

Walk-ins welcome!

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www.centralmassclass.com NOVENAS

HOUSE FOR RENT

Prayer To St. Jude May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be Adored, Glorified, Loved & Preserved throughout the world, now & forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, please pray for us. Saint Jude, Worker of Miracles, please pray for me. Saint Jude, Helper of the Hopeless, please pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day for 9 days, by the 9th day your prayer will be answered even if you don’t believe. This Novena has never been known to fail. publication must be promised. Thank you St. Jude and God. DG

Sterling 3 BR Farmhouse, spacious kitchen, 1.5 baths, oil/hot air heat, town water, great access to Rtes I-90 and 12. Avail 4/1. $1475/mo + util. Ref req. 978-365-4027 evenings

REAL ESTATE

Publisher’s Notice All real estate advertised in this publication is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, the Massachusetts Anti Discrimination Act and the Boston & Cambridge Fair Housing Ordinances which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, ancestry, age, children, marital status, sexual orientation, veterans status or source of income or any intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-827-5005. For the NE area call HUD at 617-994-8300. The toll free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275 or 617-565-5453

We Pay Top Cash For Houses and Land. Any Condition. No Hassle, Fast Closing.

978-423-6529

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WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

AUTOS

OLD G U B ILDIN S T N E CONT D WANTE

AUTOMOTIVE AUTO/MOTORCYCLE 2001 Suzuki Intruder 1500cc, showroom condition, lots of chrome, Vehix pipes. $4000. Call John at 978-466-6043. 1999 Road King Under 8,000 miles. Too many extras to list. Always stored in room temperature. $10,000 obo 978-4645525 or 978-549-3670 cell 2007 Suzuki Boulevard Cruising Motorcycle C90T; 1474cc; 6300 miles, 1 owner, perfect cond. accessories and new battery. Garaged, covered & serviced. $6,000 508-8498635

2008 Honda Metropolitan Scooter Black and gray. Mint cond. 469 miles. Asking $1650.00. Includes helmet. 207-289-9362 OR 207-450-1492. AUTO/VAN 2008 Ford E250 Extended Van 3dr, A-T/AC, Power package. Roof racks. Int. shelving, tow package, 6 rims, 8 tires in good cond. Exc. overall cond. 57K miles. $9,999. 508-8292907

ANTIQUE GOODS AND SALVAGE SHOP Open Saturdays 11AM – 5PM or by appointment

2012 Cadillac CTS AWD, 21,800 miles. Crystal red. Heated black leather seats. Panoramic roof. Dealer maintained. Under warranty. $24,500.00 978-534-8860

18 Ft. Fiberglass Fishing Boat Galvanized roller trailer, 90HP mariner, outboard motor. $1250. Also 14 ft. boat & trailer. $500 508-853-5789. Ask for Stan.

1988 Mercedes-Benz 300 SEL 6 cylinder gas. Very good cond. Runs exc. $3200.00 195k miles. Located in Sutton, MA 774-287-0777

25 HP Suzuki (Like New) with Boat & Trailer Holden area. Pete 407-375-3917 $2,000

468 Auburn St, Cherry Valley, MA Find us on Facebook and Instagram at

Over 40 Acres! Over 3000 Vehicles!

1978 MG MGB 47,000 mi. Green ext. Very solid car from GA. Good overall condition. $7500. Please call 508-7351845.

774-696-3584

USED & NEW AUTO PARTS

FREE Nationwide Parts Locator Service Deposits conveniently taken over the phone. • Foreign & Domestic • Early & Late Model • Engines • Transmissions • New Radiators • Gas Tanks • Wheels • Tires • Balancers • Exhaust Manifolds • Window Motors

Amherst-Oakham AUTO RECYCLING

91 DAY GUARANTEE

CAMPERS/TRAILERS 3 Horse Trailer 2002 Exiss XT/ 300 Gooseneck. Great condition. All alum. S.S. nose. On craigslist pics. $7,995. Paxton. Call Robert at 508-757-0887*

TRY BEFORE YOU BUY!

