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Speciality Fibres

BUYERS GUIDE TO WOOL 2017-2018


Established in 1957 by Mr Jo Modiano, G. Modiano Limited is based in London. It has grown to become one of the world’s largest wool trading and processing companies. It sells greasy wool, wool tops, including Superwash and Basolan treated, noils and wastes. It also supplies wool grease from its factory in Nejdek, Czech Republic.

G. Modiano Ltd. Broad Street House, 55 Old Broad Street, London EC2M 1RX Email trading@gmodiano.com Telephone +44(0)20 7012 0000 gmodiano.com


Speciality Fibres

BUYERS GUIDE TO WOOL 2017-2018

Acknowledgements American Sheep Association AWI/The Woolmark Co British Wool Marketing Board Campaign for Wool Canadian Wool Co-Operative Cape Wools South Africa Federacion Lanera Argentina International Wool Textile Organisation Mohair South Africa Nanjing Wool Market Art & Design Ely Torres Polyprint Pty Ltd, Melbourne Australia Published by International Trade Publ. (ITP) PO Box 11, Caulfield South Melbourne, Victoria 3162, AUSTRALIA Editor Victor Chesky Editorial Coordinator Robyn Segal Contributing writers Chris Wilcox, Robert Wang Bridgette Kelly, Michael Chereshsky Jessica Lewis, Rebekah Malka ITP publications wool2yarn global & wool2yarn china www.woolnews.net & www.woolbuy.net Front Cover Photography by Guy Hills Fabric by Dashing Tweeds UK Garment design by Phoebe Gormley G&G

Welcome to 2017 wool2yarn global magazine Environmental credentials and innovation in wool dominate many of the industry stories we have published this year. While retailers and customers do care about environmental sustainability they also care about functionality and cost competitiveness - the product must meet the needs of these consumers to survive, and product innovation is key. Consumers know what they want in performance outcome. They constantly look for new and innovative features. While some industry players are investing in innovation, more is needed, particularly in products using crossbred wools. Continual innovation and strong branding to differentiate wool from other fibres, need to dominate industry activity. The industry must continue to take advantage of wool’s current popularity as a natural fibre. But it must not drop the ball when it comes to innovation. Developing new products and making existing products function better is essential.

Victor Chesky EDITOR

Read us on line www.wool2yarnglobal.com Send us an email info@wool2yarnglobal.com

wool2yarnglobal 2016

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RedSun Wool


CONTENTS

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34

41

INDUSTRY NEWS

VIEWPOINT

INNOVATION IN YARN

10 Drivers of the Global Wool Market

33 High wool prices - a sales

64 Südwolle Group - Yarns of

in 2017

14 G. Modiano - Preferred Supplier Program

15 Hong Kong on the Asia wool map 16 Wool - quite simply as good as it gets

18 China dictates wool prices 20 What’s pushing up finer wool prices?

25 Orders lift in Europe for NSC Schlumberger

26 Curtis wool - invests in new combs 28 Woolmark Licensees reap benefits 29 Uphill battle for NZ wool industry 30 Ruyi - from wool to fashion 32 Brighter and Whiter Wool with Glacial XT

34 Ermenegildo Zegna - the ultimate brand

38 Story telling through traceability 41 Benetton Group - Wool lives here 43 Standard Wool UK invests in new machinery

44 IWTO - Reaching Generation Z 93 Falkland Island wools - benefit from additional measurement

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marketing perspective

SPECIALITY AND RARE FIBRES REPORT

tomorrow

67 Preparation units for worsted spinning

48 Brighter and Whiter Wool with

68 Reda Active goes into space 71 Yarn splicer for knot free yarns 72 Fashion and function 74 From scoured wool to knitted

WOOL & YARN TREATMENT

76 Diverse potential of Crossbred

46 Brighter and Whiter Wool with

Glacial XT Better year for speciality fibre Glacial XT Cashmere - pure luxury

50 Naturetexx® Plasma – customer feedback

52 Demand for Shrinkproofing on the rise

garments wools

79 Piedmontese perfection from Drago

80 PERINO yarn - innovative new fibre

54 Taking the green road to dalis 58 World’s largest superwash 60 EXP - sustainable wool treatment

LOGISTICS & STORAGE

WOOL DYEING

WOOL IN BEDDING

62 Understanding colour & dye matching

MOHAIR

81 Worsted sector spins more with Mohair

82 Mohair industry stays resilient despite drought

83 Chinese Mohair Designer of the Year

164 KES Distri solves logistic headache

194 Expanding market for bedding products

195 British wools perform in bedding WOOL TESTING

198 Latest in news from AWTA, NZWTA, WTAE and SGS

202 Mesdan testing - fibre to fabric 204 OFDA - accuracy in fibre measurement


CONTENTS

68 TEXTILE MACHINERY

76 100 AUSTRALIA

180 Carding set technology from

SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme lifting the bar

184 PROSINO increases spinning

Profiles on leading Australian wool companies

AUTEFA Solutions productivity

186 Latest news from NSC,

Tecnomeccanica, and Sant Andrea Novara

110 CHINA Red Sun - 20 years at the Top

188 Coppa Biella - combs for all

Tianyu leads in social responsibility

190 New compact card from

Exotic fibre by CHAFTA

machines

Hergeth GmbH’s

COUNTRY REPORTS

NWM - what it can offer you

120 UK Grading System adds valuable information

ASI - global expertise

90 ARGENTINA Organic wool top - a perfect fit

Profiles on leading UK wool and yarn suppliers

New trading conditions benefit wool users

Womenswear arrives at Savile Row

93 FALKLAND ISLAND Wool to benefit from certification

94 BULGARIA Lempriere - up and running

96 JAPAN Gateway to Japan’s fibre manufacturers

152 CANADA Wool offers blending options

154 SOUTH AFRICA

Clean-green wool

Additional certification from Cape Wool SA

Profiles on leading SA wool exporters

166 GERMANY

Offering the best in European wool

Profiles on leading German wool & fibre exporters

British Wool - A Versatile Fibre

86 USA

First superwash line for Argentina

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134 CHILE

160 ITALY

Finest wool and cashmere processing

Environmental credentials dominate

170 TURKEY

From Punta with love

Quality Turkish wool from Akel Tekstil

136 NEW ZEALAND

172 URUGUAY

Scouring merger provides better focus

Where sheep are king

Knowing which farm the wool

Changing the game through innovation

Changing landscape for woolscouring

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INDUSTRY

Drivers of the Global Wool Market

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By Chris Wilcox*

rices of Merino wool and Crossbred wool have taken very different and opposite directions in the past six to 12 months. Merino wool prices have been rising steadily, led by a surge in prices for superfine Merino wool in the first half of 2017, while prices for broader, Crossbred and Corriedale wool have dived. These price trends have benefited many growers in Australia, South Africa and, to some extent, Argentina, which all produce mainly Merino wool. But they have hit growers in New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Uruguay hard, with almost all of the wool production in these countries being wool broader than 26 micron. What

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is driving the prices for Merino wool higher and why are Crossbred prices languishing?

Production and supply World wool production is expected to lift by 2% in 2017, according to a survey of the major wool producing countries conducted by the International Wool Textile Organisation (IWTO) in March and April 2017. This increase is being driven by a sharp increase in production in Australia, the world’s largest wool producing country, as well as more moderate increases in South Africa, India, Uruguay and Mongolia. Despite the increase, world wool


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production is expected to remain at near 70 year lows, as it has been consistently for the past decade. There is little sign of a significant recovery in the near future, as competition for sheep for meat is holding back such recovery. In addition to the low world wool production levels, stocks of raw wool held in the major wool growing countries seems to be at low levels, except for New Zealand, Uruguay and, perhaps, the United Kingdom. As a result, world supply of wool is very constrained. With other things being equal, this low production level has helped support prices for wool in the past decade. While total world wool production is low, there has been a steady increase over the past decade in the production of broader wool used in interior textiles. At the same time, world production of finer wool used in apparel has, at best been flat. This divergence in production between broader wool used in interior textiles and finer wool used in apparel is one reason for finer wool prices out performing broader, Crossbred wool prices in the past 12 months. Furthermore, world production of superfine wool fell in the 2016/17 season to the lowest level in four years, largely due to a drop in production in Australia (which produces 80% or more of the world’s superfine wool).This decline in the production of superfine wool is one reason for the surge in prices for this wool this season. It seems likely that buyers have been securing quantities of this wool in the knowledge that production is declining.

Demand The trends in the exports of raw and semi-processed wool from the five major wool producing and exporting countries show that demand for wool from Australia, South Africa and Argentina lifted in 2016/17, particularly from Australia, while demand from New Zealand and Uruguay dropped sharply. This accords with the rise in prices for Merino wool and the drop in prices for broader, Crossbred and Corriedale wool. In fact, it is probably the major reason for the sharp lift in Merino wool prices and the large drop in broad wool prices. The main driver for this increased demand for wool from Australia and, to a lesser extent South Africa and Argentina, is China. China’s raw wool import from these three countries has risen abruptly in the past nine months but

its imports from New Zealand and Uruguay have fallen substantially. Other major wool processing countries in Europe, such as the Czech Republic, Germany and Italy, have maintained solid demand for raw and semi-processed wool from Australia, South Africa and Argentina, supporting the strong lift in demand from China. This increased demand for wool from Australia, South Africa and Argentina by China may, at least in part, be due to the need of mills in China to replenish stocks of Merino wool that were run down in 2016. In contrast, there are reports that China has excess stocks of broader wool (including as fabric) which had been used to produce the woollen double-faced fabrics in 2015 and into 2016 during the mania within the Chinese industry producing double-faced wool coats for women. The results from the IWTO’s annual Wool Textile Business Survey, which was conducted in March 2017, suggests that activity levels in all sectors for apparel (from early stage processing through spinning, knitting and weaving and garment making) are positive and are expected to remain positive until the end of 2017. In contrast, activity levels in the interior textile sector of the wool industry are reported to be below normal. Furthermore, stocks levels in the apparel wool sector were reported to be under control, but stocks for the interior textiles sector were a little above comfortable levels. These results provide further pointers as to why demand and prices for Merino wool have been so good, yet demand and prices for broader wool have been so poor. Despite the generally positive business conditions within the apparel wool textile industry, retail sales of clothing in the major wool clothing consuming countries are best described as ‘lacklustre’, if not downright disappointing. This suggests that orders from retailers to the global wool textile industry would be rather subdued. The same is true for retail sales of carpets, rugs and other home furnishings. These disappointing results for retail sales of both clothing and interior textiles come even though consumer confidence levels in the US and the EU are at long-term highs. Consumer confidence in the US is at the highest level since mid-2001 while consumer confidence in the EU is at the highest levels since 2007 (before the Global Financial Crisis). With consumer confidence at high levels in these countries, retailers may be confident of seeing wool2yarnglobal 2017

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better retail sales in the 2017 Autumn/Winter and may be lifting their ordering in preparation for this crucial period for wool clothing sales which begins in October. One further factor in driving demand for wool is the relative price of wool against prices of the major competing fibres, cotton, polyester staple, acrylic and viscose. While Merino wool prices have lifted and broader Crossbred prices have fallen, prices for competing fibres have also started to recover from the lows seen in 2016. As a result of the comparative changes in fibre prices, the price relativity for fine Merino wool are at very high levels, particularly for 18 micron wool (which is at record high levels). At the same time, the price ratio for 21 micron wool against synthetics and cotton has slipped back but remain at historically high levels. By comparison, 28 micron wool has fallen back to below long term average levels. Looking forward to the 2017/18 season, there are a number of positives which should help support Merino wool prices and bring a recovery for broader, Crossbred and Corriedale wool. Signs on the economic front are relatively positive. The OECD’s leading economic indicators point to a continued improvement in China and in the 12

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advanced economies. This, coupled with strong consumer confidence in the US, Europe and Japan, could sustain the recent increase in demand for Merino wool and, hopefully, flow through to demand for Crossbred wool. However, Merino prices may have reached a peak and could be entering a shallow cyclical downturn, notably once the Spring flush of Merino wools hit the market in the Southern Hemisphere. This downturn is likely to be quite shallow, particularly for superfine Merino wool, as supplies are likely to be constrained. Furthermore, the very recent rise of the A$ to over 80UScents will be a negative. On the other hand, the downturn in prices for broader, Crossbred wool could have reached the bottom and are likely to turn up sometime in the first half of the 2017/18 season. The timing and extent of the upturn in prices for these wools may be affected by any wool stocks released on to the market. These stocks may have built up after being held back from sale in New Zealand, Uruguay and, to a lesser extent, the United Kingdom over the past 6-12 months. * Chris Wilcox is principal of Poimena Analysis and Chairman of the International Wool Textile Organisation’s Market Intelligence Committee.


We’ve done our best work... Now weave your magic

For more information Tel: +61 8 82094400 Email: michell@michell.com.au

www.michell.com


INDUSTRY

G. Modiano awarded in Preferred Supplier Program the Velvet Revolution, although the woollen mill was first established on the site in 1846 with the introduction of a water turbine in the River Rolava. An important and modern textile plant was developed in 1910, with further reconstruction taking place between 1968 and 1974.

From left to right: Bill Costin (G. Modiano), Jens Kraus (Suedwolle), Mirko Lindner (Suedwolle), Michael Modiano (G. Modiano), Emir Avigdor (G. Modiano)

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ast year G. Modiano was the first company to be rewarded with the Südwolle Group Preferred Supplier Award. This award was introduced by Südwolle Group to recognise high achievers in its supply chain and G. Modiano was the first company to achieve the high score the third time in a row. ‘To analyze and manage the performance of our suppliers we established our Supplier Performance Scorecard to measure key parameters in quality (out of standards), on time delivery and leadtime, packaging, service, and certificates’, says Mirko Lindner, Purchasing Director of Südwolle Group. ‘We rewarded these extraordinary results with administrative process

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simplifications and a Preferred Supplier Award that was presented in London in November 2016. We thank G. Modiano for their efforts and their contribution to improve the flexibility and service quality for our customers,’says Mirko Lindner G. Modiano buys greasy wool in main producer countries worldwide and ships it to its mill in Nejdek, Czech Republic, where it is scoured and combed to produce top. ‘Every single lot of greasy wool is assessed at least three times by our teams of experienced buyers and checked once again in the mill before processing.’ Nejdek Wool Combing (Nejdecka Cesarna Vlny or NCV) a.s. was established in 1995, in the wake of

Today NCV is one of the most modern wool scouring and combing mills in the world, consisting of 80,000 m2 of covered area and a capacity of 23 million kgs per annum (basis top & noil) and plans to develop this further. There are also two superwash lines to apply Hercosett (TEC shrink-resist) and Basolan (soft handle) treatments. The mill is accredited with the EU Flower and Oeko-Tex 100 and runs a state-of-the-art effluent treatment plant. Through its head office in London G. Modiano offers wools in a wide range of individual types, including fleeces and pieces, from 12 to 36 microns, and length from 50 to 100 HM, and cut tops from 25 to 150 mm. Laurence Modiano reacted to the award with the following comments – ‘We are committed to providing our customers with the highest quality wool tops with excellent service at competitive prices and are very honoured to receive this award from Südwolle Group. Their valuable recognition is great encouragement and we are motivated to keep improving our performance.’


INDUSTRY

Hong Kong stands out on the Asia wool map The 87th annual IWTO Congress will be held in Hong Kong on 14-16 May 2018. This annual international wool industry event is well attended by wool textile professionals from all parts of the supply chain. ‘As well as attending the Congress we hope that delegates will visit the new Hong Kong Wool Resource Centre’, says Alex Lai, General Manager Hong Kong for The Woolmark Company (HK) Limited.

WRC in Hong Kong has quickly become a global hub for the textile and apparel industries – including spinners, knitters, weavers, retailers, designers and garment makers – seeking knowledge and support to develop, produce and market wool products

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he Wool Resource Centre serves as the permanent office for AWI in Hong Kong. It is a multi-functional, interactive space dedicated to product and process innovation through the supply chain. It includes a library, a showroom and an events space for knitters, weavers, spinners, retailers, fashion designers, students, and from time to time visiting Australian woolgrowers. ‘Hong Kong was selected as the home of the Wool Resource Centre for its importance in the sourcing of Australian Merino wool’, says Alex Lai. All global brands travel to Hong Kong for sourcing trips, and the region is also a key trading and manufacturing hub for spinners and knitters, making it a natural choice. Textiles and garments have dominated Hong Kong’s exports since the 1950s. ‘Since the Wool Resource Centre opened in April last year we have hosted over 250 visitors each month including Hugo Boss, Lane Crawford, Gieves & Hawkes, Banana Republic, Lululemon, H&M, Abercrombie & Fitch, LL Bean, Brooks Brothers, Dunhill, and DKNY and more’, he says. ‘Our Wool Resource Centre is also a popular destination for fashion and business students to learn about the versatility of Australian wool and the supply chain for wool products.’

The Wool Resource Centre hopes to connect the entire supply chain and provide knowledge and technical support and Woollab for Fabrics sourcing to the apparel industry. Supply chain partners can showcase their product or host a launch; and woolgrowers visit the centre to better understand the apparel and fashion industry. It also connects the Hong Kong office of The Woolmark Company with global players in the wool industry, acting as a permanent trade space with the aim to assist visitors improve business relationships and commercial outcomes. ‘To make an appointment to visit the Hong Kong Wool Resource Centre when you are in Hong Kong in May please visit our website’, says Mr Lai. ‘We can create an auditorium configuration for presentations and panel discussions, while an exhibition mode allows for fashion and interiors exhibitions, art installations and more. The research library doubles as a workspace for visitors to the centre, and can also be used for meetings with guests.’ HKresourcecentre@wool.com wool2yarnglobal 2017

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INDUSTRY

What’s pushing up finer wool prices?

Stuart McCullough CEO AWI by Victor Chesky

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ustralian woolgrowers are enjoying the best conditions in decades as prices surged in the first half of 2017. Most industry analysts expect prices to remain firm. So, where are prices heading. I spoke to Stuart McCullough CEO AWI in Melbourne for his take on the reasons behind this rise.

‘There is no one particular reason why wool prices are so high. There are so many links in the chain all intertwining and therefore there are a number of factors that are pushing prices up’, says Stuart McCullough. ‘The two main platforms are of course supply and demand. Supply is tight because production is not increasing. When it comes to demand this is more difficult to measure’. 16

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‘Looking at the demand segment there is obviously China with a middle class of growing influence, buying more luxury products. Wool sits well in that segment. In addition, the uniform business in China is huge and currently ongoing and that is pushing up demand for finer wools’. He also points to the expanding outdoor apparel and sportswear segment that is


INDUSTRY

increasingly using wool in their garments. ‘Consumers favour soft tailoring and demand for wool in shoulder season fabric is also increasing’. ‘Generation Y spends big when it comes to quality garments. They have a greater disposable income and want to know where the fibre comes from particularly in terms of environmental sustainability. And in countries without a lot of disposable income consumers at retail prefer to spend money on one good garment rather than 3-4 cheap ones.’ ‘These factors and more have come together to create demand although it can be difficult to measure which plays a greater part. And of course, there are marketing campaigns undertaken by AWI and that also helps. One such campaign that Mr McCullough mentioned is the gondoliers of Venice who will soon be dressed in wool. Collaborating with historical Venetian clothing brand Emilio Ceccato and the Gondoliers of Venice Association, The Woolmark Company will be kitting out approximately 400 Venetian gondoliers in Australian Merino wool, with a T-shirt, knitted jumper and sleeveless jacket all proudly bearing the iconic Woolmark logo, reinforcing the image of the Woolmark symbol as genuine wool quality. As one of the most prestigious clubs in the world, this historic partnership will last for a full year and will be the first time in history the gondoliers wear wool. ‘As the International Woolmark Prize continues to grow, it’s obvious to see why this is the pinnacle of our marketing activities. We connect emerging design talent with the world’s most important fashion bodies and retailers, providing them with commercial viability’, says Stuart McCullough. ‘At next year’s January global final, we will also introduce a new award as part of the prize, highlighting the most innovative collection from one of the nominees. The Innovation

Award aims to encourage finalists to be more experimental with their approach to design, textile development and processes, whilst shining a spotlight on the work of the industry’s trade and supply chain partners. ‘In addition, we will be announcing a new award in early-2018, dedicated to the sports and outdoor industry and targeting tertiary students throughout Europe, the UK and USA. Activewear is obviously a huge market, and as we see this as an opportunity for wool as a technical fibre to meet increasingly demanding consumer needs for comfort and performance. Whilst I can’t give too much away about this exciting new project’, he says ‘you will be sure to hear about it from the start of next year. China, as always, remains a priority for Australian wool – not just as a manufacturing hub but also as a luxury consumer market. ‘We have recently entered a two-year strategic partnership luxury department store Lane Crawford, to bring forward-thinking designs in wool direct to consumers, via exclusive collection launches across Lane Crawford stores in China and Hong Kong as well as online. The first two collections were launched in July in collaboration with Chinese fashion designer Helen Lee and active wear brand Particle fever. As the leisure collections, each designer showcased the versatility of wool along with its performance benefits. Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the first bale of Australian wool to be shipped to China. ‘To celebrate this, we are in the process of a 360-degree holistic campaign to connect and inspire our Chinese partners. ‘We have also seen a major medical breakthrough, with recently published research funded by The Woolmark Company demonstrating that wearing superfine Merino wool next to the skin is therapeutic for those suffering from eczema.’ Published in the British Journal of Dermatology earlier this year, a study challenges generalisations that wool is to be avoided by children with eczema and shows that Merino wool of 17.5 microns or finer can actually be therapeutic for the skin. The next 12 months will see The Woolmark Company continue to champion the health and wellbeing benefits of wool products. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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CAMPAIGN FOR WOOL

Wool - quite simply as good as it gets by R. Peter Ackroyd

I

t is nearly one year since over 230 delegates from the global textile industry gathered in Scotland at Dumfries House to recommit to the principles of environmental excellence that the Campaign for Wool’s Patron, HRH The Prince of Wales outlined when he launched his Campaign in January 2010. To date over 500 leading companies in the world fashion and interior business have committed themselves to the Dumfries House Declaration, a statement that amplifies the sustainable attributes of wool from farm to fashion. Purporting to represent the fashion industry’s sustainability performance, the Pulse Report ‘scored’ the industry on its environmental and social performance. You will not be surprised to hear that the wool industry did not come out with full marks and the A* it deserves. It scored a mere 32 out of 100.

In the fifty years I have been associated with the trade, I have repeatedly stated that wool in terms of environmental responsibility is quite simply ‘as good as it gets’. Some with different agendas are constantly seeking to challenge this simplistic statement of the obvious by trying, as we say in Yorkshire, ‘to blind folk with science’. One recent rather bold attempt to besmirch wool’s environmental credentials was published in the Pulse Report in May. 18

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This dismal result could be rather worrying for wool, a fibre lauded in no uncertain terms by one of the world’s leading environmentalists, HRH The Prince of Wales who said at the launch of his Campaign for Wool, “Wool is a product that the most brilliant boffin in the most hi-tech laboratory could never create”.’Il Principe della sostenibilità’, the sobriquet the Italian press gave Prince Charles on his recent visit to Florence, went on to note “Imagine the excitement if a new fibre were to be invented with a seemingly miraculous range of properties...Something that would grow naturally, requiring only grass and water as raw materials; a material that provided great resilience; a natural fire retardant, a natural flame retardant, odour resistant, and absorbent of both shocks and sound. Finally, at the end of its life it would be entirely biodegradable. Surprising as it may seem, such a versatile material has existed for a very long time. It is of course, wool.” It is patently obvious that in many cases, the brilliant boffins funded by the rich and


CAMPAIGN FOR WOOL

powerful lobbying organisations working for producers of ‘environmentally incorrect’ fibres fail, either deliberately or through ignorance, to tell the full cradle to grave story of the fibres they are paid to defend. Could it be that the examiner is in the pay of the examinee? The Campaign for Wool this autumn will focus on the ‘cradle to grave’ ecological story of wool, putting major emphasis on wool’s end of life biodegradability in a world of fashion and lifestyle that very often leads to the scourge of discarded clothing lingering for almost eternity in landfills. In the UK, the average piece of clothing lasts 3.3 years before being dumped. For the younger generation, it is much shorter. This impending environmental disaster prompted British designer Stella McCartney to stage her latest fashion show on a landfill site in Scotland to emphasise the evils of nonbiodegradable and non-recyclable materials and, of course, the ecological advantage of investing in her not inexpensive, but highly sustainable womenswear. Long before Stella McCartney came up with the idea of showing models parading on heaps of Scottish garbage, the Campaign for Wool became associated with a documentary entitled ‘Slowing Down Fast Fashion’ , narrated by British rock star, sheep farmer and environmentalist, Alex James. The film begins with some harrowing Armageddon looking shots of bulldozers shifting rubbish in a grim landfill site with crows and gulls circling above. The key message in the hour-long documentary is to buy well, buy to last, buy wool. Words that Vivienne Westwood has been saying since the Campaign for Wool was launched. ‘Slowing Down Fast Fashion’ will be premiered in Tokyo this autumn as part of a major Campaign in Japan. Over thirty retailers will be participating in Wool Week in UK in October. Several major stores in Canada, in partnership with The Prince’s Charities Canada, will be highlighting wool’s environmental excellence as part of this year’s celebrations marking the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Canadian Federation. Available on Amazon Prime

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China dictates wool prices

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t has been a mixed bag for the China wool industry in the last 12 months. As Madam Yang, Chair of Nanjing Wool Market put it during her presentation at the latest IWTO Congress ‘some people laugh while some cry’. The Chinese wool industry is clearly going through some painful changes and some companies in China have closed down altogether. But as some exit the industry others get bigger. Based on production data 2017 Q1, wool yarn production in China increased to 92,300 tons and 6.33% year on year, while woolen fabric production decreased to 121,000,000 meters and 0.82% year on year. * ‘There have been dramatically rising prices for finer wool and a drastic drop in prices for crossbred wools’, says Robert Wang China Manager AWTA. This is not only due to the tight supply of superfine and ultrafine wool but more importantly the increased demand for finer fibres globally and particularly in China. And of course consumer demand within China has been changing rapidly.’

Robert Wang

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Robert Wang further comments that there has been a gradual recovery of the Chinese economy and a relaxed control in public spending, as


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well as a surge in corporate uniform sector orders, pushing the demand for worsted fabrics upwards. At the same time, further developments in the knitting sector have gained traction with circular knitting next-toskin garments to the mass market generating strong demand for finer wool. Therefore given the latest forecast for Australian wool production in 2017/18 Robert Wang believes that prices for fine and super fine wools will remain firm in the foreseeable future. The situation for crossbred wools is not so rosy. Primary crossbred wool growing countries such as New Zealand, UK and even China have experienced a marked decrease in demand and a fall in wool price. Demand for interior textiles has been quite sluggish. The Chinese consumer market has walked away from an almost 5 year long high in demand for “double sided fabric” garments.

quality products to satisfy their Chinese and overseas consumers. So what can we expect: wool supply will remain very tight and the Chinese wool industry will maintain its current pace. These two major factors will result in Merino wool prices staying high globally. Crossbred wools however may need divine intervention!’

The Export Volume of China Combing & Carding Fabric Year-on-Year

New autumn-winter clothing collections have now clearly moved to other designs including those using shearling and fine knitted fabrics, for a better look and finer handle. This latest trend has fundamentally removed orders for coarse wool from garment manufacturers. The only way to rejuvenate the use of coarser wools, says Robert Wang, is with innovation and product development. Wool usage in shoe uppers and wool blended with other fibres for casual wear are areas to further develop he comments. Overall, China wool industry has an over capacity across the whole pipeline,’ says Robert Wang. ‘Not surprisingly, this will result in changes to create a better balance and to ensure the industry is healthy and viable. Notwithstanding this the Chinese macro economy is steady, and the pace of development has been moderated.’ Consumer spending is expected to be strong particularly for luxury goods. This is good for wool fibre but Chinese manufacturers will have to produce more sophisticated and better

China Wool Top Export Volume Year-on-Year (from July to March of 2014/15, 2015/16, 2016/17 year- on -year) Unit: ten thousand tons

China Greasy Wool Import Volume Year-on-Year (from July to March of 2014/15, 2015/16, 2016/17 year- on -year) * Yang Xiaoxiong, Chair of Nanjing Wool Market, ‘The Wool Market Situation in China’ presentation at 2017 IWTO Conference.

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Demand for new textile machinery on the rise more efficient manner as well as eliminating the inherent hazards associated with manual collection. ‘It is the first such complete plant in China, creating great savings in environmental considerations. It adds efficiency to production and we hope that further installation will follow ‘, says Mario Ploner.

Tecnomeccanica manufacturing facility near Biella Italy

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hen it comes to machinery for early stage processing plants for textile preparation from fibre to spinning one name continues to dominate with its innovative designs and sophisticated technology. Tecnomeccanica Biella has been supplying textile machinery since 1968 and has built its reputation with leading manufacturers such as Loro Piana, Ermenegildo Zegna, Botto Giuseppe, Reda, Marzotto, Benetton, XinAo and many others. ‘2016 was a very busy year for us and 2017 is also shaping up with new orders. Companies in China are replacing their old machinery, and countries such as Iran where machinery is very old they too are upgrading. Europe is also investing in new machinery, which is a clear indication of confidence in the industry’, says Mario Ploner, CEO at Tecnomeccanica Biellese. Tianyu in China is the latest company to install a fully automated by-products plant from Tecnomeccanica Biellese. It is one of the most sophisticated complete plants every for byproduct collection and treatment ever installed in China. ‘Waste can represent up to 15% of production capacity. The new plant installed at Tianyu is designed to collect waste in a

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‘Our customers realise that when they deal with us they gain a consultant and a manufacturer in one’, says Mario Ploner. ‘We design machinery to suit individual customer needs that will fit perfectly with their existing machinery as well as with new machinery’. Sant Andrea, sister company within the group, has also experienced a boost in orders this year. ‘It has been a very busy year for us at Sant’Andrea’, says Marco Ploner managing director. ‘We have experienced a lift in demand from both our customers in Europe and in China. Topmakers are replacing their old European and Chinese made machines with the latest European machinery. They are also increasing capacity by adding our new machines to their existing ones.’ Demand for the new RF5E machine has also been strong with 13 new machines already running and a large number on order. In China companies such as XinAo are consistently upgrading their machinery and increasing capacity. In 2015 it installed 2 lines and an additional 4 lines were added in 2016 and a further 2 lines have been ordered. ‘Today manufacturers recognise that to use the latest textile machinery is a commercial necessity. Greater competition and environmental concerns has pushed many companies to manufacture better quality products. At Tecnomeccanica and Sant’Andrea we provide manufacturers with the latest technology options to achieve this’, says Mr Ploner.


INDUSTRY

Orders lift in Europe for NSC Schlumberger machinery’, says Patrick Strehle. ‘And one of our biggest installations in China has been at Huafang Textile Co. We have installed a complete spinning preparation line. ‘We will been fulfilling orders for a number of combing machines’, says Patrick Strehle commercial manager. Today topmakers must produce consistent quality from one batch to another, and manufacture tops at speed for quick delivery. Our ERA combs and GC40 chain gills deliver this and more’, he says.

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he lift in demand for textile machinery, particularly preparation units and carding and combing units in Europe and the USA has seen a rise in orders for NSC Schlumberger textile machinery. ‘Manufacturers are replacing their old machinery and installing additional capacity’, comments Patrick Strehle commercial manager at nsc fibre to yarn. One of the biggest installations in the last 18 months was the acquisition of 24 new ERA combing machines by G. Modiano for its plant in the Czech Republic. G. Modiano runs 32 ERA combing machines running at this plant, with a capacity of 23 million kgs. ‘We are very pleased with the productivity of the ERA combing machine and the quality achieved by the 360 degree circular comb. Furthermore, it is much quieter than previous generations of combing machine which is conducive to the well-being and good mood of our staff ’, says Michael Modiano. NSC Schlumberger is also installing new ERA combs at Standard Wool Chile, Curtis Wool Direct in the UK, Burlington in the USA, and Sudwolle Group in Germany. ‘India is also a very active market for us, with Jaya Shree also increasing its current capacity’, he says. In Italy Marzotto and Reda have also been replacing and upgrading their machinery, as has ZKS in Germany and Czech Republic and Sandnes in Norway. ‘XinAo in China has also been upgrading its 24

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ERA combing machines provide uniform velocity of 360 ​​° combs resulting in excellent quality tops. They boast fine and reproducible settings for constant high levels of cleanliness and combing sequence that are gentle on the fibers and provide large productions greater than 50 kg / h for 21/22 μ. NSC Schlumberger has been upgrading its own facility and machinery. ‘We have moved to a new building that has been custom designed. This has improved our ability to display machinery to visiting customers and allows for more streamlined machine assembly. We have also installed a new laser cutting machine. It is very precise and this has created a further advantage to the quality of our machines.’


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A STORY TO TELL

echwool Trading in Australia (TWT) likes to lend its energies to any initiative to ‘create the story’ behind the garment. ‘Manufacturers, particularly in Europe, are keen to create a good yarn about traceability all the way from the farm to the swing tag on the retail garment’, says Rod Franklyn Techwool Trading. ‘It doesn’t matter if it is India, China, Italy or Japan today everyone is interested in wool’s story and provenance. And this is something we can accommodate with ease. We recently brokered a deal to supply a major Indian processor with a shipment of medium type Merino wool. The wool from the Mallee in the Australian state of Victoria is fairly uniform so it was not difficult to put 100 bales together of a similar type,’ he said. ‘Traditionally, we have put together specialised orders for super fine wools and this year we have done this for medium wool. The wool averaged 20 micron with one per cent vegetable matter content.

