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insidestories

he idea of schools as social service agencies is not a one-sided one. In an ideal world, outside shelters and agencies would be able to quickly identify and help every homeless student. Well, in an ideal world there would be no homelessness, so let’s call that world one level below ideal. Unfortunately, we live in a world that is several dozen levels below ideal, and Worcester Public Schools are dealing with a student body that, in addition to large numbers of low-income students, is around 10 percent homeless. And even though they might not all meet the stereotype, “couchsurfing” or doubling up is no way for someone to live when they have to deal with the normal stresses of getting an education. So, in lieu of an immediate solution – or moving to an ideal world – what is WPS doing taking care of some of its most vulnerable members? We hope this week’s cover story can at least remind people of the many faces of homelessness. - Tom Quinn, reporter

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{ citydesk }

December 1 - 7, 2016 n Volume 42, Number 14

New investment program banks on revitalization in Worcester

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Tom Quinn

for homeowners, part of a push – backed by Unibank but talked about by officials from the private sector and government for years – to local bank is setting up a “socially responsible banking program” exclusively boost home ownership, which has been shown for Worcester residents, with a $5-million to reduce crime and improve neighborhoods as people become financially invested in their kickstart and hopes to spur community community. For community development involvement in Worcester’s revitalization. projects, undertaken by nonprofits Unibank Officials with Unibank, a Central hopes to work with, the savings on closing Massfinancial institution with 13 locations costs could be $2,500. It’s all part of the idea in the Blackstone Valley and Worcester areas, that the bank should make it easier for people say the “Invest Worcester” program is their to invest in their community, not harder. way of giving back to the community. “Gateway cities thrive when there’s “We’ve been in Worcester for a few years now, and we’ve always been pretty bullish on partnerships between private businesses, nonprofits and government,” Wally said. “We Worcester,” Unibank President and CEO Bill feel like this is a perfect example of coming Mahoney said. “There’s a lot of potential for economic development. Obviously we want to together.” The exciting part of the whole thing, play a role in that.” at least for those within city limits, is the According to Mahoney, Invest Worcester will focus on three pillars: affordable housing, Worcester-specific clause. The program is only available to Worcester residents, Worcester community development and small business businesses and Worcester nonprofits. development. At its core will be a lending “We’re doing it to allow the community program that will offer “superior” rates with to help build Worcester with us,” Mahoney the hope of spurring economic development said. “... the whole idea is to demonstrate our in the Heart of the Commonwealth. commitment to the community.” “The economic development happening And while Worcester was hit hard by in Worcester – there’s a lot of private dollars the financial crisis, with home ownership going into projects in Worcester,” Unibank Vice President of Government and Community dropping steeply, Unibank officials say they are equally excited about the potential to Affairs Matt Wally said. “... we want to make boost small businesses, the cornerstone of the sure homeowners, small businesses and Worcester jobs market. developers have access to capital.” “We know how important the large Additional benefits to the program businesses are to Worcester, but we also know include $750 off closing costs for a house

A

Employees of Unibank volunteer with Habitat for Humanity. that the majority of people are employed by small businesses,” Wally said. “And we want to invest in them.” Of course, dishing out loans with superior rates and cash off closing costs takes money – lots of it, if the program is as successful

WOO-TOWN INDE X If you weren’t at the Blue Plate in Holden for Doug Moore’s return to Wilbur & The Dukes, you missed a good one. +3

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Five Finger Death Punch, as reported by the T&G’s Victor Infante, cuts short a show at DCU over “mental moment.” Did singer lie about his mother dying? -1

WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM • DECEMBER 1, 2016

Six Southbridge firefighters honored for heroic actions in two separate incidents. +2

continued on page 6

+6

Total for this week:

A weekly quality of life check-in of Worcester

Worcester military veteran given World War II blanket to replace one he used years ago to cover a woman hit by a car. The woman died, and the man never saw his blanket again. +1

as Unibank is hoping. The company is committing to lending “at least” $5 million, but if everything goes according to plan, the actual figure could be much higher. Anyone – an individual, a business or a nonprofit –

Judging by the pictures, councilors left grudges behind to team up as the City Hallers and serve Thanksgiving dinner at the Senior Center. Aww, that’s nice! +2

Big Larry billboard continues to annoy one Worcester Magazine staffer (his initials are TQ) whose window peers out directly at the rooftop sign on Shrewsbury Street. -1

Salvation Army bell ringing at Worcester Wal-Mart a great success, thanks to generous shoppers. +3

Leaf collection in a Lincoln Street-area neighborhood sees truck tear up several pieces of curbing, dumping them along the sidewalk in front of another house. -3


{ citydesk } Council benches idea of anonymous donations Tom Quinn

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orcester’s parks are full of benches dedicated to loved ones or community members as part of a city program where residents can pay around $2,000 to honor someone of their choosing. At-Large City Councilor Konnie Lukes this week stood up for anyone who may have looked at a bench and worried the city did not do due diligence in vetting the moral character of the person honored, even floating the idea of doing away with named donations entirely, a suggestion nixed by the rest of the Council. “This problem can be solved very easily by not attaching a name to the donation,” Lukes said. “If people want to make donations we’ll accept them for a specific purpose without labeling it as belonging to an institution or a corporation or an individual … then we wouldn’t have this vetting problem.” City Manager Ed Augustus Jr., though, said donations to the city — for other park installations as well as benches — were important for saving taxpayer money, citing a Rotary Club donation providing money for the bridge at Elm Park. All the city would have to do in return was recognize the organization with a plaque, he said. “We could have the taxpayers pay for the $50,000 for the bridge, as opposed to accepting a generous gift and have a modest plaque … I would hate to have us forgo that opportunity,” Augustus said. “I think we can make a judgment call on these things.” Augustus said “a number” of donations were being held up because of the dispute over the policy. The dispute did not start with the Rotary Club, though. No one mentioned it by name, but the saga of a Crystal Park bench was referenced multiple times. The family of Juan “Nunski” Shippee went through what were at the time the normal channels to get a bench put in bearing Shippee’s name in 2014, and

even buried the ashes of the Main South resident underneath before construction. But the memorial drew the ire of local activist Billy Breault and his Main South Alliance for Public Safety, with Breault blaming the bench for drawing gang activity to the area in meetings at the time and Lukes reiterating that argument in 2016, making reference to the “questionable reputation” of the memorialized. Those criticisms were dismissed by police at the time, who said the increased violence was not linked to the bench. Shippee died when he was 20 from complications related to a blood condition. His only arrest was for trespassing

at Clark University, and family and friends defended the South High graduate, saying he was never affiliated with a gang and did not deserve to have his reputation dragged through the mud. “It was sad to see the mother having to kind of relive that,” District 4 Councilor Sarai Rivera, who represents the area around Crystal Park, said. “... it kind of comes back to a level of hype.” The Crystal Park incident did not go unmarked by the city, though. The policy for “gifts, plaques, benches and monuments” shown to the City Council included a requirement for a report from the Chief of

Police in addition to a recommendation from the Parks and Recreation Commission, both of which would be sent to the City Manager. The manager would then make a recommendation to the City Council, which would approve or deny the donation. “It seemed like people wanted an investigation of anybody who was going to have something named [after them], and some reassurance that we’re not going to put inappropriate memorials in public parks,” Augustus said, in a building that shares a plot with the famously suggestive “Turtle Boy” statue. continued on page 7

DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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{ citydesk } UniBank continued from page 4

part of showing a commitment to Worcester — although if things go well, Unibank could establish similar programs in other communities. “If it works well in Worcester, it’s certainly something we would roll out in other communities,” Unibank Senior Vice President of Marketing Janet Amorello said. “We hope PHOTO SUBMITTED it will be a huge success. We’re hoping there’s a demand.” Local officials are also excited about the program, saying that any additional free cash could only help speed the recovery of the housing market and the drive for more small businesses. “Anytime there’s discretionary income to help small business development or home ownership, those are tools in the toolbox that can make things happen,” Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Tim Murray said. “... If [small businesses] can show a path forward with those microloans, sometimes that’s all that’s needed for them to get traditional funding, to get the And it’s not a charity — community ball rolling.” members will get a “premium rate of interest,” according to Unibank, which is still Reporter Tom Quinn can be reached finalizing final rates on many plans. One rate is set, though — a 1.722-percent rate for small at 508-749-3166 x324 or tquinn@ worcestermagazine.com with story ideas, businesses, mirroring the date Worcester was established as a town — June 14, 1722. It’s all feedback, or questions. Follow him on Twitter @bytomquinn. can put money into the Invest Worcester savings account, providing a bigger pool to draw from. “The dollars deposited here aren’t going to Wall Street,” Wally said. “We want to return the dollars to Worcester in a socially responsible way.”

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DECEMBER 7, 2016 NEC SYMPHONIC WINDS & CHAMBER SINGERS WITH U.S. NAVY BAND NORTHEAST This annual holiday concert serves up the spirit of the season in a big way. Bill Drury and Erica Washburn from New England Conservatory conduct a broad repertoire and holiday cheer. The students will be joined by Navy Band Northeast, a 35-musician ensemble based on board NAVSTA Newport and one of 11 official U.S. Navy bands worldwide.

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BENCHES continued from page 5

The city’s top lawyer pushed back on the idea of invasive background checks, saying it raises legal questions the city would rather avoid. “Our primary concern is how far do we dig in terms of the background of the individual being desired to be memorialized?” City Solicitor David Moore said. “That raises some privacy questions.” Legal issues aside, Augustus expressed distaste for hard-line bench memorial policies, saying the matter was best resolved with “common sense” and judgment calls rather than overly restrictive mandates. “It is a slippery slope,” Augustus said. “... If the standard is ‘have you ever been arrested,’ then we can’t have anything named after Martin Luther King in any park. So I don’t think that’s the right standard … I’m urging not to have a straitjacket, a one size fits all set of criteria.” Lukes’ motion to eliminate names from donations and her motion to send the policy back to the manager for revisions both failed when all 10 of her colleagues voted against her. The Parks and Recreation Commission has a hearing about the policy scheduled for Dec. 15 at 6:30 p.m. in the Department of Public Works office at 50 Skyline Drive. Reporter Tom Quinn can be reached at 508-749-3166 x324 or tquinn@ worcestermagazine.com with story ideas, feedback, or questions.

Rewind: 40 Years of News, Entertainment and More

{ citydesk }

Worcester long a stage for protesters

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orcester is no stranger to protests and public demonstrations. Indeed, well before the first shot was fired in the Battles of Lexington and Concord, on Sept. 6, 1774, more than 4,600 militiamen from 35 towns marched down Main Street in Worcester, rejecting British Authority. The city has seen many uprisings since then – against government authority on the local, state or national level; against international crises; against the treatment of particular groups of people. If there is a cause, there is quite likely more than a few people in Worcester ready and willing to champion it. On Dec. 1, 1990, some 500 people

marched on City Hall Plaza to protest American involvement in the Middle East. At the time, Operation Desert Shield was in being carried out. It would give way a little more than a month later to Operation Desert Storm. Worcester Magazine reported on it then, as it has several times since then on similar efforts, such as a Black Lives Matter rally down Main Street and into Lincoln Square at the height of outrage over police shootings of black men like Michael Brown. The demonstration of freedom of speech and the right to gather and demonstrate peacefully

is one of the principles of being an American. In Worcester, where so many college students reside several months out of the year, protests and rallies are a common site. Most recently, several Clark University students and supporters convened in front of City Hall before marching along Main Street to protest the election of Donald Trump as president. Sometimes, the protesters are ridiculed and maligned on local blogs and comment sections of local news web sites. No matter what, the right to protest in public is fiercely guarded and cherished. In Worcester, where some say the American Revolution truly started, a revolution of thought, discourse and action proudly continues more tan 200 years later. - Walter Bird Jr.

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Massachusetts Secretary of State released official numbers on the election this week, and while nothing really changed, it does give an opportunity to check in on Worcester’s own candidate for President of the United States. That’s right – Bill Feegbeh, who has run for mayor and City Council in Worcester in addition to campaigning at various times for U.S. Congress and State Senate, probably among others – was on the presidential ballot this year. He dropped off a news release on his campaign earlier this year, which featured lines ranging from “No war in US and I will bring peace in US and around the world” to “Improve housing and No gay, No lesbians in US and the world.” Think that can’t fly in Massachusetts? Think again, as 28 people cast ballots for Feegbeh and running mate Steve O’Brien, allegedly from Spencer. Feegbeh tied, as a write-in candidate, fellow write-in Laurence Kotlikoff, a supposedly serious Boston University professor who was featured on such media outlets as FiveThirtyEight. If you believe in the democratic process, that means Massachusetts voters registered an equal amount of approval for both men’s campaigns. He also beat write-in candidate Marshall Schoenke, whose website states “I will be your choice to break the two party system you can write in your vote and it will legally count.” Hypothetically it would, although his ticket got zero votes in Massachusetts. Will Feegbeh’s strong performance lead to momentum for his next Worcester run? Stay tuned.

VOW OF SILENCE: The Rotary Club gave the city a big donation this week to help out with Recreation Worcester and the fight against opioids. And while that’s all

very nice, and I understand they do this with some regularity and should be applauded, it’s the left-most man in the photo who we want to highlight. That’s Frank Nathan, a City Hall regular who attends City Council meetings with impressive regularity. He said he’s been going to meetings on and off since the 1980s, and remembers such historic Worcester events as the Council going into executive five times – by his recollection – to try to thin the audience during the Medical City war. But unlike his fellow Council regulars, who have almost single-handedly caused the Council to reevaluate their rules for public participation, Nathan has never once stepped up to the microphone, he said. That’s a sharp departure from how most of the public treats Council, which is somewhere between an open mic night and a therapy session. But Nathan will have his name listed on the City Council minutes for this week’s meeting, after stating his name during a roll call of Rotary Club representatives during the presentation of the giant novelty check. At the rate he’s going, Nathan’s next public speaking event will be in 2046. And at the rate the Council is going, he’ll be able to weigh in on where Worcester should locate its first dog park.

YO, BRO, PROJO: The latest article about Worcester that has the local tourism machine popping champagne is the Providence Journal’s “Rejuvenating Worcester brimming with arts, culture and nightlife.” Usually, articles about Worcester from out-of-towners are cringe worthy, but this one actually isn’t bad, if a little overly cheery. The author hits nearly every business on the Destination Worcester wishlist, from the EcoTarium to British Beer Company. Worcester, according to ProJo, has a number of places that “combine past glories with enlightened and energetic confidence in its future.” Chamber of Commerce leader Tim Murray also tosses Providence a bone, saying Worcester’s renaissance is inspired in part by the work of the late Buddy Cianci, popular Providence mayor and twice-convicted felon. And while the article is seeping with positivity, because the Associated Press style book requires articles about Worcester to make reference to the level of grittiness present, the author does mention that the trip from the Canal District to Shrewsbury Street was a “somewhat gritty walk.” Hey, no arguments here. There is also a reference to the Turtle Boy statue being the “unofficial mascot of Worcester,” which is also probably accurate.


{ worcesteria } THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT: The Mount Carmel Preservation Society has raised $23,000 in addition to $95,000 in pledges, according to MCPS President Mauro DePasquale. That’s important because for the first time since the Historical Commission refused to grant the Catholic Diocese of Worcester a demolition delay waiver, there has been some positive movement toward saving the historic Italian-American church. The city’s Municipal Operations Committee recently recommended creating a local historic district that would encompass the church, a recommendation that will go to the full City Council. But if the ball gets rolling, and rolls fast enough, Mount Carmel could be protected the same way houses in Crown Hill or Montvale are. The church has already started making repairs, and the city has said if it is made safe the church – which has been closed since May due to structural problems probably caused by proximity to I-290 – does not have to be torn down. It’s worth noting that while MCPS, a grassroots group of citizens upset with the Diocese’s condemning of Mount Carmel, has raised almost the full $120,000 to do work on the facade, that does not address additional repairs the Diocese has said are necessary, and DePasquale said they are working on a “sustainability plan” after church officials pointed out that attendance – and thus income – is down, a problem for churches everywhere, but especially one that needs a steady stream of cash for renovations. There’s no point in spending all this money to restore the church, the argument goes, if no one attends services once it opens. MCPS is pushing forward though – tickets have to be purchased in advance, but there is a Christmas party and fundraiser at Union Station on Dec. 11, and an informational meeting on Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. at 172 Shrewsbury St. GOOD BONDAGE: The city’s Fitch bond rating went up to its highest-ever level this week, as the ratings agency upgraded Worcester to AA (stable). This means lower borrowing costs, as an exuberant city press release notes, meaning potentially millions of tax dollars saved when funding infrastructure projects. This is related to the $1-billion rise in the total property value of the city, and to paraphrase former City Councilor Rick Rushton, it’s a bad week for politicians harping on the idea that Worcester needs saving. “The City’s steady revenue growth combined with prudent fiscal policies and conservative budgeting practices has led to consistently positive operating results,” according to Fitch, which joins the other two major ratings agencies in assigning a number of letters and numbers that mean “stable” to Worcester. VEGAN SHOUTOUT: People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, an animal advocacy

group with a superb marketing machine, released a list of the “Vegan Soul Food Restaurants That Will Blow Your Mind,” vegan soul food “sweeping the nation,” according to them. And making the list of 16 was Worcester’s own Belmont Vegetarian, a destination for vegetarians and vegans in central Massachusetts. Not much detail was given, but if you’re in that lifestyle, you’re probably familiar with the Belmont Street restaurant anyway.

DONE WITH GUNS: Worcester’s gun buyback program his an anniversary this year, celebrating 15 years of getting firearms off the street. As they did last year, they will also accept replica guns, as those are sometimes used in crimes as well. Part of the point of the buyback program is to give people a way to get rid of guns they don’t want in the house anymore – no one is expected hardened criminals or right-wingers to give up their guns, but a widow or children who inherited a gun and don’t want it to fall into the wrong hands during a burglary can get $25 for a rifle or replica, $50 for a pistol and $75 for a semiautomatic of any kind. Last year, 340 weapons were taken in by various police departments in central Massachusetts that joined with Worcester, and Mayor Joe Petty has renewed his call for a statewide gun buyback day on the anniversary of the Sandy Hook school shooting. In addition to Barre, Grafton, Leicester, Millbury, Northboro, Northbridge, Oxford, Southbridge, Spencer, Webster, Westboro and Worcester, new to the program this year are Leominster, Fitchburg, Dudley and Charlton. Prior year participants North Brookfield, Rutland, Shrewsbury and Sturbridge are not on the list, although there’s still time for them to join. BULLET TRAIN CASINGS: Officials are working on fixing the Worcester commuter rail, cross

their HeartToHub and hope to die. A recent report showed that only 61 percent of trains on the line – which was touted as the next big step for linking us to Boston and spurring development – were on time over the course of one month. The Telegram interviewed some people involved with the line, and most of them gave the boilerplate “we’ll fix it, we swear” line. Then there was Dave Perry of the Worcester Line Working Group. “Part of it’s luck, part of it’s making your own luck ... I have a feeling we’re not making our own luck,” he told the Telegram. Reporter Tom Quinn can be reached at 508-749-3166 x324 or tquinn@worcestermagazine.com with story ideas, feedback, or questions. Follow him on Twitter @bytomquinn. DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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commentary | opinions slants& rants { }

Editorial No easy fix for tax rates

1,001 words By Steven King

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here is unlikely to be a Kumbaya moment over the setting of this year’s tax rates in Worcester. The residential tax rate is likely to go up for the 10th straight year, which will not please residential property owners, while the commercial tax rate, even if it is lowered, will most assuredly not be reduced enough to make a huge dent in the disparity between the two sides. Once again, residential has been pitted against commercial/ industrial, and taxpayers on both sides will be at the whim of councilors whose eyes are trained clearly on next year’s election. How not to alienate residential property owning constituents while not simultaneously incurring the wrath of influential commercial/industrial property owners? What won’t happen is a single tax rate, which this year would be $23.05 per $1,000 assessed valuation, and would increase the medial residential tax bill by nearly $800. There has been some support for a gradual move back to a single tax rate, but the fact is such a move cannot come without laying down serious hurt on residential property owners. It is important not to forget that category includes tripledeckers, which stand to see an increase in taxes even if the lowest possible residential tax rate, $18.64, is adopted. Residential property owners will cry foul should the rate go up too much, but let us not ignore this fact: Worcester’s average residential tax payment in fiscal 2016 was lower than all but one adjacent community, while the average commercial tax payment was higher than all surrounding communities. In one case, compared to Leicester, it was more than four times higher. All this does, of course, is contribute to the “us against them” atmosphere that has come to surround the annual tax rate classification. How to solve it? There is no easy answer, no quick fix, no simple solution. The Research Bureau tackled the issue rather well in its most recent report, but in the end, there was no “aha moment” of clarity. The Bureau suggests continued movement to narrowing the gap between residential and commercial/industrial tax rates, suggesting residential properties are better equipped than commercial/industrial to handle more of a property tax burden without “dramatically impacting value.” However, the Bureau rightly notes that renters comprise a big part of the living situation in Worcester, and landlords are quite likely to pass on to their tenants any increase in taxes. The Bureau lays out a scenario under which the city could, with state approval, implement an independent, reduced industrial tax rate – separate from commercial and residential property. As the Bureau notes, it would be a “radical” step, and it is hard to envision the current City Council moving in that direction. Likewise, adopting a single tax rate all at once would be “radical,” and that simply is not going to happen. Other than that, the “solutions” are the same we hear every year: new growth, more revenue, etc. All much easier said than done. The city is currently not set up to sustain some of the “radical” steps needed to address the inequity in tax rates between residential and commercial/ industrial. It certainly appears headed in the right direction. As the city grows, it must balance its industrial growth between high-tech/medical jobs that cater to educated job seekers and the types of manufacturing jobs that can offer decent wages to the many residents of Worcester who lack advanced degrees – or, in many cases, have no degree at all. In the meantime, the “tug of war,” as the Research Bureau puts it, between residential and commercial/industrial property owners is likely to continue.

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WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

• DECEMBER 1, 2016

chugalug


commentary | opinions

‘Safe spaces’ are fundamental principle of education To the Editor: A passing remark in last week’s paper caught my eye. The author of the city Index called for “education,” rather than — and here the quotes are in the original — “safe spaces,” on college campuses. This distinction betrays a profound misunderstanding of what the phrase “safe space” means, and what we in higher education are doing to promote education in all its facets. At Holy Cross, where I teach, the election of Donald Trump has led to a series of incidents of hate speech: hateful slogans drawn on campus walls, and most recently, a swastika in a dorm bathroom. Those of us who are not the targets of such hate may say this speech is harmless. It is not. Education requires a seat at the table where ideas are exchanged. Such hate speech seeks to deny such a seat to vulnerable groups, without whose voices the entire college is harmed.

{slants&rants} Letter

tor i d E e to th

To call for a safe space is not to censor speech, nor to police unpopular opinions. It is a fundamental principle upon which all education is based, one which has gone without saying for as long as the population of American universities was largely homogeneous. The fact is college has always been a safe space for certain kinds of people, people — and I count myself in this category — whose privilege can make it hard to understand how college could not be a safe space for someone else. Our task, for those of us committed to the power of education, is to create an environment in which all voices are welcome, all perspectives valid, all backgrounds respected. Only in such a safe space is education possible.

“Without proper review of the proposed new assessments, it is impossible to make any rational decision regarding the new tax rates.” - Joan Crowell, executive director of the AWARE Coalition in Worcester, in an email to city officials about the upcoming tax classification hearing. “We have some guys that come in and try to feed us drinks and everything

Great. Home. Equity. Rates.

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{ coverstory }

In school and homeless: Worcester’s growing problem Tom Quinn continued on page 14

DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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{ coverstory } Middle school and high school are tough enough. Imagine going through it without a home to go back to.

Homelessness is a national issue that hits a direct nerve in Worcester, particularly among the students attending public schools. Roughly 2,500 students here identify as homeless, and as more and more of the responsibility for providing social services gets handed off to the school system, the problem is becoming harder and harder to ignore.

challenges of homelessness – and remedies like Andy’s Attic – from her time as principal at South High. She said the best lesson she learned about dealing with parents and their children is a simple one: listen. “You have to listen to what people have to say,” Binienda said. “You don’t just assume when someone comes into your office that

may be sharing housing with friends or relatives due to hard times. That doesn’t mean those students have it easy, though – in fact, they’re often harder for school staff to identify and help. “The doubled-up population is harder to track, because people don’t always come out and say, ‘I’m doubled up,’ ” Kerr said. “You

Education, there were 19,515 identified homeless students. The previous year, that number was 17,595, before that it was 15,812. Worcester actually has a higher “doubled up” population than the statewide numbers. In 2014-2015, 39 percent of identified homeless students in Massachusetts were classified as doubled up, according to DESE, a figure that STEVEN KING

DO THE MATH Casual observers may think

they can easily pick out which of their fellow Worcesterites are homeless. It’s the person with the shopping cart under a bridge, or the person asking for money on the median strip of a busy road. But homelessness has many faces, and some homeless residents can pass by without being given a second thought. It’s even easier to mask problems at home as a student, WPS employees said.