• Class A, B, C Motor Homes • Trailers Parts • Propane • Service Transportation • Temporary Housing

Fuller RV Rentals & Sales 150 Shrewsbury St., Boylston 508-869-2905 www.fullerrv.com BBB Accredited A+ Rating

Trust us to do it right! Toll Free1-800-992-0441 Fax 508-882-5202 Off Rte 122 • 358 Coldbrook Rd., Oakham, MA www.amherstoakhamauto.com

Worcester No.

508-799-9969 AUTOS

2005 Chrysler Pacifica 6 Cyl., AWD, Good Tires, New Sticker, New Brakes. Very clean. $2300 OBO. 508-736-7385. Ask for Michael.

2001 Ford Focus MECHANICS SPECIAL NEEDS ENGINE SOHC, Automatic, 4 cyl, 4 door, clean interior, straight body, new front brakes/rotors, clean title. First $300 takes it. 508-869-6841

1932 Ford Coupe Little deuce Coupe, with a Corvette mill and four on the floor. 6,000 aprox. mi. Original hot rod, all steel, show car, looks and sounds great. Holden area. $42,000. 407-375-3917

2013 BMW 128i 7K Orig Miles, Grey, 3.0, Automatic, Fully Loaded, Serviced. $16,900. 774-239-0800

1930 Ford Model A Sport Coupe, Grey and Black. 50,000 miles. Holden area. $16,000. 407-375-3917

1997 Mercedes-Benz E-420 Sedan, 4 dr., 8 cyl., 214,000 miles. Silver. $2,995 obo. New tires, brakes & more. Good, quiet engine. Purrs like a kitten. 508-865-5372

1985 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Original low mileage beauty. Recent 350/325 hp engine. Must see! Trophy winner. 774-437-8717 $6,500

• F E B R U A R Y 16 , 2 0 17

BOATS

2014 Chevrolet Spark LT2 20K Mi. Silver 1.2 Auto Remote Start 37 Highway Mpg 32 City A/C C-D Heated Leather Cruise Fully Serviced, Fully Loaded 7,950 774-239-0800

AUTOS

AUTOS

AUTOS

S pecial E vents D irectory 35 Park Ave., Worcester, MA 01605 508-791-2383 • www.ToomeyRents.Com

Tables • Chairs • China • Linen

2003 Chevy Corvette Convertable 50th Anniversary Edition 26,000 miles. Automatic, original owner, always garaged, mint cond. $25,000 firm. 774-696-4187

1999 Pontiac Grand Am 6 Cylinder, automatic, needs work or use for parts. 159,903 miles. $675. 978-422-8084

Food Service Equipment … TOOLS, TOO!

Rent Quality ... Rent Toomey’s!


www.centralmassclass.com LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 508-831-2200 Docket No. WO17C0055CA NOTICE OF PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME In the matter of Andrew Lee West Of Sutton, MA To all persons interested in petition described: A petition has been presented by Jessica M Brigham requesting that: Andrew Lee West be allowed to change his/her/their name as follows: Andrew Jayce Brigham IF YOU DESIRE TO OBJECT THERETO, YOU OR YOUR ATTORNEY MUST FILE A WRITTEN APPEARANCE IN SAID COURT AT: Worcester ON OR BEFORE TEN O’CLOCK IN THE MORNING (10:00 AM) ON: 03/14/2017 WITNESS, Hon.Leilah A Keamy First Justice of this Court DateFebruary 6, 2017 Stephanie K. Fattman Register of Probate 02/16/2017 MS

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 508-831-2200 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION Docket No. WO17P0357EA Estate of: Raymond W. Bridge Date of Death: 11/12/2016 To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Representative has been filed by: Care One at Millbury of Millbury MA requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that: Ladan Azarm of be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve With Personal Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before: 10:00 a.m. on the return day of 03/07/2017. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken without further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised administration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, Hon. Leilah A Keamy, First Justice of this Court. Date: February, 03, 2017 Stephanie K. Fattman, Register of Probate 02/16/2017 MSC