Left to right: Joel Heinicke, Daniel Evans, Dallas Willesdorf, Geoff Stevens, Malcolm Heinicke with woolfrom the Mallee area bound for India

‘Eleven growers supplied 100 bales for combing into tops at a Calcutta mill before the yarn was turned into suiting and knitwear in Japan. We have the networking capacity to match the short wool type to the mill’s requirements. We have also been able to provide these growers with direct to export as another selling option, other than the auction path. If we can generate a better price through that story we can get that premium flowing back to growers. It also provides the garment

manufacturer and retailer the opportunity to capture the imagination of the consumer by demonstrating full traceability back to the farm, with the real and genuine wool grower story behind it. We were very pleased to contribute and to be an integral part of this story’.

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Cape Wools SA creates a wool futures contract

he Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE)has listed a cash settled merino wool futures contract on its Commodity Derivatives Market. The contract allows farmers and wool buyers to protect themselves against movements in the wool price. Traders can make use of futures contracts to hedge against price movements. Such options give investors the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell the underlying asset they represent. The settlement price of the new contract will be determined by the Cape Wools Merino Indicator, an index created by Cape Wools SA. The indicator reflects movements in the price of wool by calculating a weighted average price of all wool sold at a specific wool auction and then comparing it with the result of the previous auction.

Wool auctions take place in Port Elizabeth weekly during the wool growing season. For example, the price of wool is currently at R100 per 1000kg, but a wool buyer may believe that is going to increase. To protect himself against this increase he buys a futures contract at this price. Three months later, when the future expires, the price of wool has risen to R120. The buyer can now sell his futures contract at this price, making a profit of R20. He can use this profit to cover the cost of buying wool at the now higher market price of R120. This means that the higher price of wool does not affect his input costs. Louis de Beer, CEO at Cape Wool SA, says demand for wool is excellent at the moment as global wool production is at wool2yarnglobal 2017

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an historic low. “The industry is extremely positive about the current opportunity to increase wool production. As we embark on this, the new contract will provide farmers with a mechanism to limit the risks they face related specifically to the price of wool. However, there are also many other role players subjected to price risk in the wool industry, including buyers and processors, who can also benefit from the contract.”

the exchange looks forward to working closely with the

Chris Sturgess, JSE Director: Commodity Derivatives, says

it to realise its potential.”

wool industry to build a liquid market for the new contract. “When Cape Wool SA approached the JSE about creating a wool futures contract, we were very excited to be able to respond to the needs of another segment within the agricultural sector. The South African wool industry is poised for exceptional growth at the moment and the JSE is privileged to have the opportunity to play a role in helping

Curtis Wool invests in new combs

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urtis Wool Direct (CWD) has recently completed the installation of 14 new NSC Schlumberger ERA combing machines at its Haworth Combing plant. According to David Gisbourne “this significant investment clearly demonstrates our commitment to the wool industry, particularly in the U.K. and Europe.” Haworth Combing is CWD’s processing plant in Bradford, specialising in processing and combing of all wool types, but focusing on British, Norwegian, New Zealand, Real Shetland, European as well as other speciality type wool tops, and a range of 16 to 40 microns. “Our customers expect us to deliver the highest quality and the highest in environmental standards. The decision to buy European made combs will ensure we deliver this and more.” “We control our own sorting, scouring and combing operations and this exciting recent industry investment

is part of our long term strategy to anticipate the ever changing requirements of our customers and to keep us at the head of the market,” says Daniel Isbecque, joint Managing Director at the Curtis Wool Direct group of companies. Haworth Scouring Company has a weekly capacity to scour 1,000,000 kilos of wool and is registered with the Soil Association, has GOTS and Oeko Tex accreditation and is accredited with ISO9001 and ISO14001 certification. “At Haworth Scouring we can meet the total scouring requirements of the UK industry and do this to world leading environmental standards. With our new combs and the most modern and up-to-date equipment including a state-of-the-art effluent treatment plant, we are ready to meet and anticipate the future needs of the industry and the environment” says David Gisbourne. “The scouring and combing plants in Bradford are unique. Wool scoured at Haworth has an excellent Life Cycle Analysis and benefits from Enco environmental best practice certification,” he says. “The environment is a top priority for us. Wool scoured at Haworth provides customers, all the way through to retailers, eco-friendly and green credentials for their products.”

David Gisbourne

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“The latest investment in new combing machines will not only ensure the best quality, but also increase our product range and extend our services to our customers. We are future-proofing our business into the foreseeable future,” he concludes.


The Woolmark brand is one of the world’s best-known textile quality fibre brands. It represents a commitment to quality that spans more than 50 years and has helped define the history of wool. The appearance of the logo on licensed products has now been updated to give wool textile products a fresh new look to support the ongoing quality standards.

woolmark.com

The Woolmark and The Woolmark Blend symbol are Certification marks in many countries. The Wool Blend symbol is a registered trademark in many countries..Š 2017 The Woolmark Company Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. GD2552


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Woolmark licensees reap benefits compliant products containing 50 per cent to 99.9 per cent new wool, while the Wool Blend brand is for compliant products containing 30 per cent to 49.9 per cent new wool. Also available are a number of apparel and interiors sub-brands for products that meet a number of product quality measures.

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s one of the world’s most recognised brands, the iconic Woolmark logo has adorned wool products for more than 50 years. It has been applied to more than 5 billion products, showcasing the extraordinary versatility and innate luxury of

wool.

The value of the Woolmark brand is well established across the world for wool products in the apparel, interior textiles and home laundry sectors. The Woolmark brand provides consumers with guaranteed fibre content and an assurance of quality, backed up by technical specifications for a wide range of wool and wool care products. Being a Woolmark licensee means that you can use the Woolmark brand on your products as an independent quality endorsement, thereby providing you with differentiation within the marketplace. Brands and retailer too can take advantage of the Woolmark symbol’s s prestige, by sourcing from Woolmark licensees and increasing consumer awareness surrounding their wool and wool-rich products. Woolmark certification allows for Woolmark licensees to use one of the iconic Woolmark logos on their wool or wool blend products, covering yarns, fabrics and most articles of clothing, as well as bedding, carpets and upholstery. In addition, The Woolmark Company endorses products for apparel care such as wool detergents and cycles on washing machines, dryers and irons as part of the Woolmark Apparel Care program. Widely recognised, the Woolmark logo represents products containing 100 per cent new wool. The Woolmark Blend brand is for 28

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“The Woolmark quality certification program is the consumer’s sign of quality wool products,” says The Woolmark Company Business Manager Dr Cathryn Lee. “The program provides for independent testing and certification of a wide range of textile goods and care tools. A Woolmark licence allows you to use one of our logos as an independent quality endorsement on your products. Each of our three main brands - Woolmark, Woolmark Blend and Wool Blend - are licensed separately.” Woolmark licensees have access to a range of Woolmark collateral, including official tickets and labels as well as merchandising support material. In addition, licensees are connected with The Woolmark Company’s global network of technical experts and the wool supply chain. “Woolmark licensing provides users with access to the world’s most recognised textile fibre brands,” explains Dr Lee.“Not only for retail brands, supply chain licensees can leverage the mark for any certified products for their retailer customers, including wool fabrics and yarns.” Bridging the gap between farm and fashion, licensees are connected to the source and can be introduced to supply chain partners. Licensees are also provided with video, images, graphic design, collateral and retail training, to increase demand for their wool products.


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Uphill battle for NZ wool industry Peter Crone President of Council of NZ Wool Interests and CEO of J Marshall & Co has never shied away from expressing his views about the direction that he believes the NZ wool industry should be taking. Is the New Zealand wool industry in crisis? I put this question to Peter Crone in light of the slowdown in demand for New Zealand wool. ‘Instead of trying to make our wool worth more on the international market, the key is to claw back some of the market share from synthetics and create more demand. We are making submission to the Ministry of Primary Industries to help us achieve this objective, sooner rather that later’, he says. There has been a 37% reduction in New Zealand wool exported to China and China has indicated that the semi worsted supply chain is stocked for some months to come. Compounding this low demand is the threat to

the industry from such anti-wool groups as PETA. ‘We need to counter the misinformation about the treatment of our animal and a general lack of understanding by the buying public about the benefits of wool, says Peter Crone. ‘When it comes to marketing and advertising the winner is not always the one who is right, but the one who shouts loudest!’ Peter Crone commented that ‘We need to capitalise on the expanding interest from the general public in sustainability, renewable resources, and animal wellbeing. We need to take advantage of this interest and get our story out there. Social media is a good place to start.

There’s nothing you can do that can’t be spun:

All you need is wool!

www.suedwollegroup.com yarn@suedwollegroup.de SUE_17_697-anzeigen-wool2yarn_abbeyroad_180x117_170628a_rz.indd 1

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QiuYafu, the Chairman of Ruyi

Ruyi - from wool to fashion

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by Victor Chesky

he rise of Chinese textile enterprise Shandong Ruyi Group did not happen overnight. Across 6 continents and 15 countries, Shandong Ruyi Group’s (Ruyi) global operation includes 100 offices, 13 industrial parks and over 5,000 point of sales. It employs over 30,000 employees in the group’s fully integrated value chain from raw material to fashion brands and apparel. Founded in 1972, Ruyi started as a textile factory in Jining, Shandong, the hometown of Confucius and Mencius. Over the last 45 years, Ruyi has grown dramatically to expand its global footprint, and extended its value chain from manufacturing to retail. I asked QiuYafu, the Chairman of Ruyi about the role wool fibre plays for such a diverse multinational company as Ruyi. ‘Wool is my passion’, says QiuYafu. ‘Although Ruyi has a portfolio of different fabric productions, my passion and focus has always been wool. But of course Ruyi has not limited itself to wool, we have a diversified production portfolio including cotton, mohair, silk and many other lines. One of Ruyi’s core values is technology innovation. In 2009, after seven years of research and development, the “RUYI FANG” spinning technology was developed and recognized by Chinese national textile industrial authorities. This technology is utilized to increase production quality and spinning 30

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accuracy. It largely reduces fiber waste and production cost, and combines fiber types in the spinning process. Today, “RUYI FANG” technology has been implemented in Ruyi’s industrial parks across China, and proved to effectively increase the efficiency and profitability. In 2016, Ruyi acquired Lempriere Australia, one of the oldest wool merchants in the industry, supplying a wide range of wool clips from Australia, South Africa, Argentina, United States, New Zealand and other origins. The collaboration between Lempriere and Ruyi makes the perfect partnership for the value chain. Over the last decade, Ruyi has

acquired Aquascutum, Scabal, Taylor Lodge, and Sandro, Maje, Claudie Pierlot (SMCP) in Europe, as well as D’URBAN in Japan (Renown). In addition, Ruyi services to a portfolio of global high-end brands including Dior, YSL, Brioni, Hermès, Versace, Gucci, Hugo Boss, Burberry, and Prada. Ruyi is also the majority owner of Australia’s largest cotton farm, Cubbie Station. ‘From wool to fashion, we aim to build a global textile enterprise’, he says. ‘The vision is clear. Focus on fabric technology innovation, supply top quality finished garments, and create the best possible experience for clients and customers along the way.’


Mind blowing experts in blending machinery


INDUSTRY

Cleaner Brighter and Whiter Wool A new scouring technology from Wools of New Zealand (WoNZ) will produce significantly brighter and whiter wool. Although New Zealand wool is generally known for its good colour, strength, cleanliness, and superior lustre there can still colour variations within a season. ‘Our new application, GlacialXT, treats wool at the scouring stage to achieve a consistent brighter fibre without any degradation to the substrate which has downstream processing benefits, says WoNZ Chief Executive Rosstan Mazey.

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ariation in colour can create a challenge for designers and manufacturers. ‘Our new technology creates more consistent wool colour as well as much brighter and cleaner wool, without compromising the environment.A reduction in colour variation makes it easier for designers and manufacturers to use lighter, pastel colours, giving them more potential and confidence with their designs.’

Jason Everson and Rosstan Mazey overseeing Glacial XT scouring at Cavalier Woolscourers

WoNZ represents New Zealand wool growers who account for 15 million kgs of wool. Producers will be able to dye a wider range of colours and shades, and receive a more vibrant result’, Mazey comments. ‘Under commercial conditions we have reached what we have termed ‘superwhite’ by transforming good coloured greasy wool deep into the negative Y-Z colour measurement space without

compromising the integrity of the fibre. Depending on the colour of the greasy wool you start with this process can shift the colour by over 5 measurement units. The Y reading in brightness has in some instances exceeded 75, which is the highest reading seen across all scoured wool. In addition to delivering a cleaner, brighter fibre, dye uptake is enhanced and more efficient. Better fibre performance and an improved substrate for design is the all-round result’. ‘This innovation has created a new space for high-end carpet manufactures and upholstery designers. The previous design challenges to tufted and printed carpet production are greatly reduced. New and lighter colour shades can be more easily achieved with enhancements in both brightness and clarity creating interest from designers and customers’. ‘This new technology enables our partners to create new designs and develop new products, expanding the marketing opportunities beyond the solid attributes already built in to our wool by nature. They can also expect efficiencies through the production process from a wool with improved attributes in quality and consistency that customers are increasingly demanding today.’ For more information please contact sales at info.nz@woolsnz.com

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VIEWPOINT

High wool prices - a sales and marketing perspective by Hans-Georg von Schuh Managing Director Sales Südwolle Group

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he increase in wool prices coming out of Australia over the last year has again raised the subject foremost in the minds of the wool fibre industry – to what extend can brands, and therefore the final consumer, accept price fluctuations. In our industry this is always a huge point of discussion, but strangely enough not for companies who have managed to brand their products in a way that price discussions are not an issue at all – think about Apple, think about TESLA. These are only two obvious examples but there are many, many more smaller ones as well. Within the supply chain we must manage our products to keep them valuable, not out of concern for a fluctuating Euro or Dollar but because we must promote its benefits and provide reasons why the retail customer should buy our products. This can go from arguments about the functionality of the garment, as an objective argument, all the way to emotional arguments stressing the personal feeling that can be inspired by love of a garment. If the cost for yarn in a Merino extra fine sweater fluctuates from season to season due to raw material increases by say four dollars, this roughly results in a one dollar per sweater increase. We are aware that the question is not as simple as a small increase of one dollar in the sweater. The increase will be greater

than that when it reaches the retail store. So, the question is whether the consumer can afford, and is prepared to pay, an increased cost or not? Maybe we, as an industry, should take this as an opportunity to rethink costing throughout the supply chain rather than pressing the industry in a way that companies operate at the edge of survival. The discussion should not be how do we deal with the increase in material prices, but how do we make our product interesting and wanted by the retail buyer!

The discussion should not be how do we deal with the increase in material prices, but how do we make our product interesting and wanted

The wool industry is working more in a niche than ever before. Niche markets have different rules than mass markets and we should all appreciate our valuable material which is not comparable to cheap synthetic fibers or cotton. At Südwolle Group we are making a concerted effort to differentiate our products and have been quite successful over the last years. In the near future the recent movements in the market will exert a hick-up in market forces and lead to strong discussions. But I am confident that in the long run market rules will apply, especially if we keep our efforts directed on how to make our product interesting and wanted, then we can live with prices remaining at the present level. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Ermenegildo Zegna - the ultimate brand by Victor Chesky

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rmenegildo Zegna is the most recognised luxury menswear brand in the world. The Lanificio Zegna wool mill was established in the Italian city of Trivero in 1910. By the end of the 1930s, the company had more than a thousand employees and had brought wealth to what was still a poor and isolated Italian village. Four generations and more than 100 years on, this family business now employs 7000 people and operates a total of 513 stores worldwide. It has not, however, lost the vision of its founder - the ethical production of the most exclusive fabrics through innovation and the sourcing of noble fibres directly from their origin. This has been achieved with a strong commitment to animal welfare and environmental and philanthropic initiatives including the Oasi Zegna, Zegnart, and Fondazione Zegna. The Group’s success has been achieved by carefully balancing science with nature, and craftsmanship with technology. Such success and brand recognition cannot be achieved without a deep understanding of consumer demand as it changes and evolves. I spoke with Mr Paolo Zegna, Group Chairman about the importance that wool plays in their collection and what factors influence consumers today when choosing their next luxury garment. ‘Wool is the queen of all fibres and wool has been written into our DNA since the beginning. Although we work with most fibres wool is the fibre we consume the most. Our customers know that the Ermenegildo Zegna brand is based in tradition, experience, and love of wool so there is a natural association between the Zegna brand and wool. The

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positive image of wool is getting stronger and is gaining traction with younger buyers. They are valuing it more and are attracted by its exotic and natural image provided it continues to be interpreted in elegant, beautiful and innovative ways. It plays an important role in our fashion collections.


INDUSTRY

Today wool plays an increasingly prominent role in sport garments and technical textiles.In fact our TECHMERINO project is the synthesis of the best attributes of merino wool and the most sophisticated wool processing and finishing techniques. It has been one of the most successful projects for our Group in the recent times. The result is a fabric that breathes, adapts to temperature, is quick drying and easycare.It is designed for contemporary life either for work and leisure and our customers wear it even when doing sports or just relaxing. The consumer is increasingly aware that woolen garments are no longer rough and uncomfortable to wear and can now be machine washable and crease resistant. AWI is doing a good job promoting wool fibre. They certainly have progressed a long way since the time wool was considered “a commodity”.’

Investing in the environment, from sheep to shop, has been a philosophy of Ermenegildo Zegna since its beginning. Today the company sponsors and recognises the best fine wool growers in Australia and New Zealand. How important are such issues as mulesing and animal welfare to the Ermenegildo Zegna brand? Paolo Zegna

‘Mulesing is a delicate subject. We care deeply about the animal and that is why we know that mulesing, particularly in certain areas of Australia, is a necessity. Without it millions of sheep would die a painful death. That is just a fact that the world must face. The application of anaesthetics and of pain relief treatment is certainly a solution and we deeply encourage the woolgrowers in using it. Regarding traceability, Australia’s The National Wool Declaration is an intelligent way to raise awareness and empower the customer with knowledge. Transparency is good for the market. For us, our customers trust that we adhere to a strict code of ethics. This is implied and fundamental to our brand and is the maximum expression of our quality. Going back some 50 years wool was treated as a commodity. We’ve always believed that it deserves better. Over the years we have been challenging the best woolgrowers in Australia and New Zealand to strive

for the highest quality and improve their performance season after season. Today we sponsor and recognise the best fine wool growers in Australia and New Zealand. We have nurtured our relationship with Australia and New Zealand at the grower level and I think this is strongly recognised by them all. Our awards are a formal recognition of their excellence for the wool industry, just like America’s Cup is for sailing.’

In 2014 Zegna acquired the majority of the Achill Farm, an Australian Superfine wool farm in New South Wales. Could you explain how and why this decision came about? ‘It has been a dream of our company since my father and uncle started the business to complete the circle and be involved with wool starting at the farm. This wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Achill Farm - sheep raised in the open according to modern grazing practices

dream has come true with the purchase of the majority of Achill Farm in New South Wales. This represented a decisive step for us. As a producer as well as a purchaser, at Zegna we have now acquired a deeper knowledge of the production phase of one of our primary raw materials. We have reconfirmed our longstanding support of the wool industry. As a company, we now directly know each and every step of the production chain, from the breeding of the Merino sheep in Australia to the creation of wool fabrics at Lanificio Ermenegildo Zegna in Trivero, to the final products that are available at Zegna stores in more than 100 countries worldwide.We have reached a perfect vertical integration that guarantees an unmatched and higher level of quality and uniqueness for our brand. We focus 16 - 17 micron wool at Achill Farm and really this range is perfect for our needs. At present the farm has a herd of around 10,000 sheep and 1,000 cattle, which are raised 36

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in the open according to modern grazing practices. The wool we produce is continually refined by selecting the best wool types and removing the lower ones in order to enhance the characteristics with each generation. Each new collection is different and innovative and quality and good taste always feature. We are constantly working to create intelligent interpretations using our wool. As a technical fabric we are also incorporating wool into some of our accessory items including sports shoes, hats, and scarves. We like to surprise ourselves and our customers worldwide with new uses for our most preferred fibre. Beyond that you will have to wait and see. But we promise that the next collection will not disappoint. The element of surprise is appreciated and always delights. And our Group will continue to raise awareness and appreciation for extrafine wool to meet the needs of today’s customers and their active and dynamic lifestyles.’


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Worsted yarn solutions from roving to twisted package from one single source. Valuable raw materials like wool need to be handled with outmost care during the whole textile value chain. Processing the fibre on Zinser worsted Ring Spinning machine 451 or 451Impact equipped with Texparts Drafting Systems + Spindles and Accotex Cots + Aprons, followed by the Schlafhorst Autoconer 6 Winding machine and Volkmann CompactTwister with Twinpack system, ensures you the highest quality of yarn.

WE LIVE TEXTILE.


INDUSTRY

Story telling through traceability by Elizabeth van Delden

Why you should turn traceability into your new marketing tool ? Over the past few years, making the wool supply chain visible and traceable through tracking technology has been the focus of many wool industry discussions. The discussion has been mainly focused on the philosophical aspects (why do we need to do it?) and technological aspects (how can we do it). There is however a third dimension that has not been given much attention to and that is the question of ‘How can we benefit from traceability’? The answer to the philosophical question is inevitable: We need to put traceability systems in place and become a fully transparent industry because that is what consumers, retailers and governments are demanding from us in the long term. It is the natural change of times and socio-cultural development that lead us in this direction.  The technological question of how to do it will also be solved sooner or later as technology develops ever so quickly bringing the solutions that we need to track and trace each bale of wool from farm to shop and beyond. 

How can we benefit from traceability? You know of course many of the benefits 38

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of traceability already. These include the opportunity to improve supply chain efficiency, saving energy, water and other resources, customer retention, faster product recall etc. However, I would like to argue that in addition to these benefits we should also consider the benefits it brings to our marketing and communications.

Traceability as a marketing tool As the demand by brands, retailers and consumers for more transparency in the wool supply chain is increasing, we cannot solely rely on tracking data to meet this demand, we also need to tell the stories of and behind the supply chain. This we can and should already do now by creating professional video material, creative photo imagery and good editorial content. These efforts will bring the following benefits: 

Provide additional value to your customers You can offer the stories that you capture within the supply chain to your customers for them to use in their marketing and promotion. Brands and retailers are hungry for content to communicate and display to the consumer via their website, social media platforms, email, catalogues, fashion shows, stores etc. Offering good high quality marketing content for them to incorporate into their message will be an additional selling point for you. Feed your own marketing efforts Creating content through images, video and text will of course also benefit your own marketing, especially in the area of your online and social media efforts. You can keep your website fresh


INDUSTRY

by updating it with regular content. You can also use it to send out a regular newsletter linking to your latest content on your website. And of course it helps you consistently tell your story and add value to your social media channels.Â

Building trust A one page advertisement can only say so much and always comes across a bit salesy. This is why in this Wool2Yarn magazine you probably do more, you run an ad and you tell your story in one of the articles with a photo of the whole team. This is what builds trust, much more than only the ad could do. The same accounts for communicating explicitly and transparently about your supply chain. Providing behind the scene views, explaining

each step of the way will earn you trust with your direct customers and the end consumer.

Get started While the technical challenges of a transparent supply chain are being sorted, get a head start by documenting your supply chain through video, images and text. Communicating transparently and telling the beautiful stories wool has to tell will bring you immediate benefits and open opportunities you cannot even yet foresee. Get access to more tips on how to communicate your wool message effectively online and on social at www.elisabethvandelden.com.

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Benetton Group - Wool lives here by Victor Chesky

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enetton Group is a global fashion brand known for its loyal customer base and it’s amazing range of colors. It operates over 5000 stores internationally and in 2016 sold 14.2 million garments worldwide. It is also known for its iconic advertising campaigns that has shocked, informed, and sensitized people about the most pressing social issues of our time. Benetton recently became a member of the IWTO and I spoke with Mr Lorenzo Dovesi Chief Operating Officer and asked him what role wool fibre plays in the Benetton brand.

‘Wool is a valuable material. It is extremely versatile, and to the consumer it is always synonymous with quality and reliability. Wool is the perfect synthesis of the three brand pillars of Benetton Group: knitwear, color, and social engagement.’

materials. ‘Wool is the second biggest fibre that we use in

‘Ever since the first sewing machine came into the Benetton house in 1955, we have never stopped making knitwear, experimenting with new techniques, processes and

to use 100% wool in our garments - we could reduce costs

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our production - but is the most important one, it is at the core of our knitwear designs. Benetton is not a luxury brand - so to stand out we choose by blending with other fibres but we have made a specific choice to stay with 100% wool.’


INDUSTRY

Left to right: Lorenzo Dovesi CEO and Pietro Pin Research and Development Manager at IWTO Congress in Harrogate

‘In 1991 we created our brand as United Colors of Benetton - but the introduction of color as a concept was created as early as the mid 1960s and early 1970s. This was revolutionary back then, but now color is an integral element of our Benetton brand. ‘It must be acknowledged that the material we use today for making our garments is not the same as it was 20 years ago - and wool must keep ahead of other fibres by introducing new innovative applications as it has been doing in sportswear and active garments. ‘Our customers have always been family based, in particular mothers and teenagers. In 1971 the founders of the company made the strategic decision to open up kids only stores - at that time this was quite revolutionary and today 50% of all stores are kids only. We succeeded where other kids’ only stores have not, because we introduced both the concept of colour

and quality as our benchmarks. Parents trust that our garments will use only natural fibres in our kids’ range that is cotton and wool. We test each garment under our own safety guidelines and under ISO rules. All garments are labelled to reflect these safety standards.

Wool fibre has come under some pressure from environmental groups - how important is environmental and ethical credibility to Benetton Group within its production pipeline and at retail level? ‘As a company Benetton was prepared to talk about environmental issues long before it was fashionable to do so. In fact the story of Benetton Group is not just about economic growth and industrial development. Social commitment, attention to the environment, and ethical behavior are the driving values of ​​ a company wool2yarnglobal 2017

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INDUSTRY

‘Project TV31100 got its name from the postcode of the birthplace of Benetton. Treviso is where it all started in the 1960s by the Benetton family and this Project is very close to our heart. It has been a big impact on Benetton’s ability to interact with the local community and better position itself to know what the consumer likes and prefers in both design and color.

Treviso flagship store

that has never forgotten the existence of responsibility higher than their business goals. ‘ ‘We are innovative and environmentally responsible, and one example of this is our factory in Croatia. In 2016 it was acknowledged for innovation in re-use of water. The quantity of water that we save every day can supply 7000 people daily.’ ‘To keep our product development going we must source appropriate material and we must ensure that it complies with environmental credentials. We have always been mindful of environmental impact. We work with Green Peace and adhere to the Detox Catwalk - a branding by Green Peace in environmental responsibility. Benetton Group is consistently at the top in compliance’. ‘We control our supply chain. We know where our raw material is bought because it does matter. Mandatory auditing of each store for social responsibility and social engagement is built into our franchise agreements. Such audits are fundamental to our quality control’.

Project TV31100 is something that you have talked very passionately about. This Project allows Benetton to interact with local communities and better assess consumer likes and dislikes more quickly. 42

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‘When we took 36 knitting machines to Treviso to produce our knitted products we were able to output garments quickly, make use of the local workforce and use retail shops in the area to sell more quickly, and more importantly, to gage and test whether the products would be well received more widely by a more national and international retail customer base. Our direct relationship with the client is the most effective way to know what they want. We are right there monitoring consumer response to our latest color selections. We were one of the first companies to attempt to understand that customers want color but that color should change quickly. This project enabled us to deliver different colors to different stores based on local customer demand’. A strong objective in the Project TV31100 is to promote the Made in Italy benefits of quality and style, and our use of digital support. Textile machinery software has provided us with a digital evolution in garment making. Today we can design, load the yarn at the lab level, create colors, and define stitches faster and more accurately than ever before. The software measures quickly and we can see in advance how the garment will manufacture. Previously it would take 12 -14 months from design to store, today it takes 6 months. Currently 70% of Benetton stores are owned as private franchises and only 30% are under Benetton’s direct ownership. However our long term goal is to have greater direct ownership of our stores. We see this as creating a direct connection with customer and with our workers both at retail level and earlier in the processing chain. Human rights have always been important to us at Benetton and this will not change’, Lorenzo Dovesi concluded.


INDUSTRY

Standard Wool UK invests in new machinery

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he downturn in demand for crossbred wool in the UK and around the world has not stopped Standard Wool UK from investing in new textile machinery in its scouring facility in the UK and its topmaking plant in Chile.

The company is installing a new blending plant at their Thomas Chadwick scouring facility in the UK and new combing lines and new wool grease machines at their topmaking plant in Chile. (See article in UK Report). ‘Our focus has always been to ensure that quality of our scoured wool and tops is ahead of customer expectations’, says Paul Hughes snr Group Managing Director of the Standard Wool Group. ‘Our company may be 200 years old but we are very forward looking when it comes to our products and our staff. Without investment in the latest technology you lose your standing with customers and become less competitive. We have installed new N Schlumberger combs for their efficiency, quality and speed’, he says. ‘Standard Wool UK is one of a very few companies to install new combs in South America in the last 20 years’, says Patrick Strehle N Schlumberger. ‘We were very pleased

Paul Hughes Snr

to be involved in the supply and installation of these new combs. ‘Upgrading machinery to create the best results in wool processing is cost efficient and something that customers are swayed by when choosing a company to process with or purchase from’, says Paul Hughes. ‘This investment is a commitment to our customers, who will be able to enjoy consistent and reliable products from us for many years to come’.

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REACHING GENERATION Z By Dalena White, Secretary General of the International Wool Textile Organisation

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ool has the answers for this socially aware, environmentally responsible generation, but will the message be heard in time? Making up 40% of the world’s population, the first generation of the 21st century, Generation Z, is starting to come of age. Well informed and globally connected, Generation Z is also marked by its concern for humanity’s impact on the planet. Despite emerging into times of economic difficulty, nearly three out of four Gen Z respondents to a 2015 Nielsen global online study would be willing to pay extra for “sustainable offerings.” The Nielsen study also found that one of the top sustainability purchasing drivers is that the product is made from fresh, natural, and/or organic ingredients. You can’t get more natural than wool: grown year-round by sheep on a blend of water, air, 44

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sunshine, and grass as the Woolmark website puts it. In addition: • Wool garments are recycled more than those of other fibres, and research suggests wool garments are worn for longer and retained for longer than those made of other fibres. • There’s evidence that carbon sequestration in the trees and shrubs on sheep farms offsets a proportion of greenhouse gas emissions.


• Holistic land practitioners will tell you how livestock like sheep promote biodiversity and prevent desertification. Even so, as we are all too aware, since the 1990s oil-based synthetic fibres have come to dominate the market. Lately we are beginning to hear polyester being praised for its recyclability. One recent report on the fashion industry calls for even more use of polyester as a way to increase its “sustainability score”. For those of us in the wool business, statements like these defy the laws of logic. Yet a simple Google search will return a plethora of similar results. Given that the fast fashion model – with its cheaply produced high volumes – shows no sign of eroding, one gets the impression this is but the thin edge of the wedge. We can even give the wedge a name: greenwash.

The danger zone The Oxford online dictionary defines greenwash as “disinformation disseminated by an organisation so as to present an environmentally responsible public image.” The problem with greenwash in the fashion industry is the risk of a fundamental loss of trust. The International Wool Textile Organisation (IWTO) has for example, on behalf of the industry, been fighting wool’s corner for accurate, fair representation in these kinds of fashion industry reports and apparel fibre ranking mechanisms. It is, frankly, an uphill battle. The full picture is complex. But often ratings organisations and others choose to make comparisons between products made from different fibre types, without taking into consideration that full picture – a simplification which is incorrect and often misleading. The headline-catching rankings where polyester comes out on top, for instance, tend to be based on the raw materials stage

of production only, rather than the entire life cycle of the product. In this way, synthetics are not penalized for requiring more electricity and water for frequent washing, nor for not being biodegradable, while wool suffers because the models consider the methane produced naturally by sheep to be very important. At the same time, oddly, the fact that oil is pumped from the ground counts for little against polyester. Further, wool is penalized because sheep require land to graze, and for some reason, this type of land use is considered negative, even though often the land is suitable only for grazing livestock and not for other uses. Additionally, as mentioned above, the presence of sheep encourages biodiversity and can actually be good for the planet. What happens when Generation Z discovers that it is being shown only a part of the picture?

Getting the message across Along with environmental awareness and social tolerance, Generation Z prefers realism to sugar-coating and greenwash. They believe current systems are broken and they will not be held responsible for further destruction. Generation Z’s reality is that most synthetic fibres ever produced still exist today. Their reality is overflowing landfill sites and microfiber pollution poisoning the world’s waterways and infiltrating the food chain. Their reality is that recycling plastic water bottles into textiles for apparel does not disguise the fact that it is still plastic. Clear and consumer-friendly reporting of all of the facts will be the key to the trust of future generations. That wool offers proven solutions to the environmental concerns that Generation Z will address in force, we have no doubt. IWTO will continue, through its working groups, to establish the science required to establish wool’s environmental credentials and to communicate these findings. We will dig deeper into Gen Z and beyond when we examine Wool for Future Markets, the theme of the next IWTO Congress taking place in Hong Kong in 14-16 May 2018. Visit our website for details: we hope to see you there. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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SPECIALITY FIBRE

Speciality and rare fibres by Victor Chesky

2017 has been a better year for speciality fibre according to Luca Alvigini Director of Alpha Tops in Biella. The Alpha Tops Group is a world leader in the supply of speciality fibre for the textile industry. It is a multi-national group of companies, involved in topmaking and the processing and supply of alpaca, mohair, cashmere and camel hair for yarn. ‘Overall consumption had slowed for speciality fibres all around the world’, notes Luca Alvigini. A main factor was the lower demand for luxury goods particularly in China due to anti-corruption campaign, as well as the overall slowing in their economy. ‘This has had a negative impact on luxury brand sales in China. Some international retail brands that had planned expanding have now put these plans on hold or even scaled down their retail presence ’, he said. ‘The Russian embargo has also had a negative impact on the luxury goods market. Brexit has also created some uncertainty and the devaluation of the pound has not helped. Luca AlvigIni, presidente de Alpha Tops.