“People think homelessness has this sort of look to it, but it doesn’t,” said Kate Kerr, an administrative assistant to the school superintendent who previously worked at the Central Massachusetts Housing Alliance. “Kids are kids, and they look like regular kids. They listen to music on headphones, just like everyone else. Especially with access to Andy’s Attic, they all sort of look and dress the same. Unless they said they were homeless, it’d be hard to tell.” Andy’s Attic is a well-known Worcester schools charity, providing bags of clothing to individuals and organizations, filling more than 1,000 bags last school year. It is run by students at South High Community School, and is just one of the benefits available to students. Free lunch is another, with WPS joining a federal reimbursement program last year that enables schools to provide breakfast and lunch at no charge. School Superintendent Maureen Binienda had high praise for the program, but said it doesn’t change what happens in a child’s home life, especially on the weekends. “We still notice on Mondays, kids eat more, and on Fridays they save food so that they can have it over the weekend,” Binienda said. “You have to be really observant of the students you have in front of you. Kids don’t want to say, ‘I’m homeless, I don’t have food.’ You have to look for other signs and have that communication be open.” Binienda is intimately familiar with the

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WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

Burncoat High School principal Bill Foley talks about the school’s new food pantry.

hasn’t had a shower or is hungry. You treat them just like a king or queen arrived. You treat everyone like they’re important. And when you do that, people establish a trust, and they share.” According to data provided by WPS, 2,486 students are classified as homeless as of Nov. 22, out of a total enrollment of just over 24,000, meaning around 10 percent of the student body, “lack[s] a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence,” to borrow language from the federal law that governs education of homeless youth. The number seems high – one in 10 students means that any time two WPS schools play a basketball game, statistically, one of the players on the court will be homeless. But it’s not all the stereotypical homeless experience – most of the WPS homeless population, 69 percent, is “doubled up,” meaning the student and their family

• DECEMBER 1, 2016

find that information by finding two families with the same address. Usually, the doubled up number is far larger than the actual homeless number.” For that reason and others, Binienda said the WPS homeless estimate is likely on the low side. And there are other problems – for all the talk of an improving economy, she said the schools are seeing an increase in recipients of services. The numbers bear that out: the 2014-2015 school year listed 2,090 homeless students, which jumped to 2,248 last year before creeping up around 2,500 this year. And although total enrollment increased by around 700 students before last year, this year it fell by nearly 1,200. Statewide, the number of identified homeless students also appears to be on the rise as well. In the 2014-2015 school year, according to numbers from the state Department of Elementary and Secondary

is in line with previous years. The next biggest classification was in shelters, then hotels or motels, and then youth awaiting foster care, with the smallest percentages being unaccompanied youth and “not sheltered.” In Worcester, this year sheltered students make up 19 percent of the homeless student population. Nearly 8 percent are awaiting foster care, with unaccompanied youth, unsheltered youth and those staying in hotels collectively making up less than four percent. Laurie Ross, a Clark University professor who has worked on Worcester’s “Point in Time” homeless surveys in the past for the Compass Project, said the high proportion of non-stereotypical homeless situations can mean many students don’t even know they’re homeless. “Sometimes, homeless youth might not think of themselves as homeless, because of the couchsurfing thing,” Ross, who now works


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{ coverstory } on youth violence prevention efforts, said. “But it’s a vulnerable housing situation.”

HOMEWORK WITH NO HOME Many students at all grade

levels struggle to do well in school, with some needing extra study time or attention. Now imagine needing to do well on a test after a night with no sleep at the homeless shelter. Or dealing with all the stress and emotion of prom while worrying about whether you’ll have heat or hot water when you go home. For many students, that’s the reality, and it can turn an already tough school experience into a nightmare.

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• DECEMBER 1, 2016

Sometimes the challenges of a homeless student manifest in mundane ways that may seem silly to an outsider – or indeed, to a homeless adult. “Teenagers won’t go to school unless they

have clothes that are going to be OK, that other kids aren’t going to say something to them about,” Binienda said. “We noticed when I was in high school that some kids wouldn’t come to school until they had enough money to buy their sneakers, because sneakers are kind of a status symbol in high school.” “With poverty comes a lot of struggles for kids, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be held to the highest standards,” Binienda added. “That’s the challenge – to take care of all those things that come with poverty.” One aspect of homelessness that affects school-age youth more than most is the transient nature of the condition. Families without permanent housing may move from city to city as shelter space becomes available or as other opportunities present themselves. That could adversely affect schooling, as switching schools in the middle of the year is difficult at best, and can set back a student’s education at worst. Fortunately for students, the federal McKinney-Vento Act provides for transportation to and from a homeless youth’s school of origin – meaning, for example, if someone starts school in Worcester, but moves to Marlboro halfway through the year, they can still attend school in Worcester. It also means Worcester isn’t taking on every schoolage student who moves to the city, as they can


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be bused back to where they are comfortable. That’s important to provide one of the many things schools provide that students might not get at home: stability. “It’s all about making sure there’s a safe environment,” Worcester YMCA Teen Director Amie Cox said. “That’s what I try to do. Make them feel like everything is normal, except for not living with their parents. I tell them, they have to go to school.” Cox deals with homeless students outside of school hours, one of many workers with many organizations that deal with social issues broadly and youth specifically. Cox said she is working with a handful of homeless youth now, and has seen an above average number this year. She identified a few challenges specific to homeless students. For example, while other students may need parents’ signatures on anything from a permission slip to a report card, homeless students need parents to get them into social service agency programs – and the parents aren’t always helpful. “The agency is always looking for the parent … and the parents are not there,” Cox said. “It’s usually because the parents are spending the money on substances instead of on them.” Just as school presents unique problems when it comes to homelessness, it can offer unique remedies. One program Binienda

STEVEN KING

{ coverstory }

Katherine Kerr, Worcester Public Schools administrative assistant to the superintendent, talks about homeless students in the city school system. oversaw at South, and one she said she wants to expand across the whole school system, is a “hunger week” program that teaches kids about food insecurity by weaving it into the curriculum. Teachers use real-life examples in math problems and assign literature about important social issues.

“The curriculum still goes on, but the subject is homelessness and food insecurity,” Binienda said. “You take away the stigma, so by the end of the week kids realize it’s an economic condition and we have a responsibility to help each other. It’s about changing the culture of your schools.”

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{ coverstory } SOCIAL SERVICES 101 Many students, at least

while they attend, say they hate school. But for some, and homeless students in particular, school is a refuge from turmoil in their home lives. And because school staff serve as everything from lookouts for warning signs in troubled kids to caretakers of a vulnerable population, they have become adept in their role as hubs of information, directing kids and parents to Worcester-area social service agencies.

“We have parents that sometimes come to the school and say, ‘I don’t have a place to stay tonight, can you help us?’” Binienda, who said she has seen staff pay for food or hotel rooms out of their own pockets, said. “Usually, the parents will come to school because there’s a trusting relationship that’s occurred between the school and the parent. But when they do come, they’re brave to do that … sometimes they just don’t know where to go, so they come to the school so we can hook them up to those agencies.” If all schools had to do was hand students off to an agency better-equipped to handle homelessness, that would be one thing. But with waiting lists at shelters — especially family shelters — reaching up to six months, and other service agencies already under a good deal of stress, the public school system might actually be one of the better-equipped organizations when it comes to giving kids a little comfort and security. “That’s why schools are so important,” Binienda said. “They can stabilize the kids during the day, they can get food for the family, they can provide the clothing, and

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STEVEN KING

then be that catalyst to connect kids to agencies that will service them. For the kids, they need something stable. If your whole life has no stability, then that’s why the school is needed more than ever. That’s the one stable force for that kid and for that family.” While school employees see a responsibility to take care of students, no matter what their home situation, it’s not as if WPS has piles of money lying around to disperse to social service programs. But neither do outside agencies, and as long as homelessness exists,

Above, bags full of donated clothing and shoes ready for delivery at Andy’s Attic at South High. Left, Worcester Public Schools Superintendent Maureen Binienda.

schools will have to find ways to deal with it. “It’s tough for the schools – they have all the kids, but they’re so underresourced as it is, to take a role in this is difficult,” Ross said. “But where are they going to refer them to?” One of the most important things schools do is the food pantry program. WPS now has seven food pantries, Binienda said, including the latest renovation at Burncoat High School. “When people find out about the need, they’re very surprised,” Burncoat Principal Bill Foley said. “When we first began a food pantry, I was surprised by how many kids made use of it.” Food – whether through the pantries or the free lunch program – is crucial in the fight against student homelessness. It has the obvious benefit of helping kids survive, and

• DECEMBER 1, 2016

alleviating hunger so they can concentrate and learn. But it also serves as one of the most reliable indicators of homeless trends, Kerr – whose work at the Central Massachusetts Housing Alliance yielded the Youth Against Homelessness program – said. “Usually, food insecurity is the first indicator that there’s really a struggle,” Kerr said. “When it comes to putting food on the table or keeping the lights [on] and a roof over your head, you skip the food and you pay to keep the rent going. So when you see big increases in food pantries and how many meals are being served, that’s usually an indicator of this other homeless population that we can’t quite see, that’s not in shelter, that’s doubled up. They’re just toeing the edge.” Still, even with all the challenges homeless students face, Binienda said she did not treat them with kid gloves when she was a principal, and she isn’t going to start now as superintendent. “You can’t let that be an excuse,” Binienda

said. “You still have those expectations, and you just provide the support. Because if you don’t, nothing’s ever going to improve for them. So we don’t take that as an excuse – whether you’re homeless or not, you have the same expectations, your work has to be done. It’s more important than ever that they do what they are supposed to do in school.” And while everyone involved agreed there has to be another solution on the horizon – more affordable housing, better funding for wraparound services, an improving economy to provide jobs – for now, Worcester Public Schools will continue functioning both as an institute of learning and a hub for homeless services. “Schools are different than what they used to be,” Binienda said. “They’re not only educational institutions, but social agencies. You have to be, if you’re doing the job right.” Reporter Tom Quinn can be reached at 508-749-3166 x324 or tquinn@ worcestermagazine.com with story ideas, feedback, or questions. Follow him on Twitter @bytomquinn.


art | dining | nightlife | December 1 - 7, 2016

HARRY AARON

night day &

These wrestlers go into the Beyond Joshua Lyford

Beyond Wrestling got its start back in 2009, but owner Drew Cordeiro’s history with independent wrestling dates back much farther, and his organization has continued to extend its reach in New England, most recently with an event last month at Electric Haze in Worcester. Competing against both the WWE’s Survivor Series Pay Per View and a New England Patriots game, Beyond drew a sold-out crowd – no easy feat to be sure – and will return to Worcester Jan. 29.

Cordeiro’s entry point to wrestling is an interesting one and started slow, though it wouldn’t take long for that enthusiasm to grow into something more, eventually manifesting itself into Beyond Wrestling. “When I would watch cartoons on Saturday mornings at my nana & papa’s, after that, wrestling would be on,” recalled Cordeiro. “I got into it from there. Every now and then, as a kid, my dad would sometimes take me to a local show or get a pay per view. It didn’t consume my life like it does now. That changed when I got to high school.” From there, Cordeiro and his friends discovered the world of wrestling tape trading and watched wrestling from all over the world, including Japan. They also found backyard wrestling. “We ended up starting a backyard wrestling league. Through that Beyond was kind of born,” explained Cordeiro. “I believe in 2007, I was put in charge of organizing a backyard wrestling tour, where we did five shows over three states over the course of eight days. At that time, we had wasted so much time being selfindulgent. I wanted to bridge the gap into professional wrestling.” Cordeiro was raised in Rhode Island, but had grown tired of the New England wrestling scene, which he described as largely consisting of people who “lived or died by whether or not they made it to the WWE.” Initially, Beyond was a way for promoters to see wrestlers in action. The crowds on hand were predominantly wrestlers and recruiters, and the videos made were a way to showcase individual talents. “The driving concept was backyard wrestling was wrestling for wrestlers,” said Cordeiro. “When I got into the independents, there were restrictions from promoters that prevented what the wrestlers could do. Someone is telling you who you wrestle, how long the match is, who is going to win. They’re in charge of that. The more restrictions you put on the performers, the harder it is for them to do what they want to do. With Beyond Wrestling, it was complete freedom. We

Tracy Williams vs. John Silver

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DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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wanted the focus on the artistic elements of the performance.” The popularity of the showcase videos exploded, and it wasn’t long before Cordeiro knew he had to start creating live shows to showcase these incredible talents. “We did our first show in Danbury, Connecticut,” said Cordeiro. “We bounced around and ended up in a VFW in Bridgewater. It looked fucking lame. In order for this to all come together, we have to get in with night clubs. It took us two years. There

The food truck that Cordeiro is referring to is Championship Melt, owned by his parents, that sells food at each of the Beyond events. Championship Melt was on hand at Electric Haze for Insatiable, an event that Cordeiro acknowledged was a sell-out success. “I look at shows from two angles: the business aspect and the creative aspect,” said Cordeiro. “I think fans liked the show, but I also know we could have put together a better show for that day. I look at our relationship with Electric Haze as being a great start.” Not every crowd wants the same content HARRY AARON

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night day

• DECEMBER 1, 2016

NEPWA Showcase Match was a venue in Rhode Island called Fête Music Hall. One of our wrestlers was able to get the contact information for the person in charge of booking. We thought, ‘Damn, we’ll never get in here.’ But they were so excited about the prospect of hosting professional wrestling, it was the easiest meeting possible.” There were 250 wrestling fans in attendance at that first show and the momentum continued. They would eventually find themselves in Somerville, selling 300 tickets in advance. Now Cordeiro knew Beyond was ready to continue branching out. Worcester was the next logical step in the triangle that included Boston and Providence. “I couldn’t get my foot in the door anywhere, Cordeiro said. “There are so many specifics requirements for us. First of all, the ceiling has to be high enough. Electric Haze is just high enough. We need a venue that is the right size. We don’t want a 1,500-cap venue, it has to be realistic. We need a place with their own sound and lighting equipment. We need a place that serves liquor. We need a place to be compatible with our food truck.”

and Cordeiro said some of the humor-based and submission-based bouts didn’t pop as much as other types of matches. “These fans wanted to see people get hit hard and see cool flips,” he explained. “Now I can say, ‘These wrestlers might not be best for this show, but these other wrestlers will be able to give the fans what they want to see.’ I’m a perfectionist. I know if we have a good show, we’re capable of a great show. I’m glad fans are happy with what we presented, but I know we can do even better next time.” Beyond Wrestling will return to Electric Haze, 26 Millbury St., Sunday, Jan. 29. Tickets will be available in December and can be found, along with other event information and “BeyonDemand” access, Beyond’s streaming program, at Beyondwrestlingonline.com. Reporter Joshua Lyford can be reached at 508-749-3166, ext. 325, or by email at Jlyford@worcestermagazine.com. Follow Josh on Twitter @Joshachusetts and on Instagram @Joshualyford.


night day &

{ arts }

Published author at 7, Douglas girl inspires Cassidy Wang

It is probably safe to say many 7-year-olds aren’t writing stories in their free time, especially in the current technology age where books are often swapped for iPads. But 7-year-old Emily Bastien of Douglas is already a published young author hoping to inspire people — young and old — to find their own voice.

It all started just a few years ago with Emily’s early love for stories. “She started reading on her own when she was about 4 years old,” Bridgette Bastien, Emily’s mother, said. “At the age of 6, she started writing stories at after-care.” At after-care last year, the teachers at Whitinsville Christian School encouraged Emily, and helped her spell words and write down stories that came from her imagination. “In school, I got lots of stories in my head so I decided to write them down and my aftercare teachers helped me,” Emily said. “My mom then collected them and started to type them down to make a book.” Over the past year, Emily collected several songs and books, but it wasn’t until a specific day that Emily suddenly decided that she wanted to become a published author. “We were on the way to school one morning and out of the blue, she said, ‘Mommy when I get older I want to be a famous author,” Bridgette Bastien said. “I literally had goosebumps when she said that. She has all of the stories already; all we have to do is put them together. So that’s what we did.” This sudden spark of motivation did

not disappear. Emily was persistent and thoroughly engaged with the process of publishing her book through the platform, CreateSpace. Day by day, she kept asking her mother if her drafts were ready, if she could review it again, and how her stories were coming along. “She’s a pretty laid back and humbled little girl, yet she stayed on top of us,” Bridgette

Emily Bastien with her book in her Douglas home.

Bastien said. “She was so engaged in the process that that made us even more excited.” Emily’s final product, “Aqua Tales,” reinforces the importance of love, trust and honesty through “a collection of short

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stories about kids solving problems and overcoming life’s challenges.” Because the book remains true to Emily’s own voice, readers will navigate the story through the “eyes of a young girl.” As a reflection of her own experience as a young writer, “Aqua Tales” also encourages readers to unleash their imagination and pursue their dreams. With her accomplishment, Emily strives to inspire kids to read more, write STEVEN KING more and find their own voice. Yet, similar to her early desire to publish a book, Emily is also accomplishing this dream at the mere age of 7 during every book reading she holds at local schools and churches. Her next book event will be Sunday, Dec. 11, 1 p.m., at Cake Shop Cafe, 23 West St. A, Millbury. There, Emily will select stories from her book and engage with children and adults alike. “Over the past months, we have been visiting schools, local churches and speaking about the importance of literacy. Not just learning how to read, but loving reading and exploring books, writing their own stories, letting their voice be heard,” Bridgette Bastien said. “Typically, when we attend these book meetings, Emily gives an overview of her background, her passion and interests. Then she’ll read several stories from her book and she’ll talk to the kids about what they’re interests are. Are they artists? Are they into reading or writing? And then we usually close

with questions from the students.” For Emily and her mother, such book readings are inspiring on both ends. When Emily goes to middle and high schools, students are shocked when they find out that Emily is the published author that will be reading to them. Her mother attributes this shock to their inherent belief that only adults can accomplish great things. But Emily dispels this preconceived idea, restoring in the youth a renewed sense of hope and desire to pursue their passions and aspirations fearlessly. “We envision that you actually have to be an adult to actually be an author or be so accomplished,” Bridgette Bastien said. “I think that in itself gives them hope, where they realize that [they] don’t have to be an adult to pursue [their] dreams, ‘I can work on my dream and accomplish whatever my heart desires at a very young age.’ “I think Emily is the living testimony that if you have a dream and you have people around you to support you and to encourage you, then you can accomplish anything and your age does not have to be a limiting factor on why you can’t pursue your dreams. When you see her read and get wrapped up in her stories and her character that comes through, I think by default that’s inspirational for the kids. I think the fact that she’s so young and pursuing her dreams and passion gives hope and aspiration.” Added Emily: “You can be young, you can be any age, but no matter what, you can follow your dreams.” “Aqua Tales” is available through Amazon and Kindle. Cassidy Wang is an intern with Worcester Magazine. She attends Algonquin Regional High School

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23


Celebrate!

night day &

THE

Lyford F iles

Joshua Lyford

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THANKFUL FOR SILENCE: There are a few things working

against The Lyford Files at all times: Worcester Magazine being a weekly, it can be tough to get timing just right on upcoming events; this column running biweekly (and occasionally being ditched to make room for other stories. Insert glare at esteemed editor here) means I have to be pretty careful with selecting items and finally, the guy behind the computer is an actual lunatic. We’re not going to focus on the last one today. The other two mean that Thanksgiving has come and gone, yet here I am talking about it anyway. I didn’t get the chance and I’d like to. I’m sure you’re only skimming this page en route to the crossword anyway. I had a weird holiday this year. Generally, I get together with my family, we all drink weird beer and I cook a Tofurkey while my relatives relentlessly mock me. This year, I bailed on Central Massachusetts and took a road trip to the grand Midwest. It was the best decision I ever made. I love my family unconditionally, but I was not looking forward to the inevitable and relentless political debate (debate would lead you to believe this wouldn’t have just been us yelling our opinions at each other, but make no mistake). Don’t get me wrong, these folks had the same sort of discussions, this time though, I didn’t care. I had no real vested interest and it was so liberating. All I needed to do was smile, drink vodka and eat a pound of green bean casserole. It led me to thinking: why is inter-family political bickering so heated? I can’t speak for everyone, but I have to imagine it has something to do with the ingrained history on hand. I’ve been arguing with my dad about politics for nearly two decades now (for whatever reason, politics interested my weird young mind very early on). The content doesn’t even really seem to matter, we’re just flexing our debate muscles. Still, it was interesting to note and I think I might escape every year (unless the vodka disappears and the green bean casserole recipe is tossed out) and avoid the intensity. I’ll keep my political arguments to weeknights, thank you very much.

THE RETURN OF THE RIFF: Friday, Dec. 2 is going to be a ripper. The Hotel Vernon, 1

Millbury St., will play host to an evening of riffing, headbanging and dollar draft-ing. Worcester’s Truth Decay and High Command will be ripping with Massachusetts’ Brazen Gate and Providence’s The Hurt Ensemble and Disavow. I don’t know much about some of these bands, but Truth Decay is absolutely sick and just dropped a new record, “Ghost War,” available at Truthdecay.bandcamp.com. High Command is what I guess we would call a super group, and the thrash/hardcore crossover is real. There have been rumors the band may perform entirely while shredding hoverboards. The flyer claims the show is $8 and will begin at 8 p.m., but we’re dealing with Worcester punk time here and, frankly, if a band is playing at 8, I’ll eat my hat.


night day

11th annual holiday market

&

stART AS YOU MEAN TO GO ON: That subhead is a quote from a sticker on someone’s

signature BMX frame, probably 10 years ago. I don’t remember whose and honestly, I don’t even really know what it means. I’m pretty confident the rider was British, must be a Marmite-related thing. I have been combing my hair and remembering to wear my glasses lately, but I’m by no means a sophisticate or, frankly, capable of thought poetic enough to understand what that phrase means. Still, I thought it sounded snappy and it preempts some great – if expected – news. stART at the Station will return to Union Station Sunday, Dec. 4 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. This marks the event’s 11th year, which is obviously a big deal. Think about how you’ve grown in the past 11 years. Now pretend you’re an event and not a human. See? Handmade goods and wares from artists and crafters that include pottery, paintings, textiles, stained glass, food and – likely – anything else you could imagine. Go treat yourself to something nice.

DANCE LIKE NOBODY’S WATCHING: Or not. I never understood that phrase. Okay, I understand it, I just don’t get it. When I’m dancing, I’ve usually had a couple adult beverages and I don’t care who is paying attention. I’m trying to vibe out like a total freak show. That’s sort of the point to me. I can walk like a standard adult, I can sleep like a standard adult, but if I’m dancing, I want to be on the other side of the coin, ya know? I think my rambling has gotten worse. Anyway, if the aforementioned hardcore show at Vernon doesn’t tickle your fancy, there will be a dance party for a cause on Dec. 2 as well. Danceraiser: Dr. Gabriele Goszcz’s Annual Birthday Dance Party to Support Arts and Community. From 7-10 p.m., folks will dance it up at the Sprinkler Factory, 38 Harlow St., for a suggested donation of $20. Material donations are also accepted for the Golden Bees: Sleeping Bags for the Homeless Project. The Golden Bees are volunteers who make sleeping bags and provide other necessities for Worcester’s homeless. They are looking for clean blankets, quilts, comforters, sleeping bags, flat sheets, shampoo, soap, toothpaste, toothbrushes, new towels and wash clothes, band-aids, adult sized socks, scarves, mittens, hats, hand warmer packets, that sort of thing. I’m sure you get the gist. If you can cut a rug for a good cause, that’s pretty damn cool. BREWS WITH CLAUS, NOW FOR A CAUSE: The Canal District Alliance has put

together a bar crawl for Saturday, Dec. 3 and this one’s got a twist. Earlier in the column, I wrote about dancing for a cause. So what about drinking brews for a good cause? That’s the point with the annual Santa Bar Crawl of the Canal District. Over 200 people are expected (I’d suspect that number will end up a bit higher, it is a Saturday in the Canal District, after all), and the festivities kick off at 2:30 p.m. at the Compass Tavern. 90 Harding St. No registration is necessary and the crawl will head out from Compass to the White Eagle, 116 Green St., at 3:30; the Banner, 112 Green St., at 4:30; the Gbar, 62 Green St., at 5:30; Mai Tai, 69 Green St., at 6:30; Union Tavern, 65 Green St.; at 7:30 and concluding at Whiskey on Water, 97 Water St., at 8:30. Participants are encouraged to donate $20 and 100 percent of the donations go to Toys for Tots. SAMJAMESMUSIC.COM

ONE MORE THING: I’m milking

this week’s column for all it’s worth. Dec. 2 is stacked, man. Check out the Festival of Lights downtown on the common behind City Hall from 5-9 p.m. There are a bunch of cool things going on, but first the most important: the Worcester Common Oval will be open for public skating. The weather is looking great, but the temp may be a bit finicky, as reports say it will be somewhere between 30-50 degrees. Still, even if the ice is a bit chewed up, it will be good to see people cruising again. If that wasn’t enough, Santa Claus will be on hand, the Hanover Theatre’s “A Christmas Carol” cast will do some kind of performance, the Northstar Figure Skaters will shred and there will be wagon rides, food trucks and free hot cocoa. Sam James (pictured), Worcester native and “The Voice,” performer will also be on hand belting out tunes. Reporter Joshua Lyford can be reached at 508-749-3166, ext. 325, by falling into an open-road podcast portal on an 800 mile drive, activated by an absolutely outrageous amount of caffeine, and delivered subcutaneously via the impending late night creep of the No Sleep Podcast and reemerging in the wilds of Connecticut, where sudden and immediate blinker-less three lane changes at 120 MPH are apparently commonplace, or by email at Jlyford@worcestermagazine. com. Follow Josh on Twitter @Joshachusetts and on Instagram @Joshualyford.