Worcester Housing Authority RETAINING WALL REPLACEMENT AT 4 CHENEY STREET 705-1 Main South Gardens DHCD #348136 WHA Job No. 2016-09 Public Notification for Written Quotes The Worcester Housing Authority, the Awarding Authority, invites written quotes from Contractors for Retaining Wall Replacement at 4 Cheney Street at 705-1 Main South Gardens (WHA Job No. 2016-09) in Worcester, Massachusetts, in accordance with the documents prepared by Graves Engineering, Inc. The project consists of replacing an existing retaining wall. The work is estimated to cost $22,650.00. Quotes are subject to M.G.L. c.30 §39M & to minimum wage rates as required by M.G.L. c.l49 §§26 to 27H inclusive. A pre-bid conference will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, February 16, 2017 at 4 Cheney Street, Worcester, MA 01610 at which time bidders will be invited to visit the project site with a Worcester Housing Authority representative. Quotes will be received until 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 23, 2017 and publicly opened, forthwith. The exact time will be determined by the cellular phone of the person opening the bids. All quotes should be delivered to: Worcester Housing Authority, 81 Tacoma Street, Worcester, MA 01605 and received no later than the date & time specified above. Quote forms and Contract Documents will be made available by emailing Mod-Bids@worcester-housing.com. Indicate “2016-09” in the subject line, and provide your name, company name, address, phone number, and email address in the email. Hard copies will be made available on Wednesday, February 8, 2017 at the Worcester Housing Authority, Department of Modernization, 81 Tacoma Street, Worcester, MA 01605 and thereafter, Monday thru Friday 8:00 A.M. through 4:30 P.M. Copies of the contract documents may be obtained by depositing $50.00 in the form of a company check, made payable to the Worcester Housing Authority, for each set of documents so obtained. The amount of the deposit will be refunded to each persons who returns the plans, specifications and other documents in good conditions within (10) days after bid opening. Bidders requesting contract documents to be mailed to them should include a separate check in the amount of $40.00 for each set payable to the Worcester Housing Authority to cover mailing and handling costs. The contract documents may be seen, but not removed at: 1. Worcester Housing Authority, Department of Modernization, 81 Tacoma Street, Worcester, MA 01605. 2. Joseph Merritt & Co www.merrittgraphics.com 3. CMD www.cmdgroup.com/Home 4. Project Dog www.projectdog.com Questions regarding this project shall be submitted in writing 72 hours prior to opening and emailed to Mod-Bids@worcester-housing.com. Reference the WHA Job Number only in the subject line.

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS (SEAL) LAND COURT DEPARTMENT OF THE TRIAL COURT 16SM012128 ORDER OF NOTICE To: Christopher R. Patterson; Lynn A. Patterson and to all persons entitled to the benefit of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, 50 U.S.C.c. 50 §3901 et seq.: Wells Fargo Financial Massachusetts, Inc claiming to have an interest in a Mortgage covering real property in Millbury, 39 Lincoln Avenue Extension, given by Christopher R. Patterson and Lynn A. Patterson to Wells Fargo Financial Massachusetts, Inc., dated May 5, 2005, and recorded in the Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds in Book 36315, Page 233, has/have filed with this court a complaint for determination of Defendant’s/ Defendants’ Servicemembers status. If you now are, or recently have been, in the active military service of the United States of America, then you may be entitled to the benefits of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. If you object to a foreclosure of the above-mentioned property on that basis, then you or your attorney must file a written appearance and answer in this court at Three Pemberton Square, Boston, MA 02108 on or before March 20, 2017 or you will be forever barred from claiming that you are entitled to the benefits of said Act. Witness, JUDITH C. CUTLER, Chief Justice of said Court on February 2, 2017 Attest: Deborah J. Patterson Recorder 201611-0462-YEL 02/16/17 MSC

NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Donald R. Daly and Maureen A. Daly to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., dated May 25, 2007 and recorded with the Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds at Book 41245, Page 284, of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder by assignment from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. to The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWABS Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-10 dated October 4, 2011 and recorded with said registry on October 24, 2011 at Book 48001 Page 233 and by assignment from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of the CWABS Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-10 dated May 15, 2014 and recorded with said registry on May 27, 2014 at Book 52358 Page 81, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing, the same will be sold at Public Auction at 11:00 a.m. on March 10, 2017, on the mortgaged premises located at 7 WEST ST, MILLBURY, Worcester County, Massachusetts, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, TO WIT: A certain parcel of land situated in Millbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts on the southerly side of West Street and is bounded as follows: Commencing at the northeast corner of the premise at a point on a line of said street; thence S. 20 deg. 15’’ E. with land now or formerly of one Edward A. Taylor 92.75 feet to a stake at the fence at land of one Proctor; thence S. 71 deg. 55’’ W. with the fence and said Proctor’s land 77.75 feet to the land of one Stewart; thence N. 27 deg. 19’’ W. with said land 52.8 feet to the land now or formerly of W.A. Harris; thence N. 67 deg. E. with said Harris’ land 27 feet; thence N. 24 deg. 20’’ W. with said Harris’ land to the line of said West Street, 38.5 feet; thence N. 69 deg. 45’’ E. with said street line 60 feet to the place of beginning. For title reference see deed recorded in Book 17816, Page 339 For mortgagor’s(s’) title see deed recorded with Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds in Book 17816, Page 339. These premises will be sold and conveyed subject to and with the benefit of all rights, rights of way, restrictions, easements, covenants, liens or claims in the nature of liens, improvements, public assessments, any and all unpaid taxes, tax titles, tax liens, water and sewer liens and any other municipal assessments or liens or existing encumbrances of record which are in force and are applicable, having priority over said mortgage, whether or not reference to such restrictions, easements, improvements, liens or encumbrances is made in the deed. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of Five Thousand ($5,000.00 ) Dollars by certified or bank check will be required to be paid by the purchaser at the time and place of sale. The balance is to be paid by certified or bank check at Harmon Law Offices, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, Massachusetts 02458, or by mail to P.O. Box 610389, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 02461-0389, within thirty (30) days from the date of sale. Deed will be provided to purchaser for recording upon receipt in full of the purchase price. The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this publication. Other terms, if any, to be announced at the sale. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-10, Present holder of said mortgage By its Attorneys, HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, MA 02458 (617) 558-0500 201603-0114 - PRP

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www.centralmassclass.com LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES MILLBURY PLANNING BOARD PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the Millbury Planning Board will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, February 27, 2017, at 7:15 p.m., in the Municipal Office Building, 127 Elm Street, Millbury, MA, in regard to a proposed amendment to the Millbury Zoning Bylaws, Section 14 Special Permits to delete subsection 14.9, Associate Member, in its entirety. The proposed amendment to the Millbury Zoning Bylaws is available for review in the Planning Department during normal business hours. Anyone wishing to be heard on this matter should appear at the time and place specified above. Richard Gosselin Chairman

WORCESTER HOUSING AUTHORITY ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS February 16, 2017 SEALED BIDS shall be received at the Purchasing Office, 69 Tacoma Street., Worcester, MA 01605 IFBs may be picked up at the location above or may be downloaded from our website: www.worcester-housing.com/purchasing, or call (508) 635-3203, TDD (508) 798-4530. Bidders are responsible for ensuring they have received any/all addenda prior to submitting a bid.

TOWN OF MILLBURY BOARD OF APPEALS In accordance with Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws and the Zoning Ordinances of the Town of Millbury, a public hearing will be held in the hearing room of the Municipal Office Building, 127 Elm St, Millbury, MA on: Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017 at: 7:25 p.m. To act on a petition from: Carla Rodrigues, 32 Pleasant Lane, Boylston, MA 01505 For a Special Permit for twelve (12) stall kennel in the Millbury Zoning Ordinance relative to; Property at Lot 2 Plan Book 919 Plan 125 McCracken Rd., Millbury, MA; Map# 34, Lot# 30, Book# 55550, Page# 188, Suburban-1. To construct a kennel that will house up to twelve (12) dogs. The kennel is to house the petitioners own dogs and the kennel will not be used for the boarding of dogs for the general public, (commercial use). The proposed use is allowed use in a Suburban I Zone by a Special Permit. All interested parties are invited to attend. Paul Nigosian, Chairman Millbury Board of Appeals