But notwithstanding this he believes that 2017/18 is on a better footing. Cost increases in China are favouring a production move back to Europe, and in particular, to Italy. ‘The ‘made in Italy’ label also has the perception of good quality and this is of course a great advantage to European trade’. He also expects fines de los años cincuenta, Pierspeciality Giuseppe that overall demand for fibres will be steady or slightly increased.

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Alvigini, su padre, más conocido como ‘Pino’, empezó a hacer negocios con Francis O. Patthey en el Perú, emprendiendo una relación comercial que duraría hasta el día de hoy, a través de su hijo, Luca Alvigini, conocido en Italia como “Mister Alpaca”. En 1980, Pino fundó Alpha Tops, empresa que en pocos años se convirtió en líder en la comercialización de fibras nobles como la alpaca, el cashmire y el mohair. Después de terminar sus estudios universitarios, Luca ingresó a la empresa en 1983, un año después de que François Patthey se incorporase a Inca Tops. Luca empezó manejando todas las ventas de las materias primas en los mercados del mundo, pero siempre enfocándose en su más grande pasión: la alpaca. “Hemos alcanzado en este momento el récord histórico del precio, y esto me interesa porque mi mayor preocupación es que la alpaca se vuelva un clásico, como puede ser el cashmire, menos sometido a las fluctuaciones de precio de venta en el mercado internacional”, dice Luca, optimista por el incremento del precio de la fibra procesada, que beneficia no solo a los empresarios sino también a los productores, que deben apuntar a la mejora de la calidad de la fibra. Para él, existe una coyuntura internacional que favorece a la fibra de bandera, y que podemos aprovechar para hacer de este periodo la década de la alpaca. “En China ha bajado mucho la producción de cashmire por varias razones. El gobierno chino no está incentivando la cría de cabra cashmire porque la cabra les da muchos problemas climáticos. La alpaca está muy de moda en este momento. Cuando China se abrió al mercado en los noventa, descubrió la alpaca. Ahora, los chinos compran tejido, son los más grandes del mundo, esto ha traído un efecto muy positivo al Perú. Tenemos también la suerte de que ha sido prohibido el uso del conejo de angora, porque algunas organizaciones animalistas están en contra de la utilización de ese animal. Yo preveo un tren positivo para el próximo año”, explica Luca. Para el empresario, si podemos mantener el precio

Cashmere

In the beginning of 2017 there was virtually no stock held by spinners so any small increase in demand will see prices remaining firm or increasing slightly. There is a limited cashmere clip, particularly of good quality, and this will ensure that the fibre will continue to be in demand. But, Luca Alvigini points out, the cashmere industry will have to manage some challenges into the future. Manufacturers have been creating new blends and new styles and this will see a reduced cashmere content used. Also at issue is the end of the v-neck sweater in standard cashmere knits, featured for years by major international brands, and dropped from all knitwear collections last season. On the other hand, China is still buying cashmere for its own domestic production, and this demand is balancing the current slower buying trend in Europe, resulting in an overall price stabilisation for cashmere fibre. After China Italy is the biggest importer of Cashmere using around 2,265,043 kg (basic dehaired), smaller quantities of around 344,478 is imported by the UK, and Korea with 126,799, followed by Japan at 83,251 and Hong Kong at 80,304. Luca Alvigini

‘The biggest demand that we at Alpha Tops have experienced this season has

SEÑOR ALPACA wool2yarn

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global 2017

RECOnOCidO En EL mundO tExtiL itALiAnO COmO unO dE LOS máS imPORtAntES


SPECIALITY FIBRE

been for Mongolian Cashmere. It is generally not of the same quality as Chinese Cashmere, but because the industry currently prefers the darker colours for blends, Mongolian cashmere is a more suitable fibre. And despite the severe cold in Mongolia, that has been responsible for the death of many animals, it has actually produced the same quantity as China.’ ‘In Mongolia the government is encouraging farmers to grow Cashmere because it is a major export commodity, whereas in China there is no incentive for farmers to go into Cashmere resulting in a reduction in quality and quantity’, he comments.

Vicuña Vicuña is an even rarer fibre than cashmere. The main grower countries are Peru, Argentina and Bolivia. The clip is taken only once every two years. Around 5/6 tons per year is available and as a consequence it is indeed the most expensive natural fibre available. It has been selling at USD1600.00 per kilo. ‘As such it is a very controlled market and much government documentation (CITES) by grower countries is required before any export is achieved,’ says Mr Alvigini.

Alpaca & Mohair Luca Alvigini is more optimistic about the outlook for Alpaca and Mohair. ‘Fibre such as alpaca and mohair will

be in greater demand than Cashmere in the future’, he says. There is more interest by consumers for these fibres as it is both provide a bulkier and hairier yarn. Mohair fibre has come down in price in the last couple of years’, he comments. He sees the production and demand being quite balanced. Currently mohair is more expensive than alpaca. ‘This is partly so’, he says, ‘because mohair fibre cannot be replaced with other fibres. Alpaca, on the other hand, can be blended with such fibres as wool, if it is too expensive. And there is only around 4 million kilos of mohair, with half coming from South Africa and the remainder from Argentina, Texas, Australia and New Zealand’, he says. There are approximately 6 million kgs of alpaca produced each year, 90% of this comes from Peru and the remainder from Chile and Bolivia. 40% of this clip is consumed by the domestic garment market in Peru. The remainder is exported worldwide as tops and yarn. ‘It is quite different for mohair’, he comments. ‘Almost 100% of South African mohair is exported. Only a very small quantity is used internally by the domestic market’. ‘As a luxury fibre, demand for garments and other products made from alpaca and mohair increase as buyers at retail become more affluent. The amount of fibre available is so small, and as production is not increasing, but demand is, it should be a good year’, concludes Luca Alvigini. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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SPECIALITY FIBRE

Cashmere goats in Mongolia

Cashmere: Connect directly with the source of pure luxury

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here is a limited cashmere clip and a limited number of companies that process cashmere in the world. China, Mongolia, Iran and Afghanistan are the major cashmere producing and exporting countries today. This exclusiveness will ensure that cashmere remains in demand also in the future to come. However, more and more consumers want to be certain that the premium they are paying for worth their money. Consumers want to know the story behind the product of how, where and by whom the product was made. For brands and retailers who pride themselves in creating luxurious high quality cashmere garments it is important to have full traceability back to the cashmere source. This means

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supply chain partners need to provide their customers with the story behind the fibre in addition to high quality cashmere traceable back to the source. The G. Schneider Group has committed their investment in Mongolia and Iran to provide their customers with exactly this: high quality dehaired cashmere as well as the story and expertise behind the fibre.

Benefit from local cashmere expertise Being such a luxurious and rare fibre, it is important for spinners and weavers to bring out the best of the cashmere fibre in the final product by applying the right kind of expertise. This is why G. Schneider offers its customers


SPECIALITY FIBRE

direct access to its Mongolian cashmere expert to assist and consult during the manufacturing process. Because of the more detailed demands from customers about cashmere and the way it is processed, G. Schneider has decided to enforce its cashmere department with Ms. Buyanaa Damdin from Mongolia. She will be joining the G. Schneider trading team in Switzerland. She has been working for the group for almost 20 years in Mongolia being in charge of the G. Schneider cashmere plant. Ms. Buyanaa speaks fluently Italian and English and is one of the topcashmere experts in the world. In addition, G. Schneider’s local expertise in Iran and Mongolia offers the opportunity to document and tell the cashmere story in full detail. The G. Schneider Group invites brands and retailers to benefit from the company’s local integration as this will help deliver the best product along with the fascinating cashmere story directly to the consumer.

Mongolian Cashmere The Group’s Monital dehairing plant for topquality cashmere is situated in Ulaanbataar, the capital of Mongolia. The plant has a production capacity of 200 tons of APEO-free dehaired cashmere and is one of the few mills in the country featuring a wastewater treatment plant. All cashmere gathered from the most remote areas of the country is sorted, scoured and dehaired at the Schneider plant which makes the fibre easy to track.

Iranian Cashmere Cashmere from the Middle East comes in several hues ranging from white to dark brown and is typically shorter and even coarser (between 17 and 18.5 microns) than other cashmere fibres. As this cashmere is slightly coarser its ideal outer garments such as overcoats. The Schneider Group has created the first important textile initiative in Semnan, Iran, located in the gateway between Teheran and Mashhad. The company is called PazhanSefitand is one of the two cashmere dehairing plants in Iran, with a total processing capacity of 150 tons of dehaired APEO-free cashmere. The Schneider purchasing division buys the cashmere directly from local farmers which ensures the origin of the fibre. G. Schneider Group has a total processing capacity of 350 tons of dehaired cashmere. The Group also processes fine wools and other precious natural fibres at plants in Argentina, Egypt, Italy, China, Mongolia, and Iran. For more details about Mongolian and Iranian cashmere, please contact: Jeffrey Losekoot at jeffrey.losekoot@gschneider.com G. Schneider is a family owned company with a long history and expertise in cashmere, wool and other animal fibres. Left to right: Marco Schneider, Elena Schneider and Giovanni Schneider.

Mongolia is the second largest producer of raw cashmere in the world, after China with production of about 7 million kilos per year, however only 50% of this fibre is usable because it must first be dehaired. Mongolian cashmere has a distinctive natural softness and exceptionally long fibre. Cashmere from Mongolia is usually brown or light grey and around 16.5 microns fine. This type of cashmere is ideal for knitwear including jumpers. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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WOOL & YARN TREATMENT

Naturetexx® Plasma how it works

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üdwolle Group brings a range of elite performance yarns to the market, combining the traditional benefits of Merino wool with environmental-friendly solutions to wool processing. Its Naturetexx® Plasma process is an environmental leap forward from the traditional Superwash treatment.

Südwolle Group won the highly regarded OutDoor Industry Award in the category of ‘Sustainable Innovators’ for Naturetexx® Plasma. It is GOTS and OEKO-TEX® as well as bluesign® certified. The Naturetexx® Plasma dry process treatment uses electricity and air to deliver machine washable Merino wool. As well as machine washability, it delivers fibre with the same tenacity, better pilling performance and significantly improved ability to absorb moisture. Plasma is created by holding a strong electric voltage across a non-conducting gas - often in lowpressure conditions. The voltage ionises the gas into a more reactive fundamental state. When wool tops are passed through the plasma field, the surface of the fibre reacts with the energized gas, reducing the size of the cuticle scales and removing the felting effect. The Naturetexx® Plasma process is carried out at atmospheric pressure, and the gas used is normal air. The major input is electricity, without chlorine and without water.

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Naturetexx Plasma customer feedback ®

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by Victor Chesky

aturetexx® Plasma treats wool without using chlorine. It is AOX free, demonstrating a significant advancement in an environmental-friendly solution to wool processing. Years of research and German technology by Südwolle Group has achieved a genuine alternative to Superwash. It is more than just a specialty organic niche treatment.This dry process treatment uses electricity and air to deliver machine washable Merino wool. As well as machine washability, it also delivers fibre with the same tenacity, better pilling performance and significantly improved ability to absorb moisture. It is used by a number of brand manufacturers around the world with great success. One such customer is ENGEL Sports. For over 35 years, ENGEL has been making underwear and clothing in natural fibres to the highest ecological and social standards. Underwear and clothing is certified ecologically and socially responsible throughout the manufacturing process from the raw fibres to the end product, and is made exclusively in Germany. Over 90% of the products are IVN Best or GOTS certified. ENGEL has been using Naturetexx® Plasma since 2013; initially it was just applied to ENGEL SPORTS apparel, now to all products. I asked Mrs. Kolompar, Managing Director ENGEL GmbH, why they chose to treat their products with Naturetexx® Plasma and what feedback they have received from their customers?

‘Our ENGEL products have always been eco-friendly and made of wool and wool/silk blends. Sportswear should be comfortable, trendy, odour resistant, and moisture managed. In short, we were aiming to combine comfort, functionality, and now also machine washability. The use of Naturetexx® Plasma has added value for ENGEL and our customers’, says Mrs. Kolompar. ‘Our customers trust in our sustainable approach, certified products, comfort, and quality, but until we started to use Naturetexx® Plasma customers washed our products by hand. We have overcome the challenge of washability. This has been a very positive selling advantage.


WOOL & YARN TREATMENT

End consumers don’t normally know about the specific technique used in Naturetexx® Plasma, but they do ask for more sustainable, easy-care products. They are very enthusiastic about the easy handling that our products now provide. The earlier skepticism has gone. They can see that it is possible for a garment to be natural, and still be machine washable. Of course, this has also increased the number of products we sell. For example, baby clothes that need to be washed frequently can now be laundered with a lot less work. Young mothers tell us how much they appreciate this advance in easy-care. When we speak with our B2B retail customers, we can offer more transparency and traceable production information. We clearly mention Südwolle Group as our yarn supplier offering this special Plasma treatment to make Merino machine washable. In addition to offering Naturetexx® Plasma, Südwolle Group is a very customer oriented and reliable partner that we work very closely with throughout the whole supply chain’, concluded Mrs. Kolompar.

PROTECTS THE ENVIRONMENT PIONEERING TECHNOLOGY USING JUST CLEAN ENERGY AND AIR EXCELLENT WASHING MACHINE PERFORMANCE

Machine washable Merino

FOR ALL KIND OF GARMENTS THE BEST OF MERINO

www.naturetexxplasma.com

www.suedwollegroup.com yarn@suedwollegroup.de

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WOOL & YARN TREATMENT

Demand for Shrinkproofing on the rise

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Albert Chippendale (left) and his son Lewis Chippendale at SPB plant in Bradford

number of different shrink proof treatments have been launched onto the market to varying levels of success’, says Albert Chippendale Speciality Processors Bradford (SPB) UK. ‘Some are old technology repackaged with new names and untested promises. Some still need to be proven to really work effectively when treating large quantities and using diverse wool types’, he says. ‘We know that our treatment works and our customers prefer to process their wool with us here in Europe because of our knowledge and experience with European and UK wools’, says Albert Chippendale. ‘We are cost competitive and provides a quick turn-around service.’ SPB is a commission wool processor. ‘We are not aligned or linked to any wool company. We are privately owned and totally independent.

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We process quantities both big and small, from 500kg to 100 tonnes.’ Demand by consumers for garments to look new and maintain their shape after repeated washing and drying is growing. ‘The wool we process for sweaters meet specifications that enable each finished garment to go through a washing cycle some 50 times without any shrinkage occurring and are suitable for tumble drying ’, he says. ‘We are continuously working on new processes and assessing new technologies. However we believe that at present we offer the best option for a quality machine washable product- across all microns. Our process out-performs the new technologies in terms of machine washable and tumble dry performance’. 


SHRINK RESISTANT WOOL PROCESSING Albert Chippendale has been in the industry for more than 30 years and he has seen treatment trends come and go. He is yet to be convinced that his treatment method can be superseded but comments that ‘we always look to the future and we continue to trial new treatments. We have developed our own process to render the wool machine washable without the use of chlorine. However, even chlorine treated wool from our plant contains less chlorine than drinking water!’, he points out. ‘Our treatment out-performs other shrink proofing techniques’. ‘Our treatment method continues to be the most frequently used’, he says. ‘And as a shrink proofing process it is still the most effective treatment method for woollen garments and bedding products. Wool parameters can change from sheep to sheep and from season to season and our process is proven to consistently work well with all these changing characteristics. We use our technology because it outperforms any other shrink proofing technique.’ SPB treatment complies with The Total Easy Care (TEC) process and is Woolmark Accredited and operates to ISO 9001 quality standards. It is registered with the Environmental Agency in the UK and can offer natural products that are environmentally friendly, with OEKO TEX certification. SPB also processes wool for a number of bedding product manufacturers that carry the Green Label. (refer SPB article in Bedding Report). Traditional markets for SPB products in knitwear include the UK, Western Europe, Scandinavia and North America. ‘We treat wool for hand knitting as well as for high performance apparel such as ski wear. Hand knitting has enjoyed something of a resurgence in America and this is an area of wool treatment that we are expert in, shrink proofing and getting rid of the itch factor’. ‘As a commission scourer we look after our clients consignment from start to finish’, says Mr Chippendale. ‘Our clients receive the right wool handle, right colour, and good washability properties according to their specific requirements.’ For more information please contact Albert Chippendale at speciality.processors@btopenworld.com wool2yarnglobal 2017

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WOOL & YARN TREATMENT

Taking the green road to Dalis Jiaxing Mount Chemical Co ( Dalis) in Zhejiang

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he textile industry is under extreme pressure to revamp its processing to be more environmentally friendly, and the wool industry has been meeting this challenge head on. Governments around the world are enforcing stricter environmental compliance rules on wool processors to use fully biodegradable and eco-friendly detergents for all stages of scouring, topmaking and yarn production. ‘The pressure now also comes from retail level demanding compliance and certification, and sometimes from as far down the chain as the farm from which the sheep is grown. So, when it comes to auxiliary products it is important to chose the detergent that best complies with these criteria at all stages of processing’, says Mr Zhu Jiankun, general manager of Jiaxing

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Mount Chemical Co in Zhejiang China. The company is well known to its customers in China and Europe, supplying chemical agents under its ‘Dalis’ brand. In 2017 the company was a major sponsor at the IWTO Congress in Harrogate UK. Dalis has developed and supplies a wide range of processing agents including degreasing detergents, wool lubricant oil, carding oil, antistatic agent, penetrating agent, and softening agents. These are mainly used in wool scouring, carbonizing, carding, topmaking, worsted spinning, woolen spinning, semi-worsted spinning, dyeing and finishing, and mercerized wool, machine washable wool treatment, Basolan treatment processing. ‘One of our most popular products is Wool Detergent X100 series used in wool scouring


Certificate no.: 2008C0540044 Tested for APEOs and Formaldehyde


WOOL & YARN TREATMENT

and wool carbonising and wool dyeing. It is effective in emulsification while degreasing and washing, it is non-alkaline. It does not break down the protein fibre in the wool, or corrode machinery. It is suitable for all kinds of wool scouring and is particularly good in colder climates’, comments Mr Zhu. Wool Detergent X100 series is especially suitable for high quality Australian wool scouring because of its degreasing ability, and outstanding after effect on the appearance and feel of the wool. ‘It is very cost effect and economical’. Wool Detergent X100 series clients include companies in Europe, New Zealand, Turkey and Kazakhstan as well as major companies in China such as New Chuwa, Red Sun, Tianyu Wool, and Sunshine Group. All products have passed Intertek ecological environmental protection certification. ‘We have embraced the concept of eco-environmental protection in parallel with economic development. Green development is a core feature now in the competitive industry in China’. ‘Our Eco carding oil, wool lubricant and anti-static agents are widely used in applications for wool carding, top making, spinning, mercerizing wool, machine washable wool and Basolan wool processing, which improve spinnability and yield, reduce production cost’ says Mr Zhu. ‘Our production equipment, knowledge and technology is well received internationally. We understand that wool washing methods are important to the scouring industry and the affect that it will have on the 56

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production process. Our company has been focused on improving wool detergent for 15 years and the production of Dalis detergent X100 series of products in terms of quality, cost performance, stability has reached a level that is being well received by the industry/ our customers in Europe’. Wool Detergent X100 uses high grade plantbased ingredients. In the woollen industry it is used as a raw wool detergent, wool carbonization auxiliary, and a wool dyeing detergent. After use residual wool grease is stabilized, greyness is reduced, the natural whiteness is shown, and the fibre unknots and becomes softer. There is greater grease recovery, and a higher production rate. It is environmentally safe, not containing APEO, formaldehyde, or phosphorous. It is INTERTEK certified, and REACH (EU) chemical product pre-registered. Please contact Mr Zhu Jiankun at Tel: 0086 573 88188758 88182111 Fax: 0086 573 88188768 Email: jxmount@163.com


PURE NEW WOOL


WOOL & YARN TREATMENT

Biggest superwash facility develops new treatment

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o stay ahead of their competition companies must innovate and develop new applications for its product while maintaining quality. Newlight XINGUANG Wool Treatment Co is the biggest superwash wool treatment plant in the world and in the past couple of years has invested heavily in research and development. Established in Jiangsu Province in 2000 its annual production capacity is now 21,000 tons of tops, and does so for all major topmakers in China as well as major international brands. ‘We have been working closely with Australian Wool Innovation and have jointly developed new treatments for woollen products’, says Chris Qu, chairman at Newlight. ‘These treatments enhance the characteristics in smoothness, coolness, and moisture

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Chris Qu, chairman at Newlight

absorption suitable for underwear, t-shirts, and outdoor clothing. For customers looking for hygienic qualities such as the prevention of infection and skin irritation, and sweat odour the company has developed anti-bacterial and freshness superwash wool tops’, he says. A further innovation developed by Newlight includes permanent soft treatment for wool tops. ‘After conventional Superwash wool tops are dyed, they can lose softness. Our product still achieves good spinning performance and smoothness after dyeing. In addition, our true black pre-treatment is very popular with garment manufacturers. Our special chlorination treatment process achieves a darker, brighter colour’. ‘Today we are the largest Superwash wool top


WOOL & YARN TREATMENT

treatment plant in the world’, says Chris Qu. ‘50% of our treated wool is for the domestic market and 50% for export. It doesn’t matter who makes your tops, our customers still prefer to Superwash their tops with us’. ‘Our customers around the world choose us for their top treatment needs because we don’t do anything else. We do not make tops, we do not comb wool, we do not finish, our sole focus is wool treatment, and this specialisation gives us added expertise and focus,’ says Chris Qu. Newlight uses Basolan, Soft Lustre, and Shrinkproof treatments for customers in China and around the world and processes on Fleissner and Andar machines over seven lines, an increase of two lines since last year. It was the first mill in China to introduce a non chlorine Superwash top treatment. No chlorine is used during this process and therefore there is no harmful ecological effect. The company was accredited Woolmark certification in Easy Total Care more than 12 years ago. Today it operates a product development centre for new innovative products tested by Australian Wool Innovation. It is also Oeko-tex 100 environmental

protection accredited. The washable standards specified by the Woolmark Co include wool shrink tests and machine washable standards are met after this treatment. The product also develops excellent anti-pilling properties after this treatment and is of great interest to customers in Europe. ‘We treat each order individually, and each customer personally. The untrained eye or the inexperienced hand may not see or feel the difference in top treatment but the fabric manufacturer will’, says Mr Qu ‘He will know if the top has been treated by us or top has been treated elsewhere’, says Mr Qu. ‘Our brand name is associated with quality and a large number of clients inside and outside China - they know us and specifically nominate us for their wool treatment needs. It is not just the machines that make treatment at Newlight better, it is the combination of our entire system including management, and engineers working with our people on the floor’. For more information about wool top treatments at Newlight / XINGUANG please contact Tao - qutaoi@hotmail.com Or visit the company website at www.xinguangwooltop.com Tao Qu with Superwash line one of seven lines at Newlight in Jiangsu Province

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- the benchmark in sustainable wool treatment EXP treatment is all about achieving sustainability in processing. The water used in this treatment is clean enough for drinking. The performance results are on par with Easycare, and there is no difference in cost when compared with Superwash. ‘EXP stands for “EX-Pollution” and as a treatment process it receives Bluesign and GOTS certification. It also conforms to the EUEco Flower and Oeko-Tex standard’, says Kurt Haselwander CEO at Schoeller the Spinning Group. No pollutants are used during the anti-felting treatment process. EXP enables the wool to remain machine-washable without the use of chlorine. The conventional process previously used involves smoothing these scales and then coating the chlorinated wool fibres with a wash-resistant film. A substantial amount of AOX pollutant is released during this process. The result is environmental pollution and is directly attributable to the wool fibres. EXP completely avoids the use of chlorine and employs natural salts as an oxidization agent.

‘Our EXP chlorine-free process uses fewer resources than conventional processes and is carried out reliably at our European manufacturing site. It is a truly all-round sustainable innovation. And we see it as a revolution in treatment. Wool has a scaly surface, and as its fibres do not sit uniformly, they snag when they contact one another’, says Kurt Haselwander. He explains that the patented EXP treatment does not change the wool surface as the Hercosett treatment does, and therefore it preserves the inherent characteristics of wool that provide such excellent fibre functionality. Fibre performance such as anti-felting, machine washability including TM31 (1x7A / 5x5A), or tumble drying (TEC) are comparable to those that have undergone superwash treatment. ‘If you think about sustainable wooltreatment - EXP is the benchmark’, says Mr Haselwander. EXP also brings the possibility to color wool in new brilliant shades particularly brilliant white. This Enciel Technology was developed together with TMC. ‘We are working with top makers around the world and are providing them with the opportunity to process their tops using the EXP method on a commission basis at our facilities at TTIin Hard Austria’, says Mr Haselwander.

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EXPERTS IN DYEING AND COLOUR MATCHING

DYED TOPS • YARNS • YARN DYEING

• Top Dyeing • Package Yarn Dyeing • Top Dyed Yarns • Fibre/yarn testing on site • Fibre Blending • Sythetic tow to top converting

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT US: T: +44 (0) 1274 676321 E: sales@bulmerandlumb.com www.bulmerandlumb.com Bulmer & Lumb Group Limited Buttershaw, Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD6 2NE

From left to right: Lee Darvill – Sales Director, Matthew Whitehead – Finance Director, David Midgley – Managing Director, Paul Hamilton – Technical Director, Gareth Jones – Sales Manager.


DYEING

Understanding colour& dye matching

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dvances in textile machinery have revolutionised the textile manufacturing industry. Tops and yarn dyeing is no exception, with technological advances progress this industry into the future. Nevertheless colour matching and dyeing still depends very much on the personal expertise of the dyer. Consistency in colour from one batch to another, and from one delivery to the next is the most fundamental requirement from spinners and weavers.

Bulmer & Lumbhas retained a high level of expertise in dyeing and colour matching and has been doing so for almost 100 years. ‘Our customers know that they will receive the same even colour from every batch - the first kilo will be the same as the last kilo, and this colour will be the same as it was in the previous batch and in the previous year’, says Lee Darvill export sales director. ‘When it comes to dyeing - it very much depends on the personal experience of the dyer - and we at Bulmer and Lumb excels at this. We understand colour and we are very good at colour matching’. Bulmer and Lumb achieve advanced colour matching for uniform fabrics and suiting that require ‘mix and match’ repeatability.’Some of the finest suit materials originated from our dye house in Bradford. Upholstery for commercial aircrafts, as well as militarily uniform materials are dyed by us’, says Gareth Jones sales manager. ‘Our expertise in dyeing and processing fibre gives us the edge when it comes to dealing with products requiring particular shade, colour fastness or flame retardant properties. As with all our manufacturing, these products are subjected to the highest standards of quality control.’ 62

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Accurate colour reproduction is achieved through close liaison with dyers, colour matchers and laboratory technicians ensuring a fast and accurate response. ‘This blend of traditional expertise combined with hightech assistance helps fine tune colours to the highest standards. We make rigorous checks throughout processing to ensure that the customer’s specifications, critical standards and archive shades are met every time.’ The company dyes fine and coarse micron wools, including those that have been previously ‘shrink resist treated’ and made suitable for ‘Total Easy Care’. Top dyed polyesters and nylons are dyed to form blends predominantly with wool. Speciality dyeing of noble fibres such as cashmere, silk, alpaca and mohair are offered at this flexible dye house.


DYEING

Gareth Jones (left) and Lee Darvill

The company can handle single batch sizes from as little as 10kg up to 540kg per dyed tops & 900kg of package. ‘As with all our services we offer the flexibility to provide the same excellent level of service to both small and large customers with single batch sizes from a single cone to 900kg. Also, Bulmer and Lumb now dyes Nomex and other Technical Textile fibres and yarns. Bulmer and Lumb’s package dyeing facility utilises Thies eco-bloc technology, and Thies Quattro technology, facilitating variable packing, flow speeds and fill levels, giving minimum disruption of the yarn. ‘We accommodate most types of dye packages with soft winding facility available for parallel sided dye packages. Dyeing vessels fitted with latest generation computer controls, reporting remotely to a central plant explorer system give us optimum dye cycle repeatability, superior fibre treatment, excellent shade reproducibility and efficient batch traceability’, says Lee Darvill. A computer controlled Total Management System enables Bulmer and Lumb to closely monitor order inputs, delivery and invoicing. The benefit to customers is rapid and accurate provision of information. Automatic bar-coding, check-weighing and dispensing of dyes ensures that yarn is dyed to the customer’s exact specifications.

the manufacturing site, watercourses and emissions into the atmosphere. We are fully compliance with the EEC Directive of Integrated Pollution Prevention Control’, says Lee Darvill. ‘Bulmer & Lumb has been heavily involved in the establishment of the Society of Dyers and Colourists Textile Colouration Certificate and has supported more trainees through this route than any other UK company. We are currently supporting four technical apprentices working alongside our experienced technicians’, says Paul Hamilton Technical Director.

Bulmer and Lumb Group recognise the need for continuous improvement in machinery and personnel to meet the ever more demanding requirements necessary for the textile industry today and into the future. Technical requirements, environmental considerations, health and safety implications and customer demands are all drivers toward this end.

Bulmer & Lumb has the bespoke approach and ability to deal with small lots as well as large, dyeing tops for worsted yarns for weaving, knitwear, hosiery and upholstery yarn in a count range from NM 8 to NM 52.’From the fine worsteds of Savile Row to high street fashion, fabric producers rely on our specialist colour matching expertise and quality control to produce a consistent and superior product’, he says.

The company was one of the first textile companies in the UK to be awarded an IPPC certification. ‘It is our commitment that the chemicals and dyestuffs we use cause no harm, including non-pollution of

For more information please contact Gareth Jones gareth.jones@bulmerandlumb.com or Lee Darvill leedarvill@bulmerandlumb.com wool2yarnglobal 2017

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© Expedition I, 2017, by Anton Ostler

YARN INNOVATION

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nnovation is a key factor for success. Yarn manufacturer Südwolle Group has embraced this need by creating Südwebs – a new department for product management and innovations. ‘By creating Südwebs we decided to not only build up an innovation department to develop new products. It goes beyond that, we are spreading within our organization a mind-set of being curious and open to new ideas and concepts. At the same time, we have intensified collaboration with our supply chain partners.

Südwebs goes hand in hand with our network thinking culture. Our motto ‘creating and connecting’ summarizes and describes this very well’, says Mr. Stéphane Thouvay, newly appointed Managing Director Product Management & Innovation at Südwolle Group. ‘Our goal is to work and develop products even more closely with customers and other stakeholders – to exchange ideas, to better understand our mutual needs and to anticipate trends.’

YARNS OF TOMORROW

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Südwolle Group’s innovation projects aim to enhance products in


YARN INNOVATION

terms of performance, functionality, sustainability and design. There are various projects on the go at present allowing worsted wool yarns to be used in completely new markets. In relation to design projects and new trends, Südwolle Group launches two new collections for Biella Yarn (flat knitting), Yarn in Motion (circular knitting), Südwolle (weaving),

HF/Loris (fancy) and GTI (luxury) every year. For technical usage Stöhr offers a broad range of yarns, presented at the latest Techtextil fair in Frankfurt. ‘The three major trends that we currently see are the increased usage of natural fibres in blends with wool, recycled and eco-friendly as well as performance yarns’, says Thouvay. Stéphane Thouvay, Managing Director Product Management & Innovation at Südwolle Group

‘In the field of natural fibres, we

Natural Fibres

Recycled Fibres/Sustainable

Performance Fibres

Biella Yarn / Flat knitting Yik Nm 30/2 and 48/2 80% Merino wool extrafine basolan treated, 19.5 micron, anti-shrinkage, 20% yak Yarn blend with yak from Mongolia/Himalaya with a soft, voluminous touch and hand feel in bright colours for chic and casual knitwear (ladies and menswear).

Südwolle / Weaving SRP Libeccio Nm 64/2 S 650 45% wool recycled, 55% polyester recycled Yarn made of reused post-production wool waste and recycled polyester fibre for classic fabrics used for casual garments.

Yarn in Motion / Circular knitting Idalia Nm 60/1 Z 660 50% Merino wool 19.3 micron TEC, 50% Trevira® polyester with climate effect Merino blend enhanced by Trevira polyester for superior moisture management and pilling performance. Perfect for outdoor, leisure and active wear.

HF / Loris / Fancy Maya Nm 1900 64% linen, 36% alpaca Roving yarn, chunky and rustic but with glamour for sweaters and accessories.

GTI / Hand knitting Welfat G Nm 650 100% cashmere Brushed bouclé yarn in 100% cashmere used for luxury accessories and hand knitted fashion garments.

Biella Yarn / Flat knitting Genziana Nm 30/2 and 48/2 100% Merino wool extrafine, 19.3 micron GOTS certified yarn, treated with Naturetexx® Plasma for machine washability without chlorine, used for classic and organic knitwear.

Richter / Hosiery Lahn Combi Plasma Nm 30/1 90% Merino wool, 23.5 micron 10% nylon Most established yarn quality for hosiery applications, treated with Naturetexx® Plasma for machine washability without using chlorine.

Stöhr / Technical Phoenix Flame resistant yarn, based on wool Flame resistant (FR) yarn that fulfils typical standard DIN ISO norms and is not chemically treated. Used for fire fighting, army, motor sports, chemical industry etc.