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Celebrate The Season Saturday, December 3, 8:00 p.m. Handel: The Messiah, sung by Worcester Chorus, Chris Shepard, Artistic Director, presented by Music Worcester

At Mechanics Hall

Monday, December 5, 8:00 p.m. XLO’S ‘Almost’ Acoustic Xmas, starring Rachel Platten with Very Special Guests Parachute and Wrabel Wednesday, December 7, Noon Brown Bag Concert, New England Conservatory Symphonic Winds & Concert Choir with Navy Band Northeast, Holiday Concert, Free Admission Saturday, December 10, 8:00 p.m. Massachusetts Symphony Orchestra Holiday Pops Concert, John Delorey, Conductor; Michele Graveline, Choral Conductor; Jane Shivick & Richard Monroe, Vocal Soloists; Jim Polito, Narrator. Holiday favorites, Chorus, and More! Sunday, December 11, 1:00 & 5:00 p.m. The Nutcracker Ballet presented by Dance Prism, A Family Holiday Tradition! Sunday, December 18, 3:00 p.m. Worcester Youth Orchestras Family Holiday Concert, featuring the Orchestras and Combos of the WYO with Shepherd Hill Regional High School Choirs, Worcester Chamber Music Society’s Neighborhood Strings. Friday, December 30, 4:00 p.m. Mechanics Hall Cinema: The Polar Express, starring Tom Hanks. This Christmas classic reveals the extraordinary power of belief. (sponsored by Country Bank)

MECHANICS HALL AN ACOUSTICAL MASTERPIECE

321 Main St., Worcester • For Tickets call 508-752-0888 or visit www.mechanicshall.org DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

25


night day &

{ film } From boy to man Jim Keogh

As I watched “Moonlight,” Barry Jenkins’ wonderful saga of a boy lurching toward manhood in a rough Miami neighborhood, the temptation to compare it to “Boyhood” hovered like the scent of stale popcorn.

26

Two years ago, Richard Linklater redefined the game with his intimate epic detailing the evolution of young Mason as he struggled to establish his identity amid fractured family dynamics and his own intellectual and hormonal yearnings. Linklater was so committed to an honest telling of Mason’s story, he filmed the entire cast over the course of 12 years, giving the Passage of Time equal billing to his actors. But there is a simple, beautiful camera shot toward the end of “Moonlight” that plays like an homage to Francois Truffaut’s 1959 classic “The 400 Blows,” about another confused and searching kid, and it reminded me the secret lives of boys fire the imagination no matter the era. Whether we are the Greatest Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen X, Y, Z, or Millennials, some cosmic force is scratching pencil marks onto a door jamb to chart our progress as we grow uneasily into our own skin. “Moonlight” follows a withdrawn boy named Chiron, known as “Little” during his boyhood (as played by Alex R. Hibbert), whose reputation as being “soft” places him on the wrong end of the barbs and beatings of his classmates. His crack-addict mother, Paula (Naomie Harris), is too strung out to offer comfort. Salvation arrives in the form of Juan (Mahershala Ali of “House of Cards”), a neighborhood drug dealer who sees something special in the beleaguered Chiron and becomes a de facto guardian, then surrogate dad. At one point he brings Chiron to the beach and teaches him how to swim, instructing the boy how to remain afloat when the tide threatens to pull him under. A lesson for life. Besides Juan and his blessedly kind wife, the only productive human connection Chiron enjoys is with his with his carefree buddy, Kevin, who challenges his friend to stand strong. Jenkins transports the story into Chiron’s teen years (where he’s played with a solemn grace by Ashton Sanders), where classmates’ earlier insinuations of softness have now morphed into outright accusations that he’s gay, a particularly damaging WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

• DECEMBER 1, 2016

reputation to bear within this AfricanAmerican community that takes a hard line on homosexuality. Amid the slurs and the threats of violence, Chiron remains adrift, like the quiet boy we recall bobbing in the Atlantic waves under Juan’s guiding hands. A chance encounter on the beach is either a window to clarity, or the source of more confusion. Jenkins defies expectations during the third chapter in which he brings Chiron into young adulthood, where he answers to another nickname, Black (Trevante Rhodes).

He is outwardly self-assured, respected, even feared, but still vaguely uncomfortable, like a dinner guest listening to two strangers argue at the kitchen table. Black is turned inward; introspective, maybe, or perhaps he has simply silenced the inner voice begging to ask difficult questions that may be too painful to answer. “Moonlight” takes a story that unfolds in a small sliver of geographic and social space and endows it with universal truths, just as Linklater did in central Texas and Truffaut in Paris. As with those films, this feels real to me, even though I have no personal knowledge of this place or experienced the same anguish Chiron has experienced. Jenkins has done something marvelous by showing us a life that could be lived, probably is being lived, right now. You hope it can be a good life.


night day { dining}

krave

Bootleggers Prohibition Pub

&

FOOD HHH1/2 AMBIENCE H H H SERVICE HHHH1/2 VALUE HHHH 234 Chandler St., Worcester • 508-753-1889 • bootleggersprohibitionpub.com

Worcester’s Roaring Twenties sports bar Sandra Rain

I visited Bootleggers Prohibition Pub for dinner with a friend on a recent Monday evening. Bootleggers employs a distinctly 1920’s aesthetic tempered by subtle reminders that the establishment is making an equal effort to tap into the existing Worcester bar scene.

For example, two TVs are positioned over the bar - one plays black and white movies featuring the likes of Frank Sinatra, the other airs ESPN. Servers and bartenders wear flapper headbands and shiny pearls, but also sport cut off cotton t-shirts. The space is meant to be a mysterious speakeasy, but a sign out front reads, “SECRET ENTRANCE AROUND BACK.” Gorgeous pine paneling covers one half of the dining room, but a faux

brick facade covers the other half. The menu is equally unfocused, including everything from Italian, Mexican and Korean dishes to burgers and dogs. Old awards from its predecessor, EVO, are still displayed on the walls, but staff are insistent that this is an entirely new era for the space. Keeping these discrepancies in mind, the staff is delightful and the food and cocktails are entirely approachable. I started the evening with a Blackberry Lemonade ($6.50), featuring Midnight Moon Blackberry Moonshine and garnished with a potent booze-soaked blackberry that made me jump. My friend enjoyed a Boot-Tini ($5.50), crafted with Cranberry Moonshine, Pomegranate, Agave and a Mint Sprig. It is not uncommon for a bar to shape their cocktail program around a particular spirit, but Bootleggers is the first bar I’ve seen so heavily influenced by white whiskey or moonshine. We ordered Mussels ($7.99) and an Antipasto ($11.99) to share. The mussels came poached in a spicy ginger coconut curry moonshine broth and garnished with fresh green onion and cilantro. Such a delicious sauce begged for toast, which we had to take initiative to request. No extra charge appeared on the bill for bread - a testament to fair pricing and hospitable service. Our

antipasto consisted of Romaine lettuce tossed with Capicola, pepperoni, fresh mozzarella, Asiago, Parmesan, artichoke hearts, shredded carrot, sliced olives, celery, heirloom cherry tomatoes, chickpeas, sweet onions and banana peppers. The salad was overdressed with a house vinaigrette that assaulted my taste buds, never allowing the pillowy mozzarella or the salty coppa to stand a chance. Both appetizers were served on beautiful vintage dishes that stood tall on ornate metal feet. We ordered entrees and another round of cocktails. My Ragtime Mint Julep ($7.50) Makers Mark, soda water, sugar and mint, offered a sharp bite. My friend said her Moonshine Mule ($7.75) made with Catdaddy Moonshine, ginger beer, honey, lemon juice and bitters, was the best she’d ever tasted. For our next course, we shared the Diver Scallop and Short Rib Grilled ($11.99) and the Blackberry Moonshiner Burger ($14.99). The Diver Sea Scallop arrived set atop Korean Barbecue glazed beef short rib with sauteed baby spinach, sweet onion, heirloom tomatoes and a Bearnaise sauce. Our server had informed us ahead of time it would be a small plate, but the delicate portion did

not disappoint. This dish was a testament to the quality of ingredients and care of plating that Bootleggers’ kitchen is capable of. The burger was served on a black cutting board with a side of “rustic” fries in a traditional mule mug. Cooked perfectly medium rare, the half-pound, flame-grilled Angus beef burger was served on a brioche roll with sweet onions, crispy lettuce, apple cider fromage, bleu cheese, bacon and blackberry moonshine barbecue sauce. The toppings complemented, but never overwhelmed. We found our meal nothing short of satisfying. I firmly believe Bootleggers Prohibition Pub will be successful if it commits to a single vision – either Roaring Twenties or sports bar. For those with a flair for dress-up and an appreciation for a solid burger, the secret entrance is around back. Our total came to $81.55.

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krave

Italian Scratch Kitchen • Homemade Raviolis $10 Dinner Specials Monday - Wednesday Live Music

COOKING UP SOMETHING NEW

358 Shrewsbury St. Worcester 774-823-3022 padavanosplace.com

night day BITE SIZED

Wilson Wang has more than made a mark on the local restaurant scene. With Baba Sushi on Park Ave, Chuan Shabu next door and the recently-opened Baba Sushi Sturbridge, Wang and his team keep cooking up surprises, and the New Year STEVEN KING promises to be no different. First up is the highly-secretive new brand for his restaurant group. The details have largely been kept under wraps, but one new element includes a universal gift card program. “We’ve had many requests since opening the second and third restaurants to offer universal gift card options,” Wang said. “With our upcoming plans and the fun things we have in store for next year, the timing feels perfect. We hope our loyal customers will enjoy the flexibility and think of their families, friends and coworkers as we roll out the new program this holiday season.” Basically, under the previous system, if you bought a gift card at one of the restaurants, you could only redeem it there.

&

Black Friday, however, marked the introduction of a program allowing gift cards to be used at any of the three locations, regardless of where they are purchased. To help kick it off, now through Jan. 1, every $50 gift card bought will be awarded with a $10 bonus gift card. Every $100 gift card bought will be awarded with two $10 gift cards, plus you’ll be entered to win another $100 gift card. You can buy gift cards at any of the three current locations or online at orders.babasushi. com. If you buy in person, tell ’em Worcester Magazine sent you!

A NEW FAÇADE

Work continues on 7Nana, 60 Shrewsbury St., Worcester, with attention turning to the renovation of its facade. The Japanese steakhouse has been open during renovations, and is expected to remain open as work is done on the storefront, according to property owner Rob Branca. You can make sure by calling the restaurant at 508-755-8888.

CRAFT BREWS. FRESH BREADS. SEASONAL PLEASURES. Celebrate the holidays with an unmatched selection of seasonal farm-fresh food, hand-crafted spirits and, of course, world-class beers. Our function space is designed to host unrivaled festivities, and our gift cards transform uninformed eaters into artisan aficionados. Crust, our artisan bakeshop, is also taking holiday orders to complement your gifts and gatherings. ‘Tis the season to revel in incomparable food and drink.

CRAFT BEER. FARMHOUSE FARE. RIGHTEOUS COCKTAILS.

Lunch & dinner daily beginning at 11:30AM Brunch Saturdays & Sundays beginning at 10AM Located downtown in the historic courthouse district. 144 Main Street Worcester, MA 508.795.1012 www.armsbyabbey.com

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WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

• DECEMBER 1, 2016

Open daily 7AM – 3PM 118 Main Street Worcester MA 774.823.3355 crustbakeshop.com


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night day &

Celebrate The Holiday’s with Us! LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

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Date Night Query

Was your actual high school football coach sitting at said bar when you arrived? r Did your feet stick Sa with to the floor a little bit? Was it everything you dreamed it would be? Did you decide, on second thought, to give somewhere else a try? Did your date predict that there would be someone playing an acoustic guitar at the spot you chose? Have you ever spent your Saturday night watching a middle-aged man play Pearl Jam covers? Have you ever announced your unwavering affection from the top of a large hill? Did you ever meet someone who starts all compliments by saying, “I know this is over the top.”? Did you ever wonder if you were just a pawn in some elaborate bet in which the winner receives a coupon book? Have you ever experienced a sense of relief? Have you ever wanted to do something nice for someone else? Do people who ask a lot of questions expect you to return the favor? Did you ever know someone for practically your whole life, but never really notice one another? Do open-ended questions ever have a right answer? If you weren’t here right now, where would you be? If you had to spend the rest of your life in a fire station, a lighthouse or library, which would you choose? If you were going to bury your most prized possession, where would you dig the hole? If you could only listen to one song for the rest of your life, what would it sound like? Has your favorite song ever come on while you were driving home? Does the ‘date’ in date night refer to the companion or the activity? Will you agree that the companion is the only part that matters?

CA LL A HE A D F OR T TAKE -OU

“Have you ever put on a pair of pants and then much later realized that there was a loose sock smushed up against your thigh?” Ze Frank asks all of the right questions in his uplifting TED Talk, “Are you human?” His insightful line of inquiry exposes our collective fears that others may not like us once they actually get to know us and alleviates those worries just as quickly by reminding us that we are all human. This weekend, I embarked on ‘Date Night’ with Frank’s spirited curiosity fresh in my mind. Here are the questions that arose: Has anyone ever invited you on a tour of Worcester’s finest car washes? Did your date instead surprise you with dinner at your favorite new restaurant? Have you ever felt intrigued by the spacing and capitalization of ‘deadhorse hill’? Have you ever been laughed at for likening oysters to skinless grapes or buttery sunbeams? Are there certain people who you feel have earned the right to laugh at you? Have you ever had the luxury of choosing from three variations of Negroni? Did you know that Negronis were invented by a rodeo clown in 1919? Have you ever tasted bisque like Mulberry silk? Did your date ever turn to you and ask very seriously, “Why would we ever go anywhere else?” Have you ever gone an entire night without remembering to look at your phone? Have you ever felt more like yourself after getting to know someone else? Did you ever agree to after-dinner drinks, not for the drinks, but for the company? Did you ever go to a bar that you felt like you missed out on during its heyday? Did your date warn you that this was the sort of place where the two of you would be the only non-football coaches in the room?

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DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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• DECEMBER 1, 2016


music >Thursday 1

AC String Camerata. The AC String Camerata will be performing for the community. Free and open to the public. 3-4 p.m. Assumption College: Chapel of the Holy Spirit, 500 Salisbury St. 508-767-7304. Assumption College String Camerata. The Assumption String Camerata will present music of Mozart, Corelli and Winters on Thursday December 1st. The ensemble is now in its tenth year of presenting the great string ensemble repertoire. This event is free and open to the public. Free. 3-4 p.m. Assumption College: Chapel of the Holy Spirit, 500 Salisbury St. Jazzed Up Trio. Free! 6:30-9:30 p.m. Basil n’ Spice, Thai Cuisine, 299 Shrewsbury S. 774-317-9986 or basilnspice.com Experience the magic of the season at the Ecotarium’s popular program, “A Christmas Journey.” Enjoy a reading of “The Polar Express,” a ride on the Explorer Train, a visit with Santa and more. It all takes place Saturdays, Dec. 3 and Dec. 10, 10:3011:30 a.m., 12:30-1:30 p.m. and 2:30-3:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 each, $10 for members, and must be bought in advance by calling 508-929-2700. For more information, visit ecotarium.org or email info@ecotariumorg. Open Mic Most Thursdays @ Barbers North. To check the schedules and open slots visit: Bill McCarthy’s Open Mic World on Facebook Bill McCarthy (originator of the “Half-Hour Sets!”) is your host at another great Open Mic Night! Email Bill McCarthy to reserve it at: openmcc@verizon.net (make sure you put “open mic” in the email’s “subject box”) Network * Collaborate * Learn. Over sixty different musicians regularly support my open mic nights all are friendly and supportive -- and many are: * Former or currently signed recording artists * Award-winning pro’s or semi-pro’s * Regularly gigging paid-performers * Published songwriters * Recording studio owner/operators * Combinations of any and/or all of the above. To check the schedules and open slots visit Facebook. Any slot marked as “open” usually is! Free! 6:30-9:30 p.m. Barbers Crossing (North), 175 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-8438. FM Live. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. The Mill 185, 185 West Boylston St., West Boylston. 774-261-8585. Open Mic. Attention Performers- Amateurs and Experts! Drop in for Open Mic! Full Sandwich Menu Desserts Coffee & Espresso BYOB beer & wine only $0. 7-10 p.m. Cake Shop Cafe, 22A West St., Millbury. 508-865-9866 or cakeshopcafe.com Chris Reddy Acoustic Loops from Hell. 8-11:30 p.m. Blueprint New American Bar & Grill, 9 Village Square, Westminster. 978-668-5580. Cold soldier band. Cold Soldiers report for duty every Thursday night for Lois’ happy hour time. Dwight Perry, George Dellomo, Bob Berry and whoever the cat drags in! No cover. 8-10 p.m. Dunny’s Tavern, 291 East Main St., East Brookfield. Dezi Garcia Performs at Loft, Thursday at 8. 8-11:59 p.m. Loft 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177. Jon Short. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Rye & Thyme, 14 Monument Square, Leominster. 978-534-5900. Open Mic hosted by Michael Rivelis. 8-11 p.m. Mr. Dooley’s Olde Irish Country Pub, 303 Shears St., Wrentham. Tim Pacific. 8-11 p.m. Quinn’s Irish Pub, 715 West Boylston St. 508-459-2025. Audio Wasabi. 8:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. Thursdaze -- Open Mic. 18+ with proper ID Hosted by local artist Rife Styles BYOB for guests over 21! (hard alcohol prohibited) 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Spiritual Haze, 589 Park Ave. 508-799-0629. Ghost Guest. folk punk by punk folk with feeling~we like music and psychological development 9 p.m.-midnight Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877 or find them on Facebook. Jim Devlin. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Michael’s Cigar Bar, 1 Exchange Place.

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508-459-9035. Karaoke. DJ Nancy, of Star Sound Entertainment. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385. Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Classic’s Pub, 285 Central St., Leominster. 978-537-7750. Thumpin College Thursdays. Come dance the night away with our DJ Scrappy every Thursday Night. 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. MB Lounge, 40 Grafton St. 508-799-4521.

>Friday 2

Free Show with The Cosby Sweaters at the Cove! Get ready for some Acoustic Guitarmageddon as The Cosby Sweaters return to the Cove for a free show! 80’s acoustic jams never tasted so good! 21+ Doors at 8pm No Cover. The Cove Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or find them on Facebook. Thank Friday It’s Dr. Nat. Let Dr. Nat start your weekend with jazz, swing, blues, soul, samba, R&B, Broadway, original songs about Worcester, and other surprises, such as special guest vocalists and instrumentalists. Dancers welcome! No cover charge, tips appreciated. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508-7534030 or natneedle.com BILL McCarthy Every Friday at Barbers Crossing North. Now catch Bill McCarthy playing his heart out every Friday at Barbers North (Sterling, MA) @6:30pm Visit: BillMcCarthyMusic.com for info. Free! 6:30-9:30 p.m. Barbers Crossing (North), 175 Leominster Road, Sterling. 978-422-8438. Brian Richard. 7-10 p.m. Compass Tavern, 90 Harding St. 508304-6044. Lisa Marie & All Shook Up with Johnny Juxo. Lisa Marie & All Shook Up with Johnny Juxo, gives you sizzlin’ R&B, rock & soul, funk & swing, rockabilly & jumpin’ red-hot blues... and never the same show twice! N/A. 7-10 p.m. Canal Restaurant & Bar, Bar?Lounge, 65 Water St. 508-926-8353. Scott Babineau. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. The Mill 185, 185 West Boylston St., West Boylston. 774-261-8585. Worcester Youth Orchestra. Founded in 1947, the Worcester Youth Orchestras, WYO, under the direction of Jonathan Brennand, have maintained a presence in Central Massachusetts, offering musical training and orchestral experiences for aspiring young musicians. The orchestras’ membership draws from over 32 communities in Massachusetts, as well as New Hampshire and Rhode Island. Now in its 68th Season, WYO continues to maintain a strong presence in Central Massachusetts, enriching the lives of its students and the many communities that it serves. Free. 7-9 p.m. Briarwood Continuing Care Retirement Community: Birches Auditorium, 65 Briarwood Circle. 508-852-9007. Dan Kirouac - with special guest guitarist Glenn Jackson. Dan has been part of the regional music scene for thirty years. When not busy with the tribute band Beatles For Sale, his solo performances showcase vocals accompanied by a six-string acoustic guitar. From the one-hit wonders to the lost classics, from the 1960s to today, every show is a different experience, drawing from almost 500 contemporary and oldie songs. Glenn Jackson is the former guitarist for The Diversions and (with Dan) in Broadmeadow (1995-97). More information at dankirouac.com. Free. 7:30 p.m.-10 a.m. William’s Restaurant & Tavern, 184 Pearson Blvd, Gardner. 978-632-7794. Auntie Trainwreck. Join your favorite Auntie as we make our return to a familiar Green Street hotspot, The White Eagle, on December 2nd, 2016! We made our White Eagle debut back in October, and as always, you can expect plenty of Classic Rock, Blues, Alternative and party favorites that you will want to dance to all night long! Join us for our debut and help us show Green Street who their favorite Auntie should be! 21+, No Cover, music starts nice and early around 8 pm! 8 p.m.-midnight Acadia Ballroom at the White Eagle, 116 Green St. 508-353-1108 or find them on Facebook. Bill Beck Performs at Loft, Friday at 8. 8-11:59 p.m. Loft

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{ listings}

If you like country music with a bit of rock tossed in, you should get here early to make sure you get a table. Come on down enjoy a great night out, with great music, food, and drinks. N/A. 7-10 p.m. Canal Restaurant & Bar, Bar/Lounge, 65 Water St. 508-926-8353. Outrageous Greg’s Crazy Karaoke. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. Martys pub. Christmas in the Valley. The 2016 “Christmas in the Valley” concert tour will kick off its 13th season this December. This one of a kind Christmas show features traditional, contemporary, and original Christmas music performed with acoustic instruments and vocals. $15/$10 members & seniors/$5 students/under 5 y.o. Free. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Rockdale Congregational Church, 42 Fowler Road, Northbridge. 617-429-0347 or rockdalechurchonline.org The Supersuckers, Jesse Dayton, & Gallows Bound at the Cove! $13 in advance/$18 at the door Tickets Available at showclix.com/event/supersuckers-jd-gb 21+ Doors at 8pm $13 advance/$18 door. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Cove Music Hall, 89 Green St. 508-363-1888 or find them on Facebook.