TOWN OF MILLBURY BOARD OF APPEALS In accordance with Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws and the Zoning Ordinances of the Town of Millbury, a public hearing will be held in the hearing room of the Municipal Office Building, 127 Elm St, Millbury, MA on: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at: 7:05 p.m. To act on a petition from: Ronald & Martha Boudreau, 32 Autumn Gate Circle, Millbury, MA For a Variance for frontage in the Millbury Zoning Ordinance relative to; Property at 32 Autumn Gate Circle, Millbury, MA formerly known as 118 Grafton St also know as Lot A and B on a plan entitled “A Definitive Subdivision Plan” located in Millbury; Map# 48, Lot# 88, 30 Autumn Gate Circle and Map #48, Lot #16 & 32 Autumn Gate Circle, duly Recorded at the Worcester Registry of Deeds Book# 22117, Page# 268. Both Lots A and B fail to meet the minimum standards for zoning and frontage as required by Section 23.33 of the Zoning By-laws for property located within an S-3 zone. 150 feet of frontage is required by the By-laws, Lot A has 146.70 feet frontage the difference is less than 3.30 feet. The proposed Lot B contains 35.30 feet of frontage, 114.70 feet short of the required minimum frontage. Petitioner requires a variance to create two non-conforming lots. Petitioner had a variance granted on November 2nd, 2005, which lapsed. All interested parties are invited to attend. Paul Nigosian, Chairman Millbury Board of Appeals

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Separate awards will be made for each IFB. WHA reserves the right to reject any or all responses, in whole or in part, deemed to be in their best interest. Award of all contracts is subject to the approval of the WHA Executive Director or Board of Commissioners. The Operating Agency shall indemnify and hold harmless the WHA and its officers or agents from any and all third party claims arising from activities under these Agreements as set forth in MGL c.258, section 2 as amended. Bid No. Release Date Project Title Bid Surety Bid Opening 17-04 2/16/2017 Asbestos Floor Tile Removal 10:00 AM March 14, 2017 Pre-Bid Conference at Purchasing Dept, 69 Tacoma St, Worc MA 10:00 AM March 2, 2017 Jackson Restrepo Chief Procurement Officer Visit our website at: www.worcester-housing.com/purchasing

• F E B R U A R Y 16 , 2 0 17

TO ALL INTERESTED INHABITANTS OF THE TOWN OF SUTTON In accordance with the provisions of M.G.L. Ch. 40A, §11, the Zoning Board of Appeals will hold a public hearing at the Sutton Town Hall on March 2, 2017 at 7:30pm on the petition of Albert Weems. The petitioner is requesting a Special Permit as it pertains to I.C.3.d of the Town’s Zoning Bylaws to construct a detached garage. The property that is the subject of this petition is located at 143 Leland Hill Road as shown on Assessors Map #19, Parcel #67. The property is located in the R-1 Zoning District. A copy of the petition may be inspected during normal office hours in the Town Clerk’s Office located in the Town Hall. Any person interested or wishing to be heard on this variance petition should appear at the time and place designated. Brittanie Reinold Board of Appeals Clerk

TOWN OF MILLBURY BOARD OF APPEALS In accordance with Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws and the Zoning Ordinances of the Town of Millbury, a public hearing will be held in the hearing room of the Municipal Office Building, 127 Elm St, Millbury, MA on: Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017 at: 8:00 p.m. To act on a petition from: Clearview Country Club, 66 Park Hill Ave., Millbury, MA 01527, For an appeal of the decision by the Town of Millbury Building Inspector dated November 9 and December 1, 2016 to install netting and signage or close the golf course; deed is recorded at the Worcester Registry of Deeds in Book 15071; Page 393, 66 Park Hill Rd., Millbury, MA; Maps: 21, 22 & 28; Lots: 36 -39, 41 – 74, 58 – 82 & 98; Suburban-4. All interested parties are invited to attend. Paul Nigosian, Chairman Millbury Board of Appeals

NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Wayne W. Gasco, Angela Gardner, a/k/a Angela Gasco to Household Finance Corporation II dated July 26, 1997, recorded at the Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds in Book 19029, Page 158; said mortgage was then assigned to U.S. Bank Trust, N.A., as Trustee for LSF9 Master Participation Trust by virtue of an assignment dated February 5, 2015, and recorded in Book 53358, Page 358; of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder for breach of conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at PUBLIC AUCTION at 12:00 PM on March 14, 2017, on the mortgaged premises. This property has the address of 23 West Street, Millbury, MA 01527. The entire mortgaged premises, all and singular, the premises as described in said mortgage: That certain lot or parcel of land with any buildings thereon located in the Municipality of Millbury, Worcester County, State of Mass; bounded and described as referenced below. Beginning on the southerly side of West Street at a stone monument about fifty- three and twenty hundredths (53.20) feet easterly from the intersection of the easterly line of Water Street with the southerly line of West Street; Thence southerly by  land of one Amedee about one hundred five and five tenths  (105.5) feet to a  stone monument at land of one Turgeon; Thence by  said Turgeon land sixty- two (62) feet to a stone monument at land of one Squire; Thence by said Squire land one hundred nine and five tenths (109.5) feet to a stone monument on the southerly side of West Street; Thence by said West Street sixty-five and thirty-five hundredths (65.35) feet to the place of beginning. Subject to and with the benefit of any and/or all rights, restrictions, covenants and easements of record, insofar as the same may be in force and applicable. For title see deed dated 1- 18-95 from Carl F. Gasco, Nancy L. Gasco & Wayne M . Gasco, to Wayne M. Gasco & Angela Gardner, recorded in the Worcester County Registry of Deeds Book 17619, Page 119. Subject to and with the benefit of easements, reservation, restrictions, and taking of record, if any, insofar as the same are now in force and applicable.  In the event of any typographical error set forth herein in the legal description of the premises, the description as set forth and contained in the mortgage shall control by reference.  Together with all the improvements now or hereafter erected on the property and all easements, rights, appurtenances, rents, royalties, mineral, oil and gas rights and profits, water rights and stock and all fixtures now or hereafter a part of the property. All replacements and additions shall also be covered by this sale. Terms of Sale:  Said premises will be sold subject to any and all unpaid taxes and assessments, tax sales, tax titles and other municipal liens and water or sewer liens and State or County transfer fees, if any there are, and TEN THOUSAND DOLLARS ($10,000.00) in cashier’s or certified check will be required to be paid by the purchaser at the time and place of the sale as a deposit and the balance in cashier’s or certified check will be due in thirty (30) days, at the offices of Doonan, Graves & Longoria, LLC, (“DG&L”), time being of the essence.  The Mortgagee reserves the right to postpone the sale to a later date by public proclamation at the time and date appointed for the sale and to further postpone at any adjourned sale-date by public proclamation at the time and date appointed for the adjourned sale date.  The premises is to be sold subject to and with the benefit of all easements, restrictions, leases, tenancies, and rights of possession, building and zoning laws, encumbrances, condominium liens, if any and all other claim in the nature of liens, if any there be. In the event that the successful bidder at the foreclosure sale shall default in purchasing the within described property according to the terms of this Notice of Sale and/or the terms of the Memorandum of Sale executed at the time of foreclosure, the Mortgagee reserves the right to sell the property by foreclosure deed to the second highest bidder, providing that said second highest bidder shall deposit with the Mortgagee’s attorneys, the amount of the required deposit as set forth herein.  If the second highest bidder declines to purchase the within described property, the Mortgagee reserves the right to purchase the within described property at the amount bid by the second highest bidder.  The foreclosure deed and the consideration paid by the successful bidder shall be held in escrow by DG&L, (hereinafter called the “Escrow Agent”) until the deed shall be released from escrow to the successful bidder at the same time as the consideration is released to the Mortgagee, whereupon all obligations of the Escrow Agent shall be deemed to have been properly fulfilled and the Escrow Agent shall be discharged.  Other terms, if any, to be announced at the sale. Dated: February 10, 2017 U.S. Bank Trust, N.A., as Trustee for LSF9 Master Participation Trust By its Attorney DOONAN, GRAVES & LONGORIA, LLC, 100 Cummings Center Suite 225D Beverly, MA  01915 (978) 921-2670 www.dgandl.com 53281 (GASCO) FEI # 1078.02041 02/16/2017, 02/23/2017, 03/02/2017


Two minutes with...

Worcester Magazine interns ELIZABETH BROOKS

Worcester Magazine is proud to offer a robust internship program to area students. College students are welcome, but we’ve taken high school-age interns into the fold as well. Currently, we have three terrific young interns. Lillian Cohen is a senior at Doherty Memorial High School. Diana Holiner and Kendall Korengold are students with the Dynamy Program here in Worcester. All three are playing an integral part of getting Worcester Magazine out to our readers, whether compiling information for our special, upcoming Spring Arts Preview, helping with interviews or putting together stories of their own. This week, we wanted to find out a little bit more about them. Where are you from? L.C.: Worcester D.H.: Dover K.K.: Washington, D.C. How did you end up in Worcester? L.C.: I was born here and continue to live nearby.