Yarn in Motion / Circular knitting Indiana Nm 60/1 Z 660 60% Merino wool 18.5 micron, mercerized, 40% nylon 6.6 Cordura® Cordura® Merino yarn for long-lasting durability with authentic look and comfort of wool with enhanced abrasion resistance used for uniforms, outdoor and sports gear. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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especially see great potential for Mohair and Mohair blends for suiting. With Filature Française de Mohair, our company offers 90 years of experience in Mohair production. Our office in Port Elizabeth provides full traceability by sourcing the best South African Mohair for our production directly from local farms. Through our partnership with GT FERREIRA, we now also source and spin the finest Australian Mohair and we hope to grow this supply chain.’ Today customers are more and more aware of their environmental impact. Südwolle Group keeps expanding the variety of ecofriendly yarns, using recycled fibres (including recycled wool) and biodegradable man-made fibres to spin new qualities. The company also offers organic yarns that are GOTS certified and its Naturetexx Plasma as well as X-Care non-chlorine treatments for easy care are an environmental friendly alternative to Superwash.

Performance yarn is particularly popular for technical use, but demand is also growing for outdoor or leisure apparel, and now also for flat knitting. Südwolle Group is using Merino wool blended with synthetic / performance fibres to enhance specific characteristics in the finished fabric, for example moisture management or durability. ‘No other company offers more variety in types of yarn for both weaving and knitting than Südwolle Group’, says Thouvay. ‘In our Spring/Summer 2018 and Fall/Winter 2018/19 collections we launched around 150 new yarn qualities. Today our customers require an individual approach for their yarns and each of our collections focuses on a specific market segment. This enables us to provide a specialized service to different sectors of the textile industry, but always in very closed cooperation with our customers. We don’t just want to spin yarn, we’d like to proactively manage the whole process from sheep to shop.’

The future is here in wearable technology

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earable technology is no longer confined to fitness trackers and embedded buttons and controls for iPods. Today innovations in fabric and design are stunning the retail consumer with product options focused on comfort and information without losing sight of style and quality. Most of us are familiar with the basics of textile testing for comfort, aesthetics and durability in apparel textiles. But the development of textiles for technical and industrial end uses requires an understanding of existing and new criteria for measuring and evaluating textile attributes. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the U.S. and the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy

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and Nanosystems in China have made the first hybrid self-charging power textile system that can harvest both solar energy and the mechanical energy from a person’s movements. These energies can then be stored as chemical energy in fiber-shaped super capacitors. The system can be woven into textiles for making smart clothes that power mobile and wearable electronics. Deakin University in Melbourne Australia investigated the influence of fibre, yarn and fabric parameters on the UV protection of fabrics. Undyed and untreated wool-knitted fabrics with varying mean fibre diameter, yarn linear density, yarn twist, fabric cover factor and fabric structure were examined. Testing confirmed that these fabric parameters provided both high UV protection and good tactile comfort.


YARN INNOVATION

Preparation units gain speed

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peed and reliability is fundamental to produce quality yarn and preparation units play an essential role in this process. ‘When it comes to preparation units we have made a lot of advances in the last couple of years in automation and speed’, says Patrick Strehle Sales Director at NSC fibre to yarn. ‘It is our aim to provide our customers with the latest technology to optimise their productivity. And we do this while meeting safety, quality, and production requirements’, ‘Our customers look for machinery that provides improved worsted spinning for wool and any kind of wool-like fibre such as cashmere and silk. We have developed GC40 chain gills and GN8 intersecting for finer wools and a long staple card. (For more detail about these machines refer to N. Schlumberger article inTextile Machinery Report in this magazine). These preparation units are improving productivity by 25%, at high speed, and can comb more than 50kg per hour for 21 - 22 micron wool. They guarantee high quality and are very gentle on the fibre.

GN8 intersecting for finer wools and a long staple card

N. Schlumberger also builds complete production lines for industrial knitting, technical yarns, complete clothingyarn and automotive-yarn production lines, as well as for upholstery and automotive yarn, rug and carpet yarns production lines. ‘Our lines include carding and preparation of natural fibres for coarse and medium yarns; carding and combing for top production; blending, defelting and recombing for dyed slivers used in the production of medium or fine yarns Patrick Strehle. ‘We work with individual companies to design machines to their specific needs. This could be one machine or complete lines’. N. Schlumberger also manufactures stretch breaking line for the processing of acrylic tow for blending with other fibres; spinning preparation for the production of medium or fine yarns; and stretch breaking line for the processing of synthetic fibre tow for blending with other fibres. For more information please contact Patrick Strehle at patrick.strehle@nsc.fr wool2yarnglobal 2017

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REDA Active goes into space by Victor Chesky

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eda has been setting the trends and standards in luxury fashion since 1865. Today the finest merino wools continue to make their way to the Reda factory in Valle Mosso just outside Biella, where it is converted into beautiful fabrics by the expert hands of local craftsmen. The Reda

mill employs 400 workers, uses approximately 22,000 bales of greasy wool and produces over 7 million metres of fabric per year. Not many companies can claim to be in business for over 150 years and still retain its Made in Italy label of excellence. I visited the Reda factory

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in Valle Mosso again earlier this year and asked Fabrizio Botto Poala what drives the company to maintain its edge in this overcrowded and very competitive market. ‘Reda has become a leading producer of prestigious garments of pure wool thanks to our set of values that have guided our operations for 150 years. Our fabrics are poised between tradition and innovation and we continue to manufacture exclusively in Italy. The Made in Italy label is fundamental to all our fabrics. Our wool culture is deeply rooted in centuries old traditions and the skills of local craftsmen, and we also have a creative


YARN INNOVATION

Reda fabric continues to be manufactured exclusively in Italy.

spun yarn, and fabric. The signature value of our fabric has always been lightness, pleasant handle, extreme softness, flexibility and durability, as expected by our clients in the male haute de gamme segment.’

Fabrizio Botto Poala with Reda Active fabric

and innovative soul and this has inspired us to produce fabric that are valued by luxury brands’, he says. Fabrizio Botto Poala commented that the quality of our fabric has always relied on the utmost attention we pay to each stage of our production chain, from the selection of raw materials to the final product. As part of this process quality control pays a fundamental role in striving for perfection in our tops,

‘Each Reda collection presents fabric with stylistic and manufacturing characteristics that are remarkably advanced. That is why our manufacturing cannot be delocalised. Our local craftsmen and the quality merino wool we use are essential to our success’, he comments. ‘’We aim to create a synthesis of research which creates the perfect balance between structure and design including visual as well as tactile sensations’. Reda Active fabric in pure merino wool was therefore an obvious choice for American and Russian astronauts during their six month interstellar mission on the international space shuttle. ‘One small step for man, one giant leap for Reda Active’, says Fabrizio with a smile. This fabric has a high-tech bent and is 100% biodegradable. It is loaded with energy that withstands stress and lengthy use. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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The company presents new collections to its customers twice a year. A highlight for Spring/ Summer 2018 will be a sports look. ‘The taste for a sporty look is everywhere and what has impressed us how easy and natural it has been to combine the active world with the tailored one. Our Active collection perfectly encompasses functionality and elegance. It is made from 100% 17.35 micron merino wool, is highly breathable and has excellent thermal properties. It is odour resistant and is water repellent. It is therefore ideal for business people that travel frequently and is recommended for its no crease properties. It is used in diverse products such as board shorts, ski boots, sports helmets and waterproof jackets.

wool mill are second to none and is central to our company policy’, says

‘We achieve high performance from our fabric without compromising its high environmental standards. Environmental policies at our Reda

It is not just talk - we endeavour to make a positive difference to their

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Fabrizio Botto Poala. ‘Our Eco-Management system goes beyond legal requirements. We are the only wool manufacturer in the world to have been awarded EMAS certification. This is an advanced system for ecomanagement in manufacturing processes including photovoltaic systems and water filtration. Reda is a fully integrated vertical manufacturing company. It owns a sheep farm in New Zealand that prices some of the finest NZ wools. It also works very closely with over 465 Australian farmers through its Integrity Scheme to encourage sustainable, environmental, and ethical production of wool. This Scheme provides full traceability and the highest level in animal welfare and wool quality. ‘We directly manage and control the entire production chain from the fleece to the finished product. We have invested in wool growers who have supported us over many seasons. bottom line and at the same time, grow the supply of high quality wool for our own future’, said Mr Botto Poala.


YARN INNOVATION

Yarn splicer HOT JOINTAIR for knot free yarns ®

Hand-operated

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esdan splicer retrofitting solutions are aimed to improve production efficiency, increase yarn quality and splice consistency. Mesdan has invested significant resources into research and development in the most advanced technology in splicers for knot free yarns. ‘Italian textile manufacturers are known for their attention to quality and customised spinning weaving, knitting, and finishing. Most of these companies use our splicer technology’, says Mesdan’s sales director Dejan Lalevic. ‘Our wide range of splicers, in both hand-operated and automatic versions are capable of joining yarn which may differ in fibre nature, spinning method, count, or twist. ‘We also aim to optimise yarn clearing performance, extend machine lifetime, widen machine versatility, and reduce maintenance costs’. ‘When yarn breaks there are only two options: tie a knot or splice it knotless’, says Mr Lalevic. The former generates defects in the fabrics reducing efficiency (machines stoppages), waste and costs (mending). ‘When talking about wool splicing, the Hot Jointair is the ultimate, top solution. Considering the enormous benefits of yarn splicing the Hot Jointair are installed on all machines downstream single yarn winding such as assembly winding, twisting, warping, and knitting. The final goal is to produce a knot free fabric’, he says. ‘Hot air

The Hot Jointair provides efficient technology for knotless joining of wool yarns, woolen and worsted

HOT JOINTAIR 4984B ®

FOR THE KNOTLESS JOINING OF LONG STAPLE FANCY YARNS AND MEDIUM COARSE WOLLEN YARNS as a splicing medium in VERBINDEN combination with FÜR DAS KNOTENFREIE VON LANGFASERIGEN FANTASIEGARNEN UND MITTLEREN-GROBEN two complementaryKREMPELGARNEN splicing blasts enables POUR LA quality RATTACHE SANS DES FILS FANTAISIE À FIBRE LONGUE, CARDÉS AU superior joints onNOEUD long staple yarn’. GROSSEUR MOYENNE PARAHot UNIONES DE as HILOS DE FANTASIA DE FIBRA LARGA Y CARDADOS DE The JointairSIN is NUDO available an automatic TITULO MEDIO-GRUESO version, fitted on Savio automatic winders, or PER LA GIUNZIONE SENZA NODO DI FILATI FANTASIA A FIBRA LUNGA E CARDATI MEDIO in the hand-operated version fitted on a special GROSSI

A.T.S. rail system (Air Track Supply).

Two models are available, one for fine worsted counts and the other for woollen and fancy yarns. For more information please contact Dejan Lalevic in Italy on + 39 0365653142 or at sales@mesdan.it Fred Kwan at Kar Ming Industrial Supplies Co. Ltd in Hong Kong - fred@karming.com Tel: 00852-24130688 wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Fashion and function

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unctional yarns have proved their worth in the areas of sport, outdoor and underwear with their specific characteristics in thermo regulating or flame resistant. Fine merino wool is being used increasingly as a functional fibre because wool naturally possesses more functionality than classical man-made fibres.

to work together - from sourcing the most appropriate wool to the technical design and yarn manufacturer and the final garment production company‘,says Kurt Haselwander CEO at Schoeller the Spinning Group. A well thought out process of expertise and collaboration createsthe perfect combination of fashion and function’.

The Schoeller Spinning Group is a global supplier of yarns with a particular focus on worsted yarn. The company offers a large range of products and works in close collaboration with customers and brands. ‘We firmly believe that spinning together will yield the best solutions. The process of developing a very specific yarn for a very specific application requires the entire chain

‘During our manufacturing process we focus on ease of care and skin-friendly properties. As a result, we have found that sustainably produced textiles and materials are highly popular’, says Kurt Haselwander. Innovation is a clear focus in the strategic orientation of Schoellerthe Spinning Group. More than 15% of employees work in research, development, and design.

SO

The bl create lookin ture m ge. Du transm strong dry ev re, the an incr to 50% merino cosy g ged wo makin The Climayarn program is a mixture of MERINO WOOL and POLYCOLON. This functional yarn works well as a temperature regulator. The fabric dries quickly, is machine-washable, and is suitable for winter sportswear and leisure wear 72

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YARN INNOVATION

and colourfastness as well as outstanding washing durability. It is paving the way to new designs in eye-catching colour combinations, maritime strips, vibrant socks and highly functional seamless shirts. Our EXP chlorinefreeprocess enables environmentally friendly washing and ensures that ENCIEL products are easy to care for while bringing out the brilliance of the colours’. Schoeller the Spinning Group has been working on new applications to make it easier to create perfect wool garments with convincing performance. ‘We are an extremely diverse company providing yarn to a range of applications.’ ‘Our latest products to reach the market provideperformance and luxury and a new standard in woollen yarnfor luxury clothing. Shaminah issoft and smooth to the skin and is light and comfortable for elegant clothing. It is available as Nm 50/1, 50/2, 70/1, 70/2 in 100 % ultra fine merino (14,5μ).

Kurt Haselwander CEO at Schoeller the Spinning Group

‘Wool is in fashion’, comments Mr Hasselwander.’ Particularly for activewear no man-made fibre can match wool for its variety and functional benefits. We team with manufacturers that require such garment benefits as natural temperature regulation, feeling try when 30% wet, warmth even when wet, odour and flame retardant qualities. Our Active Super Fine Merino yarn is made from 80% wool and 20% polyamide is for manufacturers producing garments for Active wear. This Active yarn is available as EXP in Nm 85/1 S + Z and Active Nm100/1 S + Z. It really is the most functional fibre.‘ ‘Merino wool is also very popular in socks and we have partnered with brands in America and Europe to perfect their functional outdoor clothing. Schoeller’s Brilliant Merino wool is branded under the ENCIEL logo together with TMC. ENCIEL is whiter-than-white and has now achieved a spectrum of bright colours not previously possible compared to synthetics fibres’, he says. ‘Our ENCIEL technology has achieved a brightness

Manufacturers looking for yarn suitable for function and fashion should be interested in Schoeller new SUPER SOFT MERINO 16,5μ. It is available as a stock service as 16,5 μ super fine Merino. It is machine washable by EXP and is available as Nm 52/1 and 52/2. Schoeller’s PROGRESS EXP is available as Nm 50/1, 50/2, 70/1 60 % Extra Fine Merino EXP 40% Tencel®. PROGRESS 60 EXP isNm 85/1 60% Tencel® 40% Super Fine Merino EXP. ‘Wool and Tencel are blending partners for optimized wearing properties. The blending partners merino wool and Tencel create an outstanding symbiosis in soft grip combined with excellent moisture management in the medium to heavy load range’, says Kurt Haselwander. Due to its hydrophobic fibrous shell, merino wool transmits part of the moisture to the Tencel fibre, a strong and efficient moisture buffer. As wool feels dry even when it has absorbed up to 30% of moisture, the soft hand feel remains comfortable even with an increased level of moisture. In turn, Tencel is up to 50% more absorbent than cotton. Tencel originates from sustainably managed wood and is produced in a closed-circuit system, making it a highly sustainable cellulosic fibre. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Mr Xiaogang Zha company president

From scoured wool to knitted garments

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oday’s China looks very different than it did a few years ago. After decades of rapid growth, it now has a gross domestic product per capita that has surged more than 20 times in the past quarter century. China’s shoppers now rank among the world’s biggest spenders and its retail market is set to surpass the U.S. Jiangsu Lianhong Textiles Co Ltd is a vertically integrated company that manufactures cashmere knitting yarn, wool knitting yarn, blend knitting yarn, knitted garments and wool tops. Lianhong supplies the markets domestically and internationally. ‘Our customers include garment manufacturers and retailers that specialise in products made from natural fibres’, says Mr Xiaogang Zha, company president, ‘70% of our production is in wool, 30% in other fibres including cashmere. Our main markets outside China are North America 20%, Western Europe 15% and Northern Europe 15%. Lianhong employs over 1,000 people and has annual revenue of US$90 Million.’ 74

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‘Notwithstanding the challenges from the domestic retail market in China and subdued demand from Europe, our production has been growing steadily. We mostly use Australian wool and many designers, retailers and brands overseas and in China buy from us’, says Mr Zha, ‘Our customer base has been changing both domestically and abroad, requiring better and better quality. We have realigned our production to meet this demand in better quality all the way through our production pipeline from early wool processing to finished garments.’ Lianhong is based in Zhangjiagang, a port city in the Yangtze Delta. It is listed among the


YARN INNOVATION

Wool Top Testing

Worsted Ring Spinning

Top 10 Enterprises in China’s Woollen and Worsted Spinning Industry and its cashmere yarn is recognised in the Top 10 Brands in China’s Cashmere Yarn Industry. It complies with environment, quality and health standards required by its international customers. It is ‘Woolmark’ and ‘Woolmark Blend’ licensed and ISO9001:2008 Quality Management System certified, and it is also Oeko-Tex Standard 100 accredited and ISO14001:2004 Environment Management System certified. Lianhong has an annual production capacity of 6,000 tons of wool tops, 3,500 tons of woollen yarn, 1,000 tons of semi-worsted yarn, 3,000 tons of worsted yarn and 2.5 million knitted garments. Its wool top making mill has 3 lines from Thibeau and NSC and 2 lines from Octir and Sant’Andrea. The woollen spinning mills have 15 lines from Kyowa and 6 lines from Gaudino and have become the largest woollen yarn production base in Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Shanghai. The worsted spinning mills have 4 preparation lines from NSC and Sant’Andrea,

20,000-spindle spinning frames from Zinser and 20 winders from Schlafhorst. The knitting mill is equipped with 123 computerised flat knitting machines from Stoll. ‘Traditionally our worsted yarn was based on wool around 21 micron, but recently we have seen demand in finer microns and we are now producing lots of worsted yarn between 17.5 and 19 micron to address this demand. Cashmere fibre is limited in quantity. This is making cashmere yarn much more exclusive. Our cashmere yarn is appealing to international brands and accounts for a significant part of our business.’ ‘We are well positioned to meet the challenges of the future. We remain focused on innovation, research and development and operate a fully equipped testing laboratory and we welcome enquiries from customers interested in our products,’ concludes Mr Zha. For more information please contact Heinrich Zhang Email: heinrichzhang@lianhongtex.com Tel: +86-512-58416016 www.lianhongtex.com wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Anne Kyyr Quinn design used for its acoustic and authentic properties in 100% wool felt

Diverse Potential of Crossbred Wools Must be Explored

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by Bridgette Kelly

rossbred wools offer the the most variety and texture of any other type of wool - fibre grown on the back of a sheep in the UK or New Zealand or indeed any other temperate climate can and does provide a clip that’s most often chosen for carpet. Why? because reliance and robust strength is seen its stand-out quality. Certainly it has the bulk and bounce

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that makes carpets made from these excellent wools a high performance floor covering, particularly where appearance retention is concerned. However, wool-rich carpets are having a hard job retaining the market share, the advent of the softer, silky synthetic fibre flooring has gained popularity with consumers. The


YARN INNOVATION

practical easy bleach-clean marketing has also had a far reaching impact that the wool industry may have doubted at its launch. This simple messaging versus wool’s complexity may baffle consumers. Nevertheless it is the superior performance of wool that rests firmly on its anatomy that makes it a natural fibre that performs better than any other in a vast array of products. But before we brush carpet aside let’s look at this market first. According to Malcolm Sims, a life-long wool professional and textile consultant(he previously worked with WoNZ), he has a good understanding of what influenced the wool market share across the years. “Flooring like any other product likes a good trend, from the Berbers in the 1970’s, the heathers and wool sisals in the 90’s to the popularity of stripes during the 2000-plus years.” Sims comments, ‘The loss of smaller spinners has had its impact, contraction has led to less experimentation and so wool carpets have not kept pace with the advance of the synthetic sector - which has experimented and improved dramatically. Wool technology and innovation has to keep moving with the times.’ That said, Sims feels that against this market share shift, spinners are trying to differentiate wool now. ‘The trend for a more chunky wool yarn is coming through in both loop and twist carpet for residential markets. A construction on 3/16th and 1/4 and 1/2 inch gauge creates a much bigger look and will see minimum weights of 40oz to 60oz - so more wool usage in the product.’ he says.

is considered more challenging for crossbred wool. But spinners producing wool for the knitwear and apparel market confirm the interest in Crossbred wools - particularly British origin for the UK, Japanese and USA markets. Shepley Yarns, is a fine worsted spinner based in Saddleworth in the UK. The company produces a range of yarns for knitted garments in British Wool including undyed wools and the company confirms that their yarns are being used by many of the leading fashion brand names. ‘We are constantly supplying Barbour, Hugo Boss, Hilfiger, Calvin Klein, St Laurent with our British yarn ranges. Garment labels may not reflect this and so it’s not necessarily visible but crossbred wool is extremely popular with the well-known brands and we ship a lot of yarn to them.’ Owner, Roger Shepley commented. Laxtons Specialist Yarns of West

Yorkshire work closely with the weavers, knitters and design houses to develop the yarn that is right for the product and produce worsted and fancy yarns, working with leading brands from Jigsaw to Jack Wills - Paul Smith to Chanel. Laxtons recently relocated, expanded to create increased capacity and invested in new machinery to offer more diverse options. They have just launched Sheepsoft - a 100% British Wool yarn for machine knitting having selected specific finer British cross bred wools to create a superior feel to the knitted fabric. ‘Sheepsoft creates a merinolike feel with 100% British provenance and a very low carbon footprint - the crossbred wool has only travelled 40 miles from auction house to finished yarn,’ James Laxton says. On the cloth front - a lighter handle fabric - Pendle Tweed from Lancashire weavers Benjamin Thornber is made with100% British Crossbred wools. These tweeds are innovative

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and beautiful in design with an outstanding soft handle, yet robust making them perfect for both interiors and apparel. This lighter handle is reflected in summer weight tweeds seen elsewhere in fashion but the use of crossbred wools to achieve it has clever and creative spinning, weaving and finishing at the centre. Walker Slater, London and Jaeger are brands that are seeing the advantage of this lighter weight tweed. Away from apparel, it is the use of 100% crossbred wool as a sustainable insulator that is fully recyclable that has great appeal to the deliver to the door generation. Companies such as Woolcool use it for eco-friendly packaging due to its impressive performance and track record at delivering perishable goods in perfect condition. Roaming Rooster, one of their customers, is a nationwide farm fresh meat delivery company in the UK. It had previously used polystyrene to line their fresh meat delivery boxes but it did not fit with their sustainable image. ‘Woolcool offers everything we are looking for as it keeps our meat at temperatures below 5 degrees for up to 48 hours during delivery.’ So significant are the thermal properties of wool, it is now used for the transport of medical supplies, Henry Schein, the worldwide distributor of medical supplies, vaccines and pharmaceuticals says, ‘Woolcool outperforms all the other thermal insulated packaging we have tried. Without doubt, Woolcool is the performance insulated packaging solution’. Woolcool, which was established in 2008, say that ‘with ice sheets used to maintain the cool 78

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use of 100% natural wool makes them ideal for large commercial spaces and residential spaces.

temperatures for pharmaceutical good, Woolcool packaging has been proven to keep contents between 2 and 8 degrees centigrade for at least 72 hours.’ Away from thermal insulation, there is increased interest in the ability of wool to insulate noise and additionally improve indoor air conditions regulating the quality of the air people breathe. This is becoming a significant area of concern as the political powers of the world unite to focus on the importance of cleaner air. Brands such as Anne Kyyro-Quinn specialise in the design of custom made high-end wall and ceiling acoustic installations and their sculptured hand-made 3-D felted fabric panels provide a greater surface area and flow resistance - which is critical in the absorption of sound. This reduces ambient noise levels and reverberation - tested and classified in accordance with International Standards (ISO) 354 and 11654, the

The additional benefit of creating a space with a pro-active, breathable wool fibre which absorbs humidity and releases it later and can permanently remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the internal space is becoming increasingly compelling to scientists. This was explained at this year’s IWTO Congress by Bangor (Wales) University’s Dr Graham Ormondroyd, Head of Materials Research. He was part of a team that looked at the way wool absorbed contaminants and discovered that different breeds of crossbred wool performed at a higher level of VOC absorption but critically this needed further exploration. As a planet, we have produced 8 billion tons of plastic since 1950, this is equivalent to 90,000 Eiffel Towers and, as of 2015, only 9 per cent has been recycled, the rest is polluting the planet. This figure is from research carried out by the Bren School of Environmental Science at the University of California and in terms of plastic - it includes polyester fabric and carpet, which they say has an average life span to waste of five years. Against this background, wool has much to offer - crossbred wool yarn and product development is already showing diverse potential. However, and to repeat what Malcolm Sims said earlier in this report - ‘Wool technology and innovation needs to move with the times’, for the wool industry there is much to be gained by taking note.


YARN INNOVATION

Piedmontese perfection from Drago

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here have been a variety of innovations introduced into processing and spinning for finer wools. This has enabled fabric made from 100% merino wool to be used in a greater range of performance apparel. According to some estimates by 2020 performance apparel will be worth over $2 billion. But this new technology is not only used in performance apparel. Luxury brands are increasingly taking advantage of these new technologies to make their formal suiting more comfortable. Drago spinning mill was founded in 1973 by Umberto and Laura Drago in Biella, Italy. 1993, the Drago family acquired Lanificio Fintes, expanding into the manufacturing into luxury fabric. Today the company is headed by Paolo Drago, who is President and CEO. ‘All of our manufacturing is done here in Biella. From this small region some of the world’s largest clothing companies and best fabric mills have been fashioned.’ The company’s high quality fabric for mens suiting use Australian and South African merino wool, as well as cashmere and silk. The mill produces 1,750,000 meters of fabric each year. Drago fabrics are exported to Japan, Europe, South America and the USA and it has recently opened its doors to customers in Russia. ‘Our customers want to achieve the latest styles from our suiting fabrics. They want fabric that will achieve multi functioning suits and jackets’, says Paolo Drago. He also comments that the ‘Made in Biella’ label recognises this fabric as the best in the world. ‘We test our product all the way along the chain from sourcing the right fibre to tops and yarn and fabric production. We offer our customers full certification and traceability. We

Paolo Drago, DRAGO President and CEO

have a fully operational in-house testing laboratory testing all stages of production. ‘Our fabric collection for 2018 combines elegance style and personality. The fabric is without ‘frills’ and can blend with any type of garment that requires high performance for a variety of applications.’ The BlueFeel collection is made specifically for the traveller and made with fine wool and mohair in Super 120’s and Super 140’s. The BlueFeel range of fabrics offers elasticity, crease resistant, stain resistant, and water repellent features. ‘Our vintage collection reflects the exclusive and refined personality of the British style English gentleman. This new collection evokes a strong sense of fashion, and has a strong sense of the ‘gentleman’s club’. It is a statement fabric using Super 130’s. The natural stretch fabric achieves elasticity performance of up to 15% without the use of artificial fibre. This flagship project uses only wool, linen, and mohair. Drago sells fabric under its own brand, but also to other niche manufacturing companies for their own brand labels with top quality fabrics. One such brand spokesperson commented that ‘for us, they do a stunning range of summer jacketing in 60% linen, 40% wool. Linen lends the fabric its superb breathability and characteristic look, while wool adds crease-resistance and softness. ‘We supply cloth to bespoke tailors, including our collection that features Super 140 fabric that is waterproof, stainproof, has a natural stretch, and is eco-friendly and fully traceable. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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PERINO - truly innovative new fibre

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atural fibre is as old as mankind and mixing and blending fibres is nothing new - but when something new does come alone it is exciting! When a New Zealand company launched its new yarn made from a blend of wool and possum this was truly innovative.

The Brushtail possum is a non native invasive animal controlled through conservation programs. It is found in the wild landscape of New Zealand and causes harm to the country’s natural flora and fauna. However it is a source of valuable fibre and Woolyarns New Zealand blends it with the finest microns of Merino and Cashmere. Woolyarns New Zealand has been producing yarns for more than 70 years. It began commercially spinning Merino / Possum yarn in 1992 and after some years of development and innovation the company launched a new version of its Perino yarn called Perino Cirrus in 2012. Cashmere replaced the Merino content and dehaired Brushtail Possum Down was introduced along with high quality Mulberry Silk. Perino Yarns are sustainable and quite unique. Properties include low pilling, breathability, anti-odour, soft to the touch, high performance, and lightweight insulation. ‘As soon as someone touches one of our products made using Possum they are amazed by the feel. It is extremely soft and produces a very tactile response from retail consumers. They are also surprised by how light it is and the warmth that even an initial touch exudes’, says Jimad Khan International Marketing Manager. ‘Our yarn engineers bring precision, passion and creativity to our yarn.’ 80

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The Brushtail Possum fibre is a tapered fibre approximately 1 - 2 microns at its tip. This is well below the 30 micron threshold that CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) has shown to cause the ‘prickle factor’. In independent tests our Perino fabrics were found to be 50% warmer than pure merino and 35% warmer than pure cashmere fabrics of the same weight and structure’. Woolyarns New Zealand offer three yarn blends for high end garments. Perino Cirrus is 40% Cashmere, 40% Brushtail Possum Down, and 20% Mulberry Silk, available in 28/2Nm, 36/2Nm. Perino Alto is 70% New Zealand ZQ Merino and 30% Brushtail Possum Down available in 28/2Nm. Perino Nimbus is 65% fine Merino, 25% Brushtail Possum Down, 10% Mulberry Silk available in 18/2Nm, 28/2Nm, 36/2Nm. Inspired by international trends the Perino colour palette includes vibrant, bold and striking colours as well as subdued hues and neutral shades. For more information about Perino Yarns please contact Jimad Khan at jimad.khan@woolyarns.co.nz


YARN INNOVATION

staying ahead of your competition

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rrespective of how successful your business is today communicating with new buyers is important to stay ahead of your competition. It is also important to constantly remind your existing customers that continuing to buy from you, not your competitor, is a benefit to them as well. If telling 5000 companies around the world about what your company can offer sounds like an impossible task - advertise in wool2yarn global and reach them all. This magazine is circulated to buyers in more than 60 countries worldwide. It is a trade directory that is published once each year

(September). It is circulated to 5000 textile companies including importers of wool and speciality fibres, wool processors and topmakers, manufacturers of yarn, carpets and rugs, spinners and weavers, cloth and garment manufacturers including major brand names and major retail chains. The next issue of wool2yarn global will be published in September 2018.

Speciality Fibres

Companies wishing to find out more about advertising opportunities should contact Victor Chesky, Editor by email at victorch@bigpond.com or visit www.wool2yarnglobal.com BUYERS GUIDE TO WOOL 2017-2018

Schoeller - always one step ahead

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‌.the sustainable chlorine-free wool treatment

Total Easy Care

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Mohair industry stays resilient despite drought

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by Deon Saayman, Managing Director Mohair SA

he South African Mohair Industry has positioned itself over the past few decades as the most reliable source of superior quality mohair production and the supply of the processed fibre, whether in tops, yarns or even finished garments.

Deon Saayman

Although some rains have fallen over the eastern parts of the production region in South Africa, the extended drought experienced over the most of the production area have resulted in farmers having to supplement feed for their animals and in some cases to reduce stock numbers to adapt to the dry veld conditions. The emminent kidding season will also be challenging for mohair producers and extra care and management will have to be exercised to ensure satisfactory kidding percentages. Despite these production challenges, it was encouraging to note that South African production remained constant at 2.48 million kg’s for the 2016 production year, although production is expected to be lower during 2017. As was the case in 2015, China continued to dominate the imports of processed mohair from South Africa, followed by Italy and Taiwan. Despite the setback in adult prices during the early part of the 2016 winter season, mainly due to policy uncertainty slowing global retail sales and volatile currency fluctuations, demand for adults, especially from China, improved later during the year and continued

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experiencing renewed interest in the early part of 2017. The volatile South African currency made trading conditions difficult during 2016 with greasy buyers facing the biggest risk with regard to the currency fluctuations. Since the implementation of the sustainable guidelines in 2009, huge strides have been made with regard to producer participation. The guidelines have been updated constantly to take into account legislative changes as well as environmental and biodiversity requirements. These guidelines are in the process of being migrated to an electronic platform incorporating a cell phone application for the producer. The platform will also initiate the possibility of incorporating the traceability of mohair back to the farm of origin. Although on-farm production conditions have been challenging for producers, prices remained at a good overall average level increasing 11% from the 2015 year. Leading fashion brands are still driving the demand for mohair at the top end with the Chinese domestic market to play an ever increasing role in the consumption of mohair, especially in knitwear. The continued marketing efforts of Mohair SA is set to keep mohair top of mind for brands and consumers alike and making it the fibre of choice. The mohair industry in South Africa has come a long way since the arrival of the first goats in 1838 and will continue to produce this special fibre in a responsible, sustainable and ethical manner.


MOHAIR

Young Chinese Mohair Designer of the Year 2017

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our Universities, One Brief, One Stage, One Winner! The Chinese Mohair University Design Competition, hosted in Shanghai, saw future designers and fashion game-changers battle it out for the title of “Young Chinese Mohair Designer of the Year 2017”. The participating universities included Donghua University (Shanghai), Beijing Institute of Technology, Xian Polytechnique University and Hong Kong Polytech. Over the course of the evening, 41 mohair garments were judged by a panel of Knitwear Designers, Spinners and Chinese Retailers. Mohair SA is proud to support young students who continue to put mohair to the test – a true testimony for this durable, locally and internationally loved natural fibre of the world.