Key Performance. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Jillian’s - Worcester, 315 Grove St. 508-793-0900. Sean Daley. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Partner’s Pub, 970 South St., Fitchburg. 978-345-5051. Tequila Bonfire. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Michael’s Cigar Bar, 1 Exchange Place. 508-459-9035. The Jimmy Connor Band. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Whiskey on Water, 97 Water St. Lavender Restaurant Karaoke. Join Magic Mike Entertainment DJ’s for Karaoke Night every Friday & Saturday Night! Free. 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Lavender Restaurant, 519 Boston Post Road, Sudbury. magicmikeentertainment.com DJs. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508-755-0879. DJs. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Compass Tavern, 90 Harding St. 508-304-6044. DJ 21+Canal. N/A. 10:30 p.m.-1:40 a.m. Canal Restaurant & Bar, 65 Water St. 508-926-8353.

holiday season in song. $12 Adults, $10 Senior/Student, $5 Children (5 and under are free). 2:30-4 p.m. Assumption College, Chapel of the Holy Spirit, 500 Salisbury St. Blue Plate Sunday Jam featuring Ravin Blue. Bring your 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177. guitar, bass, voice, drumming ability, harp, violin, etc.. and join in Bret Talbert-Live & Acoustified! Singing and strumming a on the jam. We have a full set up and welcome all musicians to vast array of popular favorites! Free. 8-10:30 p.m. Tavern on the come down and have fun. 3-7 p.m. Blue Plate Lounge, 661 Main St., Common, 249 Main St., Rutland. 508-886-4600. Holden. 508-829-4566. Brett Casavant. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. South Side Grille & Margarita Christmas Concert (All Ensembles). 3-5 p.m. Christ the King Factory, 242 West Broadway, Gardner. 978-632-1057. Church, 1052 Pleasant St. Josh Briggs. 8-11 p.m. Quinn’s Irish Pub, 715 West Boylston St. Northboro Area Community Chorus Christmas Concert. 508-459-2025. NACC 45th Annual Concert. Chorus whose membership represents Ken Macy Band. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Rye & Thyme, 14 Monument 23 local communities performing traditional & seasonal songs. Santa Square, Leominster. 978-534-5900. will make an appearance. $5. 3:15-5:30 p.m. Trottior Middle School, Live Bands. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Blacksheep Tavern, 261 Leominster 49 Parkerville Road, Southborough. 774-249-2497 or nacc.net Road, Sterling. 978-422-0255. Northboro Area Community Chorus’ Annual Christmas That Damn Band. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Frank’s, 274 Shrewsbury St. Concert. Under the direction of founder Anthony Volpe with piano 774-420-2253. accompanist David Rose. The NACC is supported in part by grants Topher Brew. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Happy Jack’s, 785 North Main St., from the Northboro, Shrewsbury & Marlboro Cultural Councils which Leominster. 978-466-3433. are supported in part by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state Live Music. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., You won’t see Rick Moranis, but you will catch a very agency $5. 3:15-5:30 p.m. Trottior Middle School, 49 Parkerville Gardner. 978-669-0122. hungry Audrey II in “Little Shop of Horrors” Road, Southborough. 774-249-2497 or nacc.net Acquaintances. Jeff Entin, Bob Blum &, Larry Balestra..Just some Thursdays-Saturdays, Dec. 2-10, 8-10:15 p.m., at the Right Angle Woman. 4-8 p.m. Frank’s, 274 Shrewsbury St. good time Rock & Roll $5. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. Worcester County Light Opera Company’s Grandview 774-420-2253. 508-926-8877 or entinblum.com Playhouse, 21 Grandview Ave., Worcester. It’s a fun time John Brazile. 4:30-8 p.m. Quinn’s Irish Pub, 715 West Boylston Ed & Dave. $5. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. not to be missed. For more information, email admin@ St. 508-459-2025. 508-853-1350. wcloc.org or call 508-753-4383. Dana Lewis Live! Dana Lewis Live! Playing the Greatest Hits of Jubilee Gardens at Sahara. Don’t miss Rainer Reichel’s last the 50’s to the 80’s in the lounge “The sound track of your Youth” gig with the band Friday Dec 2nd! He’s been playing violin with these Best Wood fired Pizza’s, Italian Food, Full Bar, Lottery & Me! No guys for a dozen years! He’s moving to Thailand with his wife and Cover. Come on out! Free! 6-9 p.m. Cafe’ Sorrento, 143 Central St., we’ll miss them both! Let’s give him a great send off! 9 p.m.-12:30 Milford. 508-478-7818 or find them on Facebook. a.m. Sahara Cafe & Restaurant, 143 Highland St. 508-798-2181. Open Mic Sundays @ Plaza Azteca! To check the schedules Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Partner’s Pub, 970 South St., Fitchburg. >Sunday 4 and open slots visit: Bill McCarthy’s Open Mic World on Facebook Bob Whitlock. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Frank’s, 274 Shrewsbury St. 774978-345-5051. Brunch with Zack Slik. 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Rye & Thyme, 14 Bill McCarthy (originator of the “Half-Hour Sets!”) is your host at 420-2253. On the Rocks. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Michael’s Cigar Bar, 1 Exchange another great Open Mic Night! Email Bill McCarthy to reserve it at: Dan Cormier & Ethan Caouette. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Rye & Thyme, Monument Square, Leominster. 978-534-5900. Place. 508-459-9035. Christmas Concert. A reception and fellowship at 12:30pm openmcc@verizon.net (make sure you put “open mic” in the email’s 14 Monument Square, Leominster. 978-534-5900. Souls on Fire. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Jillian’s - Worcester, 315 Grove St. will precede the concert. Led by Artistic Director and Conductor “subject box”) Network * Collaborate * Learn. Over sixty different Handel’s Messiah - The Worcester Chorus, with 508-793-0900. musicians regularly support my open mic nights all are friendly and orchestra and soloists. For over 100 years, this annual Messiah Konstantin Petrossian, the program features traditional Christmas The Royal Furs. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Whiskey on Water, 97 Water St. music in Armenian and in English. Soprano Joanne Mouradjian is the supportive -- and many are: * Former or currently signed recording holiday concert has served as a local tradition and an integral part Lavender Restaurant Karaoke. Join Magic Mike Entertainment Guest Soloist. (See photo.) She has appeared in the New England artists * Award-winning pro’s or semi-pro’s * Regularly gigging of the Worcester Music Festival! We will be joined by high school DJ’s for Karaoke Night every Friday & Saturday Night! Free. 9:30 area in oratorio, recital, and operetta performances: as oratorio soloist paid-performers * Published songwriters * Recording studio owner/ students through our Festival Singers program, an educational p.m.-1 a.m. Lavender Restaurant, 519 Boston Post Road, Sudbury. with the Providence Singers and the RI Civic Chorale and as the lead operators * Combinations of any and/or all of the above. To check the outreach effort of the Chorus for interested local students, currently magicmikeentertainment.com soprano in many Gilbert and Sullivan operettas with the Ocean State schedules and open slots visit Facebook. Any slot marked as “open” including participants from South Community High School and DJs. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508-755-0879. usually is! Free! 6-9 p.m. Plaza Azteca, 539 Lincoln St. Wachusett Regional High School. $49 adult, $17.50 students, $7.50 Light Opera and the Courthouse Light Opera as well as singing at DJs. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Compass Tavern, 90 Harding St. 508-304-6044. The Sunday Jam with feature artist SHIKIBOO! Mikey Temple Beth-El and is soloist at the First Church of Christ Scientist youth. 8-10:30 p.m. Mechanics Hall, 321 Main St. 508-754-3231, DJ 21+Canal. N/A. 10:30 p.m.-1:40 a.m. Canal Restaurant & Bar, and with the Gregorian Concert Choir of Sts. Peter and Paul Cathedral Lynch hosts the Sunday Jam with a great feature artist each week ext. 205 or musicworcester.org 65 Water St. 508-926-8353. Kelly & Tribe. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Mill 185, 185 West Boylston St., in Providence RI. In addition, she is Assistant Professor of Music in and open jam session. 7-11 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston West Boylston. 774-261-8585. Performance at Wheaton College, teaching a Voice Workshop. A 2004 St. 508-853-1350. >Saturday 3 Ken Macy. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Happy Jack’s, 785 North Main St., trip to Armenia resulted in the 2007 release of her CD, Songs Of The Blue Light Bandits. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Michael’s Cigar Bar, 1 Arms and Armor: Salem Trayned Band. This re-enacting Leominster. 978-466-3433. Exchange Place. 508-459-9035. Armenian Soul. Free. 1:30-3 p.m. Holy Trinity Armenian Apostolic group accurately recreates a 17th-century English colonial militia Live Bands. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. The Blacksheep Tavern, 261 Leominster Church, Sanctuary, 635 Grove St. 508-963-2076. Karaoke. DJ Nancy, of Star Sound Entertainment. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. unit from Salem, Massachusetts. The militia organization in Salem Road, Sterling. 978-422-0255. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385. “An Afternoon in Vienna”. Worcester Schubertiad presents dates back to 1628 and was a continuation of typical European Ricky Duran Performs at Loft, Saturday at 8. 8-11:59 p.m. “An Afternoon in Vienna” featuring Brahms waltzes and seasonal Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Partner’s Pub, 970 South St., Fitchburg. military practices of the day. Dressed in period clothing and equipped Loft 266 Bar & Lounge, 266 Park Ave. 508-796-5177. selections by a vocal quartet and piano. This fundraising concert will 978-345-5051. with historically correct arms and armor, the Salem Trayned Band Whitney Doucette. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. South Side Grille & Margarita Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Classic’s Pub, 285 Central St., Leominster. include a silent auction of items suitable for holiday gifts. Tickets: will show you how our colonial ancestors defended themselves. Factory, 242 West Broadway, Gardner. 978-632-1057. 978-537-7750. 617-512-1882 or worcschubertiad.com. Museum doors open at (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. Live Music. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, 74 Parker St., 1:30PM. $35. 2-3:30 p.m. Worcester Historical Museum, Fletcher 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Conference Room, >Monday 5 Gardner. 978-669-0122. Auditorium, 30 Elm St. 508-753-8278. 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. Blue Mondays - Live Blues. 7 p.m.-1 a.m. Gardner Ale House, Atlantic Avenue Band. Classic rhythm, blues, soul, rock and jazz Carlos Odria - Jazz and World Music Guitar. Solo guitar Dana Lewis Live! Dana Lewis Live! At Quaker Tavern, Rt.146 Exit 74 Parker St., Gardner. 978-669-0122. tunes $5. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Beatnik’s, 433 Park Ave. 508-926-8877. - instrumental music. Original compositions and jazz standards 2 to Rt. 14a, Uxbridge. Playing & singing the Greatest Hits of the Backseat Zero. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Classic’s Pub, 285 Central St., arranged by Peruvian-born guitarist Carlos Odria (Ph.D. Musicology). Fitchburg State Winter Choral Concert. The Fitchburg 50’s to the 80’s. “The soundtrack of your youth” Great Food, Full Bar, Leominster. 978-537-7750. Odria has done extensive research on different world music traditions State University choral ensembles will be joined by singers from Lottery & Me! No Cover. Be There! Free! 6-9 p.m. Nancy’s Quaker the Fitchburg High School and Leominster High School choruses Eclipse. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Simple Man Saloon, 119 High St., Clinton. and developed a unique blend of styles including flamenco, jazz, Tavern, 466 Quaker Hgwy (Route146a), Uxbridge. 508-779-0901. for “Winter around the World” at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 5 in Weston 978-365-1949. samba, Cuban, and Afro-Peruvian genres. He has been a featured Open Mic. Open to musicians, poets, comedians or anyone with a Auditorium, 353 North St. Admission is free. Performers at the Isabel Stover and Pamela Hines. Jazz! Isabel Stover- vocals artist at national music festivals and has performed at concert halls talent! Hosted by Stephen Wright. 6-9 p.m. Nu Cafe, 335 Chandler St. concert will include the Fitchburg State Concert Choir and Chamber Pamela Hines- pian0 Bob Simonelli- bass Miki Matsuki- drums free. and universities across the east coast. For more information, visit: 508-926-8800 or nucafe.com Choir (including university students and faculty), the Fitchburg State 9 p.m.-midnight Nick’s Bar and Restaurant, 124 Millbury St. 508carlosodria.com Free. 2-5 p.m. Homefield Brewing, 3 Arnold Road, Aunt Mimi (new to Basil n’ Spice). Free! 6:30-9:30 p.m. Community Chamber Orchestra (including students, faculty and staff 753-4030 or nicksworcester.com Fiskdale. 774-242-6365. Basil n’ Spice, Thai Cuisine, 299 Shrewsbury S. 774-317-9986 or members), the student a cappella group Harmonic Velocity and the Jack Rabbit Slim. $5. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W “A Worcester Holiday” with the Worcester Children’s basilnspice.com Leominster and Fitchburg high choruses. 7-9 p.m. Fitchburg State Boylston St. 508-853-1350. Chorus. Join the Worcester Children’s Chorus as the celebrate the Mychael David & Howie Swett. Mychael David and Howie Swett.

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• DECEMBER 1, 2016


night day &

University: Weston Auditorium, 160 Pearl St., Fitchburg. XLO’s ‘Almost’ Acoustic Xmas. Starring Rachel Platten with very special guests Parachute and Wrabel $59.50 and $49.50. 8-11 p.m. Mechanics Hall, 321 Main St. 508-752-0888 or mechanicshall.org Karaoke. DJ Nancy, of Star Sound Entertainment. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385.

>Tuesday 6

“Live from Vincent’s” a Roots Music Showcase of the region’s finest Americana performers! The December 2016 showcase will feature singer/songwriter/guitarist Bob Moon (Comanchero - Hamburger Midnight - Fellowship of the King) who will pull double duty as the house MC. Also on the docket is James Keyes. “Occupying his own unique space in American music somewhere between the throaty junkyard stomp of Tom Waits and the wild mercurial ramblings of Dylan, James Keyes is a musician whose own sound is just gritty and earthy enough to scare away the casual listener in these times of disposable culture and just easy enough to make the adventurous a listener for life.” - lifted from his web site. A must see/hear and we will tonight in a half-hour showcase setting of this amazing Central MA talent! In the mix as well is Zack Slik who performs Old Time Back Porch Music, a mix of roots Americana, Blues, Jug Band Jazz, and Old Time. Switching between banjo, mandolin, guitar, and accompanying himself with harmonica. Arrangements of traditional tunes alongside original songs. Jon Bonner (Boogie Chillin’) was our musical host last month and it’s only fitting that he wrap up the 2nd edition of Live From Vincent’s! Jon’s mantra is “Taking American Roots music into the future!” Jon Bonner is also the featured act at Vincent’s on Tuesday’s from 9 pm to Midnight. Jonathan Leary will be after the sound, Marty Ayotte is running the Board at WCUW and I’ll be on hand to take the blame for everything that goes wrong. Hugs welcomed by all if it works right! Tune in at 91.3 FM or stream the show at wcuw.org. Better yet, come and be part of the “live” intimate audience and be heard throughout the land! Let’s pack the house, again, and make this 1st Tuesday of the Month “Live On Air, and Around the World” gig an on-going reality through the blistery months that lie ahead! For more information contact Troy Tyree at 508-753-1012 / troy@wcuw.org. 7-9 p.m. Vincent’s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439 or wcuw.org Tuesday Open Mic Night @ Greendale’s Pub with Bill McCarthy Local Musicians Showcase! To check the schedules and open slots visit: Bill McCarthy’s Open Mic World on Facebook Bill McCarthy (originator of the “Half-Hour Sets!”) is your host at another great Open Mic Night! Email Bill McCarthy to reserve it at: openmcc@verizon.net (make sure you put “open mic” in the email’s “subject box”) To check the schedules and open slots visit Facebook. Any slot marked as “open” usually is! Free. 7:30-11:30 p.m. Greendale’s Pub, 404 W Boylston St. 508-853-1350 or find them on Facebook. Boogie Chillin’. Bluesy, bluegrassy, acoustic band with a twist. Jon Bonner - Guitar & Vocals Fernando Perez - Percussion Zack Slik - Mandolin & Vocals Dan Villani - Violin/fiddle Rose Villani - Bass Free! 9 p.m.-midnight Vincent’s Bar, 49 Suffolk St. 508-752-9439 or find them on Facebook. Karaoke. DJ Nancy, of Star Sound Entertainment. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Club KasBar, 234 Southwest Cutoff. 508-798-8385. Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Classic’s Pub, 285 Central St., Leominster. 978-537-7750.

>Wednesday 7

Brown Bag Concert: NEC Symphonic Winds & U.S. Navy Band Northeast. This annual holiday concert serves up the spirit of the season in a big way. Bill Drury and Erica Washburn from New England Conservatory conduct a broad repertoire and holiday cheer. The students will be joined by Navy Band Northeast, a 35-musician ensemble based on board NAVSTA Newport and one of 11 official U.S. Navy bands worldwide. Bring your own “brown bag” lunch or buy one at the Hall while they last! Free Admission. Noon-1 p.m. Mechanics Hall, 321 Main St. 508-752-0888 or mechanicshall.org OPEN MIC. To check the schedules and open slots visit: Bill

Enjoy Christmas by Candlelight at Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Fridays-Sundays, Dec. 2-23, 3-9 p.m. There’s caroling, pictures with Santa and a whole lot more! The cost is $22 for adults, $14 for youth 4-12. Children 3 and under are free.

instruments welcome. 21+ or with guardian. Sign-up begins at 7:30 free. 8-11 p.m. Legends, Airport Road - Fitchburg Ma, Fitchburg. 978-895-5883. Trivia Night. 8:30-11 p.m. Banner Pub, The, 112 Green St. 508755-0879. Brett Brumby. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Michael’s Cigar Bar, 1 Exchange Place. 508-459-9035. McCarthy’s Open Mic World on Facebook. Bill McCarthy (originator of Karaoke. Come sing your hearts out with DJ Mikey Mic’s every the “Half-Hour Sets!”) is your host at another great Open Mic Night! Wednesday Night. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. MB Lounge, 40 Grafton St. 508Email Bill McCarthy to reserve it at: openmcc@verizon.net (make 799-4521. sure you put “open mic” in the email’s “subject box”) To check the Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Whiskey on Water, 97 Water St. schedules and open slots visit Facebook. Any slot marked as “open” Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Partner’s Pub, 970 South St., Fitchburg. usually is! Free! 6-9 p.m. CJs Steakloft, 369 W. Main St. (route 20), 978-345-5051. Northborough. 508-393-8134 or find them on Facebook. Karaoke. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Classic’s Pub, 285 Central St., Leominster. Open Mic - hosted by Amanda Cote. All genres and acoustic 978-537-7750.

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arts

ADC Performance Center (@ The Artist Development Complex), 18 Mill St., Southbridge. 508-764-6900 or adcmusic. com Anna Maria College, 50 Sunset Lane, Paxton. 508-849-3300 or annamaria.edu ArtsWorcester, “The Pace of Nature” by Allison Coelho Picone, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through Jan. 25; Off the Grid: Call and Response with the Fitchburg Art Museum, Wednesdays, Thursdays,

Inspire us. Digital Multimedia Representative The Holden Landmark Corp., a growing multimedia publication group of over 15 years, seeks an inspiring Digital Multimedia Representative. One with expertise in sales delivering effective multimedia sales strategies, and building determined goal-achievements. Our new representative will be a digital powerhouse, finding effective ways to attract new dollars through new products and services, building stronger relationships with influential clients of all sizes, and showcasing an understanding of what makes our market and its business community thrive.

For more details and to apply, send resume and cover letter to kreal@worcestermagazine.com

Holden Landmark Corp. EOE M/F/V/D

DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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? n g i s a r o f d e e n a e Hav We Can Deliver Your Message! Give Us A Call This Holiday Season! We are YOUR Sign and Graphics Solution Light Boxes • Channel Letters • Pylon Signs • Window Lettering Trade Show Displays • Magnetic Signs Graphic Design Vehicle Wraps and Lettering • Marketing Materials Trade Shows & Exhibits • Embroidery • Custom Carved Signs Digital Services: Responsive Website Design • Search Engine Optimization Retargeting • Direct Email

545 SW Cutoff, Worcester, MA 01607

508- 459-9731

info@signaramaworcester.com • www.signaramaworcester.com or, consult with your Media Consultant

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{ listings}

Fridays, Saturdays, through Dec. 16. Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 1-4 p.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday - Friday, 1-4 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Free. 660 Main St. 508-755-5142 or artsworcester.org Asa Waters Mansion, Admission: $3 for guided tour $7-10 for tea. 123 Elm St., Millbury. 508-865-0855 or asawaters.org Assumption College: Emmanuel d’Alzon Library, 500 Salisbury St. 508-767-7272 or assumption.edu Booklovers’ Gourmet, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 55 East Main St., Webster. 508-949-6232 or er3.com Clark University: University Gallery, Hours: noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, noon-8 p.m. Wednesday, noon-5 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. 950 Main St. 508-793-7349 or 508-7937113 or clarku.edu Clark’s Cafe and Art On Rotation Gallery, Hours: 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday - Saturday. Admission: Free for gallery. 310 High St., Clinton. 978-549-5822 or 978-365-7772 or aorgallery.com College of the Holy Cross: Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Art Gallery, Woven Power: Ritual Textiles of Sarawak and West Kalimantan, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through Dec. 14. Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Friday, 2-5 p.m. Saturday. 1 College St. 508-793-3356 or holycross.edu Danforth Museum of Art, Hours: noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, noon-5 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday - Saturday. 123 Union Ave., Framingham. 508-620-0050 or danforthmuseum.org EcoTarium, Turtle Travels, Sundays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through May 7. Hours: noon-5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. Admission: $15.00 adults; $10 for children ages 2-18, college students with ID & senior citizens. Children under 2 & EcoTarium members free. Additional charges apply for Tree Canopy Walkway, Explorer Express Train, planetarium programs & other special event. 222 Harrington Way. 508-929-2700 or ecotarium.org Fisher Museum Harvard Forest, 324 N. Main St., Petersham. 978-724-3302 or harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu Fitchburg Art Museum, Hours: noon-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, noon-4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. 25 Merriam Parkway, Fitchburg. 978-345-4207 or fitchburgartmuseum.org Fitchburg Historical Society, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday - Tuesday, 10 a.m.-midnight Wednesday, closed Thursday - Saturday. 50 Grove St., Fitchburg. 978-345-1157 or fitchburghistory.fsc.edu Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Road, Harvard. 978-4563924 or fruitlands.org Gallery of African Art, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday - Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Donations accepted. 62 High St., Clinton. 978-265-4345 or 978-598-5000x12 or galleryofafricanart.org Highland Artist Group, 113 Highland St. highlandartistgroup.com Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, Hours: 12:30-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. 414 Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087 or massaudubon.org Museum of Russian Icons, Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 11-3 a.m. Tuesday - Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, 11-3 a.m. Friday, 9-3 a.m. Saturday. Admission: Adults $10; Seniors (59 +), $7; Students, $5; Children 3-17, $5; Children <3, free. 203 Union St., Clinton. 978-598-5000 or 978-598-5000x17 or museumofrussianicons.org Old Sturbridge Village, Hours: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday Saturday. Admission: $14 - $28 charged by age. Children under 3 free. 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Sturbridge. 800-733-1830 or

508-347-3362 or osv.org Park Hill Gallery, Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday - Friday, closed Saturday. 387 Park Ave. 774-696-0909. Post Road Art Center, Hours: closed Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday - Saturday. 1 Boston Post Road, Marlborough. 508485-2580 or postroadartcenter.com Preservation Worcester, Hours: closed Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Friday, closed Saturday. 10 Cedar St. 508-754-8760 or preservationworcester.org Quinebaug Valley Council for the Arts & Humanities, the Arts Center, Hours: 2-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday Friday, 2-4 p.m. Saturday. 111 Main St., Southbridge. 508-346-3341 or qvcah.org Rollstone Studios, Hours: 11-4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. Admission: free. 633 Main St., Fitchburg. 978-348-2781 or rollstoneartists.com Salisbury Mansion, Hours: closed Sunday - Wednesday, 1-8:30 p.m. Thursday, 1-4 p.m. Friday - Saturday. 40 Highland St. 508-7538278 or worcesterhistory.org Saori Worcester Freestyle Weaving Studio, 18 Winslow St. 508-757-4646 or 508-757-0116 or saoriworcester.com Sprinkler Factory, Admission: Free. 38 Harlow St. sprinklerfactory.com Taproot Bookstore, Hours: noon-5 p.m. Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday - Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 1200 West Boylston St. 508-853-5083 or TaprootBookstore.com Tatnuck Bookseller & Cafe, Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday - Thursday, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday Saturday. 18 Lyman St., Westborough. 508-366-4959 or tatnuck.com The Foster Gallery, 51 Union St. 508-397-7139 or thefostergallery.com Top Fun Aviation Toy Museum, Hours: 1:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday. 21 Prichard St., Fitchburg. 978-342-2809 or 978-297-4337 or topfunaviation.com Tower Hill Botanic Garden, Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. Admission: $12 Adults, $9 Seniors & $7 Youth, free to Members & Children under. 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111 or towerhillbg.org Worcester Art Museum, Facing the World: Modernization and Splendor in Meiji Japan, Through April 16, 2017; Helmutt on the Move, Sundays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through Aug. 31; Jeppson Idea Lab: Renoir’s The Jewish Wedding, Through March 26, 2017; KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley, Through Sept. 9, 2017; Picket Fence to Picket Line: Visions of American Citizenship, Through Feb. 5, 2017; Tour of the Month: Celebrations, Saturday; Zip Tour: Northcote: Chess Players, Saturday; Arms and Armor: Knight’s Tale, Sunday; Stroller Tour: Winter’s Coming - Let’s look for snow and wintery pictures in the galleries., Wednesday. Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday - Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Admission: Free for members, $14 adults, $12 seniors, free for youth 17 and under. Free for all first Saturdays of each month, 10am-noon. 55 Salisbury St. 508-7994406 or worcesterart.org Worcester Center for Crafts, Exhibition: The Cup Show, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Dec. 1 - Dec. 24. Hours: closed Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday - Saturday. 25 Sagamore Road. 508-753-8183 or worcestercraftcenter.org Worcester Historical Museum, Mall Series: Worcester Galleria by Stephen DiRado, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through Dec. 24. Hours: closed Sunday - Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday. 30 Elm St. 508-753-8278 or worcesterhistory.org Worcester Public Library, Hours: 1:30-5:30 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday - Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday - Saturday. 3 Salem Square. 508-7991655 or worcpublib.org WPI: George C. Gordon Library, 100 Institute Road. wpi.edu


theater/ comedy

Dick’s Beantown Comedy Escape at Park Grill & Spirits - Fridays, Saturdays. Dick Doherty’s Beantown Comedy Escape at Park Grill & Spirits 257 Park Ave Worcester MA 01609 Dick Doherty’s Beantown Comedy Clubs Showtimes: Friday 9pm-Saturdays 8pm -$20pp Reservations Recommended at 800-401-2221 Prices: $20 Fri/Sat pp except Special Events Drinks and Appetizers available in the show room Full Dinner Available before Show in Restaurant $5off with College ID and Reservations 2 for 1 Active Military or Veterans and Reservations $4 off with Dinner Receipt and Reservations. Fri & Sat Dec 2nd & 3rd Billy Winn and Friends. Dick’s Beantown Comedy Escape at Park Grill & Spirits Great Food and Fun Make Reservations Early at 800-401-2221 or online at dickdoherty.com “Sorry! Wrong Chimney!” - Sundays, Fridays, Saturdays, Saturday, November 26 - Sunday, December 11. A Holiday Farce by Leo W. Sears and Jack Sharkey David Tuttle is moonlighting as a department store Santa so that he can buy his wife a fur for Christmas. He tells her he’s working late at the office, but she finds out he isn’t at the office. A suspected other woman, hypnotism, the notorious Santa burglar Kris Kreigle and his gun toting fiancée, and a confused policeman add up to a rollicking tale that is hilarious Christmas or anytime entertainment. Directed by Christine Taylor & Rob Latino Starring April Swanson, Isaac Swanson, Lacey Melanson, Greg Glanville, Nick Doig, Anne Adams, and Mark Bourdeau November 26 - December 11: Fridays at 8PM, Saturdays at 2PM & 8PM, Sundays at 2PM Tickets: $18, seniors/students/US military $16, 12 and under $10. 2-4, 8 p.m.-10 a.m. Stageloft Repertory Theater, 450A Main St., Fiskdale. Call 508-347-9005 or visit stageloft.org Mary Poppins - Based on the books by P.L. Travers and one of the most popular Disney movies of all time, Mary Poppins delighted Broadway audiences for over 2,500 performances and received nominations for nine Olivier and seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical. Mary Poppins is an enchanting mixture of irresistible story, unforgettable songs, breathtaking dance numbers, and astonishing stagecraft, with lovable characters and plenty of opportunity for special effects and magical illusions. This Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious is expected to sell out fast - get your tickets now! December 3 and 4 at 8PM; December 4 at 2PM; Special Sensory-Friendly Performance on December 3 at 2PM. $17. 2-4:30 p.m. Mount Wachusett Community College: Theatre, 444 Green St., Gardner. Call 978-630-9388 or visit mwcc.edu Kinky Boots - Thursday, December 1-Sunday, December 4. Kinky Boots is Broadway’s huge-hearted, high-heeled hit! With songs by Grammy® and Tony® winning pop icon Cyndi Lauper, this joyous musical celebration is about the friendships we discover, and the belief that you can change the world when you change your mind. Inspired by true events, Kinky Boots takes you from a gentlemen’s shoe factory in Northampton to the glamorous catwalks of Milan. Charlie Price is struggling to live up to his father’s expectations and continue the family business of Price & Son. With the factory’s future hanging in the balance, help arrives in the unlikely but spectacular form of Lola, a fabulous performer in need of some sturdy new stilettos. With direction and choreography by two-time Tony Awardwinner Jerry Mitchell (Legally Blonde, Hairspray) and a book by Broadway legend and four-time Tony Award-winner Harvey Fierstein (La Cage Aux Folles), Kinky Boots is the winner of six Tony Awards including Best Musical, Best Score and Best Choreography. Take a step in the right direction and discover that sometimes the best way to fit in is to stand out. “There is no show hotter than Kinky Boots!” CBS News thehanovertheatre.org/subscriptions.php. Thursday, 7:309:30 p.m. Friday, 8-10 p.m. Saturday, 2-4 and 8-10 p.m. Sunday, 1-3 and 6:30-8:30 p.m. Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts, 2 Southbridge St. Call 877-571-7469 or visit thehanovertheatre.org The 1940’s Radio Hour - Thursday, December 1 - Saturday, December 3. A musical by Walton Jones $20 regular, $17 student/ senior. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Calliope Productions Inc, 150 Main St., Boylston. Call 508-869-6887 or visit calliopeproductions.org