D.H.: The Dynamy internship year program. K.K.: The Dynamy internship year program.

Is the newsroom what you expected it to be? L.C.: It’s a lot less tense. The environment

created by the publication is very welcoming and always open to ideas of its interns and employees. D.H.: I agree with what Lilli said. It’s a lot less tense than I expected it to be and the environment is very welcoming. K.K.: I imagined it to be a stressful and pressure-packed environment.

What made you want to intern with Worcester Do you think you’ll pursue a career in Magazine? journalism? L.C.: Going into college next year, I L.C.: Absolutely. I was already pretty

wanted to get a firm grasp on my field of interest and therefore gain some valuable experience. D.H.: I’ve always been interested in writing, and more recently journalism, and I wanted to get more experience with the journalism field. K.K.: Pursuing journalism has always been an aspiration of mine and I finally found the opportunity to explore it.

certain beforehand, but this internship has been a truly enriching experience, validating my aspirations of a future career in journalism. D.H.: Definitely, yes. I think that journalism is really important, especially in this day and age. I didn’t always think that I wanted to be in the journalism field, but over the past year, it has become increasingly clear to me that I would really enjoy working in the field. How has the internship gone so far? K.K.: I definitely want to continue to L.C.: Good. I have written a few articles for pursue journalism; however, I may the publication, one of which ended up as experiment with different types of jobs in the cover story. It’s been a great working the field. and learning experience. D.H.: I think it’s going very well. I enjoy Has the internship given you a unique writing and working at Worcester appreciation for the city of Worcester? Magazine. L.C.: Growing up in Worcester, it’s all K.K.: I enjoy my time here very much. My I’ve ever known. I thought that I knew coworkers are helpful and the atmosphere Worcester, but coming to this internship is welcoming and comfortable. Our boss, has given me an entire different Walter Bird Jr., is generous with the perspective on the city and what it has to work he gives us and provides a safe offer. environment to ensure that we have a D.H.: Yes, I think that before I started memorable and worthwhile experience. I wasn’t as aware of things that were going on in Worcester, but I feel like this

internship has opened my eyes to things that are happening in the city. K.K.: Yes. By reading Worcester Magazine and keeping up with current events, I was given a chance to get to know where I live a little better and feel closer to the city.

What do you do for fun in Worcester? L.C.: I’m on the board of my synagogue

youth organization, and we do lots of cool things, like skating downtown and different community projects. D.H.: Mostly, I hang out with my roommates. Sometimes, I go to Boston.

Which do you like do you like better: Boston or Worcester? D.H.: They’re different, so, I like them both in different ways.

What is biggest thing you’ve learned through your internship? L.C.: I think I’ve learned to just overall write well.

D.H.: I’ve learned how to work more on a

deadline basis. Most of the things I did before didn’t have any deadlines. K.K.: On the second day, I really couldn’t speak up. I had to make a bunch of phone calls, and I don’t really know how to speak to people.

What is the weirdest thing you’ve overhead or seen in the newsroom? L.C.: Why is there a picture of a pantless guy on the ceiling?

D.H.: When [Walter] said [he] would kiss Dave Matthews for backstage tickets.

K.K.: Probably the weird nicknames you

Kendall, what do you do for fun in Worcester? guys have for people. K.K.: I like to explore different restaurants. I like to see local bands. Any advice to a future intern? L.C.: Enjoy the experience and take every What are your favorite restaurants in opportunity given to you. It’ll help you in Worcester? the long-run. This is the beginning of a K.K.: deadhorse hill. I used to go my career. Be serious about it. guy friends to Hooters to see all the D.H.: Stay motivated, determined, and meatheads. They actually gave me card to be a waitress. It was really funny.

Did you apply? K.K.: No. After that, we stopped going,

because we saw a lot of girls being harassed.

don’t be afraid to step outside of your comfort zone. K.K.: Ask every question you have.

- Tom Matthews and Walter Bird Jr. FEBRUARY 16, 2017 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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• FEBRUARY 16, 2017


Worcester Magazine February 16 - 22, 2017