The overall prize went to WEN ZHI GAO from Donghua Fashion School

Contemporary British Mohair ‘We buy the mohair fibre at auction in South Africa at source’, says Matthew J. Simpson Managing Director William Halstead. This family owned group has been engaged in mohair fibre for three generations. It spins on commission yarns unique to its specifications. ‘Our Mohair cloths are particular to our ranges and not available anywhere else’, he says. ‘For us Mohair is not just a feature fibre in low percentage for promotion. 100% Mohair yarns are used in weft giving the high percentage characteristic, crisp, sheen and recovery of real Mohair. Our 100% Mohair is woven from specially sourced fine micron fibre, spun in two-fold for warp and weft.  There is continuity wool2yarnglobal 2017

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of manufacturing in our mill going back over 140 years. We are an authentic part of the textile heritage of the city of Bradford. We have preserved the expertise and continuity of textiles skills for, in Mohair and worsted weaving. ‘We stock a huge colour range in top dyed classic colours and a rainbow of solid colours. The comprehensive range of Mohair offered from stock is appreciated by the world’s super brands and finest tailors as a “go too” supplier for all those pressured merchandisers and designers working close to the season and on short deadlines where the collection can change direction at a moment’s notice’, he comments. Super brands are increasingly using mohair woven into heavier and courser

fabrics, in 2ply yarns woven in panama or twill weave. Canvas feel and raw finishing effects are in demand, rather than traditional suiting. ‘Retail is well supplied with Coca-Cola cloths, our Mohair fabrics are providing something unique for brands looking to define themselves differently. Asia is increasingly appreciating our Mohair fabric. The direction is not all cutting edge for fashion, in tailoring we have had to source finer micron Mohair to combine with fine worsted yarns but always with a mohair “bite”; no one is looking to us for “blended with mohair” fabrics. Fine bespoke and made to measure tailoring continues to appreciate our finer mohair/worsteds and our unique 100% mohair for suits and tuxedo. We are increasingly receiving interest from the most recognisable highend brands for special Mohair weave to create evening wear. In tailoring mohair tends to remain as it has been traditionally as a Spring/Summer article, however for so many brands and collections it has really widened its reach to be used in either season and especially trans-seasonally.

Worsted sector spins more with Mohair

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trong demand for kid Mohair in the worsted sector has continued this season. Major brands are increasingly using Mohair fibre in their worsted products for both winter and summer collections. ‘Mohair is second to none in natural fibre durability’, says Deon Saayman of Mohair South Africa. ‘A mohair garment will outlast cotton, wool, and cashmere garments. It is resistance to dirt and creasing. The smooth scales of the mohair fibre stop dirt from becoming trapped and the fabric from becoming creased. It is an excellent insulator and produces the perfect fabric for both warmer and cooler climates’, he says. ‘The use of Mohair in a variety of products from suiting, knitting, upholstery, and carpet has been rising in the last couple of years. Mohair South Africa is a non profit organisation representing the interests of the entire Mohair

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industry in South Africa. It has been very effective in marketing South African Mohair worldwide, and collaborates with international designers and artists, participates in fashion and industrial textile exhibitions globally, promoting the fibre and its varied applications with increasing success. The Mohair fibre is white, lustrous, resilient, wavy and up to 150mm / 6 inches long. To spin mohair successfully remains an art, as the fleece lacks barbs that hold the strands one to another. As such, only a few mills have succeeded in spinning the ultimate mohair yarn. It is a favourite for evening garments and mens suiting and can be woven into a relatively lightweight fabric, yet it maintains superb crease resistance. Some of the World’s biggest weavers have been using mohair successfully in summer suiting for decades, with more weavers starting to venture into using mohair in winter weights, with great success.


MOHAIR

Mohair has found its niche in Japan. Japan is known and respected for its boutique style suiting production and none more so than Miyuki Keori. ‘We have been using Kid Mohair in luxury mens suiting for many years’, says Masaharu Suzuki at Miyuki Keori. ‘As well as wool, Mohair has always been an important fiber for our men’s suiting. Mohair fiber is very suitable for the humid climate of Japan, thanks to its unique crisp airy character, especially in plain weave use. It has luxurious lustre which makes men’s suit appear more attractive. A variety of texture can be created by changing the composition of wool and Mohair. It will continue to be a key raw material for our future’, he says. British manufacturers have also been using Mohair for their fabric for many years. ‘Our Mohair fabrics are providing something unique for brands looking to define themselves differently. For us Mohair is not just a feature fibre, says Matthew J. Simpson Managing Director William Halstead in Bradford. ‘Fine bespoke and made to measure tailoring continues to appreciate our finer mohair/

worsteds and our unique 100% mohair for suits and tuxedos. Asia is increasingly appreciating our Mohair fabric’, he says. Ermenegildo Zegna, the most recognised luxury menswear brand in the world, has been associated with South African Mohair industry for many years. The Ermenegildo Zegna Mohair Trophy Awards has been going since 1970, playing its part in the continuous high standard delivery of Mohair production. ‘Of course speciality fibres, including Mohair, are appreciated as a luxury fibre. We would like to buy more Mohair but there is only a limited quantity produced each year. It is a very special fibre. The Japanese and Korean market in particular favours Mohair because they are familiar with its quality and enhanced characteristics in comfort and crease resistance. And Mohair is coming back, with a renaissance from the younger buyer wanting quality and style and we are steering our attention toward this market’, says Paolo Zegna, Group Chairman of Ermenegildo Zegna Group. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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USA

ASI assembles expertise from around the globe The American sheep industry, much like the country it calls home, is a melting pot of breeds, climates and management styles. From the hot, humid southeast to the dry southwest deserts and the intermountain region that divides the two, sheep graze in harmony to produce an environmentally friendly fiber that is recognized the world over for its loftiness.

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s versatile as the climates they call home, American sheep produce a wide range of quality wool that can be used in everything from luxury clothing to blankets and insulation. From American Merinos to Lincolns, the wool produced in the United States is as resilient, versatile and sustainable as any in the world. Living in a land where animal welfare standards are second to none, sheep are a source of pride for American farmers and ranchers. They are never mulesed, and the American Wool Council, a division of the American Sheep Industry Association, has developed sciencebased guidelines for the care and treatment of these animals. First brought to America by Spanish explorers in the 1500s, sheep are

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now raised in all 50 states, with the majority of American wool produced in the western part of the country by large range flocks. The eastern half of the United States tends to be home to small, pasture-based flocks. In 2016, American sheep produced 12.85 million pounds (approximately 5,800 metric tonnes) of clean wool. More than 50 percent of that wool was exported for manufacturing to countries such as China and India. The loftiness of American wool makes it perfect for blending, which is a common practice among buyers of the wool. The process adds bulk to finished products, perfect for knitwear, hosiery and other high-bulk end uses. Now you know that American sheep producers can offer a wide range of wool types suitable


this land is

WOOL’S LAND

USA

The American spirit is alive in the fiber, fleece and fabric of natural American wool. This is where happy, healthy sheep are raised to thrive in vast, open ranchlands. It’s where bold shepherds and ranchers are genuine stewards of the earth—constantly seeking sustainable ways to ensure the future of this invaluable industry. This is America, where innovation is celebrated, tradition is respected and high performance reigns.

Unparalleled Loft / Exceptional Versatility / Never Mulesed

sheepusa.org Copyright 2016 American Sheep Industry Association

American Wool Council, a division of American Sheep Industry Association

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USA

Chase Adams

Roy Kettlewell

Rita Kourlis Samuelson

for nearly every imaginable use of nature’s miracle fiber. But did you know that the American Wool Council has assembled a staff from around the globe in an effort to serve both international and domestic buyers of American wool? It starts with ASI Director of Wool Marketing Rita Kourlis Samuelson. Raised on an American sheep ranch started by her father after he emigrated from Greece, Samuelson was intimately involved in all aspects of the sheep industry long before she left home to earn a business degree and work in the apparel manufacturing and retail industry. Samuelson brings more than 35 years of experience in the wool trade and oversees all wool programs for AWC. This includes working with various companies and agencies to market American wool on an international and domestic level. She manages ASI’s wool team, which brings together more than XX years of wool industry experience to market wool and develop new products with the goal of increasing the market and value of the American wool clip.She also works with sheep producers, shearers and other personnel to develop programs to ensure the quality of the American wool clip. Barry Savage works as a consultant for the AWC and his focus is the development of international markets around the globe for American wool. He also contributes to the AWC wool team in the areas of technical & commercial input in regard to early-stage 88

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Goetz Giebel

Barry Savage

processing & spinning as well as logistical & marketing issues. Savage was employed by G. H. Michell & Sons (Australia) Pty Ltd – a major world trader and early-stage wool processor. He began his career in Sydney, Australia, in production management in the scouring/carbonizing/ topmaking/fellmongery facilities of Michell and then moved on to be the general manager of Woolscourers (Victoria) Pty Ltd, and subsequently the general manager of Penny’s Knitting Mills Pty Ltd. (a worsted spinning & knitting operation in Adelaide). Working on AWC’s international programs, Savage seeks companies that produce the type of products that would use American wool. Heroutinely accompanies international clients on reverse trade mission trips, which allow potential clients to see American wool first hand. Goetz Giebel of Germany joined the AWC wool consultant team in 2016 and continues to serve as the president of Interwoollabs, a non-profit organization for the international harmonization of laboratories measuring wool for micron and length. With AWC, he plays a role in developing new international markets for American wool, as well as identifying new clients and expanding marketing and strategy for the American wool brand. Australia’s Roy Kettlewell brought more than 40 years of industry experience to AWC when he joined the team in 2017. He’s worked with the International Wool Secretariat, the Woolmark Company and Australian Wool


USA

Innovation. His focus is on adding value to

Chase Adams serves as senior policy and

wool products by developing new processes

information director for ASI. Working from the

for the wool fiber. Innovation is a side of the

association’s Colorado office, Adams handles

industry he knows well, having spent the last

regulatory and legislative issues while also

four decades working with the entire wool

working on the front lines of animal welfare

processing pipeline in China, Europe, India

concerns. He graduated from Black Hills State

and the United States to implement new

University before heading to the University of

technologies that deliver a point of difference

South Dakota School of Law and becoming a

in the industry.

practicing attorney.

Versatile US wool available all year round Lempriere Group’s USA offices, located in the south eastern city of Charleston, South Carolina and in Texas, provide ready access to the entire USA wool clip. ‘We supply our international buyers with the best quality wool that will meet their specific processing needs. Our team is very knowledgeable in US wool and its processing suitability, and we also offer our clients extensive services in shipping and logistics’, says Rick Powers, division manager at Lempriere USA.

I

n the past, US textile mills consumed nearly all of the domestic wool production. However more recently many mills have either closed or moved their production facilities to other countries. Because on this shift, export markets, along with the U.S. military, have become increasingly important to US wool producers. ‘Our American wool is not mulesed. Our sheep have never been mulesed. They are a smooth bodied animal that is less likely to suffer fly strike problems and this is a bonus to manufacturers looking for wool that has this desired credential’, he says. U.S. sheep producers traditionally harvest wool during the spring months. In fact, more than half of American-produced wool is shorn and sold during April, May and June. The average weight of a fleece in the United States is just

Rick Powers

over 3kg. However, there is a variation from state to state; for example, an average fleece produced in North Carolina and Iowa weighs 2.2kg while an average fleece produced in Nevada weighs 4.4kg. The US wool clip is small and very diverse, providing a niche product for almost every type of manufacturing operation from weaving applications to value based woollen manufacturers. It is also versatile and suitable for use in woven apparel, sweaters, hosiery and upholstery as well as used in insulation materials, hand-made rugs, tennis balls, bedding products and clean-up pads for oil and chemical spills. ‘Because of the diversity of the US clip, it is very important to know the farmers, the fibers, the brokers, the logistics, and the hidden costs’, says Rick Powers. ‘We can provide that knowledge and do so for each and every client we supply. Rural Sheep station and brokering backgrounds and love of the fiber and wool industry enable the team to communicate effectively with in the farm community, through auction houses, and through to topmakers, manufacturers and fashion industry on the international stage.’ Lempriere USA can be contacted at wool@lempriere.com.au wool2yarnglobal 2017

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New trading conditions benefit users of Argentine wool of the best quality wool in Argentina and is contamination free and completely free of foot and mouth disease and the sheep are not mulesed. Some other important advantages very much appreciated are the snow white colour, a very low CVH and very low VM.

Left to right: Mariano Guerra, Tony McKenna (CEO of Lempriere Group) and Claudio Ulrich.

‘The removal of restrictions in foreign exchange, has further enhanced exports of greasy wool from Argentina’, says Claudio Ulrich Managing Director of Lempriere Argentina, major exporter of greasy wool in the last decade. ‘And Argentine farmers do not mules their sheep so our wools are non-mulesed and this is a further incentive for international buyers concerned about traceability.’ Lempriere Argentina has increased its exports to China steadily each year. ‘Our client base in China has increased every year. Last year we exported 1.8 million kilos to China and we expect that this year it will increase to 2.5 million which is an increase of 40%. Most of the wool we export is Merino wool and 50% of our wool exports went to China last season and we expect this to grow to 70% for this season’, says Mariano Guerra, Lempriere senior wool buyer and trader. ‘Our expertise in Argentine wools and our ability to source wools direct from the farmer gives us an important advantage over our competitors around the world. We continue to be the largest exporter of greasy wool to China’, he says. Lempriere Argentina mainly exports merino wool in 19.5 – 20.5 micron but can also provide 18,5 -19,0 and 21-22 micron if required. It also supplies Rio Gallegos crossbred wools in the 24 – 29 micron range. China continues to be the biggest market for Argentine greasy wool, increasing from 50% to 60% for this season. This season China mostly purchased 19.5 and 20.5 micron merino wool and not much in crossbred wools as farmers have been keeping their wool, waiting for better prices. ‘Our Patagonian wool continues to be a favorite with top makers internationally’, says Mariano Guerra. ‘This region is the home of some 90

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A new sorting program, by Lempriere Argentina to enhance the quality of its wool for export, has created an additional level of scrutinywith a dedicated sorting team at its warehouse in Trelew. All wools exported by the company that are sorted at farm are sorted again prior to export. Mariano Guerra comments that ‘all greasy wool is sorted at farm, using the “Prolana” national policy. We sort the wool again after purchase, as it arrives at our warehouse. This further sorting provides extra assurance that quality is maintained and customers receive exactly what was ordered.’ More than 95% of the wool grown in Argentina is exported and although the industry has resisted exporting its wool in greasy form, such exports have been maintaining the same volume every year. Production this year has been virtually unchanged from last year - 60% of the clip is merino and 40% crossbred. Lempriere special type has been in strong demand. This ´GT´ (‘Good Topmaking’) is a type of 100% re-sorted Fleeces that represents the best selection of wool in all categories. It comes from pure fleece and is of the best quality. ‘We strongly recommend it to our existing customers as well as to new customers. It is ideal for top making. ‘ For more information about buying wool from Lempriere Argentina please contact Claudio Ulrich at E: culrich@lflsa.com.ar Cel. +54911 44778681 Mariano Guerra at E: mfguerra@lflsa.com.ar Cel. +54911 5793 1108


ARGENTINA

Fuhrmann organic wool top - a perfect fit

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n today’s fashion markets there is a clear transition from fast food to slow food and a shift in paradigm from fast fashion towards slow fashion. The reason for this transition is that more and more consumers want to know how, where, and by whom their products have been made. Consumers want reassurance that their products are healthy, safe and sustainable. Although some fast fashion brands might still be quite successful, the business model of slow fashion is challenging the future of this concept; and it is this business model in particular that relies on sustainable, organic, responsible and traceable wool production and wool processing to meet the consumer demand. This new business model is also made possible by technological advances in yarn and fabric manufacturing, together with new treatments that are broadening the horizons and uses for woollen textiles; and of course by changes in consumption that can be regarded as necessary, healthy and genuine. In order to create slow fashion products, buyers from around the world need to take extra due diligence when sourcing wool for their products. Buyers need to find supply chain partners that can guarantee organic, sustainable production along the whole complex supply chain. That is why partnering with a vertical integrated wool supplier can be the beginning of a long term successful partnership. ‘Helping our customers create sustainable organic products in the most straight forward way is the mission we at Fuhrmann have set out to accomplish’, says Marco Gallia Director of Fuhrmann Argentina. ‘We believe that the natural way we rear sheep, grow and process

Marco Gallia Director of Fuhrmann Argentina

wool in Patagonia is the pure essence of slow fashion and a sustainable lifestyle. Fuhrmann organic wool top is a perfect fit for any sustainable brand aiming to create sustainable products.’ As such Fuhrmann’s location in the south of Argentina has a key role to play. ‘The nature of our production, which is all non-mulesed, benefits from unmatched sanitary conditions offering organic wool with traceability,’ he says. The cold and dry weather of Patagonia (where most wool is produced in Argentina), makes it a fly and pesticide free environment of extensive production. ‘On our growing number of farms, all of which are GOTS certified, or in process of becoming GOTS certified sheep farms, we rear just over 200,000 sheep. Our scouring and combing plant is also GOTS certified and has a capacity of 5 million kgs of tops per year ranging from 16-30 microns.’ wool2yarnglobal 2017

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First superwash line for Argentina

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nilan is a leading exporter of Argentine scoured wool and wool top. It has installed a new superwash machine at its plant in Chubut. Diego Jones, Director, said ‘we are the first company in Argentina to install a superwash line and we look forward to providing this additional service to our customers worldwide’. Unilan is a well established Argentine wool company that has been exporting greasy wool, scoured and tops since 1953. The company continually updates its plant and equipment and employs a well equiped laboratory for raw material and quality control.

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‘Our company policy is based on customer service and we offer consistent quality to all our product range’, he says. ‘The installaion of our new superwash line will enable our customers to shrinkproof their tops in our factory, saving time and money’. Last year Unilan installed one of the most modern scouring plants. ‘This year we further invested in the superwash line and this shows our long term commitment wool processing Argentina. Argentine finer wool grades are well known for their whiteness and soft touch and are in demand by manufacturers of luxury fabrics. The broader wool grades cover an ample


specter of products, from hosiery to knitwear, upholstery, carpets, rugs and non-woven goods. The majority of tops exported by Unilan are destined for Europe and its greasy wool is keenly sought by China. ‘Our wool is well-liked for its non-mulesed status and the certification that we can provide, and this has added to its popularity with manufacturers of luxury products around the world’, says Diego Jones. We welcome enquiries from companies from around the world that are looking for a reliable supplier of greasy or scoured wool, lanolin, and wool tops from Argentina. We are

interested in building long term relationships with buyers’, concludes Mr Jones. Diego Jones can be contacted at jones@unilan.com.ar

Talk to 5000 buyers in China wool2yarnChina magazine is used by wool and textile companies around the world to advertise their products and services to the woollen industry in China.

wool2yarn China Speciality Fibres

‘This Chinese language publication is circulated to over 5000 major importers of wool and speciality fibres in China’, says Victor Chesky, Editor. ‘It is circulated in China by Nanjing Wool Market to wool processing and topmaking mills, spinners and weavers, carpet and garment manufacturers, and government agencies and ministries in China.’ wool2yarnChina is also distributed to all delegates (600+) attending the annual Nanjing Wool market Conference, the major conference for the wool and early wool processing industry in China. A number of copies are also distributed to textile enterprises in Hong Kong and Taiwan. ‘This magazine provides exporters the opportunity to communicate to buyers in China, in their own language,

中国羊毛与纱线 特种纤维

breaking down any language barrier,’ says Mr Chesky. ‘For companies seeking new export business, advertising in wool2yarnChina will introduce their company to this targeted decision maker base in all sectors of the wool industry in China. For companies that have established customers in China, advertising in wool2yarnChina will reinforce their position as a preferred supplier to these existing customers, and will also introduce their company to new buyers.’ ‘wool2yarnChina is published in

September each year and is a buyers’ guide that is used by our readers in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan as a reference tool for the following 12 months. If your company is interested in advertising in the 2018 issue of wool2yarnChina please contact us’. Mr Chesky can be contacted by email at victorch@bigpond.com. www.wool2yarnchina.com wool2yarnglobal 2017

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BULGARIA

Lempriere Bulgaria - up and running

Left to right: Falk Zopp Industrial Manager, Eric Durand CEO, and Stephane Brojniart Production Manager

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n my trip to Bulgaria this year I visited the new Lempriere Bulgaria plant in Sliven, a pleasant two and a half drive east of Sofia. I drove from Sofia with Falk Zopp Industrial Manager at Lempriere Bulgaria, through the beautiful green unspoiled countryside. Bulgaria is a Balkan nation with diverse terrain encompassing Black Sea coastline, a mountainous interior and rivers, including the Danube. Rich in history it is a cultural melting pot with Greek, Slavic, Ottoman, and Persian influences. Bulgaria joined the European Union in 2007 making it the newest member. ‘As a member of the EU we must comply with EU energy, and labour laws and regulations. ‘We have a capacity to produce 6 million kg of tops per year’, says Eric Durand. ‘And we are now

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running 340 days a year - 7 days a week - 24 hours a day. Our operating hours are more extensive than any other top maker in Europe.’ Lempriere Bulgaria has installed a brand new effluent treatment facility to comply with European environmental regulations. The plant operates a fully accredited Interwoollabs laboratory. It is also GOTS and EU Flower certified. The company is mainly focused on processing 17.5 - 25 microns. It processes wool from all around the world but mostly from New Zealand, Australia and South Africa. Production has been running since March and operates at 75-80% for Lempriere requirements and 2025% on commission, servicing the knitting and weaving sectors. It employs some 100 people from the local region.


BULGARIA

Interwoollab accredited on-site laboratory

‘European spinners increasingly prefer tops that are made in Europe. So Bulgaria was a logical location for Lempriere to set up a low cost manufacturing operation’, commented Eric Durand. ‘Bulgaria is cost competitive and has a well educated labour force. Increasing costs and longer delivery time for tops to reach Europe from China also made it a logical choice. ‘ The company has installed the longest 7 bowl scouring line, ideal for low yield wool. This scouring line has been fully renovated as has all machinery installed at the plant. The plant is fitted with noise reduction and automatic loose fibre extraction machinery ensuring the top is uncontaminated by loose fibres. This is a great advantage to our production’, says Stephane Brojniart Production Manager. ‘We have received good feedback from customers regarding the consistent quality of our tops’, says Mr Brojniart. ‘We can provide a stock service and one of the advantages of being so close to our customer is that we can quick delivery. Our proximity to the closest port, at Burgas, and excellent road connections to all European countries mean

that we can deliver within Europe in 3 - 4 days’, says Eric Durand. ‘For spinners and weavers in Europe that require traceability and certification we can source the right wool through our offices in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and South America and process these wools to their specification here in Bulgaria, in the heart of Europe’. Eric Durand can be contacted at Eric.Durand@lempriere.bg wool2yarnglobal 2017

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JAPAN

Gateway to Japan’s natural fibre manufacturers

E

conomically Japan is one of the most highly developed nations in the world. Manufacturing is one of Japan’s strengths and with few natural resources many companies import raw materials and turn them into high end products for both domestic and export consumption. Natural fibres including wool and speciality fibres are no exception. Japanese textile manufacturers are constantly looking for new and innovative ways to produce their products. Argo International is one such company in Japan that works closely with fibre growers around the world, special fibre processors, and Japanese manufacturers. It is particularly well known for its innovative use of wool and speciality fibre of the finest quality including Vicuna, Alpaca, Mohair, Wool, Silk, Cotton and Linen.

‘Knowing where to source the best fibre in the world and where to spin and weave it is as important today as it was 30 years ago. The consumer will pay extra for natural, quality products. We seek the best use for each fibre, and bring to the attention of Japanese manufactures innovative concepts to inspire them to manufacture beautiful fabric’, says Aki Ogura CEO Argo International. ‘For us, business is still creative work, undertaken with a passion for innovation and the love of natural fibre. The unique qualities can only come from these natural fibres, they cannot be imitated by manmade fibres without resulting in an inferior product’. Toshiaki (Aki) Ogura has been in the textile business for some 40 years. He served as President of the International Alpaca Association for six years and has been an Executive Member of the International Mohair Association for more than eight years. ‘We are at the forefront of innovation’, says Yohei Ogura. ‘We are the only supplier of melted amino acid for various natural fibres and we are involved in a special study with several universities in Japan in the use of natural fibres for use as artificial blood vessels. We have also cooperated with the Thai Government to discuss ways to produce and export Cassava Silk’, says Mr Ogura. Argo International has been involved in a number of projects in recent years. It has facilitated the collection of the finest US Rambouillet Merino for J. Press Japan, well-known menswear apparel brand in Japan. It has also been involved in sourcing 17-18 micron wool from a stud Merino farm in Australia for futon covers for high end products for mattresses. It also sources 20 micron Australian Rambouillet Merino wool for 100% wool blankets in addition to Poll Dorset carbonized wool usage for futon filling for Nishikawa Living Inc. Osaka. The company is also working with mohair growers in Australia to achieve the finest micron mohair. This greasy mohair has tested at between 16 - 22 microns.

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JAPAN

Regeneration technology

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f a new material is born, there is a possibility that a new industry applying it will also be born. ‘We believe that “cross linked keratin” is a ground breaking material with such a possibility’, says Mr. Nomura, President of Little Scientist Co in Japan speaking about the company’s research and development into Aminoethyl disulfide keratin. The Little Scientist Co together with Argo International in Japan has been exploring new bio materials made from wool, and it has made developments in watersoluble wool and has been applying it to the beauty product industry. ‘We have made great advances in damage care cosmetics using wool and feather keratin’, says Aki Ogura of Argo International.

Toshiaki (Aki) Ogura, President at Argo International with son Yohei Ogura

‘After scouring and combing it can achieve a fineness of 19 - 20 micron and this is the finest we have seen so far. Scouring and combing has been undertaken by Safil/ Südwolle Group’, says Aki Ogura. ‘We have also been involved with Little Scientist Co in Japan that has been researching and developing “cross linked keratin”. This ground breaking material has great possibilities. We believe this could be important to the textile industry in creating new hybrid wools with the advantages of other materials, including regeneration of leather, and developing new industries through further technical innovation called “regeneration”. ‘We can open Japan’s doors to international natural fibre producers’, says Aki Ogura. ‘If you have a fibre that is new, and can provide innovative products, we are sure that manufacturers in Japan would be interested to hear from you’. Aki Ogura can be contacted at aki@argo-int.jp or office@argo-int.jp

Chemically, wool is made by protein called “keratin” which binds hundreds of thousands of its hands into “three-dimensions”. ‘20 years ago, technology had only advanced so far. The fact that wool melts in water was very revolutionary. Shape memory suits and hair damage care cosmetics made using keratin protein is becoming a hot topic.’ ‘We believe this could be important to the textile industry. We would be able to recycle wool fibers with a texture like cashmere which is ultra-fine, finer than wool, taking advantage of the characteristics that re-join “hands”. We could create spinning of new hybrid wools incorporating the advantages of other materials, including regeneration of leather, adding functionality equivalent to artificial leather, and completely new modelled objects using 3D printers, developing new industries through further technical innovation called “regeneration”. ‘Our Aminoethyl disulfide keratin research began with the selection of the best wool as our raw material and using molecular design that can regenerate the keratin with the same “hands” as the original wool. We are developing a highly efficient manufacturing method without loss and can now establish this cross linking induced keratin development in mass production technology.

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AUSTRALIA

When traceability matters

T

echwool Trading (TWT) supplies wool to over 100 combing, carding and carbonizing mills worldwide. ‘Sourcing the right wool for the right application is always challenging for buyers and sellers of wool. It’s what separates the sheep from the goats, the professionals from the amateurs’, says Ken Welsh of TWT. TWT exports around 300,000 bales each year and supplies all standard types from fine to medium Merino fleece wools, crossbred fleece, and blend types as well as skirting and carding types. It traditionally values greasy wool by style, top length, tensile strength, and background colour. and garment manufacturers and access wools that are specifically suited to the precise products they wish to manufacture. ‘Some clients buy 2 - 3 containers each year, while some will buy this quantity every month. The strength of our company is that we look after all our customers, big and small’, says Ken Welsh.

Ken Welsh (left) and Brendon Miller

TWT has extensive and traditional knowledge in wool classing and sources wool from all wool growing regions in Australia. It is well equipped to match types and blends to suit individual processing needs. Warehouses located in all growing regions, hold stock ready for quick handling and delivery. ‘We can source certified non-mulesed wool and provide origin traceability for customers to fulfil their manufacturing and marketing requirements. Many of our customers want to know the story behind the wool and they want to know that it is grown ethically’, comments Ken Welsh. ‘We work closely with topmakers 98

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‘We regularly travel worldwide working with our customers on types best suited to their production, marketing and budgeting requirements. This hands-on approach ensures we provide uniform deliveries of wool that will process consistently time after time and with current wool pricing at a high, this advice can be timely and help minimise costs for the mill or processor’. ‘Europe, India, and Asia are all familiar territories for us. Over many years we have provided service to customers worldwide and we understand the types of wool most suited to their varied and particular processing needs. Our facilities in all growing regionsof Australia hold stock ready for quick handling and delivery, ‘ he concludes. For more information please go to the TWT website www.techwool.com.au or contact Ken Welsh or Brendon Miller at exports@techwool.com.au


AUSTRALIA

SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme lifting the bar The New England Wool (NEW) managed SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme has shown phenomenal growth since its humble beginnings in early 2015. The Scheme, whose major sponsors are the shareholders of NEW, Reda and Vitale Barberis Canonico, now boasts over 620 accredited farms, making it one of the largest sustainability schemes within the wool industry.

T

he Scheme ‘relaunched’ in August 2017 strengthens a number of areas in line with processor and brand/ consumer standards and requirements. It incorporates a strengthening in areas that are in line with current requirements of shareholders, brands, and consumers. There are added sections on ‘Social Responsibility’

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and ‘Responsible Handling and Transport of stock’. The Scheme was designed as a tool for the Italian shareholder to allow them to show their clients just how well their raw material suppliers cared for their animals and their environment.


AUSTRALIA

‘The Scheme promotes the high-level animal welfare and environmental practices performed by the majority of wool producers in Australia - many of which are performed routinely but not promoted effectively to those who use this wonderful fibre’, explains the instigator of the SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme, Mr Andrew Blanch, Managing Director of NEW. ‘I believe that by providing a platform for growers to promote their professional behaviour to the world, those that are accredited have taken real ownership of the Scheme’, remarked Mr Blanch. ‘The wool consumer is increasingly demanding a higher level of traceability along the pipeline of the production system from which they buy. Not only does the product need to be of the highest quality, there also needs to be a compelling ‘story’ behind the product clearly showing the highest level of environmental and social sustainability and animal welfare’, Mr Blanch states. NEW prides itself on its long and close association with woolgrowers throughout Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. ‘The woolgrowers are the very soul of our welldeveloped supply chain, and we are keen for them to tell their own story, but with the help of our shareholders we need to advise our current and potential suppliers of areas that can be improved or enhanced in certain production systems. NEW wants its suppliers to standout from the crowd – in the very best way’, he said. The SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme is the largest sustainability scheme in Australia. It is commercially based being underpinned by 1 – 5 year private contracts and special prices at auction offered to accredited farms. The Scheme comes at no cost to growers and is independently audited by the Australian Wool Exchange’s specialist auditing team. ‘It was always the intention that the Scheme would be “changeable”. The market (brands

Andrew Blanch (second left) with Australian wool growers

and consumers) is forever changeable and our Scheme cannot stand still in the face of a changing world. After two full years building a critical mass of professional farms and the resulting wool supply, it is definitely the time to broaden the Scheme and to hone in on particular items that need improvement or strengthening’. In the arena of Animal Welfare, Mr Blanch said he feels the SustainaWOOL™ Scheme has raised the bar as far as achieving the best welfare outcome for the animal. ‘NEW and its shareholder/clients have been very clear over many years of their desire for the mulesing procedure to cease as soon as practicable. NEW is supportive of any research leading towards a “non-mulesed” Australian wool industry. The international community has sent a very strong message for this outcome to be the “end goal’. ‘The best possible welfare outcome for the animal must remain paramount.Where ceasing to mules is difficult (at this time), accredited suppliers are required to use a registered Pain Relief product on all stock undergoing the mulesing process. In the future, and if registered and readily available, the SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme recommends suppliers continuing mulesing, to use a pre-procedure analgesic pain relief product until a viable and effective alternative to mulesing can be found’, Mr Blanch commented. ‘I believe our Scheme has influenced a number of woolgrowers to move to the use of Pain Relief where nothing was used in the past. Our contracts and special limits which pass a premium price for non-mulesed wool is also sending the commercial message of where we would like the industry to be in the future. We wool2yarnglobal 2017

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will not leave growers behind– but it is our responsibility to let growers know of the strong demand building for NM wool’.

property, showing a deeper level of care and responsibility towards high quality management of their flocks.

In response to the international market and the requirements of some major brands, the SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme very clearly identifies the two major groups of growers within the Scheme.

Declarants must show that reasonable care has been taken to avoid, remedy or mitigate any adverse effects on the environment, thus protecting the land now and for future generations. Compliance with all National and State Work, Health & Safety (WH&S) legislation and regulations will be a requirement for successful accreditation.

The SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme will now clearly identify those suppliers who do not mules (ceased or never mulesed) as ‘SustainaWOOL™ GREEN’ suppliers. Those that continue to mules but are using a registered pain relief product are identified as ‘SustainaWOOL™ BLUE’ suppliers. Wool users (processors and brands) are able to make a clear choice to source product through the SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme from the ‘Green’ or ‘Blue’ (or both) suppliers with the highest level of confidence. This clear division of suppliers will also allow NEW and its shareholders to send strong commercial messages to both groups through strategically targeted grower contracts and special prices at auction.