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Comedy of Errors - Friday, December 2 - Saturday, December 3. Come see Millbury High School’s Drama club present William Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors! $5 Student/Senior, $10 General. 7-9 p.m. Millbury Memorial High School, Capparelli Auditorium, 12 Martin St., Millbury. Call 508-865-5841. “Little-Shop-of-Horrors” - Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, Friday, December 2 - Saturday, December 10. 8-10:15 p.m. Worcester County Light Opera Company, The-Grandview-Playhouse, 21 Grandview Ave. Call 508-753-4383. Check out Dr. Gabriele Goszcz’s Annual Birthday Dance Party Friday, Dec. 2, 7-10 p.m., at the Sprinkler Factory, 38 Harlow St., Worcester. There’s a $20 suggested donation, along with material donations to support the Sprinkler Factory and the Golden Bees, who make sleeping bags and provide other necessities to the homeless. Dance to music from DJ Pandaphonic. For more information, visit sprinklerfactory.com or email info@sprinklerfactory.com. Comedy of Errors - Saturday, December 3. Come see Millbury High School’s Drama club present William Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors! $5 Student/Senior, $10 General. 2-4 p.m. Millbury Memorial High School, Capparelli Auditorium, 12 Martin St., Millbury. Call 508-865-5841. “Little-Shop-of-Horrors” - Sundays, Sunday, December 4 - Sunday, December 11. 2-4:15 p.m. Worcester County Light Opera Company, The-Grandview-Playhouse, 21 Grandview Ave. Call 508-753-4383. The 1940’s Radio Hour - Sundays, Sunday, December 4 Sunday, December 11. A musical by Walton Jones $12 regular, $17 student/senior. 2-4 p.m. Calliope Productions Inc, 150 Main St., Boylston. Call 508-869-6887 or visit calliopeproductions.org Auditions for “The Cover of Life” Auditions for “The Cover of Life”, by R.T. Robinson, will be held Monday and Tuesday, Dec 5 & 6 at 6:30 pm. Six women, ages 20-50, and one man in his twenties are needed for this February production directed by Lou-Ellen Corkum. Auditions will consist of readings from the script. Dress comfortably and plan to have a fun time. The read-through will be Wed, Dec 7. Rehearsals will pick up after the holidays, but the cast will have several weeks to learn lines in preparation for rehearsals. Rehearsals will be held on Sunday and Tuesdays. Production dates are February 10, 11, 17, 18 & 19. Presented by permission through special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. Synopsis: Tood, Weetsie, and Sybill are brides in rural Louisiana in 1943. Each married a Cliffert brother. The men are off to war and a local news story about these young wives keeping the home fires burning intrigues Henry Luce. He decides that they belong on the cover Life Magazine and assigns Kate Miller to the story. She has been covering the war in Europe and, though she views doing a “women’s piece” as a career set back, she accepts because it will be her first cover story. Kate spends a week with the Cliffert women and her haughty urban attitude gives way to sympathy as she begins to understand them while coming face to face with her own powerlessness in a man’s world. Filled with charm and fun, The Cover of Life is a deeply affecting story about the struggle for self worth. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Gateway Players Theatre Arts Barn, 111 Main St., Southbridge. Call 508-764-4531 or visit Facebook. Holiday One-Acts Festival. Gateway Players Theatre presents “Holiday One-Acts Festival”. This is an Adult Themed Show. Performance dates are December 2 & 3 at 7:30pm and December 4 at 2pm. This production is part of our New Director’s Workshop. The three directors will be Lynn Boucher, Patrick Bracken and Joe Sawyer, and they are being mentored by Lou-Ellen Corkum, Mary Gahagan and Carole Hayes. Barbara Day is the producer. Tickets are $13 for adults and $11 for seniors, and available for purchase by calling 508-764-4531. Online ticket sales are available at: brownpapertickets.com/event/2711747 The cast includes: Cole Carron, Jason Czernich, Jim Piehl and Sierra Trudel for “Nativity” directed by Patrick Bracken. Luis Aviles, Jason Czernich, Dennis Gahagan and Angela Grove for “Dust of the Road” directed by Joseph Sawyer. Charles Alan, Jason Czernich and Robyn Spain for “Magic

Flowers” directed by Lynn Boucher. Play synopsis: Dust of the Road by Kenneth Sawyer Goodman. Peter and Prudence are surprised by the entrance of a tramp. Peter has had entrusted to him thirty one hundred dollars which he is tempted to keep. On the dawn of Christmas day, Peter and Prudence rejoice in a new happiness that comes of honesty. Nativity by Matt Hoverman. Two strangers (one dressed as Mary, the other as Joseph for separate upcoming holiday pageants) meet in the waiting room of the Bethlehem, PA Fertility Clinic one Christmas Morning. Presented by permission through special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. Magic Flowers by Bill Sterritt. Ethel is a Scrooge-type ad executive who hates Christmas. A homeless man convinces her to buy flowers, which will bring her love, and then she has a visitor appear at her door. This sweetly romantic comedy rounds out the one-acts trio. $13 for Adults, $11 for Seniors and Youth. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Gateway Players Theatre Arts Barn, 111 Main St., Southbridge. 508-764-4531 or find them on Facebook.

classes >Thursday 1

Sogetsu Ikebana. Instructor: Kaye Vosburgh Sogetsu Ikebana is an internationally recognized school of Japanese flower arranging. Member $35, Non-member $50, per class. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-869-6111, ext. 124 or towerhillbg.thankyou4caring.org

>Thursday 1 – Thursday 29

Vinyasa Flow Yoga Class - All Levels. A dynamic yoga practice that seamlessly links breath and movement, while flowing smoothly from posture to posture. Drawing from traditional elements of Ashtanga, Hatha, Iyengar, Kundalini and Pranayama (breathwork). A class designed to build strength and increase endurance, while improving flexibility and reducing stress. Leave each class feeling energized and renewed. Open to ALL Levels $15 Drop-in Class Fee (Class Cards Available). Char Yoga Fitness, 125 Turnpike Road, Westborough. 339-225-9944 or charyogafitness.com

>Friday 2

Friday Morning Birds. Enjoy a leisurely birding experience and help document the sanctuary birds over the season. This walk helps us confirm which birds are migrating and which are year-round residents. We’ll explore different corners of the sanctuary each time you never know what we will find. Birders of all levels are invited. For more information and to register, call 508-753-6087. Free for Mass Audubon Adult Members, $5 Adult Non-members. 7-9 a.m. Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087. Intro to Product Photography with Jessica White. In this 2 hour class, learn the basics of product photography. You will learn basic staging and 2 different options for lighting your product. You will need to bring your own camera (camera phones welcomed), and you will be responsible for knowing how to use your camera. Please feel welcomed to bring samples of your work to practice on! Limit 10 Students $60 Members / $80 Non Members. 6-8 p.m. The WorcShop, Studio 12 - True Life Photography of MA, 243 Stafford St. 774-293-8165 or eventbrite.com Candy Cane and Icicle Ornaments in the Flame Shop. Learn to pull twisted glass cane to create candy cane and icicle ornaments in the flame shop. Awesome for gifts and great practice for pulling twisted canes and stringers for use in your glasswork. Come and join in the holiday fun! No experience necessary. All materials are included. Wear natural fibers and bring a bottle of water to class. All glass classes take place at the New Street Glass Studio, 35B New Street, Worcester, MA 01605. Fee Breakdown: Student Fee: $55 Materials Fee: $5 6:30-9:30 p.m. New Street Glass Studio, Flameworking, 35B New St. 508-753-8183, ext. 301 or register. worcestercraftcenter.org Glassblowing Holiday Ornaments. Get a taste of the ancient art of glassblowing in this fun one-night course. In one evening, you will learn about the history and process behind creating beautiful blown glass at the New Street Glass Studio. After learning the safety

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and studio etiquette rules, students will watch a brief demonstration of this 2000-year-old art before diving in and making their very own holiday ornament from glass gathered out of a 2100-degree furnace. Students will choose their own colors and instructors will guide them through the steps from gathering to blowing the bubble and applying a glass loop for hanging. No experience is necessary; all materials are included. Fee Breakdown: Student Fee: $85 Materials Fee: $5 $90. 6:30-9:30 p.m. New Street Glass Studio, Hot Glass Studio, 35B New St. 508-753-8183, ext. 301 or register.worcestercraftcenter.org

>Friday 2 – February 24

Laboratorio Abierto. Para todos lo que necesitan ayuda usando dispositivos electrónicos. Te enseñamos hacer lo que quieres en la computadora (búsquedas, Facebook, correo electrónico, escritura de resume, programas de Microsoft como Word o Excel) o tu teléfono. 3er Piso, Laboratorio de Computación Gratis y abierto al público. Free. 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Worcester Public Library, 3er Piso, Laboratorio de Computación, 3 Salem Square. 508-799-1655, ext. 3.

>Saturday 3

First Saturday of the Month Volunteer Days at Broad Meadow Brook. Help care for the sanctuary and enjoy a few hours of fresh air, fun and fulfillment. Come once or every week and become part of our growing group of sanctuary volunteers. Together with Mass Audubon staff, put up signs and markers, look for wildlife tracks, pick up branches, fill bird feeders, tend the gardens, and distribute program information. Some tasks may require heavy lifting. Ability to work without supervision required. Carpentry skills welcome. Nature lovers appreciated. Sponsored by Wheelabrator Millbury. For more information, call 508-753-6087. Free. 9 a.m.noon Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087. Genealogical Software Choices. The December meeting will start the winter hours and will be held the first Saturday (Contact: Reference Department at 508-799-1655 or mywpl.org). The morning will begin with a short business meeting followed by the morning’s presentation by Richard Reid. There are so many choices to make today for your genealogical software. This session will cover all the major players with their strengths and weaknesses. Both Windows and Mac programs will be covered and some specialized add-on programs that will help take you to better ways to present your work and to document your findings. Richard Reid is the director of Friends of Irish Research based in Brockton, MA. For the past 34 years he has worked as a computer specialist and analyst. He has taught in several colleges and co-authored several books. His genealogical work has included assisting and training people in their family research and providing regular lectures for a number of organizations throughout New England. The website www.friendsofirishresearch.org documents the work of the group and provides hundreds of links to free research sites. The meeting is open to anyone interested in this presentation. Attendees are encouraged to bring along a friend(s), as well as your own non-alcoholic beverage, munchies will be provided. Anyone bringing goodies to share will receive an extra door prize ticket. Membership is encouraged for anyone pursuing the hobby, passion, or profession of Genealogy. Yearly membership is only $25.00 for an individual and $30.00 for a family living in the same household. Please note that parking isn’t allowed in the “green” areas (further from the door). Note your space number and pay for parking at the outdoor kiosk (credit cards accepted) before entering the library. Questions? Contact: Nancy Schultzberg, Publicity Chairperson, at 774-573-9529. For more information about the Worcester Chapter of the Massachusetts Society of Genealogists, visit our website: massachusettssocietyofgenealogists.org -or- msoginc.org Free. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Public Library, Saxe Room, 3 Salem Square. 508-799-1655. Holiday Nature Crafts for Girl Scouts. Come to the visitor

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center to view our tree decorated with wonderful ornaments handcrafted from all-natural materials, and then join us in the program room to make your own. Volunteers will guide you through the process of creating several ornaments, or you can create your own design. We’ll provide some holiday goodies and music. Drop in anytime between 10 and 12 for some holiday fun! For more information and to register, call 508-753-6087. Free for Members, $5 for Nonmembers. 10 a.m.-noon Mass Audubon: Broad Meadow Brook Conservation Center and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Road. 508-753-6087. Reiki II. $215. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Quinsigamond Community College, 25 Federal St. 508-751-7900 or trainnow.qcc.edu Remembering Our Own - Memorial Service. Please join us as we remember our loved ones at this special event. We will honor their lives, and share our journey together. Feel free to bring a photo of someone you wish to remember. RSVP 508-434-2200 Free. 10-11 a.m. Overlook Hospice, 88 Masonic Home Road, Charlton. Holiday Help Series: Healthy Holiday Baking. We will taste and share recipes for treats to keep your holidays healthy. The event is free and open to all ages, but please register early online at eventkeeper.com as seating is limited! Free. 2:30-4 p.m. Worcester Public Library, Saxe Room, 3 Salem Square. 508-799-1655, ext. 3. Glassblowing Jellyfish Paperweights. Get a taste of the ancient art of glassblowing in this fun one-night course. In one evening, you will learn about the history and process behind creating beautiful blown glass at the New Street Glass Studio. After learning the safety and studio etiquette rules, students will watch a brief demonstration of this 2000-year-old art before diving in and making their very own jellyfish paperweight from glass gathered out of a 2100-degree furnace. Instructors will guide students through the steps from gathering to creating a sea creature with simple color patterns, from casing it in clear glass to shaping their own paperweight. No experience is necessary and all materials are included. Fee Breakdown: Student Fee: $85 Materials Fee: $5 $90. 4:30-7:30 p.m. New Street Glass Studio, Hot Glass Studio, 35B New St. 508-753-8183, ext. 301 or register.worcestercraftcenter.org

>Saturday 3 – June 3

Mommy + Me Creative Movement Class. My Mommy & Me | Walking to 2.5 years An introductory dance and creative movement program, specifically catered to our youngest students! Students will learn rhythmic movements; hand-eye coordination; counting music; stretching; and basic pre-dance techniques. Our Mommy & Me classes offer a chance for parents to spend extra “special” time with their child, as well as meet other parents & their children in a comfortable group setting. Our goal of one-on-one quality instruction is essential for our students’ development of selfesteem and sense of personal achievements. Open to girls and boys, ages 20 months - 2.5 years. Dress Code:_ Dancers should dress comfortably in clothing that is easy to move in; female dancers are welcome to dress like a “ballet dancer” (pink tights, pink leotard, pink skirt), but not required. Ballet shoes or bare feet are recommended for all dancers (no socks, please). [Parents - please wear comfortable clothing. Absolutely no street shoes are allowed on the dance floor at any time.] Tuition: $10 per student (includes accompanying parent); drop-in class. Credit card payments are not accepted for this class. Discounted punch cards available upon request. $10 drop-in per dancer, per week (discounted punch cards also available). 8:45-9:30 a.m. The Dancer’s Sole, Studio II, 6 Main St., Webster. 508-949-1508 or thedancerssole.com

>Sunday 4 – August 27

Helmutt’s Drop In Studio. Add to your museum visit experience by participating in Helmutt’s Drop-In Studio, offered in conjunction with the exhibition, “KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley.” Try your hand at some of the techniques Ed uses to create his colorful picture books, like thumbprint drawing, printmaking, and making pictures with color block shapes. New art-making activities

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weekly. Open hours: Wednesdays-Fridays, 11am-12noon, and 1-3pm; Sundays 2-5pm. Suitable for all ages; Helmutt’s Drop-In Studio is available on a first-come, first-served basis. Free with Museum admission. 2-5 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Studio 100, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

>Monday 5

All-American Worcester Campaign. Join us as we build an application for the 2017 All-American City Award to recognize Worcester and in particular, efforts to improve reading and summer learning for children across the City! Free. 7-8:30 p.m. Worcester Public Library Tatnuck Branch, 1083 Pleasant St. 508-799-8329.

>Tuesday 6

Rainbow Supper Club. The Rainbow Supper Club meets the 1st Tuesday of each month and offers LGBTIQA seniors age 60+ a nutritious meal and an opportunity to socialize with friends. Advance reservations are required. Please call or email by the previous Tuesday: (508)756-1545 ext.404 or wlen@eswa.org All are Welcome: LGBTIQA 60 years old and older; younger partners, friends, and allies! $2.50 suggested donation for those age 60+; the fee for younger individuals is $5.50. 6-8 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church of Worcester, 90 Holden St. 508-756-1545 or meetup.com DIY Dream Catcher. Learn how to make your own dreamcatcher and spend your Tuesday evening talking about arts and crafts.. and the happy dreams they bring! We will craft our own dream catchers using a doily, yarn, ribbon, beads, and of course, creativity. Each participant will start with a doily, 8” embroidery hoop, and yarn to create their dream catcher and then embellish it with various types of yarns, ribbons, beads and other materials provided. . Please note that there is no weaving in this class. Preregister through Paypal: paypal. com Project Level: easy Project Time: 1.5-2 hours Project Cost: $20. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Flying Rhino Cafe, 278 Shrewsbury St. 508-7571450 or find them on Facebook.

>Tuesday 6 – Tuesday 27

Hatha Flow Yoga Class - All Levels. A gentle yoga practice, taught using traditional yoga postures, which are held in accurate alignment with a steady flow from posture to posture. Perfect for those who enjoy the continuous movement of Vinyasa Flow classes, but at a slower pace and with fewer Vinyasas. Flow with a focus on strength, openness, stillness, awareness and breath. Leave each class feeling calm, peaceful and renewed. Perfect for beginners who need some demonstration of yoga poses & intermediate yogis looking for a slower paced class. $15 Drop-in Class Fee (Class Cards Available). 9:30-10:30 a.m. Char Yoga Fitness, 125 Turnpike Road, Westborough. 339-225-9944 or charyogafitness.com

>Tuesday 6 – January 10

Trauma-Sensitive Yoga for Women. This healing TraumaSensitive yoga class series is for any woman who has experienced trauma or any of the following: Anxiety, Depression, Stress, PTSD, and Grief. The objectives of Trauma Sensitive Yoga (TSY) classes are to help participants feel comfortable in their bodies, to learn selfregulation skills, and to improve their ability to direct attention away from ruminative thought processes. Trauma-sensitive yoga is a way for us to safely experiment with having a body. Through yoga we can experiment with: Breathing, Moving, Strengthening, Stretching, and Resting. The classes are set up so that students are in control over what they are doing with their body at all times and the teacher is there to provide safe, professional guidance to help facilitate healing. This is a gentle yoga class and no yoga experience is necessary. $75 for series. 6-7 p.m. Enlightened Interventions, LLC, 51 Union St., Suite 222. 508-317-2323 or clients.mindbodyonline.com

>Wednesday 7

Community Worc Nite #3. The WorcShop is proud to present Community Worc Nights! Come create, make art, check out our facilities. The party is bring your own supplies, and pot luck, so grab a dish and an unfinished project and come spend some time with

• DECEMBER 1, 2016

good people in a place made to cultivate creativity. We’re hoping to throw an event like this every month. $0 - Free. 6-9 p.m. The WorcShop, Classroom Side B, 243 Stafford St. 774-545-0720 or find them on Facebook. Forge your own Bottle Opener with Willow Zietman. In this Bring Your Own Blacksmithing class, bring your own bottle and Willow teach you to make a bottle opener. In this three hour class you will be introduced to the basic blacksmithing techniques of hammering, drawing-out, cutting, bending, and twisting. This class will run for 3 hours, and at the end, you’ll have a finished bottle opener. There is a minimum of 3 students needed to run this class, and a maximum of 6 students. $70 members / $80 non members. 6:30-9:30 p.m. The WorcShop, 243 Stafford St. 774-545-0720 or eventbrite.com

The Worcester Festival of Lights lights up Worcester Common Friday, Dec. 2, 5-9 p.m. Don’t miss the lighting of trees, skating on the Oval, and of course a visit from Santa himself – straight from the North Pole. There is no cost, but get there early, as this annual event always packs the common. For more information, find the event page on Facebook, email AndersonC@WorcesterMA. Gov or call 508-799-1175.

>Wednesday 7 – February 22

City Services Q & A. City Services Q & A provided by the City of Worcester Department of Health & Human Services. Get information on housing, substance abuse treatment and recovery options, human rights, and other services available in Worcester. Stop by their table on the 2nd Floor, Wednesdays 3:00 - 4:00. Sponsored by the WPL Public Services Division. Free. 3-4 p.m. Worcester Public Library, 2nd Floor, 3 Salem Square. 508-799-1655, ext. 3.

family >Thursday 1

Trip to Christmas at the Newport Mansions. Leave Tower Hill at 8am and return by 5:30pm Member $125, Non-member $150, includes transportation, lunch, and admissions to the Breakers and Marble House The glitter of gold and the sparkle of silver will dazzle you as you tour two magnificent mansions decked out in Yuletide finery. The Breakers and Marble House--two National Historic Landmarks and icons of the Gilded Age in America--are filled with thousands of poinsettias, fresh flowers, evergreens and wreaths. Decorated Christmas trees reflecting individual room decor anchor many of the magnificent spaces. Dining tables set with period silver and china complete the elegant setting. And windows of each mansion are lit with individual white candles, in keeping with the colonial tradition. A working garden scale model of the Vanderbilt family’s New York Central Railroad will be on display in the second floor loggia of The Breakers, traveling through a village made up of gingerbread replicas of some of the Newport Mansions, created by local pastry chefs. Member $125, Non-member $150. 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston. 508-8696111, ext. 124 or towerhillbg.thankyou4caring.org Art Carts: Family Fun - Arms and Armor. Knightly armor is nice and shiny, but how does it feel? How heavy is the armor? Is it comfortable? How and why did they decorate it? Discover the answers to these questions and more with our hands-on armor activity! (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. 1-2 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court Balcony, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. Art Carts: Family Fun - Antioch, the Hunt Mosaic & WAM. Ever wonder how our wonderful collection of mosaics got here? How they were made? Where they came from? Where is Antioch? Learn about all this and try your hand at making a mosaic! (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

to read hieroglyphs? Take a look at our three Egyptian inscriptions. Learn how to recognize words and names and how Egyptian writing is different from our alphabet. Then, write your own name in hieroglyphs to take home! (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Egyptian Gallery, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

>Saturday 3

Christmas Pictures with Santa. Ho, Ho, Ho! Santa will be meeting & greeting. Spread the Cheer! Take Christmas pictures together with only a $5 donation! Children & Pets Are Welcome! $5 Donation. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Klem’s, Field, 117 W Main St., Spencer. 508-885-2708 or klemsonline.com Family Tour. Explore the museum galleries with your family on a docent-guided discovery tour. Hear fun facts, stories and enjoy sharing observations and time together. Tours last approximately 30 minutes. Free with Museum Admission. Admission if free the first Saturday of the month from 10:00am - 12:00pm. Tour begins in the Lancaster Welcome Center. Free with Museum admission. 10:30-11 a.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. Families Make Art. Families - Stay after your family tour (starting time 10:30 am), or drop-in for this fun intergenerational time in the galleries. Get inspired by our art and try making something uniquely yours. Materials will be provided. Come recover your childlike sense of free spirited play! Museum admission is free the first Saturday of the month from 10:00am - 12:00pm. Free with Museum admission. 11-11:30 a.m. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. Children’s author visit with Donna Mae. Donna will be reading and signing copies of her books Marshmallows Galore and The Wooly Adventures of PURL for children ages 2-6. For more information visit donnamaeauthor.com. About the author: Donna Mae lives in Massachusetts with her husband and dog Gerty. She loves to write, read, garden, do yoga and of course, knit. About Marshmallows Galore: Come take a trip with Charlie on his Marshmallow journey. See what can happen when sharing and compassion are stirred into the mix! All a little teamwork and anything can happen. This children’s book is meant to inspire out of the box thinking. About >Friday 2 The Wooly Adventures of PURL: PURL just turned six years old. A Art Carts: Family Fun - Arms and Armor. Knightly armor pet lamb and a pair of knitting needles from Momma seemed like is nice and shiny, but how does it feel? How heavy is the armor? a perfect gift. Or is it? Free, books available for purchase. 1-3 p.m. Is it comfortable? How and why did they decorate it? Discover the Booklovers’ Gourmet, 55 East Main St., Webster. 508-949-6232. answers to these questions and more with our hands-on armor Art Carts: Family Fun - Fun and Games. Discover the past activity! (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum by playing games! Learn to play chess medieval style, checkers with admission. 1-2 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court no kings, plus classic games such as Nine Men’s Morris and Mancala! Balcony, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406. Art Carts: Family Fun - Egyptian Heiroglyphs. Ever wanted (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission.