NEW requires that the wool is removed by trained and/or careful shearers (i.e. AWI “5 Pillars of Shearing”), the wool is prepared using the guidelines of the current Australian Wool Exchange’s (AWEX) ‘Woolclasser Code of Practice (COP)’, and that the wool is classed by a Registered Professional or Owner woolclasser. A fully completed National Wool Declaration (NWD) should be submitted covering every bale of wool being offered for sale.

Traceability is still a major pillar of the scheme. The ability for wool purchased by NEW under the SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme to betraced back to its source is paramount to the Scheme’ssuccess. Not only does transparent traceability allow a solid conduit for individual ‘stories’ to be told from properties or wool producing areas, but it also gives our client’s (and their clients) confidence in the integrity of fibre delivered to them under this Scheme. The SustainaWOOL™ Grower Checklist also allows suppliers to nominate their ability to trace individual animals on their 102

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The welfare of the animal should also be paramount throughout shearing to link the shearer and animal to create some accountability in shearing quality. Minimisation of distress to the animal should be a priority. ‘NEW is very proud of this Scheme and particularly the enthusiasm in which it has been embraced by a large proportion of the wool producing community’, Mr Blanch said. ‘We have a long way to go and we fully understand that we cannot stand still in this sustainability space – it is a moveable, changeable object. The relaunch of the SustainaWOOL™ Integrity Scheme in August 2017 will ensure that we are keeping abreast, and in some cases ahead, of the requirements of the wider wool industry and the modern discerning consumer’. *For more information visit www.newenglandwool.com.au


™ INTEGRITY SCHEME www.newenglandwool.com.au

We care about wool quality, our stock and the environment – now and for the future


AUSTRALIA

Australian growers encouraged to better quality G. Schneider Australia buys a variety of wools ranging from ultra fine merino to crossbreds. ‘Our core business is the international supply of best ultrafine and superfine wools from Australia to our mills in Italy, Argentina, Egypt, and China’, says Tim Marwedel of G. Schneider Australia from his office in Sydney. ‘We have a network of buyers at auction sourcing the best Australian wool and with control of our own combing facilities; this puts our group in a very strong position. ‘Each of our mills employ their own specific expertise to satisfy client requirements, so we source and deliver wool suitable to each mill in our group’, says Tim Marwedel. ‘We pay particular attention to style and performance while carefully enhancing and checking the tested results for length, strength, cleanliness and VM. We do this to ensure the quality we deliver. That’s our expertise and responsibility to our clients. The company places much emphasis on conveying the importance of quality clip preparation to the Australian wool grower. ‘This is particularly important as interest in the sustainability story by consumers cement itself as a market driver’, he says. ‘Supporting Australian wool growers and encouraging the production of good quality wools in a

sustainable way is a main objective of G. Schneider Australia’. Although supply is tight, Tim Marwedel sees the outlook for Australian wool as positive. ‘We feel confident about the future of Australian wool and to boost our buying capability we have just employed two additional young wool buyers ‘straight from the bush’. They will be trained in house for our specific business. We also feel it’s very important to our industry to encourage and train quality young people, we can’t continue to downsize. Supporting the Australian wool grow to greater productivity and increased awareness of the benefits they can achieve from growing better quality wool, this is where we play a useful role’, he comments. There is no doubt that the sustainable story of wool production regarding animal and environmental welfare is gaining momentum, we must relay that story to the producers and encourage it through market pressure. ‘The wool price is good for farmers at present. Stock through the pipeline is now at historical lows.Given the reduced supply, merino prices should be maintained. The supply and demand situation is very different, something we haven’t seen for many years.’ Europe, and in particular Italian interests, continues to dominate the purchase of quality fine wools from Australia. ‘However it is difficult to say what impact the higher wool prices of today will have on garment manufacturers in the next season. However, with continued interest in a quality product, we are confident that prices for the best traditional superfine wool will remain positive in the foreseeable future,’ he concludes.

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AUSTRALIA

Building a story around a brand

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empriere Wool was one of the first companies in Australia to provide traceability and certification for its greasy wool. ‘This included NM, green, and eco and these are still a big part of our business today, providing full evidence in traceability to our customers’, says Eric Durand Lempriere CEO. ‘Our diverse buying channels that include direct farm buying as well as auction buying offer our customers complete traceability from sheep to shelf’.

Lempriere Group is one of the oldest wool companies in the world. Founded in 1857, today it is one of world’s largest wool merchant. It has offices in China, Argentina, South Africa, and New Zealand and supplies wool to some of the most famous brands including Ermenegildo Zegna and Burberry. Lempriere Australia exports around 7% of the Australian wool clip. Last season it exported over 111,557 bales, the majority being merino fleece. This year Lempriere Group started production at its own wool top making mill in Bulgaria.

greasy wool as a principal and sell it to our customers either as raw wool, scoured wool, or wool tops depending on customer requirement. Our diverse worldwide client base requires a variety of wool for their production and we can supply any type from 15 - 24 microns. We also offer crossbred wools and wools for carding.’

‘We offer our customers a competitive wool buying structure to deliver them with low cost solutions for all their wool fibre needs. This structure is streamlined in buying, funding, processing and manufacturing, logistics, and administration’, says Eric Durand. ‘We buy

‘We see a greater number of our customers coming to us to build a story around their brand and we assist them by providing a link all the way to the farm. We arrange farm visits introducing them to the farmer who grows the wool so the manufacturer can build a story from farm to shop’, he says. Eric Durand can be contacted at trading@lempriere.com.au

To supply a wider range of microns Lempriere Australia buys 20% of wool privately through established farming channels around Australia. It is also a main buyer at all Australian auction centres. ‘Size does matter and we are consistently one of the five top buyers in Australia’, he says. As merino wool becomes more expensive the processing chain and garment manufacturers seek to add value to their tops, yarn, and finished garments.

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AUSTRALIA

Australian wool processing becomes more competitive ‘The cost of labour, energy, water treatment, and transportation has risen considerably in Asia. These factors together with the quality and cost efficiency that we offer our customers gives us the edge in providing the best possible processing solutions for users of Australian wool’, says Paul Ferronato Senior Buyer at Victoria Wool Processors (VWP), the largest domestic wool processor in Australia. ‘Woolen system operators should ask their Australian greasy wool suppliers if it makes better financial sense to import wool carbonised in Australia rather than greasy wool. We believe it does’, says David Ritchie General Manager at VWP. ‘The lower value of the Australian dollar has had a significant impact on cost effectiveness for wool processing in Australia. Early stage wool processing is more competitive in Australia today than it has been for a long time, and this is why we have been working 7 days a week.’

VWP core business is processing carbonised and scoured Australian wool and this has been its focus for over 30 years. It exports this processed wool worldwide with a particular emphasis on markets in Europe and Asia, particularly in Korea and Japan. Environmental credentials and certifications are becoming more important, particularly for European yarn and fabric manufacturers. ‘Wool processing in Australia delivers the best results in environmental credentials and at the best possible price’, says Paul Ferronato. ‘We consult with each of our clients before buying the most appropriate wool for their particular needs, and know what type of wool will process better on their machinery, advising them accordingly. VWP’s is more than just a commission wool processing company. Our knowledge and experience enable us to take the initiative. We don’t just sit and wait, we are proactive in procuring the right wool on behalf of

our clients’. VWP offers a varied range of scoured and carbonised types to suit the requirements of spinners and weavers. From lambs to full fleece merino crossbreds and downs wool, the company can supply a product to suit any requirement. Wool buyers at VWP operate in all wool centres in Australia and offers a full commission scouring or carbonising service tailored to each customer, and forward and prompt shipping and logistic services to all parts of the world. The company employs Chinese, Korean, Italian, Spanish and Vietnamese speakers, making communication easy for its customers in any part of the world, complementing existing agents based in Europe and Asia. ‘VWP processed wool is not blended with wool from any other country. It is 100% Australian wool’, says Paul Ferronato. ‘Wool processed by us in Australia also ensures that processing waste stays in Australia and is not a cost or pollutant problem to the buyer’. ‘Our expertise and our advanced carbonising plant enable us to carbonise from the finest merino wool to the coarsest downs wool. Using clean Australian water combined with the latest in processing technology, our wools are well known for cleanliness, strength and consistency’, says Paul Ferronato. ‘We can work directly with spinners to develop specific types most suited to their needs’.

Management Team from left to right: David Ritchie (General Manager), Myungjin (Jim) Kim (Chairman), and Paul Ferronato Senior Wool Buyer

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Paul Ferronato can be contacted on PaulF@vwp.com.au


Celebrating 20 ye EXPORTER OF TOPS

RedSun Wool


ars in top making & SPECIALITY FIBRE


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New Red Sun factory in Jiaxing Bond Free Zone

20 years at the Top

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his year Red Sun, one of the largest topmaking companies in China, celebrated 20 years of production. ‘After 20 years of growth we continue to expand its wool processing capacity. Our third factory is now under construction in the Jiaxing Bond Free Zone and we plan to start running next year with a capacity of 8,000 ton focusing on 19.5 and finer. All products from this new factory will be exported to Europe, Japan, and Asia. This new factory will enable us to keep up with demand from existing customers and open the way for new customers. We are building a new plant, and we are building on our good name and reputation’, says Mr Shao Wei Yang, Director at Zhejiang Red Sun Wool & Textile Co. The company started in 1997 as a commission wool processor, mostly processing mid micron and cross bred wools. By 2002 it had built its own combing plant. The 2008 financial crisis was an unlikely time for further expansion but Red Sun continued to grow and built. At this time it built a second factory with its own scouring and combing lines, originally buying machinery from Austop in Australia and BWK in Germany.

and even fewer have been doing it as quickly as Red Sun’, says Mr Shao Wei Yang. Today Red Sun’s increased capacity includes 18 cards 3.5m wide and 130 PB31 and PB33 combing machines and just purchased another ERA machine. ‘Our production capacity has improved and it is diverse. We mostly process Lustre and Lincoln types with a 60hm and 50hm in the 16-28 micron range. Our biggest production is between 18.5-21 micron 60hm and this is the biggest market share in China. Our quality is steady, particularly when it comes to 18.5 - 19.5 60vhm, and this is the best in China’, he says.

By 2013 Red Sun had replaced its entire scouring machinery with new, tailor machinery customized to its particular needs and in 2015 it bought new NSC ERA and GS30s and expanded further in 2016 with the purchase of 50 combs from Reward.

We have developed a strong reputation with clients, banks, and government as a result of this continuous investment and commitment to the wool industry. We have achieved a triple A rating for three years in a row. Our investment in a young positive and professional team has also contributed to our production quality’.

‘Very few Chinese mills have been upgrading to new textile machinery,

Red Sun operates an advanced testing centre

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CHINA

YANG Shao Wei Director at Zhejiang Red Sun Wool & Textile Co

that is equipped with the latest testing and measuring instruments including the ALMETER fibre length instrument, Sirolan-Laserscan and a Swiss-made Uster yarn evenness tester. ‘We produce a range of wool tops of various specifications suitable for high end worsted, semi-worsted, and woollen textile manufacturers. We have invested in the latest technology and this investment is paying off.’ ‘For spinners and weavers that require non-mulesed certification, we can provide this through AWTA. Even when we process orders for tops that are made from up to 200 different lots AWTA can provide us with one certification.’

YANG Shao Xiao, Chairman at Zhejiang Red Sun Wool & Textile Co

open tops, broken tops, sliver tops, Superwash & Soft Luster tops, Basolan tops, mohair tops, Lincoln tops, and more, suitable for highclass worsted, semi-worsted and woolen textiles manufacturers. We also supply noils and Lanolin all year around. Red Sun also operates the most advanced water treatment plant in China and is ISO 9001 Quality Management System Certification and ISO14000 Environment Management Certification. ‘A sustainable future is a high priority for us’, says Mr Shao Wei Yang. ‘We produce excellent tops with an eye to environmental considerations. We are among the world’s best in energy saving, environmental protection, and production efficiency.’ For further information about the variety of products available from Red Sun please contact Vivian Huang at import-sfy@redsunwool.com or Nick Chen at cyg@redsunwool.com www.redsunwool.com

‘Our customers can now buy a wider variety of wool tops from us and do not need to source from anywhere else. It is more economical, more convenient, and our customers find it more practical than shopping around. We can supply tops of various specifications ranging from 15.5 to 32.0 microns including nonmulesing wool tops, and wool2yarnglobal 2017

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CHINA

Mr Qingnan WEN welcomes delegates to Lal Lal Estate

Mr WEN and son Tony at Lal Lal Estate in Victoria

China’s biggest topmaker takes a lead in social responsibility

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hinese wool tycoon Qingnan Wen sees two main problems facing the world wool industry. ‘As an industry we must work harder to create a more favourable view of wool with consumers worldwide for current and future fashion trends’, says Mr Wen Chairman of Tianyu Wool. ‘The second issue, he further maintains, is that wool growing must be profitable to ensure that wool growers stay in wool farming, and increase production.’ Tianyu is the largest top maker in China and one of the largest in the world. It is a comprehensive enterprise engaged in scouring wool and wool top manufacturing, and in functional processing. The annual output of scouring wool is 80,000 tons, sliver is 21,000 tons, and the annual process capacity of mercerized, shrinkproof and basolan wool is 8,000 tons. Mr Wen is also a wool grower. Lal Lal Estate near Ballarat in Victoria Australia grows some of the best Australian wool. The farm is 2000ha and stocked with 17,000 sheep. ‘We have invested $10m into Lal Lal Estate to improve the pastures, sheep genetics and wool productivity. We plan to show that with the best farming techniques wool growing in Australia can still be profitable and provide the quality to suit wool users like Tianyu Wool’.

pay particular attention to skills training, team building and company culture. This, and our investment in the latest plant machinery will ensure that we continue to be an industry leader’. Tianyu was one of the first company’s in China to implement a wastewater treatment facility and today is one of only a few to comply with all environmental laws. ‘Our environmental laws in China are stricter than they are in Italy’, comments Mr Wen. ‘We have invested RMB$100 million in environmental protection projects.’ Since 2008, the company has invested over 100 million Yuan in environmental protection and has established relationships with colleges and universes, research units at home and abroad for researching and developing scouring fluid fertilizer, and more.

Tianyu has also expanded its operations with a new buying office in Port Elizabeth South Africa. ‘We have been expanding our global reach in wool sourcing and our Port Elizabeth office is just one more step toward this expansion.

‘Tianyu is a modern company with a strong sense of social responsibility’, says Mr Wen. ‘We want to promote Tianyu as one of the largest fine merino top makers, involved in wool to fiber from farm to fashion. We are working with many supply chain program and brands. We see ourselves as a leader in environmental, sustainable, traceable practices producing the best quality fiber’, says Mr Wen.

Mr Wen comments that ‘the future at Tianyu is clear. Our people are our most valued asset. We focus on our work place ethics and skills. Training has always been an important aspect of our business and we

For more information about woollen products offered by Tianyu www.tianyu-wool.com or contact jane@tianyu-wool.com

In 2017 Mr Wen brought together the influential China Wool Industrial Association for its annual meeting at Lal Lal Estate. This is the first time this wool processing and manufacturing group has met outside China. This meeting was attended by some 200 people from around the world.

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CHINA

Exotic fibre exports on the increase

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he CHAFTA brand of Zhangjiagang Zhongfuda Textile Co in Jiangsu Province supplies tops in exotic fibres from China and Mongolia. Products include tops and yarn from cashmere, angora, and mohair, camel, and yak down, as well as cashmere blended silk yarns, scarves, sweaters, thermal garments, trousers, and socks. They are exported to customers in USA, Canada and Europe. Located in Zhangjiagang city, CHAFTA’s close proximity to Shanghai makes it a good choice for business customers internationally as well as domestically. ‘At CHAFTA we are committed to developing new products and technological innovations. There has been a deficit in the domestic production capacity of worsted dehaired angora top and cashmere tops in lengths of 28mm-38mm. Our plant is equipped with 10 sets of carding machines from Japan and UK, 31 sets of NSC worsted carding machine from France. We process white cashmere tops, colored cashmere tops, and operate a dehaired tops production line with an annual production of around 500 tons per year. We produce more than 200 tons of 2/26Nm,2/120Nm blended yarns and knitted yarns and repeat orders from our customers attests to our reputation’. CHAFTA’s Cashmere top is the ideal raw material for many worsted and semi worsted products and is treated with and anti-pilling treatment. The micron is between 15.3 -16.5 and of 32-35mm in length. There is little length variation and very few neps and skin flakes. ‘We are also the only manufacturer that can produce high quality yak down tops. Our worsted Yak down top comes from Tibet. It is fine, soft, and is smooth in lustre. After treatment it achieves better elastic recovery and can be used in high end super fine fabrics. It is comfortable to wear, and positive qualities include permeability, antipilling, and easy maintenance.’ 114

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Worsted dehaired camel top from CHAFTA has achieved its quality through ongoing research and development initiatives. This top is soft yet has good handle, elasticity and abrasion resistance qualities. International customers are placing orders as they discover that this product offers good uv protection, warmth retention, does not shrink after washing, is tough and does not pill. Worsted dehaired rabbit top is fine and smooth. It achieves good warmth retention and yet is permeable. Length variation is low and is therefore better in spinning. CHAFTA’s catalogue also offers dehaired rabbit top in blends with cashmere, yak down, wool, and silk. Mohair top and blending yarns are also exported worldwide by CHAFTA. ‘At CHAFTA we are always striving to improve the quality of our products and the standard of our customer service. We believe we are achieving this through the product testing and certifications we provide.’ Zhangjiagang Zhongfuda Textile Co’s CHAFTA is ISO14001 and IS9001:2008 certification. ‘We are widely trusted both at home and abroad. We do hope we can do business with you!’. For more information please contact Mr. Li Jianming Email: lijianming@chafta.com Web: www.chafta.com


CHINA

Mr QIU Ganxin of Zhejiang Zhongxin Wool Textile Co

Zhongxin Wool Textile facility cover an area of 160,000 square meters

Increasing wool yarn production capacity

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recently published China Textile and Apparel Industry Report 2016 - 2019 describes the current climate in Asia’s textile and garment sector and indicates that for the foreseeable future China will remain the leading textile and apparel sourcing country. The view shared by many executives in the industry is that there is no other country or region that will be able to match China in terms of scale, infrastructure, efficiency, expertise, and stability. ‘In China we have a long history and culture of textile development’, says Mr QIU Ganxin Chairman of Zhejiang Zhongxin Wool Textile Co. ‘Our wool industry in China is rapidly shifting to more value added products and will continue to improve its quality and product range through innovation’. Zhejiang Zhongxin Wool Textile Co specialized in manufacturing and exporting wool top, worsted yarn. blended yarn, and cashmere and cashmere blended yarn. It has an annual production capacity of 6000 tons of wool top and 2000 tons of worsted yarn, with a further 2000 tons of anti shrink wool top. The company main production is based in 116

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Zhejiang and includes scouring, slivering, dyeing and spinning facility. Establishment some 30 years ago, today it facility cover an area of 160,000 square meters employing over 300 employees, including 86 senior technical staffs. ‘Our goals are long term’, says Mr QIU Ganxin. ‘We expect to supply quality spinning yarn for decades into the future. We have been upgrading and expanding our operation over time and continue to do so. Zhejiang Zhongxin mainly operates European machinery from Italy, France and Switzerland using 20,000 spindles. It operates six Italian top manufacturing lines, and CMT/Kroy48 anti-shrink mercerized production line. ‘This has enabled us to expand our wool washing, combing, spinning, and dyeing capacity, all within one integrated plant, increasing efficiency and quality in our production.’ ‘We were the first company to operate new Italian carding equipment and in 2014 we made a technical innovation investment, with the establishment of a new dyeing workshop, achieving enhanced technological and production capacity. Later that year we introduced imported wool washing equipment to create a complete industry chain’, he says. The company is provided technical support from Zhejiang University of Technology and research institutions. ‘We continue to develop new products and new technologies. Zhejiang was the first province to be recognised for its green credentials. We are certified ISO9001/140001. Environmental quality is important to us.’ For more information please contact Jackson at E: zhongxinhcx@163.com T: 0572-3186070 F: 0572-3186666


CHINA

Nanjing Wool Market - what it can offer you and processing companies’. Today we welcome around 600 delegates and over 100 of these are international delegates. NWM also plays an integral liaison role with the international wool community and chairs the Joint China Australia Wool Working Group and Joint New Zealand China Wool Working Group. It is involved in arbitration and trade dispute settlements, and offers financial services including Bills of Exchange and Letters of Credit.

Nanjing Wool Market stuff

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he annual Nanjing Wool Market Conference provides an excellent opportunity for all international delegates to meet with China’s biggest wool buyers, all in one place. It also offers exhibition space for companies wishing to exhibit their products. The Conference is open to delegates from all around the world. It has moved from domestic Chinese industry issues to become a fully international conference with presentations and participation from industry leaders worldwide. Speakers at the Conference offer insight into the China wool industry and its future plans. ‘The Conference provides an excellent opportunity for delegates to learn about future plans in the China textile industry and time to mix with all major wool and textile companies from all over China’, says Madam Yang NWM Chairwoman. ‘We welcome international delegates to our annual conference. It is a major conference for the wool and early wool processing industry in China and is attended by executives of all major Chinese wool buying

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NWM is known to most wool importers to China as their first port of call for advice and assistance in doing business in China. NWM membership includes woolgrower cooperatives, traders, primary processors, and spinners of wool, and allied fibres all over China, as well as foreign membership. ‘Foreign companies planning to establish new relationships or planning to set up joint ventures with companies in China are welcome to consult us at NWM or China Wool Textile Association (CWTA)’, says General Manager Mr Jian Chen. We are always pleased to assist any company that wishes to do business with our members.’ In addition to hosting the NWM Conference, NWM is responsible for providing training to the early wool processing industry in China. It works closely with AWI, AWEX, and AWTA in training wool classers, wool shearers, and providing educational resources to local wool growers. Nanjing Wool Market Conference is an annual event held in September and overseas companies interested in attending the next conference should register their interest by contacting Nanjing Wool Market at njwoolmarket@163.com


UNITED KINGDOM

British Wool - A Versatile Fibre… British Wool has earned its reputation for being the strongest carpet wool in the world by outperforming many other options, some natural and many synthetic. This dependability is the reason it is chosen by global spinners and manufacturers for use in carpet, rugs and upholstery. 

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he naturally robust crimp of wool grown on British sheep breeds lends a longevity both in appearance retention and structural form. It is the number one choice for the commercial location particularly for those with heavy footfall and often also wheeled luggage or mobility traffic hotels, casinos and cruise ships. These high footfall flooring areas need wool that is consistently reliable, particularly with

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colour richness. British Wool is highly regarded for its ability to absorb dye well and will retain the depth and clarity of colour over many years. Deep, robust colours such as those within Axminster carpet ranges require longlasting definition of dye within pattern and the fibre has a long record of achievement in this sector. Also spinners rely on certain British Wools to achieve a natural heathery effect which may be part of the design such


UNITED KINGDOM

as in tweed - like or flecked styles. However, British Wool has many other uses than carpets these days - the textile industry has picked up the baton of sustainable solutions with natural origin at its heart and found in British Wool a true performance fibre that is ticking many increasingly important boxes. It is its volume and natural bulk that has created an expansion in its use within the bedding sector.  Quality mattress manufacturers are choosing British Wool for its ability to bounceback despite recurrent daily use. An interest in healthy lifestyles and wellbeing have all played a part in the rise of sleeping with wool but it is the lasting comfort and quality of British Wool in product that is compelling criteria to bed manufacturers.

Left – Graham Clark (Head of Marketing), Centre – Joe Farren (Chief Executive Offer). Right – Stephen Spencer (Head of Wool Sales)

colourations and textures that are

‘We want to ensure the confidence

a design dream for new and niche

in British Wool is underpinned by

product development,’ Clark says.

our own internal systems. Buyers

‘Assets such as the breathing function of wool - that is the way it absorbs or ‘wicks’ moisture which helps provide great quality sleep - are also high on the list of reasons for choosing wool for the sleep environment. However, it is the bulk quality of our wool that maintains the sleeper’s comfort that makes our fibre the superior choice,” Graham Clark, the new head of marketing at British Wool explains.

Heathery flecks and the crunchy

On the knitwear and apparel front - the heritage stories, textures and distinctive natural colours offered by over 60 different pure breeds of sheep offer dream marketing opportunities to both the knitting and finished garment sector.

mid-micron British Wool offer can

‘British Wool offers uniform quality in bulk but also unique natural

appeal of country style clothing and tweed can all be developed from

at every level need to know that our fibre has been ethically grown and is environmentally compliant.

British Wool as can a softer handle

Clark concludes, ’The trend for both

with lustrous sheen from down land

British origin wool and eco-credibility

wools and long wool sheep breeds.

is very strong and we want to support

The crispness of certain British

the buyer’s choice in British Wool and

wool types adds important shape to

to help market their products in store

garments and in blended yarns for

and our new marketing programme

tailoring. It is equally the asset for

will do that.’

soft furnishing upholstery and the

Joe Farren, Chief Executive Officer of

transform a lifeless fabric to one that will resist wear and hold its shape.

British Wool added, ‘British Wool is a versatile and high quality fibre with a tremendously positive provenance,

The credibility of the fibre is

animal welfare and environmental

important to British Wool - it has

management back story. We will be

enhanced its quality control and

exploring new product development

assurance processes to buyers at

opportunities for Far Eastern markets

auction, and along the wool pipeline

with manufacturing and retail partners

to the manufacturing and retail sector.

in the coming months’. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Curtis expands it product range by Victor Chesky

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etting Tim Holgate and Daniel Isbecque, joint Managing Directors of Curtis Wool Direct, together in the same room and at the same time is not an easy task but this year I managed to catch up with them and David Gisbourne at their Haworth Scouring plant in Bradford. CWD has recently installed 14 new NSC Schlumberger ERA combing machines, GC Gills and finishers at its Haworth Combing plant - a big investment, particularly at a time when the crossbred wool market is not doing that well. I asked Tim and Daniel why now? customers face ever increasing demands,” says Daniel Isbecque.” The installation of this new machinery at Haworth Combing is a natural progression for our company, and part of a long term strategy for the business,” he says. CWD is the largest wool exporter from the U.K., sourcing the best wool from many origins. The company is a registered buyer and licensee of the British Wool Marketing Board, and specialises in processing and exporting a wide range of British, Irish, Norwegian, European, New Zealand and Real Shetland wools. It supplies to all parts of the textile industry worldwide, including carpet, hosiery, cloth, hand and machine knit, bedding and the non woven sectors.

Tim Holgate (left) and Daniel Isbecque

“Notwithstanding the drop in sales of certain crossbred wool types, recent lower prices are driving demand for wool in other sectors and volumes remain satisfactory,” says Tim Holgate. “Our diverse client base around the world uses a wider range of scoured wool and combed top types and we remain busy exporting scoured wool and tops to these international markets, as well as the U.K. market.” “We have a very positive view for the future of the industry and for crossbred wool, despite the current more challenging trading environment. We have been able to expand and diversify our product range and invested in machinery required to ensure we produce to the highest quality standards, as our 122

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“We buy more than half the British wool clip via British Wool Marketing Board auctions, and with further acquisitions completed in Ireland earlier this year, the company is now also the largest buyer of Irish wool,” says Daniel Isbecque. “Together with our procurement and trading activities in both the North and South Islands of New Zealand, our customers rely on us as a one stop shop for all materials from greasy to scoured wool and wool tops.” Tim Holgate comments that “as the biggest wool merchant in the U.K. our customers expect us to deliver the wool they need, all year round, quickly, at very competitive prices, and with consistent high quality. Owning and operating our own Scouring and combing facility is key to providing control over quality and direct management of all supply logistics - an essential requirement today enabling us to deliver a very diverse range of quality wool types on time, even at short notice, to customers worldwide? Furthermore, we are able to focus on sustainability and our green credentials, in order to supply our customers with wool processed and certified to the highest environmental standards.” Curtis Wool Direct Limited tim@curtiswool.co.uk; daniel@curtiswool.co.uk


Wool Carpets#Naturally GLOBAL TESTING WOOL CARPET FOCUS GROUP


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Variety and in-stock volume from around the world for something a little bit different. We supply manufacturers all over the world including spinners of weaving, knitting, upholstery and carpet yarns, as well as felt-makers, technical non-woven and home-ware manufacturers. Our focus is on supplying to woollen and worsted spinners. Our customers can buy small or big quantities. We will also store wool for our customers who prefer to take it in small lots as they need it’, says Mr Morsley. Europa Wools is a registered trader with the British Wool Marketing Board with access to all the British wool types in the wool auction. It aims to have a good variety in natural shades and good colour, clean types, ranging from 28 - 38 microns.

Richard Morsley

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he capacity to hold a huge variety of stock throughout the year is something only a few companies are able to do. For 30 years Europa Wools has been operating out of the heart of the UK wool industry region of West Yorkshire. It supplies over 1 million kgs of textile raw materials to the worldwide wool trade every year, making it a leading stockist in the UK and Europe. ‘We carry big wool stocks of New Zealand, Australian, and British, as well as South American in scoured form, open top and combed tops’, says Richard Morsley of Europa Wools. ‘We also offer rare fibres and speciality fibres and have a wide range of synthetic fibre. We always try and stock rare breed wools 124

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The company stocks a wide range of New Zealand types including lambs, slipes, fleeces and pieces and mainly carries average to good colour grades ranging from 22 – 38 microns, with lengths of 1-3” up to 4-6” with low VM percentages. The bulk of its Australian wools are lamb and fleece types, ranging from 18 - 28 micron, with best style and good colour. VM is of no more than 0.3%. The company selects the best style, snow white fleeces for Falkland types and stock good length fleeces in microns ranging from 19 - 29 microns that are generally very clean fleeces at no more than 0.3% VM. ‘We scour any grade of greasy wools from a minimum of 100kgs up to large runs of any weight. We Kroy Hercosett (superwash) scoured wool and combed wool tops and comb most natural fibres, and can create blends from all natural fibres and synthetic fibres.’ The company can bespoke gill blend combed tops to create blends of many fibres, starting from as little as 10kgs sample runs up to large runs. From only 10kgs up to large runs, it can dye loose stock or tops for all types of natural and synthetic fibres. Using high tech colour matching systems it will match any colour that is required on most fibres.’We have a lot of experience in dyeing and we can be very competitive with a fast reliable service.’ Other processes include garneting, carding, combing, precision cutting, random cutting, opening and pulling. ‘We also source very specific fibre for very specific applications. If a customer tells us what he is looking for we will know where to find it, and at a competitive price. Please contact us for all your fibre requirements’, he concludes. Richard Morsley at info@europawools.com


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The importance of Traceability Traceability from fibre to finished product is growing in importance for consumers, particularly in the fashion, outdoor clothing and eco-interior sectors. Buyers want to know where the wool has started its journey along the chain from raw wool to yarn before it is made into the final item. ‘At H. Dawson Wool we have straightforward and transparent relationships with growers and suppliers to ensure that this traceability is evident in every link of the chain,’ says Jo Dawson Chairman of H. Dawson Wool. ‘Wool has been our core business for almost 130 years. We are also involved in fibre product innovation, technical development, sustainability, and traceability’.

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that give them true value when processed into yarn and fabric’, says Mr Dawson.

‹We offer our customers the most flexible and appropriate natural fibre solutions at prices that give them true value when processed into yarn and fabric. Our long history in wool trading and the breadth of wool knowledge and skills within our team enable us to source wool from an unparallel global supply base, matching our clients requirements for the wool most suitable to them›. 

‘We don’t see ourselves as just suppliers of wool; we strive to innovate and solve problems. If a customer is looking for a particular blend we will create this for their specific requirement’, he says. ‘We understand the current trends that affect demand for particular wool types which helps our experienced traders and sourcing teams to source the right wool for the right product, throughout the year.’ 

‘We add value to wool and make efforts to add value to the wool industry too. We are a leading supplier of wool as an eco product by offering our customers the most flexible and appropriate natural fibre solutions at prices

The company sources wool from over 50 countries on behalf of a diverse customer base of manufacturers of carpets, apparel, furnishings, performance wear, and building products.


UNITED KINGDOM

British Wool Grading System

B

ritish Wool is owned by approximately 40,000 sheep farmers in the UK and on their behalf it grades 30 million kgs of wool every year. There are over sixty pure breeds of sheep, and more cross and half-bred sheep - it offers more choice in wool than any other country in the world.  The wool from these different breeds is graded into types based on its physical characteristics including fineness, staple length and strength, colour, crimp, lustre and handle and sold to merchants via an electronic auction.

core tested and independently, scientifically evaluated to international standards by Wool Testing Authority Europe for certification. This adds valuable information at auction - micron, colour, vegetable matter and yield are tested and the accredited testing certification documentation is provided to the buyer. Where farms have certified organic status their wool will be graded and sold separately - a farm’s organic status must be renewed annually to be eligible to be processed separately.

The grading of British Wool is a skilled role, experienced graders will have trained for five years and they will be inspecting each fleece for characteristics such as strength and uniformity based on the fibre’s micron, staple length and colour. 

‘Whilst we grade our wool into around 100 different types (with micron range 25-35+) the Chinese market currently buys only 10 of these in greasy state in significant weight, mainly our Fine , Medium and some of the finer mule types which are in the 32-35 micron range’, said Stephen Spencer, Wool Sales Manager for British Wool.

The wool is graded at eleven depots across the UK, where the grading teams inspect locally grown wool and it is then packaged for auction into lots with each 4 or 8 ton lot being made up of a single grade. It is also then

‘We will have samples of the grades from this year’s wool clip that are sold “greasy” into China on display at the Nanjing Wool Fair on Saturday 16th September 2017’, concluded Mr Spencer.

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Technical expertise offered by UK wool merchant

t has been another positive year for Swan Wool UK. Our product consistency and reliability is the cornerstone of our business. We are able to service both large and small clients, whilst still maintaining a personal relationship with each one.’ says Andrew Price, Managing Director of Swan Wool Europe Limited. Swan Group trading centre in Bradford, is ideally located to effectively service its European customer base both in proximity and time line. The team has extensive sourcing, processing and trading experience as well as a diverse range of products and services. It offers greasy wool, scoured woo and carbonised wool as well as tops and open tops. The company utilises wools from around the globe and oversees the whole pipeline to provide quality wools for the Worsted, Woollen and non-Woven sectors. Our small but experienced team provide customers the service they require in an industry where time is money and product quality paramount’, says Andrew Price. ‘Fibre knowledge and diversity are the key components to operations at Swan Group and we are always on hand to offer our collective technical expertise to our clients.’ ‘Wool is the supreme technical fibre, and clients need to be assured they are receiving a product that performs on the machines, and improves yields’, comments Andrew Price. ‘It’s the end cost that matters most and technical expertise is essential.’ ‘Our company policies and direction is quite simple – we offer our collective experience, in a timely and professional manner to all of our clients. We strive for quality in product and service, and look to build long term relationships. We also take pride in what we do and try to enjoy ourselves along the way, and hope it shows’. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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his year’s front cover is a collaborative effort - UK’s Dashing Tweeds and Gormley & Gamble (G&G) have pulled their expertise to create a suit for today’s woman - corporate in style, beautifully cut. The image is the result of an individually crafted fabric made from 49% Merino wool, 49% Linen and 1% Tussah silk and provided by Dashing Tweeds, designed, tailored, and worn by Phoebe Gormley, and photographed by Guy Hills of Dashing Tweeds, a stone’s throw from Savile Row. Phoebe Gormley interned between Savile Row and Jermyn Street from the time she left school. She has been dubbed Savile

Row’s Queen of Style by The Resident magazine, has been awarded ‘Young Star’ at the Women of the Future Awards 2015, ‘Entrepreneurial Spark’ at the Great British Young Entrepreneur Awards 2015, and has also been named in Management Today’s ’35 Under 35’ and Brummell magazine’s ’30 Under 30’. IN 2017 she was listed in Forbes 30 Under 30 for her contribution to the Arts, and in October 2015 Gormley & Gamble became the first women’s only tailor in the history of Savile Row. ‘It’s an addiction, a passion for femininity, womenswear and Savile Row’, says Phoebe Gormley. ‘We’re partnering these elements together for the first time.’

Womenswear arrives

Phoebe Gormley

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‘Our G&G is here to re-define the classics, beautifully, elegantly and simply by women for women. Customers can select from swatches of thousands of fabrics, and if we don’t already have it, we can source samples upon request. We only use British, Scottish and Italian mills that are expert in what they do’, she says.

collections’, says Guy Hills of Dashing Tweeds.

Savile Row has never been the home to fast fashion. It maintains skills passed down from generations and will never be the place you go to for something that’s on-trend for a season and then gets binned.

forward into new and exciting territory with

‘Style, colour and performance are all essential ingredients for our fabric and clothing

clothing for personal expression and changing

‘We supply many Savile Row stores with Scottish-made, high end quality fabric, but with a distinctly modern feel.’ Dashing Tweeds designer and weaver, Kirsty McDougall comments that ‘we are pushing our fabric. Our menswear ready to wear and made to measure collections explore the different shapes and cuts of traditional tailoring. We develop functional fabric and elements in urban living,’ she says.

at Savile Row London

Dashing Tweed team (right to left) Holly Pressdee, Business Development Director, Guy Hills CEO and Kirsty McDougall Fabric Design Director

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Scouring facility at Thomas Chadwick & Sons

Paul Hughes Jnr

Standard Wool UK – further invests for the future by Victor Chesky

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tandard Wool is a multi-million pound group of five companies that together make up one of the world’s leading wool trading businesses. It has a customer base spanning across 30 countries and specialises in sourcing, supplying and processing wools from the UK and overseas. It employs around 150 people across West Yorkshire and overseas locations including New Zealand, China and Chile. I asked Paul Hughes jnr Standard Wool UK Group Trading Director about the new combing lines it is installing at its Punta Arenas plant in Chile and its automatic blending machinery at its scouring facility in UK, and his views on the long term future of demand for wool products. These investments point to our commitment and confidence in the industry. Even with the downturn in demand for crossbred wool we are in the fortunate position of having a diversified group supplying crossbred and merino wool to woollen and worsted sectors 132

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across various continents around the globe. We are still busy both in the UK and in Chile. In actual fact our scouring facility at Thomas Chadwick & Sons has been busier this year and our long term objective has always been to add value for our customers. Much of our business


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is for the carpet trade in particular for wool blended with nylon for Axminster carpets. Our investment in automatic blending will enable our clients to blend to their specification. Our customers use us as consultants – to advise them about best wools and best blends. Companies today cannot afford to employ staff that is expert in all stages of wool processing and best blending, so approaching us for such advice is a service we are happy to provide to our customers’, he says. Thomas Chadwick & Sons processes around 25 million kilograms of wool every year and employs 55 highly skilled workers. ‘Our ability to process wool using our own machinery in the UK and Chile is an important point of difference between Standard Wool UK and other wool companies. We are able to maintain control throughout the whole process’, says Paul Hughes Jnr. Grease recovered from the wools we process at Thomas Chadwick & Sons is a different quality. This grease is described as “technical grade”, but is just as versatile and can be refined into a multitude of products such as animal feed supplements, leather-treatment and anti-corrosion products, as well as an ecofriendly base for animal branding fluids. The company’s environmental policies and commitment to best practice have earned it the coveted ISO9001:2000 Quality Management accreditation in Processing as well as ISO14001:2004 Environmental Management accreditation. Soil Association accreditation is a further demonstration of our high degree of competency and commitment to excellence in every aspect of our operations as well as the Oeko-Tex100 Certification this year.’ He further comments that ‘our business is quite diverse. We are a commission processor for scoured wool, wool tops noils and wool grease. We also hold large stocks of wools from around the world including NZ, UK, South

Andrew Jones (left) and Richard Moore of Standard Wool UK

American, and Europe in greasy and scoured form as well as tops and Punta Tops. Our Punta tops can be delivered to Biella next day and our customers can receive delivery of greasy or scoured wool, of any origin, within 5 days.’ Gary Doherty from Standard Wool New Zealand comments ‘we source wool from all over New Zealand and specialise in scoured wool for carpet and knitting industries. We work closely with our head office in the UK to source the best wool New Zealand has to offer’. ‘We are also the only company that can supply 100% Chilean tops. Mulesing is not practiced in Chile and this makes our wool tops very attractive to companies that value environmental accreditation for their product. Investment in the latest technology is essential to maintaining quality and retaining customer loyalty. Our focus has been to deliver quality and that is why we invested in N Schlumberger combing lines that are European made. This machinery also offers the best in speed and efficiency. ‘We really feel that the company is so much better equipped now and we are looking to the future with confidence. We are cementing our position as a company of great diversification’, he concludes. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Dean Sugden General Manager of Standard Wool Chile

From Punta with love

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he Standard Wool UK group has made major investments into its topmaking plant in Chile, installing new NSC combing lines and new wool grease machines.’Our knowledge in Chilean wools and our sourcing expertise enable us to make a versatile top for a variety of applications. We process and supply long tops, noil, and high grade wool grease for a diverse international customer base’, says Dean Sugden General Manager Standard Wool Chile (SWC). ‘The new combing lines and wool grease machinery will ensure that we maintain the quality expectation that our customers expect from us long term. Today the textile industry works on much shorter deadlines and quality expectations are high’, he says. Standard Wool Chile is the only company that guarantees 100% Chilean top. There is no mulesing in Chile so full non-mulesed certification can be provided to spinners that require it, particularly in Europe and the USA. In addition, Standard Wool now incorporates the IWTO Guidelines for Wool Sheep Welfare in purchase contracts with Wool Producers and actively promotes good animal welfare practices, most notably in the set-up of “Buenas Prácticas Ganadera Magallánica” last year’, says Paul Hughes Jnr. At the start of every wool season Standard Wool Chile wool buyers take the time to visit the individual farmers in all wool growing regions of Chile including Patagonia. ‘This is something that is often overlooked, but we believe that valuing the wool on a visual basis rather than only looking at a test certificate is very important’, says Dean Sugden. 134

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Standard Wool has also set up a working group in Chile called “Buenas Prácticas Ganadera Magallánica” to promote best farm practices with Chilean wool growers to focus on practices that produce the best quality and animal friendly wool. ‘We deal directly with 450 of the region’s most reliable and experienced farmers and suppliers. Our team in Chile has access to the finest wools at the best possible prices, and typically accounts for 60% of the country’s entire annual clip. Our long-standing relationship with Chilean producers also gives us a strategic long term partnership.– a real benefit when it comes to safeguarding product quality, stock reliability’, says Dean Sugden. The most important wools in terms of quantity and quality are produced in the south of the country. It is generally 19.5 - 30 microns of snow white colour and is especially popular for knitwear manufacturers. ‘The original and best Punta Arenas Super Fleeces Top has a soft handle, super strength, low vegetable matter and exceptional length and meets Oeko-Tex Standard 100 Product Class 1. We are Interwoollab accredited for length and micron given further assurances to the Wool Spinner.’ The processing plant is equipped with French carding and combing machinery and has a 2.4m wide Andar 6 bowl scouring line and has the capacity to process 4 million kilos each year with a modern effluent treatment system. The company’s Alfa Laval wool grease recovery plant delivers excellent quality wool grease which is exported to clients all around the world. Dean Sugden can be contacted at dsugden@standardwool.co.uk


STANDARD WOOL WHERE WE LEAD, OTHERS FOLLOW. WITH OVER 200 YEARS INDUSTRY EXPERIENCE, STATE-OF-THE-ART TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICING MORE THAN 30 COUNTRIES WORLD WIDE, IT’S NOT SURPRISING MORE AND MORE CUSTOMERS ARE TURNING TO US FOR ALL THEIR WOOL REQUIREMENTS. WWW.STANDARD-WOOL.CO.UK

STANDARD WOOL (UK) +44 (0)1274 756600 STANDARD WOOL (Nanjing) +86 25 5807 1182

PASSIONATE ABOUT WOOL


NEW ZEALAND

Bulkier wool from Ngamatea Station wool that averages 34 micron high bulk and very white.’We have developed extremely high bulk wool that is of great commercial interest, particularly to bedding manufacturers‘, says Renata Apatu. Ngamatea Station was the first to embrace the New Zealand Wright Wool quality assurance scheme. ‘Our wool is fully traceable and our animal husbandry is of the highest level. Our pastures are green and pesticide free, and we provide only natural feed. We believe that consumers are increasingly looking for sustainable and environmentally sound fibres to wear, and for their homes and commercial spaces.’ The farm is 70,000 acres and in addition to Renata and his brother and sister there are 15 full time staff. The family passion for wool is deep-seated, with its origins dating back to the early days of the family’s settlement on the property. Shearing takes place once each year - 4-6 inches long. 1,000 bales per year make it possible to supply customers’ long term. Philippa Wright, and Renata Apatu wearing his late mother’s family Tartan (Fernie)

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hen a manufacturing company in Thailand found out about Ngamatea Station’s bulky wool they knew it would fit the bill perfectly. This Thai company makes Father Christmas costumes and New Zealand bulky white wool for their costume beards was just what they needed. Ngamatea Station is located an hour outside of Napier in the North island of New Zealand. This farm has been family owned for four generations and is currently managed by Renata Apatu, who like his late mother before him is a qualified wool classer. Renata is also the current Chairman of The Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust. The Station runs Romneycross sheep with

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‘We have a long heritage in sheep farming that started with merino sheep and later switching from merino to crossbred. We have a strong emphasis in wool preparation including classing and grading, relying on our qualified classers.’ Ngamatea Station has also been involved in supplying wool to a New Zealand manufacturer of pillows and duvets for the American market. The bulk in his clip is also used by USA Paragon Products in its pillows and pet beds. ‘Although the quality of New Zealand wool is considered the best in the world, it must still be continually improved to remain competitive in the international textile arena’, says Philippa Wright of Wright Wools, buyer, broker and exporter for Ngamatea Station wool.’The extra bulk and exceptional preparation of the Ngamatea Station clip stands out as an attractive option for manufacturers looking for bulk in their wool. Its production is large enough to meet the needs of large manufacturers in Japan, Europe, or the USA.’ ‘The process from farm to consumer is not simple’, says Renata Apatu. ‘The journey from the paddock to the market can be complicated and we welcome the expertise of Wright Wools.’


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Changing landscape for woolscouring in NZ

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he merger of the scouring operations of Cavalier Wool Holdings (CWH) and New Zealand Wool Services International Limited (NZWSI) is now very much in place, with one scouring plant operating in the South Island and two scouring plants operating in the North Island. Kaputone has now ceased production and all South Island wool scouring is done at Canterbury Woolscourers in Timaru. I caught up with Tony Cunningham, recently appointed CEO Cavalier Woolscourers and ask him about the merger and how it has changed the wool scouring landscape in New Zealand. ‘Operations at the Whakatu Wool Scour and Hawkes Bay Woolscourers in the North Island and our South Island facility, Canterbury Woolscourers at Timaru are business as usual. We believe that the new arrangement has achieved the right capacity for scouring needs in New Zealand’, says Tony Cunningham. ‘Our South Island facility at Timaru is the only one of its kind in the world, capable of washing every type of wool, from fine merino for apparel to coarse wool for carpets. It is EU Ecolabel compliant so we can offer our customers the highest level of environmental certification and labelling. We are the most quality conscious commission scouring company in the world’, he says. 138

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‘Eco Labelling Certification demonstrates our adherence to strict environmental practices. We lead the way with World Best Practices for environmental issues such as low water usage, energy usage and recycling. All wash water is fresh pure natural water from artesian ground wells onsite, not recycled water that has been stripped with acid and polymers’, he comments. Cavalier Woolscourers is accredited Global Organic Textiles (GOTS) for “100% Organic Scoured New Zealand Wool”. ‘We can meet the growing demand from markets for certified organic products. We are accredited as an organic processor under the


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automated scanning and detection equipment such as metal detectors. ‘Our processing achieves a maximum yield with world-leading technology and pre-scour treatment results in less entanglement of finished product, less felting and consequently a higher percentage of product suitable for market’. ‘Wool that has not been washed to specification presents a cost to manufacturers in money and time, and the possibility of product defects if pollutants go undetected’, says Tony Cunningham. ‘Our scoured wool is consistent in quality, and uniform length and colour, which makes it an ideal fibre for any textile product’.

BioGro programme, to IFOAM standard. If you require full traceability to ensure product separation, and the use of approved inputs for the scouring process we can deliver’.

After scouring, every bale is tested for moisture content, residual grease, colour and vegetable matter. Cavalier is an approved core testing supplier with both SGS New Zealand and the New Zealand Wool Testing Authority (NZWTA).

‘New Zealand has the cleanest brightest scoured wool on the planet’, says Tony Cunningham. ‘Our processed wool has the lowest levels of fibre residue anywhere in the world. We have the skills and machinery to provide one-stop-shop service and are as competitive in price as any scourer in China or anywhere else in the world. We offer each customer a tailor made wool processing service. We run highly developed and fine-tuned ANDAR “Top Master Woolscours” to scour Fine Wool to exacting quality standards.’

‘When a customer receives wool that has been processed by us, they will receive wool that is clean and ready for use. The wool has been processed with the environment in mind and processors can be confident that they are getting 100% New Zealand wool that has not been blended with inferior types from other countries ‘,concludesTony Cunningham.

The company has processes to detect contaminants throughout the scouring process; visual checks by experienced technicians, and

For more information please contact Tony Cunningham at tonyc@hbws.co.nz

Tony Cunningham

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David Hobson - a Wools of New Zealand grower of the year

Left to right: Wools of New Zealand Chairman Mark Shadbolt, Rosstan Mazey and Jason Everson with branded wool bales

Changing the game through innovation

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ools of New Zealand is 100% owned by over 700 New Zealand wool growers who represent around 15 million kgs of wool. The company invests significantly in innovation and new technologies to differentiate Wools of New Zealand fibre. Recently Wools of New Zealand has commercialised Glacial XT, a scour process that significantly enhances the ‘whiteness’ and ‘brightness’ of wool, providing a more consistent and clean substrate for new product development. Other developments include Kiteq, a unique dye process that provides increased colour opportunities and significantly improved light fastness, and Oritain traceability, a physical proof of origin technology that enables Wools of New Zealand to prove the authenticity and provenance of products that contain Wools of New Zealand wool. The company has created an efficient and streamlined supply chain model. ‘Our growers send their wool “Direct2-Scour” from their farms where the wool is independently handled, tested and assessed. Wools of New Zealand has partnered with world leading scourers Cavalier Woolscourers as our Direct-2-Scour service provider. We have created the shortest possible supply chain route for first stage processing, into our international customers, providing them cost and efficiency benefits’, says Chief Executive Rosstan Mazey. ‘Products containing wool sourced directly from Wools of New Zealand can carry the Wools of New Zealand brand in

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to the market’, says Mazey. ‘Yarn from a partner spinner using our grower’s wool qualifies for use of the Wools of New Zealand brand. Our purpose is to directly link our grower’s wool with the Wools of New Zealand brand which is well recognised globally.’ ‘The world is becoming increasingly connected and consumers are becoming more aware of how products are produced. With our direct line of sight from the market to the farm we provide clear signals to our growers to create points of difference for our wool in the market’, he says. To this end Wools of New Zealand and scour partner Cavalier Woolscourers has worked with EU Ecolabel to ensure its growers are accredited to supply EU ecolabel compliant wool. Its wool supply conforms with the recently developed Responsible Wool Standard (RWS) which has been introduced at the request of international consumer brands to remove risks associated with non-transparent supply chains. ‘Globally, consumer and retailer trends are shifting towards natural and sustainable products with an increasing focus on the importance of origin and the way in which the product is grown. Considering these trends, our 100% New Zealand grower owned company is well positioned with an ethically grown, traceable and sustainable natural fibre. Wools of New Zealand’s Laneve brand guarantees traceable and ethically produced wool from Integrity Programme registered farmers,’ he concludes.


100% New Zealand Grower Owned Growers, Innovators and Suppliers of quality New Zealand wool A brand you can trust Head Office: 12 Orchard Road Christchurch Airport 8053 Christchurch New Zealand P: +64 3 9741805 E: info.nz@woolsnz.com

www.woolsnz.com


NEW ZEALAND

John Dawson

Scouring merger provides better focus for WSI Prices for New Zealand wools are at an historic low and the industry faces a real challenge according to John Dawson of New Zealand Wool Services International in Christchurch. ‘The reduced demand from customers in China has left a gap in the market that is too large for others to fill’, he says. ‘European buyers and manufacturers cannot believe how competitively priced New Zealand wool is at present. Our biggest challenge is to increase demand for New Zealand crossbreds. At such low prices there is an opportunity for this wool to be used in many more applications than previously, as higher price disincentives are no longer there’, he says.

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‘Notwithstanding the slowdown in China our Red Band label and Purelana™scoured wool continue to be in demand, particularly in Europe and in India. Now that the merger of the two scouring companies is in place we can better focus on exporting greasy and scoured wool to our customers.’

wool types’, says John Dawson. ‘The label conveys a level of confidence to processors that each bale delivered will perform consistently, as it is backed up by stringent selection criteria and in-house testing, providing technical data within 48 seconds of each bale tested.

‘The Red Band is all about quality, consistency and traceability and is available in a range of

Careful monitoring of each bale minimises range fluctuations, providing more even


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deliveries.Every shipment has an extensive warranty and detailed testing certification. ‘And of course New Zealand wool is not mulesed and we can provide non-mulesed certification to customers when required’. WSI sources wool from auction and selected farms where sheep are grown in a pure, green and natural environment. The wool is then scoured in the most modern wool scouring facilities. Strict systems of environmental care are enforced and only pure New Zealand water is used in the scouring process. Organic waste is then used to manufacture superior compost products. The company works to ISO 9001 and 14001 standards and has Eco Labelling, GOTS, and REACH Certification. After China WSI’s biggest customers are in Europe, UK, and India. Customers in the UKare aware that New Zealand wool is free from black fibre and when blended with British wools is ideal for carpet and rug manufacture. Customers in Europe are keen on finer and shorter types, ideal for upholstery and fabric as they perform well when dyed. Through its partnership with Lempriere Group, WSI can now offer New Zealand Merino wool to its wide customer base. ‘Lempriere has always been known as a supplier of finer wools from Australia and New Zealand’, says Guy Spooner who has been with Lempriere NZ since 1995 and now works with WSI as a buyer and trader. He has considerable experience in the Merino sector with an emphasis on direct purchasing agreements with fine wool growers. ‘For the most part this fine wool activity has been concluded under the name of Lempriere given that Lempriere has been synonymous with Merino wool growers here in New Zealand since the early 70’s. It’s a name, or brand, if you like, that fine wool growers are familiar with’, he commented. ‘As for the future of fine wool here in New Zealand, there is certainly a focused and determined push from traditional buyers of

TC Bilandani Manger WSI office Delhi

New Zealand fine wool to enter into long term and sustainable buying programs. Wool growers can clearly see their product is in demand from top makers and fully vertical mills alike. These buyers understand that protecting their own businesses means they need to protect the wool grower with prices that are not only sustainable but encourage growth and on-farm investment. New Zealand produces excellent Merino wool and although the clip is not large we can source and deliver when needed’. The WSI Red Band is also recognised and well known to spinners in India and Turkey.’We have long and well established supply links to spinners and weavers in India and we have strong customer support’, says TC Bilandani who manages the WSI Delhi office. ‘Our customers in India appreciate that we do not compromise on quality, and we maintain very high standards with our shipments to India.’ ‘Historically WSI has been a major exporter of scoured wool from New Zealand and with the acquisition of JS Brooksbank in Wellington we now offer large shipments of New Zealand greasy wool as well’. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Oldest name in the wool business European manufacturers to reintroduce wool into their production where it may have been too expensive to use before this price reduction. ‘We have been supplying wool to the international market for many years’, says Steve Finnie. ‘Our emphasis has always been on quality. We appraise every lot of wool to ensure our customers receive exactly what they ordered.’ G. Schneider also sources the finest New Zealand merino wool for Italy’s famous fashion houses.

Fuhrmann NZ team left to right: Helen Cameron, Louise Tabb, Tara Richards, Peter Christensen, Steve Finnie, Phil Deacon

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fter China, Europe is the biggest market for Fuhrmann New Zealand. The company is one of the largest exporters of New Zealand wool offering all types including merino wool, greasy and scoured crossbred wool, slipe wool, and all types of lambs’ wool. It is one of the oldest companies in the world and has been trading wool since 1735. ‘For a company that has been trading wool for so long we have seen some “ups and downs” in the wool industry over its long history. Our Group spans nearly 300 hundred years in the wool industry and during this time we have enjoyed some good trading conditions, and survived some more challenging ones’, says Peter Christensen. ‘We can provide assurance to our clients that our Group of companies will be with them through good and bad times. The G. Schneider Group and its shareholders have financial strength and long term commitment to the wool industry’, says Peter Christensen. ‘We predict a very tough season for New Zealand wool exports to China. Some New Zealand exporters have exited the China market altogether and are looking for other markets in Europe and the UK. At the time of writing this article exports to China had decreased by 37%’, he said. This drop in demand has affected New Zealand wool prices and it is now very competitively priced. This is creating an opportunity for 146

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‘We specialise in buying finer wools, 11 microns and up and supply to such companies as Loro Piana that need the finest wool possible for their production line’, says Helen Cameron, Schneider NZ manager and buyer from Fuhrmann office in Christchurch. ‘We buy New Zealand merino wools for the entire global G. Schneider Group including our mills in China, Italy, Argentina, and Egypt. We have established longstanding relationships and a sense of trust with fine wool growers in New Zealand’, she says. ‘As finer wools don’t necessarily go to auction these relationships are very helpful in sourcing wool for our Group’. Fuhrmann NZ is represented in Europe by G. Schneider Group in Biella. ‘It is important to be able to react quickly to changing market conditions’, says Jeffrey Losekoot director at G. Schneider Italy. ‘Fuhrmann has access to a wide variety of wool types and can supply wool for the fabric industry, carpet manufacturers, and bedding, fancy yarns, felts and lambs’ wool for upholstery and knitting yarn. If you are looking for quality New Zealand wool for a variety of applications you should contact us’. Fuhrmann NZ can be contacted in New Zealand at fuhrmann@fuhrmann.co.nz and in Europe jeffrey.losekoot@gschneider.com


F U H R M AN N Z N


NEW ZEALAND

Find your way to quality NZ wool Customers are influenced by animal welfare concerns. This is important to the modern consumer, as is the environmental practices throughout the wool manufacturing process. There is a limited quantity of non-mulesed wool available in the world but there is plenty available from New Zealand. ‘Our fleece wool is non-mulesed and we can provide full proof of traceability direct from the farm’, says Peter Crone of John Marshall & Co. ‘Our New Zealand wool is also sought after internationally for its resilience and exceptional whiteness. These attributes make it particularly receptive to dye, a crucial factor for use in high-end carpet and fabrics for both interior design and apparel fashion houses’. ‘New Zealand wool is naturally very white and free of black fibres, making it easier for manufacturers to produce dense and uniform colour’, says Peter Crone. ‘It is a sustainable fibre, farmed outdoors and naturally long and strong. This is why our New Zealand wool is considered the premium eco-friendly fibre for many applications.’ John Marshall & Co exports New Zealand crossbred greasy wool, scoured wool, slipe wool, and wool tops. It is among the top 10 wool companies in New Zealand and sourcing wool through the auction system as well through its established direct buying channels. John Marshall & Co is also a member of Council of New Zealand Wool Exporters, and is a strong supporter of the Campaign for Wool.

‘Our Merino wool comes directly from a selected group of growers in the southern region of New Zealand. They all produce wool from the same bloodline. These sheep produce high quality merino wool that is well received by top makers in Europe and China’, Peter Crone says. ‘We have been sourcing wool from these same woolgrowers for many years, and this gives us considerable direct buying capacity. Our personal relationships are a great advantage. We can guarantee supply of excellent quality New Zealand Merino wool. While the quantity of New Zealand merino wool has dropped over the last 10 years the quality has not’, he says. In recent years John Marshall & Co has developed its JOMA® Wool brand for applications specific to manufacturers of mattress and bedding products in America, Asia and Europe. ‘About 10% of our wool each year is used to produce our high-end Joma Wool. This specially processed wool has extra crimp and an increased bulk of 40% to 50% which further enhances its natural resilience. Each fibre of this wool functions as a miniature spring and the vertical alignment of the fibres and crimp work together to create a cushion under the body that facilitates air circulation’, says Peter Crone. ‘We are always on the look-out for new and innovative applications for New Zealand wool’, says Peter Crone. Please contact Peter Crone at peter@joma.co.nz or info@joma.co.nz

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PATRON: HRH THE PRINCE OF WALES

PATRON: HRH THE PRINCE OF WALES


NEW ZEALAND

Buying & selling wool made easy online and yarn from all over the world’, says Victor Chesky CEO International Trade Publications (ITP). It is very easy to simply login and see what you can buy, or login and list your wool for sale. ‘This website facilitates direct links between buyers and sellers. We are not a party to any financial transactions between buyers and sellers’, says Mr Chesky. ‘When you make an enquiry or buy wool you communicate directly with the seller, there are no other parties involved’.

B

uying and selling wool is being made easier with online platform - www.woolbuy.net. This 24 hour interactive website is simple to use and free to all. woolbuy.net now has over

5780 registered users and feature over 120 listings of wool, tops,

International Trade Publications is an independent publishing house. ‘We do not buy or sell wool, so users of this site can be assured that there is no conflict of interest. International Trade Publications also publishes a monthly online newsletter www.woolnews.net and international trade magazines including wool2yarnchina.com and wool2yarnglobal.com

Better colour options from NZ

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‘Although we are well known as a supplier of New Zealand scoured slipe wool, in the last few years we have developed a strong market for scoured crossbred wool in Europe’, says Michael Inkson Managing Director of JL Crichton from his office in Christchurch. ‘We don’t trade every wool type, we are very selective, and so the wools we choose are very white, with low VM, and a lower CV in length and micron. We can offer a range of colour, micron, and length, and our standard is consistent’.

wool is a better colour’, says Michael Inkson.

‘Manufacturers that have specific colour requirements come to us because our scoured

provide whiter, brighter New Zealand lambs’

‘We supply New Zealand wool all year wool in a range of types including wools for carpets, socks, blankets, and upholstery. ‘We handle smaller rather than big quantities and specialised blends. This gives us better control over quality particularly when it comes to colour. Price is not the most important factor to our customers that have been buying from us for over 60 years. Our ability to handle longer term delivery and supply contract and wool is a greater priority.


NEW ZEALAND

‘We always suggest customers place their orders earlier in the season to receive the best quality wool. If an order is not placed early it is more likely that some specific wool types will not be available later in the season. We strongly recommend that if you know that you will require a specific type, an early order will ensure that you get the wool you need’, he says. ‘Future contracts will ensure that we can store wool for our customers until needed’. All JL Crichton wool is tested prior to sale at an accredited testing facility, which provides objective measurements of commercially important characteristics. The characteristics tested include yield, condition (moisture content), fibre diameter, colour, length, strength, and bulk. For more information www.crichtonwool.co.nz or wool@crichton.co.nz

Michael Inkson (left), Mark Hunter, and Anna Kilpatrick

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CANADA

Canadian wool offers blending options that blending with Canadian wool is a cost effective, quality option sought by many wool processors across the global looking for sound economical solutions to maintaining production standards’, says Eric Bjergso general manager at Canadian Co-Operative Wool Growers (CCWG). ‘Of course our wools can be used on its own for a variety of products that favour coarser wool types’.

Eric Bjergso

C

anadian wool has developed a niche in the market focusing on its highly elastic characteristics that are recognised by manufacturers as an advantage in wool products retaining their original shape. Only 10% of Canada’s production is consumed domestically, and the remaining 90% is exported to the United States, China, India, Czech Republic, Egypt and Bulgaria. While cross bred wools have been under pressure in terms of price and demand in the last 12 months Canadian wool is weathering the slowdown. Most Canadian wool is being blended with other wools and international customers remain interested in buying Canadian wool and taking advantage of this opportunity. ‘Higher wool prices in Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand mean

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CCWG has been providing Canadian wool growers with services in international wool marketing and collecting and grading since 1918. The Canadian clip is comparatively small and mainly ranges from 22 – 35 microns with the bulk of production being between 29 -34 microns. Some of the most popular breeds of sheep in Canada include the Suffolk, Dorset, Rideau Arcott, Rambouillet and Targhee. Sheep farms accounted for less than 2% of Canadian farms with some 1,074,300 sheep and lambs. In terms of the Canadian wool clip our volume is stable, despite the drought experienced in Eastern Canada that will see fewer ewes shorn this year. ‘Our usual practice is to shear in the spring before lambing. An expert shearer using power equipment similar to barber clippers only


CANADA

larger, can shear a sheep in less than five minutes, rolling off the fleece in one piece’, says Eric Bjergso. Fleeces are sacked and shipped to CCWG for grading and marketing. Wool is weighed on arrival at the CCWG warehouse and then graded and core tested. The raw wool is inspected by hand and classified by average diameter and length of the fibre, colour, lustre and crimp (tight, natural wave). The graded grease wool is packed in 600 pound bales and shipped to world markets. All wool types are objectively measured after grading. ‘We believe that this gives us an essential edge. Accurate measuring for each wool lot offered for sale is appreciated by our customers. They know they are receiving a well prepared and better quality graded wool

that results in a higher market value for their product’. For more information contact Mr Eric Bjergso Email: ericb@wool.ca

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SOUTH AFRICA

S

Clean-green South African wool

outh Africa produced 52,5 million kilograms of wool this season, 5% more than the previous season. Almost all wool produced in South Africa is exported and the value of trade in the industry amounts to around R4,5 billion. South Africa has between 4500 and 9000 commercial wool producers and between 30 000 and 50 000 communal wool producers. The average clip achieved by 30% of farms is 10 bales per clip, but some big dedicated wool farmers could achieve up to 2000 bales per year. ‘And as far as mulesing is concerned, this is not practiced here’, says Louis de Beer, CEO Cape Wools SA, the representative body of the South African wool industry based in Port Elizabeth. George de Kock, chairman at Cape Wools for two years points out that South Africa does not a have guaranteed levy or government assistance. This lack of commercial leverage on the international stage, together with a tight budget, means it must work smart to make sure that its members are well served. ‘We focus on good farming practices and our aim is always to keep the quality of our wool to the highest standard, and achieving this comes down to preparation at the farm level. Quality depends on the breed, and the fibre length is important too’, he says. Some South African farmers have started practicing twice yearly shearing to achieve short length wool. This has proved a financial benefit to farmers as shorter wool has been in demand and selling well. Much of the South African clip is shorn by hand. Many producers prefer hand shearing to machine shearing for animal welfare concerns. Shearing times are flexible and producers can react very quickly to

Fine wool grower classes wool into 22 different lines to obtain evenness for any measured properties within an individual line minimum variation around properties such as micron, length, strength, vegetable matter (VM), yield, quality and appearance, is critically important.