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2-3 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court Balcony, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

>Saturday 3 – Saturday 10

A Christmas Journey. Experience the magic of the season at the EcoTarium’s popular holiday program, A Christmas Journey. Enjoy a reading of Chris Van Allburg’s classic “The Polar Express,” a ride on the Explorer Express Train, hot cocoa and cookies, and a visit with Santa. Tickets for A Christmas Journey are limited and must be purchased in advance online, at the EcoTarium’s Tickets and Information Desk, or by calling 508.929.2700. $20 ages 1 and up (includes museum admission); $10 EcoTarium members. Children under age 1 are free and must sit on an adult’s lap while riding on the train. 10:30-11:30 a.m., 12:30-1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. EcoTarium, 222 Harrington Way. 508-929-2700 or ecotarium.org

>Saturday 3 – Sunday 18

Christmas Overnight at Old Sturbridge Village. New this year, Old Sturbridge Village’s holiday overnight program takes place in the museum’s education center with families making a hearthside dinner. Overnight guests will take in Christmas by Candlelight before gobbling up holiday treats and a Christmas bedtime story. The next morning, young and old will enjoy a continental breakfast, while kids take part in a hands-on craft project and visit with Santa. This program is geared towards multi-age groups. Participants must be a minimum of 6 years old. We cannot make exceptions for younger children due to safety concerns. All children must be accompanied by an adult at the ratio of one adult for every 3 children. Download the Christmas Overnight Guide and Museum Education Map on the website for more information. $125 per person. 4 p.m.-9 a.m. Old Sturbridge Village, Museum Education Bldg, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Sturbridge. 800-733-1830 or osvchristmas.org

>Sunday 4

Art Carts: Family Fun - Antioch, the Hunt Mosaic & WAM. Ever wonder how our wonderful collection of mosaics got here? How they were made? Where they came from? Where is Antioch? Learn about all this and try your hand at making a mosaic! (Programming subject to change) Free with Museum admission. 2-3 p.m. Worcester Art Museum, Renaissance Court, 55 Salisbury St. 508-799-4406.

>Sunday 4 – Sunday 11

A Christmas Journey. Experience the magic of the season at the EcoTarium’s popular holiday program, A Christmas Journey. Enjoy a reading of Chris Van Allburg’s classic “The Polar Express,” a ride on the Explorer Express Train, hot cocoa and cookies, and a visit with Santa. Tickets for A Christmas Journey are limited and must be purchased in advance online, at the EcoTarium’s Tickets and Information Desk, or by calling 508.929.2700. $20 ages 1 and up (includes museum admission); $10 EcoTarium members. Children under age 1 are free and must sit on an adult’s lap while riding on the train. 12:30-1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. EcoTarium, 222 Harrington Way. 508-929-2700 or ecotarium.org

fairs/ festivals >Thursday 1 – Sunday 4

Festival of “Giving” Trees. 2016 Festival of (Giving) Trees Schedule of Events Thursday, December 1 Opening Day Premiere Tree Viewing 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM Admission is $3/person or $5 and stay for Choral Premiere. Be among the first to see the spectacular array of uniquely decorated trees Thursday, December 1 Choral Premiere Special Event 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Admission $5 at the door or online @ www.sparklingtrees.com Performance features a mass Choir from area churches and schools singing Christmas music in a variety of styles. Performed at Notre Dame Church. Immediately followed by tree viewing and refreshments at the LaSalle Reception Center. Sponsored by Big Bunny Market Friday, December 2 Tree Viewing & Senior Citizens’ Day 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM free

admissions for seniors - Ages 62 & over. Free Raffles for Seniors and lunch served by Annie’s Country Kitchen at a special price of $5.00 from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM. Lunch available to all at regular prices. Live entertainment throughout the day. Free tours of the Historic Notre Dame Church at 10:45 and 12:45. Sponsored by Savers Bank Friday, December 2 Friday Night Lights 6:30 PM to 11:00 PM Admission is $15/person Featuring entertainment by Noah Lis, former “The Voice” contestant. Live Auction as well as our silent auction and lots of raffles. Win a weekend getaway for 2, take chances on the 50/50 Raffles, $1000 Lottery Ticket Raffle, many Special Raffles and the Harrington Hospital “Gift of Life” Raffle. Food Stations and Cash Bar. Tickets available online for event and raffles at sparklingtree.com Sponsored by United Lens, Soleil & Suns Bakery, Dexter Russell, Southbridge Savings Bank and Radiation Therapy Services at Central Massachusetts Cancer Center Friday, December 2 New Friday Night Lights Door Prize Giveaway Drawing Friday, December 2nd at 10:00 pm* A weekend getaway for 2 to Mohegan Sun Casino. Prize package includes concert tickets to see Tim McGraw and Faith Hill at the Mohegan Sun Arena with amazing seats. Dinner reservations at Tuscany Restaurant, breakfast voucher, and hotel accommodations for the evening as well as $100 casino cash. Sponsored by Radiation Therapy Services at Central Massachusetts Cancer Center *Must be present to win. Saturday, December 3 Children’s Day 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Food available for purchase 11:00 AM- 2:00 PM Hosted by St. John Paul II Parish Youth Group 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM Visit with Santa Claus in the Tuscany Room 10:00 AM - Kevin Driscoll and Doug the talking Dog 11:00 AM “Holly” the Elf 11:45 AM Balloon Making with “Holly” the Elf 12:30 Lee Irish Dance 1:15 Elm St. Congregational Church Bell Ringers Entertainment sponsored by Southbridge Cultural Council, Southbridge Savings Bank and D&D Welding Saturday, December 3 Festival of (Giving) Trees “Festival’s Got Talent” Contest. 3:00 PM Festivals Got Talent Contest LaSalle Reception Center, Southbridge, MA Enjoy local talent as they compete for cash prizes. Sponsored by Hyde Tool Sunday, December 4 Final Day 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM Admission is $3/person Pancake/Sausage Breakfast available for purchase from 9:00 to 11:00 AM Hosted by Boy Scout Troop 160 The fun continues with entertainment throughout the day. Special guest Noah Lis, joins us again. Silent auction continues bidding at sparklingtree.com. All raffles drawn at 3:00 PM. Winners of trees and raffles announced shortly thereafter. All tree, raffle and auction item winners must pick items before 7:00 PM $3 unless otherwise noted. LaSalle Reception Center at Notre Dame Church, 444 Main St., Southbridge. 508-765-0601 or sparklingtrees.com

>Friday 2 – Friday 30

Candlelight tours “At Home for the Holidays”. Stroll the historic rooms of Salisbury Mansion by candlelight and celebrate the spirit of the holiday season. You’ll be “At Home for the Holidays” with docents who will share the stories of Worcester and the Salisburys as you enjoy the decorations by local florists and volunteers. Nonmembers: adults $10; up to 18, $5. Members, $5. (No passes.). 4:30-6:30 p.m. Salisbury Mansion, 40 Highland St. 508-753-8278.

>Friday 2 – Friday 23

Christmas by Candlelight. Christmas by Candlelight at Old Sturbridge Village is an evening filled with New England holiday traditions, live musical performances, storytelling, sleigh rides, festive foods, a roaring bonfire, and strolls around the decorated Village Common. New this year is the North Pole Village where families will find Santa and his whimsical elves, Mrs. Claus’ Bake Shop, a magical talking Christmas tree, a kids’ holiday craft workshop, and an expanded G-scale train display. And do not miss the nightly tree lighting and the ever-popular gingerbread house contest! Christmas by Candlelight highlights include: -Old Sturbridge Village’s town common decorated for the holidays with twinkling lights, glowing candles, fresh evergreen garlands and wreaths, and a 40 foot Village Christmas tree -An all-new North Pole Village for families and kids to explore and enjoy including Santa Claus and Tinsel, the Village’s talking Christmas tree -Holiday traditions explained and recreated including roasting chestnuts, yule logs, mistletoe, and more

-Demonstrations of period gingerbread baking and cider mulling, as well as tin-making, pottery and 19th-century printing -Strolling Victorian carolers -Sleigh rides (weather permitting) -Gingerbread House Contest -Display of the Little Town of Bethlehem nativity -Puppet Shows and Magic Shows with Bob Olson -Christmas carol sing-a-longs -Dance from Dicken’s A Christmas Carol -Readings of The Night Before Christmas, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and A Visit from Saint Nicholas -Readings of “The Nativity Gospel of Saint Luke” and “The Nativity Gospel of Saint Matthew” Adults: $22 | Youth ages 4 -12: $14 | Children 3 and under: Free. 3-9 p.m. Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Road, Sturbridge. 800-733-1830 or osvchristmas.org

>Saturday 3

Abby Kelley Foster Charter School 5th Annual Holiday Craft Fair. A great place to get some holiday shopping done! Free admission! Free parking! A kid zone! Food! Raffles! Fun and shopping for everyone! 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 6 New Bond St., Worcester. Christmas Festival. This event will feature raffles, children’s activities, crafts, jewelry, flea market, nativity displays, model trains and more! Bring along a donation of a new toy for “Toys for Tots” and enter to win a prize! Bring along your appetite and enjoy a delicious lunch! No admission fee - come enjoy the festivities, including live music to get you in the Christmas spirit! No entry fee. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. St. Christopher Church, Church Hall, 950 West Boylston St. 508-853-1492. Princeton Arts Society’s Show & Holiday Marketplace. 40 artists (Society Members) have produced hundreds of small wall artworks and artisan crafts of all kinds of gift items appropriate for holiday giving (prints, jewelry, ornaments, cards, arrangements, etc., etc.). Come support our local artists. Free. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Center Building, 18 Boylston Ave., Princeton. 978-464-2051 or princetonarts.org Santa’s Workshop. Holiday fun! Decorate toys in Santa’s workshop. Make your own wrapping paper. Go ice fishing in Elf Pond. Decorate a photo frame. Write a letter to Santa. Juice and cookies with Mrs. Claus as she reads “Twas the Night Before Christmas” at 11 AM. Reserve your spot(s) by calling 508-753-8278. $10 per person. 10 a.m.-noon Worcester Historical Museum, Fletcher Auditorium, 30 Elm St. 508-753-8278.

>Sunday 4

Worcester JCC’s Holiday Shopping Boutique. Come and get your holiday shopping done early at the Worcester JCC’s Holiday Shopping Boutique! This event will feature a raffle, local artisans and crafters of homemade doll clothes, jewelry, leather crafts and more. Popular community vendors including LulaRoe, Thirty-one, Tastefully Simple, Tealightful, Usborne Books, and Discovery Toys will be there, just to name a few! Proceeds will go to benefit our Early Childhood Center. For more information, please contact Sandy Scola at sscola@worcesterjcc.org or call (508) 756 - 7109 x258 Free. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Worcester JCC, 633 Salisbury St. 508-756-7109, ext. 258 or bit.ly/2ePSh6m stART at the Station. Browse through 100 Artists and Crafters in the Grand Hall and then take a stroll around the Concourse where 35 more Artists and Crafters will be selling their wares. As with all stART events, artists and crafters create only handmade goods. Wares will range range from textiles, pottery, stained glass, and fine jewelry to photography, pet wares, holiday cards, ornaments, terrariums and so much more. Shop before the crowds beginning at 9AM for an entry fee of $15. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Grand Hall at Union Station, 34 Washington Square. startonthestreet.org

college sports Men’s Basketball Clark Dec. 1 v Becker, 5:30 p.m. Dec. 6 v Fitchburg State, 7 p.m.

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Assumption Dec. 3 @ Franklin Pierce, 3:30 p.m. Dec. 6 v Saint Anselm, 7:30 p.m. Anna Maria Dec. 1 v Mount Ida, 5:30 p.m. Dec. 3 @ Rivier, 3 p.m. Nichols Dec. 3 v Wentworth, 12 p.m. Dec. 6 @ Western New England, 7:30 p.m. Becker Dec. 1 @ Clark University, 5:30 p.m. Dec. 3 @ Newbury College, 3 p.m. Holy Cross Dec. 3 @ New Hampshire, 1:00 p.m. Dec. 7 @ Maine, 5:30 p.m. . WPI Dec. 1 @ Framingham State, 6 p.m. Dec. 3 @ Fitchburg State, 1 p.m. Dec. 6 v MCLA, 7 p.m. WSU Dec. 1 @ Lasell, 8 p.m. Dec. 3 @Wheaton, 3 p.m. Dec. 6 @ Mass-Dartmouth, 7 p.m.

Women’s Basketball Clark Dec. 3 @ Emerson College, 1 p.m. Dec. 7 @ Coast Guard Academy, 7 p.m. Assumption Dec. 3 @ Franklin Pierce, 1:30 p.m. Dec. 6 v Saint Anselm, 5:30 p.m. Anna Maria Dec. 1 v Simmons, 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3 @ Rivier, 1 p.m. Nichols Dec. 3 v Wentworth, 2 p.m. Dec. 6 @ Western New England, 5:30 p.m. Becker Dec. 1 @ Southern Vermont, 7 p.m. Dec. 3 @ Newbury College, 1 p.m. Holy Cross Dec. 7 v Penn State, 7:05 p.m. WPI Dec. 3 @ Wheaton, 1 p.m. Dec. 7 @ Smith, 7 p.m. WSU Dec. 2 @ Wesleyan, 6 p.m. Dec. 3 v TBA @ Wesleyan Tournament, TBA Dec. 6 @ Keene State, 7 p.m.

Men’s Ice Hockey

Assumption Dec. 3 v Stonehill, 6:35 p.m. Dec. 6 @ Framingham State, 7:30 p.m. Nichols Dec. 1 @ Johnson & Wales, 6:55 p.m. Dec. 3 @ Suffolk, 7 p.m. Becker Dec. 1 v Western New England, 7:40 p.m. Dec. 3 @ Wentworth, 3 p.m. Holy Cross Dec. 2 v Air Force, 7:05 p.m. Dec. 3 v Air Force, 7:05 p.m. WSU Dec. 1 @ Plymouth State, 6 p.m. Dec. 4 v Salem State, 4 p.m.

DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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www.centralmassclass.com “Believe It”--or not. by Matt Jones

JONESIN’ Across 1 Sushi fish also called yellowtail 4 Amount a cab driver gives to you 8 “___ O’Riley” (“CSI: Miami” theme song) 12 Participated in racewalking 13 Like a serrano pepper, compared to a poblano 15 Olmert who preceded Ariel Sharon as Prime Minister of Israel 16 Mitsubishi off-road three-wheeler, for example 17 Exact quote from Gordon Gekko in “Wall Street” 19 Catchphrase spoken verbatim on the original “Star Trek” series 21 “La ___ Bonita” (U.S. #1 hit for Madonna) 22 ___ & Literacy (brown category in Trivial Pursuit) 23 Army service call used by Al Pacino in all of his movies (not just “Scent of a Woman”) 25 Used an old phrase 27 “Winnie-the-Pooh” marsupial parent 29 202.5 deg. on the compass 30 Conjunction that’s spelled with a backslash 31 “Better Call ___” (spin-off sequel to “Breaking Bad”) 33 Creatures proven to be found at Area 51, for short 34 Process scrupulously utilized by all news outlets (which I obviously didn’t do with a single clue in this puzzle) 38 Abbr. from the Latin for “and many more” 41 Drink produced by the real-life brand Heisler 42 Nobel Peace ___ (award given in Stockholm) 46 Hundred Years’ ___ (which lasted less than 100 years) 47 Suffix meaning “doctrine” which is not a valid Scrabble word by itself 48 One of the original Three Musketeers, along with D’Artagnan 49 Beginning-of-term activities 51 Meat ___ (“Aqua Teen Hunger Force” character with three teeth) 53 RNs report to them 54 Famous Greta Garbo line from “Grand Hotel” 58 Idiom taken directly from Shakespeare’s “King John” 59 ___ Tin Tin (movie German shepherd originally played by a female) 60 Universal plasma donor’s blood type, for short 61 Shout of the recently incarcerated 62 Tic-___-Dough (pencil and paper game) 63 Shrek in the movie series, but not in the original William Steig book

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Fun By The Numbers Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test! Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

64 Did 100 kph in a 70 mph zone, e.g. 65 Opposite direction from 29-Across Down

37 Jazz artist Diana who married Elvis Presley 38 Bo Sheep in “U.S. Acres,” for one 39 Airplane activity that takes place in the air 40 Night ___ (“X-Men” character aka Hank McCoy) 43 Toyotas and Subarus, in Japan 44 Flowers that repel hummingbirds 45 Sister magazine of Ebony 47 Lives and breathes 48 Singer of the “Spectre” theme song 50 Palmolive spokesperson played by three different actresses 51 Tom whose second novel was “The Bonfire of the Vanities” 52 “... It’s ___! It’s Superman!” 55 “Analyze ___” (2002 sequel) 56 Permanent worker 57 Negative vote 58 Nickelodeon’s trademark slime

1 Coffee bean that yields more caffeine than its counterpart 2 Venerates, slangily 3 Like an unexpired coupon 4 Flower, south of the Pyrenees 5 Bungling 6 Semillon and Riesling, for two 7 Speaker of the first line of the first episode of “South Park” 8 “Ain’t Too Proud, ___ Differ” (Temptations hit) 9 What an Australian weatherman may say “it’s gonna be” on an August day 10 Like boulders 11 Use the minus button 13 “Citizen Kane” studio Last week's solution 14 “___ the news today, oh no” (Beatles lyric) 18 Neighborhood in London’s East End 20 Time ___ the Year (selection made since the magazine’s inception) 24 “___ Like the Wind” (“Dirty Dancing” song) 26 Phanerozoic, for one 27 West-side tributary of the Rhine 28 Cheer for a pescador 31 Boat part furthest away from the bow 32 Card played last in a winning game of Klondike solitaire 35 “Santa Barbara” airer, once 36 Three-word EMT skill, for short ©2016 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

• D E C E M B E R 1, 2 0 16

Reference puzzle #808

Who said nothing in life is free? Run your four line ad for FREE for two weeks and then you have to the option to run your ad until it sells for $20! Or you may run your ad from the beginning until it sells for $20 (no refund if the item sells within the two weeks)

SUBMIT ITEMS UNDER $2016 FOR FREE! Here’s all you need to do! 3 ways to submit ...

1. Mail completed form to Central Mass Classifieds, P.O. Box 546, Holden, MA 01520 2. OR FAX the completed form to 508-829-0670 3. OR Email the info with name/address/phone number to sales@centralmassclass.com

NO PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED FOR FREE ADS

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY ... We are not liable for misinformation due to ad being illegible: Have you advertised in the Central Mass Classifieds before? Please check one. ___Yes ___No Name ________________________________________________Phone___________________________ Address ___________________________________________ Town _________________Zip _________ Email Address (optional) _________________________________________________________________ Ad Text: (approx 28 characters per line includes letters, spaces, numbers, punctuation) _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

PLEASE READ SUBMISSION RULES: Maximum 4 lines (approx. 28 characters per line). We reserve the right to edit if ads come in that are too long. NO phone orders accepted. See ways to submit above. Merchandise Ads Only- NO autos, snowmobiles, RV’s, trailers, boats, ATV’s, etc. We have a special rate for these ads ($20 till it sells). NO business Ads accepted for this section. If we suspect the ads are being sent in by a business, we reserve the right to refuse. Limit 1 ad per name/address/ phone number every 2 weeks. Free Ads will run for 2 weeks. If you choose to run your ad until it sells for $20, no refund will be given if it sells within the first two weeks. Limit 1 item per ad (group of items OK if one price for all and under $2016). Price must be listed in ad. NO Cemetery Plots.

Sudoku Solution on page 46


Classified

www.centralmassclass.com

978-728-4302

www.centralmassclass.com

sales@centralmassclass.com

FAX: 508-829-0670 Email:

Reaches Over 90,000 Readers in Print and Online • Ads post immediately! New postings every day!

AUTOMOTIVE

HOMES

EMPLOYMENT

SERVICES

MERCHANDISE

READERS NOTICE

SERVICES

CHIMNEY CLEANING

DISCOUNT OIL

ELECTRICAL SERVICES

EXCAVATION

Readers Notice:

ALTERATIONS

Ruchala Chimney Sweeping -Caps -Cleaning -Waterproofing -Chimney Liners Serving the Wachusett Area. Certified and Insured. ruchalachimney.com 978-928-1121

OLD MAN OIL Why Pay More? Serving Wachusett Region. Scott Landgren 508-886-8998 24 hour service (508-832-5444 service only) Visa, MC, Discover, Cash. www.oldmanoil.com

Kurt Smollin, Electrician All your electrical needs. Additions, pools, spas, service upgrades. 30 yrs exp. Quality work. Masters Lic. 20050A Insured. Call (508)829-5134

BBC EXCAVATING Site work for new homes/additions. Septic system installation repair. Driveway maintenance/repair. Drainage/grading. Sewer/water connections. Stump removal. 15 Years in Business. NO JOB TOO LARGE OR SMALL. Brian Cheney 978-464-2345

This newspaper will never knowingly accept any advertisement that is illegal or considered fraudulent. If you have questions or doubts about any ads on these pages, we advise that before responding or sending money ahead of time, you check with the local Attorney General’s Consumer Fraud Line and/or the Better Business Bureau. Also be advised that some phone numbers published in these ads may require an extra charge. In all cases of questionable value, such as promises or guaranteed income from work-at-home programs, money to loan, etc., if it sounds too good to be true – it may in fact be exactly that. This newspaper cannot be held responsible for any negative consequences that occur as a result of doing business with these advertisers. Thank you.

Customer Dress Making Expert seamstress and dress maker. 557 Lancaster Street Suite 103. Leominster. International Expertise! 978-227-2953

HOME SERVICES CARPET CLEANING Is Your Home True Pro Clean? Free Estimates. Monthly Specials. Call Today@ 978-987-3911 True Pro Cleaners. Steam Cleaning, Carpets, Upholstery, Tile & Grout. www.trueprocleaners.com Phillipston, MA

HEALTH, MIND & BEAUTY INSPIRATION

MASSAGE

Need a friend?

• Fibromyalgia • Mood Disturbances • Sleep Deprivation • Pain From Work & Traveling

Call Dial-A-Friend

508.852.5242

Inspirational Messages Recorded Daily

Get a massage today with Helen Nguyen for only $49 (reg $65)

Massage and Prenatal Therapy 131 Lincoln Street, Worcester, MA 01605 (Near Lincoln Dental and Adcare Hospital)

24 Hours Everyday

CLEANING SERVICES

508-400-1977

MUNDIAL CLEANING SERVICES LOOKING FOR HOUSE CLEANING? GOOD REFERENCES,FULLY INSURED, 12 YRS EXPER FREE ESTIMATE CALL LUCIA AT 774-535 2576 774-535-2575

BATHTUB REFINISHING

DECORATING Color Consulting & Decorating Interior, exterior paint colors, designing window treatments & furniture layouts. Melissa Ruttle (978)464-5640 mmrruttle@gmail.com www.colorsconsulting.com

Julie French Interiors Rethink - Refresh - Redesign Home Staging & Redesign Color Consultation Shopping Services - Wallpaper Removal Interior Decorating julie@juliefrenchinteriors.com 508-523-1209 DISCOUNT OIL Al’s Oil Service Best Prices, Full Service Serving Worcester County for 50 Years! 24 Hour Expert Burner Service 508-753-7221 alsoil.com

Don’t Replace,

Refinish! • THOUSANDS LESS THAN REPLACEMENT!

“Yesterday, my bathtub was ugly.

Today, it’s beautiful!”

After! ALL WORK GUARANTEED

We Also Repair and Refinish: • Countertops • Tile Showers & Walls • Sinks & Vanities • Fiberglass Tubs & Showers

Call for a FREE Estimate! 508-655-2044 Each Miracle Method franchise independently owned and operated.

See our work at MiracleMethod.com/

D E C E M B E R 1, 2 0 16 • W O R C E S T E R M A G A Z I N E . C O M

39


Service Directory

www.centralmassclass Call Sales at 978-728-4302 .com

SIZE PER BLOCK 1.75 X 1.75 8 weeks ........... $32.75/week = $262 12 weeks ......... $27.75/week = $333 20 weeks ......... $26.20/week = $524 36 weeks ......... $24.50/week = $882 52 weeks ......... $23/week = $1196 Minimum commitment of 8 weeks.

to place your ad or e-mail sales@centralmassclass.com

Advertising

Advertising CHIMNEY SERVICES

BUSINESS REFERRAL PROGRAM

TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEP

Refer a business to join our Service Directory, C.S.I.A. Certified Sweep #1529 and if they advertise with us, you’ll receive Insured a $25 credit on your account for future Professional Cleaners Since 1982 advertising. We appreciate your business in the Randy Moore 508-839-9997

978-728-4302 Central Mass Classifieds!! JUNK REMOVAL

MOVING, DOWNSIZING & CLEANOUTS Buy, Move or Remove Everything! Estate Cleanouts, Donate, Repurpose

Some Jobs Done for Free Call Peter (978) 835-2601

www.GoRedRooster.Com

Advertising

"Small Jobs My Specialty" CALL

508-839-1157 LIC. #E23477

Flooring 30 Years in Business

C&S

Carpet Mills CARPET & LINOLEUM 30 Sq. Yds. $585 Installed with Pad Berber, Plush or Commercial

ELECTRICIAN

800-861-5445 or 508-886-2624

Advertising

Advertising LANDSCAPE SERVICES

Advertising

LANDSCAPING BUSINESS REFERRALMILLER’S PROGRAM •Fall Cleanup •Tree Removal

Refer a business to join our Service•Tree/Shrub Directory, and if they advertise with us, you’llTrimming receive •Snow Plowing a $25 credit on your account for•Gutter futureCleaning advertising. We appreciate your business in the

774-230-0422

978-728-4302 Central Mass Classifieds!!

Fully Insured Free Estimates www.millerslandscapingma.com

Advertising PAINTING SERVICES

Refer a business to join our Service Directory, Interior/Exterior Painting & and if they advertise with us,Staining you’ll•receive Powerwashing Concrete Epoxy a $25 credit on your account for future Licensed and advertising. We appreciate yourFully business in Insured the Grafton Resident

978-728-4302 508-479-8040 Central Mass Classifieds!!

WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

Bob Yaylaian

FLOOR COVERING

TopHatChimneySweepmass.com

✰PROGRAM ✰✰✰✰ BUSINESS REFERRALFive Star Painting

40

ELECTRICAL SERVICES

ASK about double blocks (size 3.75” x 1.75”) and COMBO pricing into our other zone and reach 40,600 households in 26 towns in Central Mass each week. FREE line ad included with each block purchased. Book for 52 weeks and receive a Spotlight Business of the Week! Ask for details!

• D E C E M B E R 1, 2 0 16

Advertising

Free Metal Included Call Tom

Advertising

BUSINESS REFER

Refer a business to join and if they advertise a $25 credit on you advertising. We appreci

978-728-4302 Central Mass Advertising MASONRY

BUSINESS REFERRAL PROGRAM BULKHEADS Donald F. Mercurio

Refer a business to join our Service Directory, Repaired & Replaced and if they advertise with us, you’ll receive a $25 credit on your account Foundation for future Repairs Brick • Block •in Stone advertising. We appreciate your business the Basement Waterproofing

978-728-4302 Central Mass Classifieds!!

508-835-4729 • West Boylston

Owner Operator Insured

Advertising WINDOW REPLACEMENT

SNEADE BROS. BUSINESS REFERRAL PROGRAM VINYL SIDING & Refer a business to join our Service Directory, REPLACEMENT WINDOWS and if they advertise with us,Fully you’ll receive licensed & Insured a $25 credit on your account for future Richard Sneade advertising. We appreciate your508-839-1164 business in the www.sneadebrothers 978-728-4302 windowandsiding.com Central Mass Classifieds!!

WELLS No Water? Stop Wishing For It! Well & Pump Installation & Filtration Service

978-422-7471 24 Hr Emergency Service 877-816-2642 Mobile: 978-815-3188


www.centralmassclass.com EXCAVATION

GLASS

Complete Sitework Septic Systems, Driveways, Drainage, Grading, Etc. ALSO, Small Excavator with blade/ thumb & Operator for rent $85/hr. plus delivery. 4 hr. min. 978-503-9385

Central Glass Co. A Complete Line of Glass. Automotive-Residential. Window Glass Repairs, Screen Repairs/Pet Screens, Tub & Shower Glass Enclosures, Table Tops, Mirrors & More. Family Owned Over 50 Years. 127 Mechanic St. Leominster 978-537-3962 M-F 8-4

FIREWOOD

GUTTERS

TREE SERVICE | FIREWOOD Fully Insured | Free Estimates Free Delivery $250 per Cord (128 Sq Ft) or $150 for 1/2 Cord (64 Sq Ft) Carlson Tree Service 508-829-1777

FIREWOOD for sale, green or seasoned clean dry solid hardwood delivered. Call to schedule before we are sold out. 508 -868-0508 FLOORING/CARPETING

Creative Floors, Inc. Ceramic-Carpet-Vinyl Marble- Granite- Laminate Wallpaper Pre-finished Hardwood Sales-Design- Installation Residential & Commercial Free Estimates. Carpet Binding Financing Available Come visit our showroom! 508-829-7444 www.creativefloorsinc.com FLOORING/CARPETING C & S Carpet Mills Carpet & Linoleum 30 Sq. Yds. $589 Installed with Pad. Free Metal Incl’d. Berber, Plush or Commercial. Call Tom: 800-861-5445 or 508-886-2624

FURNITURE RESTORATION Paul G. Hanson Furniture Repair. Major/Minor Repairs. Chair regluing. Touch ups. Pick-up & delivery. Call Paul (978)464-5800

Gutter Cleaning Single family homes starting @$75 Two family homes starting @$90 ALL LEAVES BAGGED AND TAKEN AWAY FULLY INSURED 774-696-4934

HEATING & PLUMBING SCOTT BOSTEK PLUMBING & HEATING Small Jobs Is What We Do Residential Repair Specialist Water Heaters-DisposalsFrozen Pipes-Remodels & AdditionsDrain Cleaning-Faucets Ins. MPL 11955 Free Estimates 25 yrs Exp. Reliable 774-696-6078

PLUMBING

LAWN & GARDEN

JOSH SHEA PLUMBING

LANDSCAPING & LAWN MAINTENANCE Free Fall Clean Up Quotes

Specializing in plumbing service and repairs. 18+ years of experience. Licensed & Insured Master Plumber #13680 10% Senior Discount joshsheaplumbing.com 508-868-5730 SIDING Sneade Brothers VINYL SIDING & REPLACEMENT WINDOWS Fully licensed & Insured Richard Sneade 508-839-1164 www.sneadebrothers windowandsiding.com TREE SERVICES Ross A. McGinnes Tree work, Stump removal, pruning & removals. Free estimates. Call 508-365-9602

C&R Remodeling Additions & all home improvements, 25 yrs exp. New & historic David 508-829-4581 HOME SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS Turn a job to do into a job well done with PK Services Landscape cleanups, snow removal services, plumbing and electrical services and Weatherization Call now @ (978) 549-0853

MASONRY Donald F. Mercurio BULKHEADS Repaired & Replaced Foundation Repairs Brick*Block*Stone Basement Waterproofing 508-835-4729/West Boylston Owner Operator Insured

Call anytime to be added to our schedule. Prepay Discount 978-228-5296 LANDSCAPING & LAWN MAINTENANCE Miller’s Landscaping Fall Cleanup, Tree Removal, Tree/Shrub Removal, Snow Plowing, Gutter Cleaning Fully Insured, Free Estimates 774-230-0422. millerslandscapingma.com Burnham Maintenance Clean-ups. Lawn Maintenance. Shrub Pruning. Bark Mulch, Screened Loam & Compost. Patios & Walkways. Fertilization Programs. Deliveries Available. Please call 508-829-3809 or 508-400-4263

Sterling Peat Inc. Quality Screened Loam & Compost, Screened Loam/ Compost Mix, Mulches, Screened Gravel. Fill, Fieldstone. 978-422-8294 SNOW PLOWING

Great prices on

Snow Plows and Sanders Call Mike 508-835-3190 or email mike@flaggrv.com 66 West Boylston St. West Boylston

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED Seeking families throughout Central Massachusetts who are interested in improving a child’s life. Call to inquire about our upcoming foster parent training.

MULCH & LOAM

HOME IMPROVEMENT

FOSTER PARENTS

$1,000 SIGNING BONUS Call for Details (Must mention this ad during inquiry)

688 Main Street, Holden, MA Toll Free (877) 446-3305

www.devereuxma.org

EMPLOYMENT

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Administrative Assistant, FT, West Boylston Entry level position; potential upward mobility to field duties. Responsibilities: daily office tasks, phone/ email communications, transcriptions, social media/internet research. Qualifications: MS Office, critical thinking/ writing. Prior office experience & Bachelor’s Degree preferred. CL & Resume to SLajoie @PrivateInvestigator.com

Plow Driver

CDL driver for plow truck. Reliability a must. $25.00 an hour. 508-393-8877

HELP WANTED

JOB OPENINGS TOWN OF PRINCETON The Town of Princeton is accepting applications for the following positions: TRUCK DRIVER/HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR in the Highway Department. This position has an hourly wage range between $18.36 to $19.76 per hour. Min. qualifications include: high school diploma or GED, Mass. CDL Class B driver’s license, Hoisting Engineer License or ability to obtain hoisting license w/in 1 year, three years’ experience in highway construction and maintenance activities, experience with repair and maintenance of automotive and heavy-duty construction equipment preferred. Three to five years’ experience in all aspects of snow removal. Snow and ice overtime required. May be required to work nights and/or weekends. SEASONAL WINTER EMPLOYEE’S in the Highway Department. This is a temporary position, on an as needed basis, with an hourly wage rate of $18.00 for a Class D license or $18.50 for a Class B license. The incumbent will participate in snow & ice operations. Copies of the full job descriptions are available online at www. town.princeton.ma.us. Applications must be submitted to the Town Administrator by email at townadministrator@town.princeton.ma.us by 4:00 PM on Wednesday, December 14, 2016. Positions open until filled. The Town of Princeton is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

D E C E M B E R 1, 2 0 16 • W O R C E S T E R M A G A Z I N E . C O M

41


www.centralmassclass.com HELP WANTED LOCAL

HELP WANTED LOCAL

HELP WANTED LOCAL

SALMON Health and Retirement Now Hiring

Hiring Seasonal Licensed & Experienced Skid Steer Operators

School Van Drivers/Monitors Wanted:

Certified Nursing Assistants & Registered Nurses needed for Westborough and Northbridge locations! Hiring for all shifts, Great full time benefits Sign on bonus included Walk in interviews: 85 Beaumont Dr. Northbridge MA, 01534 Wednesdays 12pm-4pm and 3 Lyman St. Westborough MA, 01581 Thursdays 12pm-4pm Or submit a resume or contact information to Jobs@salmonhealth.com

Cooks - Banquet & Wedding Full or Part Time. Pleasant working environment. 978-464-5600 or john@harringtonfarm.com

We are currently accepting applications for the 2016-2017 winter season. MUST have transportation & hold valid drivers & 2A hydraulic licenses as well as D.O.T. cert. Apply at www.jolinconstruction.com or 508-852-8345 Worcester MA Assessors Clerk - Town of Rutland PT (16 Hr. M-TH) clerk to perform duties that support all Assessor Dept operations; direct assistence to public, data updates, abatements, excise tax, mailings, Board meetings. Customer services oriented, organized and computer skills necessary. Send resume to lkelley@rrgsystems.com

HELP WANTED LOCAL

ARCHway, Inc.

An agency serving adolescents and adults on the autism spectrum is seeking energetic and creative people to fill the following positions: Part and Full Time Residential Instructor positions available to teach activities of daily living and social skills. Hours available are: 1st shift Saturday and Sunday only, 2nd and 3rd shifts Monday thru Sunday Starting Pay is $13.50/hour To apply: Fax/mail a letter of interest and resume to: ARCHway, Inc. 77 Mulberry St. Leicester, MA 01524 Fax: 508-892-0259 Email: scombs@archwayinc.org

42

WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

H E L P W A N T E D

• D E C E M B E R 1, 2 0 16

Now hiring van drivers throughout Massachusetts. No exp. needed, will train. Starting at $13/hr. Keep the van at home. Additional bonuses may apply to include 7D license bonus. M-F day time split shifts. Call for an application after 9 AM (978) 355-2121. EEO Now Hiring Shuttle Drivers FT&PT $11-$14/hr

We are seeking shuttle & valet drivers for locations in the Worcester area. $11-$14/hr. More info & application at valetparkofamerica.com/employment

Pastoral Assistant (Worcester, MA) Assist Pastor w/prep for worship svc, coordinate youth ministry; org & implement church and social rec. programs for congregation; edit weekly bulletin. Bachelor’s Deg. (any major) & 2 yrs. office mgmt. exp. Must be able to speak and write in Polish language. Cvr ltr and resume to: Rev. Richard Polek, Our Lady of Czestochowa Church, 34 Ward Street, Worcester, MA 01610

Are you hiring? Our Readers make GREAT employees. Call or email us for more information. 978-728-4302 sales@centralmassclass.com

HELP WANTED LOCAL

Expert Staffing in partnership with Boutwell, Owens & Co., Inc. Has several openings for 12 hour shifts - Days & Nights Packers, Gluer Operator, Digital Press Operator, Press Helpers, Utility Persons, Sheeter Operators & Die Cut Operators. A Recruiter will be onsite at Boutwell, Owens & Co. Every Thursday from 9 am to 3 pm - located at 251 Authority Dr. Fitchburg, MA 01420 No appointment necessary! Keyla.correa-ayala@expert-staffing.com Can’t make it? Call 978-798-1610

EXPERT STAFFING IS HIRING!!!! We have positions available in: Leominster, Fitchburg, Gardner, Clinton, Sterling, Shirley, Ayer & Devens TEMPORARY~TEMP TO HIRE ~ FULL TIME ~ 8 HOURS 12 HOURS ~ ROTATING SHIFTS ~ DAYS ~ NIGHTS WEEKENDS ~ DIRECT HIRES Packers ~ Forklift Operators ~ Warehouse ~ Order Selectors Air Hammer Operators ~ Press Feeders ~ Die Cut Operators Production Line Operators ~ Gluer Operators ~ Production Associates Machine Operators ~ Customer Service ~ Material Handlers Process Technicians ~ Production Assistants APPLY AT:

40 Spruce Street, Suite 206 Leominster, MA 01453 Send Resume or email: Leominster-LI@expert-staffing.com phone: 978.798.1610 • fax: 978.537.2052

WALK-INS WELCOME


www.centralmassclass.com HELP WANTED LOCAL

Antiques & Collectibles

“Oh My Gosh”

INJECTRONICS IS NOW PART OF THE PHILLIPS-MEDISIZE FAMILY

Antiques & Collectibles

Expert Staffing in partnership with Injectronics

Found at The Cider Mill

Now hiring for 8 & 12 hour Shifts-Days & Nights Production Associates, Process Techs, Quality Techs, Maintenance Techs, Production Trainer, Tool & Die Techs. Whitney Square, 40 Spruce Street, Suite 206 Leominster, MA 01453 978 798 1610 barbara.sidilau@expert-staffing.com

To Advertise In This Directory Please Call 978-728-4302

Walk-ins welcome! Who said nothing in life is free?

Run your four line ad for FREE for two weeks and then you have to the option to run your ad until it sells for $20! Or you may run your ad from the beginning until it sells for $20 (no refund if the item sells within the two weeks)

SUBMIT ITEMS UNDER $2016 FOR FREE! Here’s all you need to do! 3 ways to submit ...

1. Mail completed form to Central Mass Classifieds, P.O. Box 546, Holden, MA 01520 2. OR FAX the completed form to 508-829-0670 3. OR Email the info with name/address/phone number to sales@centralmassclass.com

NO PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED FOR FREE ADS

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY ... We are not liable for misinformation due to ad being illegible: Have you advertised in the Central Mass Classifieds before? Please check one. ___Yes ___No Name ________________________________________________Phone___________________________ Address ___________________________________________ Town _________________ Zip _________ Email Address (optional) _________________________________________________________________ Ad Text: (approx 28 characters per line includes letters, spaces, numbers, punctuation) _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

PLEASE READ SUBMISSION RULES: Maximum 4 lines (approx. 28 characters per line). We reserve the right to edit if ads come in that are too long. NO phone orders accepted. See ways to submit above. Merchandise Ads Only- NO autos, snowmobiles, RV’s, trailers, boats, ATV’s, etc. We have a special rate for these ads ($20 till it sells). NO business Ads accepted for this section. If we suspect the ads are being sent in by a business, we reserve the right to refuse. Limit 1 ad per name/address/ phone number every 2 weeks. Free Ads will run for 2 weeks. If you choose to run your ad until it sells for $20, no refund will be given if it sells within the first two weeks. Limit 1 item per ad (group of items OK if one price for all and under $2016). Price must be listed in ad. NO Cemetery Plots.

MERCHANDISE

CEMETERY PLOTS

CEMETERY PLOTS

Worcester County Memorial Park, Paxton, MA Garden of the Cross - 2 Lots Value $10,500 - asking $4000 OBO 774-239-9189

Worcester County Memorial Park Paxton, MA. 2 Lots in the Garden of Faith. $1500.00 for both. Near the feature. Mary 508-886-4334.

15 Waushacum Ave., Sterling 978-422-8675 Open 7 Days a Week 11 am to 5 pm Thursdays 11 am to 8 pm

FOR SALE

WOOD FOR SALE

Oak Children’s Bed & Desk Set Wooden chest, oak table, marble top table. Good condition. Price is negotiable. 774276-1047

Cut, split, and delivered Seasoned or Kiln Dried Firewood. Visit woodbustersfirewood.com for details. Or call Putnam Services 508-886-6688

Ceramic Kiln Old but hardly used. Make an offer. 508-8292725 Handicap Equipment Lift/recliner chair, wheelchair, walkers, canes, bath seat, commode, safety bars, etc. Less than 2 years old. Call 508 853-3085. Maytag Washer & Dryer 3 months old. Paid $649 each. Moving, must sell. Asking $1000. 508-886-6968

Heavy Duty Prototype PVC Pipes Hammock Frame w/1 cloth & 1 rope material, all accessories. $75 978-537-9925 Golf clubs, bag, cart (used) Asking $250. 508-865-5726*

CEMETERY PLOTS

CEMETERY PLOTS Worc. County Memorial Park Paxton, MA Grave sites. 2 lots, Good Shepherd. Plot 147, graves 3 & 4. $5000.00 each. B/O Call Kris 508-735-9996

Worcester County Memorial Park Paxton, MA Garden of the Cross Premier Location, Must sell Value $5250 Asking $4000 OBO 508-799-5678

Worc. County Memorial Park, Paxton Garden of Honor, 2 plots, Plot 17, Unit C, Graves 3 & 4. Today’s cost is $8,800 for both. Asking $2950 total for both. Call 978-582-9309

Worc. County Memorial Park Paxton. Garden of Faith, 2 plots, Section #347-A 1&2. Today’s cost is $3,900.00 for both. Asking $1,500.00 total for both. Call 508-882-3421 or 909-714-0064

Worcester County Memorial Park - Paxton Unit C, section Heritage II, plots 1 and 2. Today’s price is $6500, asking $3500. 508-344-9626

Worcester Memorial Park Paxton Garden of Honor, 2 plots, unit B, graves 3 & 4. Today’s cost $8500 for both, asking $4000. Call 910-477-9081

|

Worcester County Memorial Park - Paxton Garden of Serenity Two lots for sale. Present price $3495 for both, will sell for $900 each, totaling $1800. Call 801-294-7514 Worcester County Memorial Park, Paxton MA Garden of Heritage II. 2 Lots w/vaults. Current value $8300.00 Asking $3950.00 for both or B/O. Call Jim 508-769-8107

FOR SALE Princeton Upright freezer $50.00 Lawn Vacuum attaches to a lawn tractor $200.00 978-464-2630

Amana ART104TFDW 14.3 cubic foot refrigerator/freezer, bought new, excellent condition, $375. 508-640-5888 Brother HL-2170W Wireless Laser Printer, bought new, very good condition, $50 508640-5888

C-13 Zeppelin Stamp Flag Cancelled $200. Got Stamp Questions? Call Ron at 413896-3324 2 Winter Snow Tires (Winter Claw) Like new. Asking $125. 508-885-7127 Radiators Cast iron - 8"x 20 x 36 (H); 5" x 10 x 24 (H); 5" x 10 x 36 (H) all 3 for $100. Baseboard Weil Mclain radiators - 2" x 9" x 24" - 2 pcs - $50. 508-847-4531 16 Gallon Fish Tank Everything included except fish. $75 508-414-7833 Christmas tree 3ft and fully decorated plus other assorted decorations. $15. Call 508 853 -3444. Thomasville dining rm set Round table expands w/2 leaves to 68", marble top buffet 65" long, marble top tea trolly 44" long & chairs. Also 2 lighted hutches. Top condition. $1,495. 508-829-6891

EDUCATION MUSIC INSTRUCTION Instrumental, Vocal, Jazz Improv Lessons Available on most instruments. Lou Borelli 508-752-6213

OTHER COMMUNITY FLYING FIELD WANTED Local RC club is looking for a field to fly quiet, electric-only model planes. Land owners who are willing to share their space with hobbyists should contact 508-641-3787. NOVENAS Prayer To St. Jude May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be Adored, Glorified, Loved & Preserved throughout the world, now & forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus, please pray for us. Saint Jude, Worker of Miracles, please pray for me. Saint Jude, Helper of the Hopeless, please pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day for 9 days, by the 9th day your prayer will be answered even if you don’t believe. This Novena has never been known to fail. publication must be promised. Thank you St. Jude and God. DG

REAL ESTATE We Pay Top Cash For Houses and Land. Any Condition. No Hassle, Fast Closing.

978-423-6529

FURNITURE Corner Hutch Solid pine - 4 doors - 48" x 76". Accommodates 42" television. $250. Photo available. 508-829-6792

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www.centralmassclass.com WINTER BULLETIN BOARD Westborough Community Chorus Presents

Our Holiday Favorites Dec. 2 & 3 - 8pm Dec. 4 - 2pm Admission: $12 Seniors/Children: $9 Mill Pond School - Route 30 6 Olde Hickory Path Westborough For Advance Group Sales & Ticket Information Call: Ellen Kluge 508-485-4469 Westborough Community Chorus Inc. productions are supported, in part, by grants from the Westborough Cultural Council and the Southborough Cultural Arts Council, local agencies supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency. www.MassCulturalCouncil.org www.WestboroChorus.com

REAL ESTATE

Publisher’s Notice All real estate advertised in this publication is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, the Massachusetts Anti Discrimination Act and the Boston & Cambridge Fair Housing Ordinances which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, ancestry, age, children, marital status, sexual orientation, veterans status or source of income or any intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll free at 1-800-827-5005. For the NE area call HUD at 617-994-8300. The toll free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275 or 617-565-5453

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT Main Street Holden 3 Rooms, Approx. 320 Sq. Ft. 1st Floor w/parking. Ideal for insurance, sales or real estate office. 508-829-4485

Yard Sale & Flea Market Directory Custom Made Craft Fair Fundraiser for Burncoat Chorus and Toys fot Tots Salem Covenant Church 215 E Mountain St Worcester MA 01606 Sat Dec 3rd 10 am -3 pm

Call 978-728-4302 or email sales@central massclass.com

GRAFTON CELEBRATES THE HOLIDAYS COME ONE! COME ALL!

GRAFTON PUBLIC LIBRARY Sunday, December 4th, NOON TO 3:30 PM

~ BOOK ‘N’ EPHEMERA SALE ~ Vintage Stamps • “Beatlemania” 1,000s of Items from 18th, 19th and 20th Centuries Prints, Maps, 1st Editions RTE. 140 - GRAFTON CENTER Checks & Credit Cards Accepted - Bring Boxes

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• D E C E M B E R 1, 2 0 16

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOS

AUTOS

AUTO/MOTORCYCLE

2004 Pontiac Bonneville 114,000 miles. Graphite Gray. $595 Motor knocking, likely needs replacement, body and interior good shape. Good project or parts car. 508-873-7449

1985 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Original low mileage beauty. Recent 350/325 hp engine. Must see! Trophy winner. 774-437-8717 $6,500

2001 Suzuki Intruder 1500cc, showroom condition, lots of chrome, Vehix pipes. $4000. Call John at 978-466-6043. 1999 Road King Under 8,000 miles. Too many extras to list. Always stored in room temperature. $10,000 obo 978-4645525 or 978-549-3670 cell 2007 Suzuki Boulevard Cruising Motorcycle C90T; 1474cc; 6300 miles, 1 owner, perfect cond. accessories and new battery. Garaged, covered & serviced. $6,000 508-8498635

2008 Honda Metropolitan Scooter Black and gray. Mint cond. 469 miles. Asking $1650.00. Includes helmet. 207-289-9362 OR 207-450-1492.

2001 Ford Focus MECHANICS SPECIAL NEEDS ENGINE SOHC, Automatic, 4 cyl, 4 door, clean interior, straight body, new front brakes/rotors, clean title. First $300 takes it. 508-869-6841

1930 Ford Model A Sport Coupe, Grey and Black. 50,000 miles. Holden area. $16,000. 407-375-3917

AUTO/VAN

1997 Mercedes-Benz E-420 Sedan, 4 dr., 8 cyl., 214,000 miles. Silver. $2,995 obo. New tires, brakes & more. Good, quiet engine. Purrs like a kitten. 508-865-5372

2008 Ford E250 Extended Van 3dr, A-T/AC, Power package. Roof racks. Int. shelving, tow package, 6 rims, 8 tires in good cond. Exc. overall cond. 57K miles. $9,999. 508-8292907

1932 Ford Coupe Little deuce Coupe, with a Corvette mill and four on the floor. 6,000 aprox. mi. Original hot rod, all steel, show car, looks and sounds great. Holden area. $42,000. 407-375-3917

AUTOS

1999 Pontiac Grand Am 6 Cylinder, automatic, needs work or use for parts. 159,903 miles. $675. 978-422-8084

2013 BMW 128i 7K Orig Miles, Grey, 3.0, Automatic, Fully Loaded, Serviced. $16,900. 774-239-0800

2002 Mercedes C-320 Wagon Custom leather interior excellent condition. Runs good, looks good. Asking $2995 or best offer, call 954-540-4155 2003 Chevy Corvette Convertable 50th Anniversary Edition 26,000 miles. Automatic, original owner, always garaged, mint cond. $25,000 firm. 774-696-4187 1997 Mercedes-Benz C-Class Sedan 54,600 miles. One owner. Two sets of wheels included. Black, $4,900. 508-735-9568 2008 Ford Mustang 8 cyl, 300HP. 21K miles. Never driven during winter. Always garaged. Perfect cond. $21,900 negotiable. 508-865-3528 after 3pm. 2012 Cadillac CTS AWD, 21,800 miles. Crystal red. Heated black leather seats. Panoramic roof. Dealer maintained. Under warranty. $24,500.00 978-534-8860

AUTOS 1988 Mercedes-Benz 300 SEL 6 cylinder gas. Very good cond. Runs exc. $3200.00 195k miles. Located in Sutton, MA 774-287-0777 2011 Ford Ranger 2WD Silver 13K Mi. Auto. O/D 4 Cyl A/C Remote Start Bedliner Tonneau Cover Trailer Pkg Step And Toe Rear Bmpr $8,950 774-2390800 2014 Chevrolet Spark 20K Mi. Silver 1.2 Auto Remote Start 37 Highway Mpg 32 City A/C C-D Heated Seats Cruise Fully Serviced 7,950 774-239-0800 BOATS 25 HP Suzuki (Like New) with Boat & Trailer Holden area. Pete 407-375-3917 $2,000 18 Ft. Fiberglass Fishing Boat Galvanized roller trailer, 90HP mariner, outboard motor. $1250. Also 14 ft. boat & trailer. $500 508-853-5789. Ask for Stan. CAMPERS/TRAILERS 3 Horse Trailer 2002 Exiss XT/ 300 Gooseneck. Great condition. All alum. S.S. nose. On craigslist pics. $7,995. Paxton. Call Robert at 508-757-0887*

AUTOS

Over 40 Acres! Over 3000 Vehicles! USED & NEW AUTO PARTS

FREE Nationwide Parts Locator Service Deposits conveniently taken over the phone. • Foreign & Domestic • Early & Late Model • Engines • Transmissions • New Radiators • Gas Tanks • Wheels • Tires • Balancers • Exhaust Manifolds • Window Motors

Amherst-Oakham AUTO RECYCLING

91 DAY GUARANTEE

Trust us to do it right! Toll Free1-800-992-0441 Fax 508-882-5202 Off Rte 122 • 358 Coldbrook Rd., Oakham, MA www.amherstoakhamauto.com

Worcester No.

508-799-9969

RUSTY ANTIQUE CARS/TRUCKS, SOUGHT & BOUGHT

BLUE COLLAR VINTAGE SALVAGE 774-696-3584 • 10AM-10PM


www.centralmassclass.com LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES

CAMPERS/TRAILERS

TRY BEFORE YOU BUY!

• Class A, B, C Motor Homes • Trailers Parts • Propane • Service Transportation • Temporary Housing

Fuller RV Rentals & Sales 150 Shrewsbury St., Boylston 508-869-2905 www.fullerrv.com BBB Accredited A+ Rating

Town of Millbury Conservation Commission The Millbury Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at 7:05 P.M. at the Municipal Office Building, 127 Elm Street to act on a Notice of Intent from Nancy Conley to extend a garage slab for a family room addition and new deck located at 12 Warren Street.Said work falls under the jurisdiction of the Wetlands Protection Act M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40. Donald Flynn Chairman

JUNK CARS We Buy and PICK UP Your junk or wrecked cars or trucks. We Sell New and Used Parts. Specials on Batteries and Tires. New and Used! Airport Auto Parts, Inc. 56 Crawford St. Leominster, MA 01453 978-534-3137

Town of Sutton Conservation Commission The Sutton Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at 8:00PM, at the Sutton Town Hall, 4 Uxbridge Road, Sutton, MA. The purpose of this hearing is to review an Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation submitted to the Conservation Commission by Matthew McGrath, Charlton, MA. The project consists of an Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation for Old Tavern Lane, on Map 23 Parcel 99, at 14 Old Tavern Land, Sutton, MA. This notice is publicized in accordance with the provisions of General Law Chapter 131, Section 40 commonly known as the Wetlands Protection Act, and the Sutton Wetlands Protection Bylaw.

NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Premises: 47 Main Street, Sutton, Massachusetts By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Robert Vanzant and Dustin Vanzant to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for Village Capital & Investment LLC and now held by Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP, f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, said mortgage dated February 18, 2009, and recorded in the Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds, in Book 43837 at Page 215, as affected by an Assignment of Mortgage dated November 2, 2011, and recorded with said Deeds in Book 48102 at Page 1, as affected by a Loan Modification Agreement dated March 12, 2012, and recorded with said Deeds in Book 49347, at Page 256, of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder, for breach of the conditions in said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction on December 22, 2016, at 10:00 AM Local Time upon the premises, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, to wit: The land in the Village of Manchaug in said Sutton, on the northeasterly side of Massachusetts Highway leading from Manchuag to East Douglas, with the buildings thereon bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron pin on the northeasterly side of the road leading to Douglas at the northwesterly corner of said tract at land now or formerly of one Conley; THENCE N. 67 degrees E., by said Conley land 177.30 feet to an iron pipe at land now or formerly of one Caisse et ux; THENCE S. 25 degrees E., by land of siad Caisse et ux 82.55 feet to an iron pipe; THENCE S. 62 degrees 35’ W., by said Caisse et ux land 173.28 feet to a stone bound in the northeasterly side of said road; THENCE N. 27 degrees 50’ W., by the northeasterly side of road 95.01 feet to the point of beginning. CONTAINING 15,493 square feet. The description of the property contained in the mortgage shall control in the event of a typographical error in this publication. For Mortgagor’s Title, see Deed dated April 23, 2008, and recorded in Book 42853 at Page 185 with the Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds. TERMS OF SALE: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 275 West Natick Road, Suite 500 Warwick, RI 02886 Attorney for Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing LP, f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Present Holder of the Mortgage Telephone: (401) 234-9200 MLG File No.: 14-16970

LEGALS

BILL “THE TREE MAN” Handmade Fancy Wreaths, Garlands

ABOUT!

and Holiday Cemetery Boxes

BILL’S TREE LOT

1490 MAIN ST HOLDEN • ACROSS FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL

LARGEST SELECTION OF FRASER FIR TREES IN THE WACHUSETT REGION! OPEN DAILY 9AM CLOSE SAT-WED 5PM CLOSE LATE THURS & FRI 7PM! FREE POPCORN & HOT CHOCOLATE

508-829-WILD

ONLINE ORDERING

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9:30AM-8PM EVERY DAY

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661 Main Street, Holden

at The Blue Plate Farmstand

www.butterflynursery.com

508.886.6570 • 35 Years Of Experience As A Grower • Best Quality Around

MARSH’S TREE FARM Route 31 at Holden/Princeton Line. Choose & cut your own hand-sheared, premium quality trees.

$45.00 INCLUDES TAX & BAILING

Opening Fri Nov. 25, 26 & 27 Dec. 2, 3 & 4, Dec. 9, 10 & 11 9:30 a.m.-Dusk • 978-464-2413

Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Worcester Probate and Family Court 225 Main St. Worcester, MA 01608 508-831-2200 CITATION ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION Docket No. WO16P3615EA Estate of: Donald R. Lavigne Date of Death: 09/22/2016 To all interested persons: A Petition for Formal Probate of Will with Appointment of Personal Representative has been filed by: Robert H. Lavigne of Shrewsbury, MA and Michelle M. Flynn of Bedford, NH requesting that the Court enter a formal Decree and Order and for such other relief as requested in the Petition. The Petitioner requests that: Robert H. Lavigne of Shrewsbury, MA and Michelle M. Flynn of Bedford, NH be appointed as Personal Representative(s) of said estate to serve Without Surety on the bond in an unsupervised administration. IMPORTANT NOTICE You have the right to obtain a copy of the Petition from the Petitioner or at the Court. You have a right to object to this proceeding. To do so, you or your attorney must file a written appearance and objection at this Court before: 10:00 a.m. on the return day of 12/13/2016. This is NOT a hearing date, but a deadline by which you must file a written appearance and objection if you object to this proceeding. If you fail to file a timely written appearance and objection followed by an affidavit of objections within thirty (30) days of the return day, action may be taken without further notice to you. UNSUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION UNDER MASSACHUSETTS UNIFORM PROBATE CODE (MUPC) A Personal Representative appointed under the MUPC in an unsupervised administration is not required to file an inventory or annual accounts with the Court. Persons interested in the estate are entitled to notice regarding the administration directly from the Personal Representative and may petition the Court in any matter relating to the estate, including distribution of assets and expenses of administration. WITNESS, Hon. Leilah A Keamy, First Justice of this Court. Date: November 16, 2016 Stephanie K. Fattman, Register of Probate 12/01/2016 MSC

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LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Mark S. Bourdeau II and Melissa I. Bourdeau to Bank of America, N.A., dated October 25, 2010 and  recorded with the Worcester County (Worcester District)  Registry of Deeds at Book 46557, Page 91, of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder by assignment from  Bank of America, N.A. to  Green Tree Servicing LLC dated  March 8, 2013 and recorded with said registry on  March 19, 2013 at Book  50606 Page  359 and  by assignment from  Ditech Financial, LLC, Successor by Merger to Green Tree Servicing, LLC to  MTGLQ Investors, L.P. dated  August 31, 2016 and recorded with said registry on  September 14, 2016 at Book  55962 Page  108, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing, the same will be sold at Public Auction at 4:00 p.m. on December 13, 2016, on the mortgaged premises located at 77 West Main Street, Millbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, TO WIT: A certain tract or parcel or land with the buildings thereon, situated in that part of Millbury called Bramanville and bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the southwest corner of the lot on the easterly side of this road leading to Armory Village; Thence northerly by said road, two (2) rods and four (4) links to a stake; Thence south 62 degrees 30’ east by land now or formerly of Thomas and Anne Donlon, six (6) rods and five (5) links to a stake; Thence south 30 degrees 31’ west, two (2) rods and four (4) links to a stake at land formerly of Thomas Kinniery; Thence north 62 degrees west by said Kinniery land six (6) rods and five (65) links to the point of beginning. Being the same premises conveyed to the herein named grantor(s) by deed recorded with the Worcester County Registry of Deeds in Book 37960, Page 231. For mortgagor’s(s’) title see deed recorded with Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds in Book 37960, Page 231. These premises will be sold and conveyed subject to and with the benefit of all rights, rights of way, restrictions, easements, covenants, liens or claims in the nature of liens, improvements, public assessments, any and all unpaid taxes, tax titles, tax liens, water and sewer liens and any other municipal assessments or liens or existing encumbrances of record which are in force and are applicable, having priority over said mortgage, whether or not reference to such restrictions, easements, improvements, liens or encumbrances is made in the deed. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of Five Thousand ($5,000.00 ) Dollars by certified or bank check will be required to be paid by the purchaser at the time and place of sale.  The balance is to be paid by certified or bank check at Harmon Law Offices, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, Massachusetts 02458, or by mail to P.O. Box 610389, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 02461-0389, within thirty (30) days from the date of sale.  Deed will be provided to purchaser for recording upon receipt in full of the purchase price.  The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this publication. Other terms, if any, to be announced at the sale. MTGLQ INVESTORS, L.P. Present holder of said mortgage By its Attorneys, HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, MA 02458 (617) 5580500 201501-0852 – TEA MSC 11/17/16 NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Marsha L. Eisan a/k/a Marsha Eisan, Marilouise Oakley and Amanda J. Oakley to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., dated August 25, 2003 and  recorded with the Worcester County (Worcester District)  Registry of Deeds at Book 31373, Page 315, of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing, the same will be sold at Public Auction at 12:00 p.m. on December 13, 2016, on the mortgaged premises located at 272 Mendon Road, Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, TO WIT: The land in Sutton, Worcester County, Massachusetts on the southerly side of Mendon Road, bounded and described as follows: BEGINNING: at a point in the southerly line of said Mendon Road marked by a drill hole in a corner of walls marking the northwesterly corner of the lot herein conveyed and land now or formerly of Fedorczuk; THENCE: S. 67 degrees 14’ 10’’ E. by wall and the line of said Road 161.64 feet to a drill hole in said wall; THENCE: S. 46 degrees 31’ 00’’ E. by wall and the line of said Road 24.62 feet to a point; THENCE: S. 30 degrees 29’ 00’’ W. 277.44 feet along other land of grantor to a point; THENCE: N. 52 degrees 53’ 54’’ W. 124.29 feet by other land of grantor to a wall; THENCE: N. 14 degrees 40’ 00’’ E. 80.00 feet to a drill hole in said wall by land now or formerly of Fedorczuk; THENCE: N. 17 degrees 35’ 40’’ E. 174.38 feet by wall and said Fedorczuk land to the point of beginning. BEING shown as lot number 1 on Plan of Land in Sutton, Mass. Owned by Maurice J. Panaccione et ux dated 14 December 1976 and recorded in Worcester District Registry in Plan Book 441, Plan 2. Being the same premises conveyed to grantors herein by deed dated March 17, 1978 and recorded in the Worcester District Registry of Deeds in Book 6416, Page 234. Recorded herewith Book 31373 Page 314. For mortgagor’s(s’) title see deed recorded with Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds in Book 31373, Page 314. These premises will be sold and conveyed subject to and with the benefit of all rights, rights of way, restrictions, easements, covenants, liens or claims in the nature of liens, improvements, public assessments, any and all unpaid taxes, tax titles, tax liens, water and sewer liens and any other municipal assessments or liens or existing encumbrances of record which are in force and are applicable, having priority over said mortgage, whether or not reference to such restrictions, easements, improvements, liens or encumbrances is made in the deed. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of Ten Thousand ($10,000.00) Dollars by certified or bank check will be required to be paid by the purchaser at the time and place of sale.  The balance is to be paid by certified or bank check at Harmon Law Offices, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, Massachusetts 02458, or by mail to P.O. Box 610389, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 02461-0389, within thirty (30) days from the date of sale.  Deed will be provided to purchaser for recording upon receipt in full of the purchase price.  The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this publication. Other terms, if any, to be announced at the sale. WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. Present holder of said mortgage By its Attorneys, HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, MA 02458 (617) 558-0500 201412-0777 – YEL 11/17/16 MSC

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WORCESTER HOUSING AUTHORITY ADVERTISEMENT FOR QUOTES December 1, 2016 QUOTES shall be received at the Purchasing Office, 69 Tacoma Street., Worcester, MA 01605 RFQs may be picked up at the location above or may be downloaded from our website: www.worcester-housing.com/ purchasing, or call (508) 635-3203, TDD (508) 798-4530. Quoters are responsible for ensuring they have received any/all addenda prior to submitting a quote. Separate awards will be made for each RFQ. WHA reserves the right to reject any or all responses, in whole or in part, deemed to be in their best interest. Award of all contracts is subject to the approval of the WHA Executive Director or Board of Commissioners. The Operating Agency shall indemnify and hold harmless the WHA and its officers or agents from any and all third party claims arising from activities under these Agreements as set forth in MGL c.258, section 2 as amended. Bid No. 16-35

Release Date 12/1/2016

Project Title Electrical Services

Opening Date 10:00 AM 12/16/16

Pre-Quote Conference at 1050 Main Street, Worcester MA (Electrical Room in Basement)

10:00 AM 12/09/16

Jackson Restrepo Chief Procurement Officer Visit our website at: www.worcester-housing.com/purchasing

NOTICE OF MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Donald R. Daly and Maureen A. Daly to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., dated May 25, 2007 and recorded with the Worcester County (Worcester District)  Registry of Deeds at Book 41245, Page 284, of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder by assignment from  Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. to  The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of CWABS Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-10 dated  October 4, 2011 and recorded with said registry on  October 24, 2011 at Book  48001 Page  233 and  by assignment from  Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to  The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of  the CWABS Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-10 dated  May 15, 2014 and recorded with said registry on  May 27, 2014 at Book  52358 Page  81, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing, the same will be sold at Public Auction at 10:00 a.m. on December 9, 2016, on the mortgaged premises located at 7 WEST ST, MILLBURY, Worcester County, Massachusetts, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, TO WIT: A certain parcel of land situated in Millbury, Worcester County, Massachusetts on the southerly side of West Street and is bounded as follows: Commencing at the northeast corner of the premise at a point on a line of said street; thence S. 20 deg. 15’’ E. with land now or formerly of one Edward A. Taylor 92.75 feet to a stake at the fence at land of one Proctor; thence S. 71 deg. 55’’ W. with the fence and said Proctor’s land 77.75 feet to the land of one Stewart; thence N. 27 deg. 19’’ W. with said land 52.8 feet to the land now or formerly of W.A. Harris; thence N. 67 deg. E. with said Harris’ land 27 feet; thence N. 24 deg. 20’’ W. with said Harris’ land to the line of said West Street, 38.5 feet; thence N. 69 deg. 45’’ E. with said street line 60 feet to the place of beginning. For title reference see deed recorded in Book 17816, Page 339 Subject to a first mortgage to Citizens Mortgage Corporation dated June 28, 1994 and recorded with the Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds at Book 16395, Page 158 in the original principal amount of $96,300.00. For mortgagor’s(s’) title see deed recorded with Worcester County (Worcester District) Registry of Deeds in Book 17816, Page 339. These premises will be sold and conveyed subject to and with the benefit of all rights, rights of way, restrictions, easements, covenants, liens or claims in the nature of liens, improvements, public assessments, any and all unpaid taxes, tax titles, tax liens, water and sewer liens and any other municipal assessments or liens or existing encumbrances of record which are in force and are applicable, having priority over said mortgage, whether or not reference to such restrictions, easements, improvements, liens or encumbrances is made in the deed. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of Five Thousand ($5,000.00 ) Dollars by certified or bank check will be required to be paid by the purchaser at the time and place of sale.  The balance is to be paid by certified or bank check at Harmon Law Offices, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, Massachusetts 02458, or by mail to P.O. Box 610389, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 02461-0389, within thirty (30) days from the date of sale.  Deed will be provided to purchaser for recording upon receipt in full of the purchase price.  The description of the premises contained in said mortgage shall control in the event of an error in this publication. Other terms, if any, to be announced at the sale. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-10 Present holder of said mortgage By its Attorneys, HARMON LAW OFFICES, P.C., 150 California Street, Newton, MA 02458 (617) 558-0500 201603-0114 – PRP 11/17, 11/23, 12/1 MSC


Two minutes with...

Ernest Eldridge Ernie Eldridge has been selling Christmas trees on Park Ave for about 30 years. He gets his trees from Canada and sets them up next to the old Diamond Chevrolet adjacent Wendy’s restaurant. He sets up the day before Thanksgiving and disbands on Christmas Eve, all the while staying in a small home trailer in the vacant lot he sells the trees in. Most of his business, he says, comes from repeat customers. The rest of the year, when he’s not selling Christmas trees, he sells used cars. What’s the most difficult customer you’ve ever had? They’re all pretty good. We have fun

Have you ever had any customers fight over a tree? Yes. They walk in and say, ‘I want

that one,’ and walk around and other people come back and get it, and they come back and they get into an argument. About six years ago I ran out of trees. I had like six trees and all six people came at once to get them. Some guy, he wanted Do you have any crazy stories? We have some guys that come in and try to feed us one, and I said I don’t have any, and told him I’d come back in a half hour, and I drinks and everything to get a cheaper tree, but we can’t drink during the day. We had to go to another tree lot, and buy more just to keep the customers happy. Then stay open to 10 every night. there’s other years we’ve thrown 200 trees away, too, so it ain’t as good as it sounds, When do you open? 7 a.m. until 10 p.m. but it’s fun doing it. After you know the What’s the smallest car you’ve tried to put a people, the same people come back. There’s tree on before? We put a 15-foot tree on top one family that comes back, the daughter must be 14 now, and they get a picture of a Fiat. We got some people come and every year next to the tree they buy every pick ’em up in a convertible. Then we got year from us, and they’ve done it since she other people coming with shopping carts. was an infant. Then we got other ones that walk in and carry ’em outta here. If there’s snow on the ground, they put them on a toboggan. We So, there haven’t been any physical got a delivery mostly for the older people. altercations over a tree? Nah. Well, we were up the street where Domino’s was But we have a tree for everybody. Small, in that little lot there for 20 years, and large. We have a tree for every family. one Saturday they were having a football And we donate a lot to needy families. game, and the traffic was all jammed up, [Jordan] Levy, we go on his radio show and some guy walked up and took a tree, when he’s having that food thing, the and I chased him down the road. We got donation thing. We donate so many trees it back, though, only because the football and we’ve got a password, and they come game was going on and he couldn’t get no down and get them.

with them all. Most of them are repeat customers over the years, and now their kids are even coming to buy them. So it just keeps getting bigger and bigger each year.

further. We were all out there trying to stop the traffic and he was trying to run through there with a Christmas tree.

Have you had anyone else try to steal any trees here? Yes. We catch them. The

Worcester Police Department sits over here most of the time. It’s good for us, but it’s bad for us because we used to get a lot of guys that would go to the bar and come grab a tree before they go home. Now they see the cops and they won’t come in. So it’s good and bad for us.

What do you do with the trees you don’t sell?

I got one that comes and gets ’em for a fish and game’s club. They put ’em in the woods for the birds all winter, and they hide in them. Some people put them in their ponds for the fish. Then the rest of ’em get chipped up. But we try to get just enough. We don’t want to throw too many away.

How many do you have here in total? We sell about 3,000 trees all together. And then we got the cemetery boxes, wreaths. We sell about 500 of the cemetery boxes.

Do you have a quota you need to meet each year for the number of trees you need to sell? Usually, we get just about the same amount each year. Only one year we

STEVEN KING

were real low and that was a real good year. Like I said, these trees are all out of Canada. The Maine tree, it’s gotta be real cold when they cut these trees, and the global warming is kind of messing Maine up a little bit ’cause the trees, you can’t sell ’em a month ahead of time, they won’t last. So, we sell a lot of Fraser Firs. They’re a lot better tree, they hold the needles a lot better, but the downfall is it doesn’t have a big smell to it, so you gotta take a couple branches from the Balsam trees, and just put it on the heater or something. But we sell a lot of Frasers here. It’s because they hold up so much longer. My wife keeps ours in the house until February. Everybody can’t remember the name of them, so they just say, ‘I want the one that the needles don’t fall out of.’ They come back every year for it.

What’s something every customer should know before they buy a Christmas tree?

Water it every day. Some days it won’t take water, other days it will drink it two times. You gotta just keep checking it, just like you would an animal or anything else. Keep it away from any heating systems, and put it in the coolest part of the room, if you can. –Tom Matthews DECEMBER 1, 2016 • WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

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HOLIDAY MAGIC SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 8:30AM–2:00PM

Breakfast with Santa at Uno’s / Santa’s Village at Cinema De Lux Free photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus / Costumed Characters Millbury High School Carolers / Live Music / Radio Remote Prize Wheel and Giveaways / And much more!

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WORCESTERMAGAZINE.COM

• DECEMBER 1, 2016

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