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market signals. Long wools (60 mm and above) normally comprise more than 65% of the clip, while shorter qualities are well suited to the fine woollen apparel trade and represent the remainder of the clip. South African wool has a very low CVH and very regular length and is suitable for top and yarn manufacturers. The majority of fibre ranges from 17 - 24 microns with more than 98% of the clip finer than 24 microns. It is known for its excellent colour and measures between 60 - 69 Y units on the brightness scale. These attributes also make it ideal to blend with Australian wool. ‘We have a reputation for delivering a wellclassed clip to the international wool textile markets’, says Louis de Beer. ‘I believe our Code of Best Practice reflects well on our ability to sell a very good product. In South Africa we grow our wool ethically and responsibly and this attaches further value to the exceptional quality of our apparel wool’, he says. Meticulous classing has always been an important aspect of the wool harvesting process. One of the most important criteria of the Code is for the classer to obtain evenness of any measured or immeasurable properties within an individual line. Thus, minimum variation around properties such as micron, length, strength, vegetable matter (VM), yield, quality and appearance, is critically important. As South African wool is non-mulesed this is a further advantage to customers, particularly in Europe where certification is most sought after. Cape Wools can provide verification certification to all buyers. ‘This is something that is being well received by buyers who are increasingly focused on sourcing verifiably non-mulesed wool’, says Louis de Beer.


www.simonsays.co.za | 8611

Cape Wool has been produced from Merino sheep at the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa since 1789.

South Africa provides a fantastic natural environment for raising Merino in a caring fashion.

South African Merino Wool is globally acclaimed for exceptional quality apparel wool and well classed for the international markets.

Tel: +27 41 484 4301 capewool@capewools.co.za | www.capewools.co.za


SOUTH AFRICA

Cape Wools South Africa provides additional certification ‘Mulesing is of concern to the entire industry and negative publicity about mulesing is often indiscriminate, and will damage the entire wool industry. Certification automatically provides an important level of support to retailers and their customers, in relation to the ethical treatment of the sheep’, says Mr De Beer CEO Cape Wools SA. ‘There is no mulesing in South Africa and we are keen to demonstrate this to buyers and users of our wool by providing certification. ‘Providing reliable certification is in the interest of our exporters. This non-mulesed wool certification is further proof of the veracity of the wool delivered. The information is freely available to all along the supply chain and right up to a product at its retail

destination’, ‘Our sound animal husbandry practices as outlined in our Code of Best Practice also demonstrate the level of care taken by our farmers’. ‘Buyers can verify the authenticity of the Non-Mulesed declarations they receive with their consignments of wool from South Africa by simply logging onto our website’, says Louis de Beer. By logging on to www.capewools.co.za customers can key in the unique reference number and verify that the detailed information contained in his received copy is the same as in the electronic version. If the system electronically rejects the query then your document may have been tampered with, acting as a safety feature to customers.

Non-mulesed wool from South Africa ‘Demand and prices for South African wool in most microns was strong last season’, says Mark Wright joint managing director at Standard Wool South Africa. ‘Most greasy wool stocks were completely depleted last season. Some areas

have been under drought conditions for some time and this impacted on availability.’ ‘As wool buying trends change very quickly we know how important it is to keep our customers up to date with information about stock, prices, and market conditions. We can source the most appropriate wool types for their latest production requirements’, he says. Standard Wool SA is the biggest exporter of South African greasy wool. It is privately owned and has no links to any top making company. All exported wool is tested by an independent IWTO-accredited laboratory (Wool Testing Bureau of South Africa) and IWTO test certificates are used as a basis of trading as per the international norm.

Ken Craig

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‘Our South African wool stands out for its environmental credentials. Mulesing is virtually unknown in South Africa. Companies concerned about mulesing can buy South African wool with a new Verification Certificate, issued by


SOUTH AFRICA

Cape Wools SA to authenticate non-mulesed wool’, says Paul Lynch joint managing director. ‘Users of South African wool can be confident that the wool we send them is non-mulesed. The consumer at retail level is increasingly interested in the story behind wool. Buyers of fabric and garments want to know where the wool has come from, and they want to know about the welfare credentials of the producers and the Verification Certificate provides this certainty’. ‘While our South African wool does not have the same specifications in yield and vm as Australian wool, users know that if used correctly South African wool will perform just as well or even better’, comments Paul Lynch. ‘Our customers also know that our wool prices are always competitive and we make sure that the correct wool is bought for each individual client. We are a large enough company to guarantee supply, but we are not too big and do not compromise on quality or service.’

Mark Wright (left) and Paul Lynch

For more information please contact Paul Lynch at paul@standardwool.co.za or Mark Wright mark@standardwool.co.za or Ken Craig ken@standardwool.co.za

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The perfect NM solution Peter Carey heads the recent management change at Lempriere South Africa. ‘We have a very young team and it will be an exciting challenge to help train and support the next generation for wool in South Africa. Our new team is highly motivated and ready to continue the service that has been provided now for many years’, says Peter Carey who has extensive buying and trading experience in all wool types and began his career at CIL in 1991. He has also worked in varying roles related to purchasing, sales and topmaking for Chargeurs and more recently Tianyu.

Peter Carey

‘For our customers it is business as usual. We look forward to strengthening existing relationships and nurturing new ones’, he says. ‘As a greasy buying arm for Lempriere Group we offer individual solutions for each customer for the full range of types. The majority of the wools we purchase are 18.5 and 21 micron range and we cover all types for carding and combing needs. We also buy wools native to South Africa and a full range from Lesotho during the season. We have noticed significant improvements in the preparation standards for Lesotho wool in the last two years’, he says. ‘Our customers are showing more interest in sustainability, traceability and animal welfare and we are able to offer practical solutions from farm to retail with close associations at all levels of the local supply chain’, says Peter Carey. ‘Most South African farms have very high staffing levels in comparison to Australia and New Zealand and this is a contributing factor to most sheep being shorn at 6, 8 or 10 month intervals, enabling us to offer consistent volume and quality year round. Added to this the short lead time from auction to shipment and it becomes very complimentary to Australia as a valuable supply source. South African Wool is world renown for being

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well prepared, good colour, low VM and high yielding, and is highly valued by scourers, combers and carbonisers alike for both worsted and woolen products. Lempriere Group office in South Africa is one of the largest buyers of South African wool from farms and at auction including crossbreds to superfine spinners’ wool, and offering forward contracts and delivering promptly to specification. Established 8 years ago in Port Elizabeth Lempriere South Africais an integral component of the Lempriere global supply network.Main export markets are China, India, Europe and the Americas and strong ties to the grower ensure consistent and reliable supply in terms of both quality and quantity. All wools purchased by Lempriere South Africa are tested by an Interwoollabs accredited wool testing house. South African sheep are non-mulesed and on request Lempriere South Africa can offer non-mulesed certification. ‘A large percentage of the South African clip is still shorn by hand and this is appreciated by producers that insist on good animal welfare practices. Meticulous classing of wool is also a very important aspect of wool preparation for the South African wool industry and these factors account for our strong customer base.’ Peter Carey can be contacted at peter.carey@lemprieremerino.com


Add to cart

PANTEX S.p.A.


ITALY

Environmental credentials dominate European trade is no longer practiced; Pain Relief (PR), from farms where animals are treated with anaesthetic. ‘As a one-stop-shop most of our customers rely on us for all of their fibre needs. We hold large stocks. Some of our customers have been coming to us for many years and as our standard types are very consistent many customers don’t even ask for a sample. Our wool products are ready for immediate delivery,’ he says.

Giovanni Zedda

Piercarlo Zedda

‘Every year is different from the previous one in terms of trading conditions’, says Piercarlo Zedda joint company director at Pantex in Biella and current president of the Italian Wool Trade Association. Traceability of fibre and environmental accreditation has become the most important issues for European garment manufacturers. Pantex is a one-stop-shop with warehouse facilities in the heart of Italy providing in-stock options ready for immediate delivery. It has been supplying spinners and weavers in Europe for 45 years. ‘We provide wools for combed and carded spinning for knitting and weaving, blankets, furnishings and feltings. We supply tops, open tops, scoured wool of all origins, carbonized wool and wool blends, as well as raw noils and carbonized noils, and combing, spinning and weaving wool wastes’, says Piercarlo Zedda. Pantex sources its greasy wool from Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and South America. It provides traceability assurance for all greasy wool of all origins processed in Italy. ‘When we buy Australian wool we pay close attention to wool growers that do complete the National Wool Declaration’, says Giovanni Zedda joint company director. We offer our customers wool that is Non Mulesed (NM), from farms where mulesing is not practiced; Ceased-Mulesing (CM), from farms where mulesing 160

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For carding wool types Pantex will blend to customer requirement. This special service is tailored to specific customers for very specific blends. ‘Even if you buy from other suppliers we recommend that you come and have a look at what we have to offer’, says Giovanni Zedda. ‘We are accessible and always ready to listen and offer advice and suggestions that may assist your business’. All Pantex wool is tested at its own laboratory that is Interwoollabs accredited. ‘All fibre and tops are re-tested again before delivery to customers. You get exactly what ordered’, says Mr Zedda. All wool is classified at the plant and long term contracts are available as well as one off buying from its warehouses. ‘We are also accredited with Associazione Tessile e Salute and we participate in the textile and health project funded by the Italian Ministry of Health. This is aimed at protecting the health of people, guaranteeing to the end consumer the safety and the transparency of the textileclothing products they receive.’ Piercarlo Zedda and Giovanni Zedda can be contacted by email at pantex@pantex-spa.it


ITALY

Speed and certainty from Italy T

o have stock when an order comes in is what makes a good supplier. Grey Stone Wool is an agent company based in Biella Italy. It has been supplying spinners and weavers in Italy for many years and offers a variety of stock including tops, open tops, scoured and carbonised wools from all origins as well as noble fibers such as dehaired cashmere and

developed supply sources that provide certainty of quality and supply’, says Mr Lorenzo. ‘I would be very happy to speak with new customers to help them determine the most suitable wool for their requirements’, says Mr Delorenzi. ‘We are always interested in establishing contact with exporters of wool and speciality fibre and manufacturers of tops and noils from around the world.’ For more information Mauro Delorenzi can be contacted in Biella Tel. 039 015 8497172 E. mauro@gw-srl.it

dehaired cashmere tops and angora. ‘We can assist customers by sourcing the fibre they need for manufacture of any type of product including coarser types to finer types and in most instances we can deliver within days if prompt delivery is required’, says Mauro Delorenzi Director of Grey Stone Wools. ‘Customers can contact us for their particular requirement types’. Mr Delorenzi is a member on the executive committee of the Associazione Nazionale del Commercio Laniero (Italian Wool Trading Association). ‘Members offer the textile industry an impressive number of supply companies of textile raw materials, covering 90% of the needs of the Italian market. Our Association has partnered with the textile industry for more than 90 years and during this time we have grown and wool2yarnglobal 2017

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How to keep your manufacturing flexible and quick

O

ver the recent years there has been a trend along the wool supply chain of keeping stock levels low combined with shorter order times. This trend has developed out of several factors: one was the change of brands and retailers moving away from two traditional fashion seasons to enticing the consumer into the shop with new products every six weeks. Another factor was the cost of stock holding and related cash flow implications during challenging economic times. A periodically volatile wool price made planning and committing to orders even more difficult. The result is that spinners and weavers need supply chain partners that enable them to meet their customer’s orders in a flexible and timely manner. It was a strategic decision of the G. Schneider Group to continue investing particularly into its processing plants in Italy and Egypt. With this geographic set up, the company can supply European high end customers with their individual specifications and

requirements as quickly as needed. Each of the plants are specialisedin different fibres and processes which together offer a wide spectrum of wool and other animal fibres to the luxury textile and fashion industry in Europe.

The G. Schneider Group is a family owned business with three generations fully committed to their customer’s success.

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ITALY

Pettinatura di Verrone in Biella, Italy, manufactures superfine wool tops and other precious animal fibres.This plant has an average production of 4.5 million kg of superfine wool top and open tops with an average fineness of 17,5 micron with a capacity to process as fine as 10 micron. The plant processes greasy merino wool from Australia and New Zealand. It also processes cashmere and camel tops, mohair tops, and dehaired vicuña and guanaco.

No fibre wasted in the center of imagination in Prato, Italy Progetto Lana is based in Prato specialized in the recovery and upgrade of textile byproductsand waste materials generated during the various stages of textile production. ‘We retrieve the materials and through handcrafted processes generate new fibre that is used primarily by the carded textile industry,’ saysSauro Guerri, G. Schneider’s Partner in Prato. ‘The capacity to use by products from the wool processing supply chain and to transform them using skill and imagination was the impulse that encouraged our Group to build an important center for collecting and processing by-products of wool and other special natural fibres’, he says.This also has a huge environmental benefit as no part of the natural fibres processed get wasted and they create value further down the supply chain.

European origin certified wool top from Sadat City, Egypt ‘Our plant in Egypt has been operating since 2011’, says Jeffrey Losekoot Group general manager. ‘It is ideally located to service customers in Europe, Turkey and India with wools coming from Australia, New Zealand and South Africa’. This facility processes tops of 17,5 – 23.5 microns and has a production capacity of 4.5 million kgs of tops and 2 million kgs of carbonised wool per year with a delivery turnaround time as quick as one week if needed. Mediterranean Wool Industries is

situated in the bonded area of Sadat City. Due to bilateral agreements between Egypt and the EU, all wool tops are Euro 1 certified with the additional benefit that there are no import duties on wool topsimported into the EU. G. Schneider Group is a fully integrated company with processing plants in Argentina, Egypt, Italy, China, Mongolia, and Iran. The 100% family owned company, also operates wool and speciality fibre buying offices in all natural fibre producing countries including Australia and New Zealand. The Group is synonymous with processing fine and super fine wools and speciality fibres. It is a major supplier of tops to major brands around the world. To source wool in Europe that meets your requirements contact Jeffrey Losekoot at jeffrey.losekoot@gschneider.com wool2yarnglobal 2017

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WOOL LOGISTICS

More than just transportation

O

ver 100 wool and textile companies from around the world use the secure transportation service and storage warehousing facilities of German company KES DISTRI. The company has been transporting wool and natural fibres for over 30 years providing secure and hassle free logistic services to the textile industry worldwide. ‘Cheaper logistic services may be available from other companies but our customers come back to us for the extra value and competency that we provide’, says Harry Starkus company director. ‘We are expert in bringing wool and tops into Europe. And that means more than just transportation. We have a large transport fleet, a modern trans-

Left to right: Jonas Hüneke, Harry Starkus, Martin Konkel

shipment facility and warehouse, computercontrolled transport and storage and 25 staff members that can guarantee delivery of your fibre on schedule.’ KES DISTRI is GOTS certified for the storage and processing of organic products. In the interests of problem-free import and export handling, KES DISTRI is certified as an “authorized economic operator” (AEOF 120492). The company works as a fiscal agent in close collaboration with customs, finance authorities and tax consultancy firms, and offers services related to European VAT clearances.  It is also an agent for WTAE, and it performs core tests. Among its clients Kes Distri count such companies as Südwolle Group, Schoeller, Tianyu and Red Sun. ‘Europe has a complex customs and tax system’, says Martin Konkel. ‘The importation of wool and natural fibre into Europe can be very complicated for companies outside the European Union. Choosing the right transportation channels for your wool can save

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a lot of time and unnecessary costs’, he says. ‘When an exporter entrusts us with their wool we manage sea transportation, customs clearance, delivery to our bonded warehouse, and secure storage. The customs department in Bremen is familiar with wool imports, and with our assistance all custom and duty tax is made easy, as it is something we do every day.’ Today smaller quantities and prompt deliver has become the norm in supplying customers in Europe. ‘This is why many of our customers utilise our centrally located warehouse in Bremen as a retail floor to store their wool top and yarn. Importers and owners can view their wool in our warehouse via our website and monitor their remaining stock. Sales from their stock can be made in bigger or smaller lots as required.’

a member of:

IPSEN LOGISTICS Power beyond cargo

Logistic services are provided to exporters of greasy wool, as well as importers of tops and yarn, and traders and wool merchants from South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, China, South America and many other countries. ‘In the long run it is cheaper and less problematic to import wool via Bremen and truck it to its final destination whether that is in Italy or further afield into a growing Eastern European market,’ says Jonas Hüneke. KES DISTRI is owned by IPSEN LOGISTICS, a large shipping and logistics company based in Germany. This ownership provides KES DISTRI greater financial security and the ability to offer competitive cargo and container services to and from anywhere in the world. ‚We focus on developing concepts tailored to the specific requirements of our clients and the KES DISTRI delivery network is an important part of the logistic services we provide our customers‘, says Eduard Dubbers-Albrecht of Ipsen-Logistics, Bremen. For more information please contact martin.konkel@kes-bremen.de   Tel: 0049 421 690777 03 harry.starkus@kes-bremen.de    Tel: 0049 421 690777 01 jonas.hueneke@kes-bremen.de   Tel: 0049 421 690777 19 wool2yarnglobal 2017

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GERMANY

German fine wools continue to make an impact experienced now, would see a lift in demand, but currently there is no indication that prices for crossbred wools will attract more buying.’ ‘Finer wools, on the other hand are doing very well, there has been no over production and luxury goods have shown better demand.We also notice a positive change at retail as some well known stores raise the profile of wool in their knitwear. Therefore the price for finer wools continues to rise’, he says.

John Semmelhaak of Friedrich Sturm Wool

P

redicting the future is no easy thing particularly when it comes to the wool industry,so talking to John Semmelhaak of Friedrich Sturm Woolabout his take on the current trends in wool prices provides another perspective. ‘Manufacturers producing for mass consumption are mostly focused on cheap prices and easy simple manufacturing processes. This of course does not sit well with fibres such as wool. Also, mainstream products that traditionally used crossbred wools are increasingly substituting wool with acrylic, compounding the lack of demand. The fact that wool is a natural and sustainable fibre so far appeals to a small consumer base, not big enough to absorb world wool production. All these factors compound the price of crossbred wools. ‘Typically the drop in prices, as being

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‘Our German wool is no exception to this general trend, with crossbreds in Germany also low in demand and finer wools doing reasonably well. Additionally German wool is no longer only used for carpet, it has moved into more exclusive markets such as tweed fabric and other technical textiles requiring finer wool’, say John Semmelhaak. We speak to smaller designers, manufacturers and engineers looking for niches in the market, and research for new or forgotten products which have been or can be made from wool. Slowly but surely and step by step we do begin to produce results. We promote the wool story from farm to retail to attract specialty consumers keen on technical attributes. So, if you have any new or innovative use for wool fibre we would be very pleased to hear from you. ‘The good news is that price is not the main prohibitive factor anymore. Wool is still a high-performer in functionality, and so the doors are generally open. However we do not have enough regional manufacturers along the supply chain with good ideas they can convert into products fast enough.


GERMANY

Friedrich Sturm Wool is the largest exporter of German wool. The East and South of Germany produces 3000 - 4000 tons of wool every year and about 70 % of this is at the finer end. German wool has been very consistent in quality and is low VM, with good length and colour.

characteristics. But today our German wool is used in a wider range of applications and in the last few years our company wool exports have grown by 20% each year.’ John Semmelhaak attributes this increase to company transparency in dealing with customers big and small.

‘We can offer organic certification and traceability. Our German farmers are producing better quality wools due to strengthening farmingpractices and preparations.We source this very special type of wool from selected German farms. The clip is not large but we add value with specially sorted and organically certified wool that is traceable right back to the farm.

‘We offer our clients the highest level of security for our wool. Every lot is sorted to client specification and it is tested by Wool Testing Authority Europe (WTAE).When we export German wool to our clients they know that it is 100% German wool. We do not sell blended wools’, he points out.’Despite the limited availability of our wool it has found its place in many markets around the world.’

‘The carpet manufacturing sector already recognises German wool for its specific

John Semmelhaak can be contacted at jrs@frsturm.de

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GERMANY

Frank Meyer (left) Ralph Behnke

A

All in one

n increased customer base has seen Stucken Melchers, leading supplier of wool and speciality fibres in Germany, finishing a steady 2016-2017 trading season. ‘It has been a stable trading year for us. We have experienced strong demand for carbonised wool, particularly from the felting industry’, says Frank Meyer company director at Stucken Melchers in Bremen Germany. ‘We have been supplying increased quantities to existing customers and have a number of new customers in Europe coming to use for scoured wool’. ‘We have been supplying German wools within Europe and outside the EU. Our customers know that German wools are ideal for blending

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with other wools for use in hand knitting and machine knitting. It is generally a very good wool for products that require coarser types,’ says Ralph Behnke. Stucken Melchers operates a number of warehouse facilities in both Eastern and Western Europe. It can hold stocks of wool and speciality fibres close to client locations. The company also markets a range of Stucken Group wool and mohair products from its processing and spinning operations in South Africa. ‘Our diverse range of stock is our strength’, comments Ralph Behnke. ‘We can offer all type of fibre from specialty fibres including Mulberry and Tussah Silk tops, noils and spun


Silk yarns, Camel and Yak wool, and Cashmere dehaired and tops, as well as carbonised and scoured wool and wool tops. Our wide range provides our customers with the opportunity to deal with one company for all their needs. We provide a quick delivery service from the heart of Europe and have warehouses in Biella for same day delivery. Silk still remains Stucken Melchers biggest seller but the market has been challenging for most speciality fibres including cashmere and camel hair. Stucken Melchers is Oekotex-100 certified for mulberry silk, tussah silk, camel wool, yak wool, and cashmere. We have also experienced an increase in demand for wools in the 22-24 micron range. This is mostly due to finer microns becoming dearer and so customers are shifting to coarser wool, as long as they see the quality of their product not being compromised. We can source such wool for these customers and are therefore able to meet their changing needs’, says Frank Meyer. For more information about the products available from Stucken Melchers Frank Meyer can be contacted at meyer@stuckmel.de South African scoured wool

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TURKEY

Scoured and greasy wool from Turkey

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extiles and clothing are among the most important sectors of the Turkish economy and foreign trade. Accounting for about 7% of the GDP, these two sectors are important to the Turkish economy in terms of GDP contribution. Turkey is at the crossroads between East and West, overlapping Europe and Asia. A strong local manufacturing industry that includes leading wool operations are providing for an increasingly sophisticated and growing domestic and export market. AKEL Tekstil is one of the largest exporters of Turkish and Romanian wool. The company operates a scouring plant in the Turkish city of Usak and a trading office in Istanbul. It

supplies manufacturers of top, bedding covers and mattresses, as well as fake fur products, and fabric, carpet and rugs. ‘We have been supplying scoured wool to Italian, Portuguese and Belgium manufacturers for many years’, says Omer Ozden joint director. ‘We produce good quality scoured wool and compete in both quality and price with the best processors around the world. We are the only Turkish company to supply 20.2 micron scoured wool, approved by accredited wool testing house certification’, says Baris Gelenbe of Akel Tekstil from his Istanbul office. Akel Tekstil was recognised as one of the fastest growing companies in Turkey at a special presentation organised by the Turkish government. “We want to draw attention to the success of the fastest growing companies in our country and strengthen their global connections’, said Union of Chambers and Commodities Exchanges of Turkey President M. Rifat Hisarcıklıoğlu.​‘We have been supplying Turkish and Romanian scoured wool to international customers for many years. Our greasy and scoured wools are in the 22 - 40 micron range’, says Baris Gelenbe. AKEL’s scouring plant in Usak also processes a variety of European wool and wools from Australia, New Zealand and Britain. The wool is sorted and processed on commission, as well as for the company’s own use. ‘We have a scouring capacity of 25 metric tons per day. Our two scouring lines have 8, 2 metre wide pools and dust machines. AKEL has the capacity to supply 3500MT scoured wool & 5000MT greasy wool per annum. Large warehousing facilities complement this scouring facility. ‘We can transport orders to clients with ease and speed whether they are in Europe, the Middle East, USA, or Asia because Turkey is so well located. It is close enough that we can also travel quickly to clients to see first-hand what machinery is being used and what production is being manufactured’, says Baris Gelenbe. ‘We can advise our customers about the best wools for their particular manufacturing needs and we can supply wools that are effectively used for blending to reduce cost. The wool we deliver is always as per sample and we stand by the quality of our wool’.

Baris Gelenbe with scoured wool at Akel Tekstil plant

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To find out more about the wools supplied by Akel Tekstil please contact Baris Gelenbe at woolakel@gmail.com wool@akelwool.com


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Pedro Otegui Managing Director Lanas Trinidad - Uruguay wool of excellent quality and free from mulesing ‘In Uruguay sheep are king’

Where sheep are king W ool continues to be an important export product from Uruguay generating over US$ 193 million each year. It exported 37.6 million kilos of wool and over 57% of this was combed. According to the latest statistics China remains the biggest individual importer taking around 42%. Lanas Trinidad is the biggest topmaker in Uruguay and exports wool tops and scoured wool. It also exports some 500 tons of wool grease for use by the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry. The company prides itself in achieving best practice in animal welfare and land management, as well as worker wellbeing. ‘In Uruguay sheep are king’, says Pedro Otegui Managing Director Lanas Trinidad. Living conditions at farm is excellent all year around including natural grass pastures, water supply, weekly controls, and veterinary care. In Uruguay there is no snow, no desert, no mountains, and no strong winds. Farmers 172

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adhere to animal welfare protocols, and there is no mulesing practiced. It is a self-sustainable environment, ideal for sheep breeding.These conditions allow Uruguay to produce excellent quality wools. The Lanas Trinidad plant in the city of Trinidad has the capacity to produce around 10,000 tons of quality combed wool tops annually. Its offers tops in 15 - 30 microns available in rolls or bumps of different weights for different export markets. It also offers traceable wool tops to customer requirement. Non-mulesing certification is also available and all tops are packaged in a non-polluting polyethylene film. ‘Lanas Trinidad provides consistency and quality from one delivery to another, year after year. This is a very important focus for us. In addition, we offer competitive prices and personal service before and after sale each, every time. This is one of the reasons why our customers come back to us with


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Fleece is separated according to fineness and quality - completing the first link of a sound traceability system

repeat business year after year. We operate without polluting the environment and run our plants using clean and renewable energy. Our wool scouring process is performed with biodegradable detergents. And our combing process only uses sizing oils and biodegradable antistats’, says Mr Otegui. ‘To wash our wool we use our own water supply system that is wholly sourced from rainwater. Our reservoir has a capacity of 1 million cubic metres of water that is supplied through an aqueduct some 7km long. The water is natural and renewable’. A clean green image is important to Lanas Trinidad. Production processes are ISO 9001-2008 (LATU/ IQnet/OQS) certified as well as GOTS Standard / IMO for organic wool certification, ISO 14001 - 2008 for environmental management and OHSAS 18001 -2007 for occupational safety, and Oeko-tex 174

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standard certification 100. It operates testing laboratories that are Interwoollab certified. Uruguay is a member of International Labour Organization (ILO). ‘Separating and sorting fleeces for the right application is one of the most important aspects of our process. Most of our wool is sourced from farms that we have known for generations. We know their family, we know their wool, and this enables us to offer our customers perfect traceability of our tops - we know exactly where it has come from’, says Mr Otegui. Lanas Trinidad offers its customers a full traceability program from farm to wool containers ready for delivery. ‘Our customers can choose to use our own traceability certification, that is comprehensive, and we will soon be able to provide RWS certified wool tops. ‘Our customers trust that from sourcing and sorting to final delivery, what they order is what they get. Besides our quality wool tops, the cornerstone of our company is the good relationship we have with our customers both at farm level and worldwide’, concludes Pedro Otegui. For more information about Lanas Trinidad – Email: CwUruguay@wtp.com.uy www.lanastrinidad.com


is for sure, if buyers have not heard ‘One thing about your company it is unlikely they will buy your product ’ Advertising in wool2yarnglobal & wool2yarnChina magazines: • business to business trade directories - readership over 38,000 in more than 60 countries worldwide

Speciality Fibres

BUYERS GUIDE TO WOOL 2017-2018

wool2yarn China Speciality Fibres

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The Wool ComfortMeterTM allows retailers and manufacturers to develop and market next-toskin wool garments which are scientifically proven to offer a more comfortable wearer experience.

The Wool HandleMeterTM allows retailers and manufacturers to measure key garment handle attributes which means better next-to-skin wool knitwear products.


URUGUAY

Quality, traceability & credibility in Uruguayan wools Traceability and environmental credentials are very important factors for spinners and weavers today. Knowing which farm the wool comes from gives manufacturers control over fibre supply and enables them to build a story around its product.

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stancias Puppo is the largest wool grower in Uruguay and began exporting in 2008, increasing its volumn year on year. Today it is the main exporter of greasy wools from Uruguay that are finer than 24 microns.

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Orders can be shipped in a matter of days from the time the order is placed.

Estancias Puppo exports direct from farms to customers worldwide. “Our customers know exactly where their wool comes from”, says D´jalma Puppo from Estancias Puppo.

90% of the wool exported by Estancias Puppo is certified “green label”. ‘This is a mark of distinction in shearing and sorting and further profiles our wool as high end export quality. Uruguay is free of mulesing, and this is certified in the Health Certificate. RWS certification can be issued if required by our clients.’

‘We are very careful to ensure that traceability of each bale is transparent and all information readily available to customers. Stocks are available on demand from our warehouse.

‘The greasy wool that we export ranges from 17-25.5 microns and is very low VM (under 0.3%) with an average dry yield of 77%, and no coloured or dark fibre or contaminants of


URUGUAY

any kind”, he says. “Our customers know that the wool they get from us comes direct from the farm. We do not blend different categories of wool, and classifications are made at the farm and packed into export bales in our warehouse. All our bales are tested by Latu, an accredited IWTO testing laboratoy.’ ‘Uruguayan wool is well regarded by processing companies around the world’, says Mr Puppo. They have been using it for many years and are well acquainted with its characteristics. We have hosted wool industry visitors from around the world, interested in seeing our beautiful natural landscape and we welcome buyers from Asian and Europe to visit our farm and see our natural wool production by themselves,’ he concluded.

D’Jalma Puppo and Margarita Cortabarria

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Card for wool tops installed at M/s Pettinatura di Verrone, Biella, Italy in January 2017

OCTIR Carding Set technology for all fibres

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pinners and weavers of a variety of different fibres including wool, noble fibres, and synthetics know that streamlining their textile machinery needs with one provider is a better way to operate. AUTEFA Solutions manufactures OCTIR Cards for woollen, worsted, and semi worsted yarn, AUTEFA wool presses and a number of other textile machinery components.

‘Our cards are chosen by the world’s top textile manufacturers for modernity, reliability, high production and an excellent after sale service’, says Giacomo Meucci Regional Sales Director Autefa Solutions from the Biella Italy office. ‘We have been producing textile machines for more than 100 years and have supplied more than 6.000 cards all over the world.We can supply single cards or complete plants whether for spinning (Octir) or Non woven (For). 180

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Today AUTEFA Solutions is a preferred partner in supplying cards with the most advanced mechanical and electronic technologies, always fully designed and manufactured in Italy. Four successful machine manufacturers form the company AUTEFA Solutions - they are AUTEFA in Friedberg, Austria-based Fehrer in Linz, and the Italian companies FOR and OCTIR in Biella as well as newly founded companies AUTEFA Solutions North America and AUTEFA Solutions Wuxi,China. The company manufacturers OCTIR Woollen Carding Sets for processing fine and extra fine wool, cashmere and silk, for high quality weaving and knitting yarns. It offers carding sets for processing standard wool and synthetic fibres for carpet and blanket yarns, as well as worsted cards for


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processing wool, mohair, angora, cashmere, synthetic fibres and silk for high quality weaving and knitting yarns. Its semi worsted cards for processing wool and synthetic fibres for carpets yarns are also central to their catalogue. OCTIR-Dragon Multitrave Woollen Carding Sets are available with a single or double tape condenser, as well as either with a giant traversing creel or a tandem creel. Based on the OCTIR system, the synchronization between the two cards is mechanical (breaker and finisher).Wool, Cashmere, Synthetic fibers, other natural fibers including Camel Hair, Mohair, Alpaca, and Yak, fibers, new or reclaimed, pure or blended can be processed into woollen yarns from 0.6 Nm to over 40 Nm for Carpet Yarns, Blanket Yarns, Weaving Yarns, and Knitting Yarns.

AUTEFA Solutions still manufactures the large dimension parts, such as main and side frames, in cast iron (and is one of the few in the world) and submits them to a long natural seasoning, to guarantee long dimensional stability and less vibration, and finally the most even tops during time. It offer the customers less fiber breakages and damage and longer final average fiber length in the tops, using large diameters with 6 workers / strippers, easy cleaning with Ø 650 mm Morel cylinders and with an easy removal of brush cylinders and improved efficiency of the suction of dust and exhaust air. ‘Our machines provides a more simplified opening of the card cover and increased throughput and blending action’, says Giacomo Meucci. ‘New side doors, no more rails on the floor, provide easy and quick access to the card parts for cleaning and maintenance. These provisions achieve the best product quality and highest efficiency. Wool, Cashmere, Synthetic fibers, Mohair, Silk fibres achieve tops with a fiber fineness from 14.5 to 40 microns and a fiber length from 40 to 220 mm’, he says. For more information please contact Giacomo Meucci at Giacomo.Meucci@autefa.com

OCTIR. Woollen. Worsted. Semi worsted.

The best worsted, semi worsted, and woollen carding sets to process the finest fibers.

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New ERA machines - faster, constant speed, and quieter than older models

INNOVATION DRIVES PRODUCTIVITY

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anufacturers of top and yarn rely on their textile machinery to perform without fail. Deadlines get shorter and shorter, customers demand quick delivery to facilitate faster moving consumer fashion trends. Today’s textile machinery must offer higher productivity, and reduced running costs and interruptions’, says Patrick Strehle director of commercial sales for N Schlumberger nsc fibre to yarn. ‘The latest improvements to our machinery offer all this and more’. ‘Many companies in China, Europe and the USA have been upgrading their machinery to include our GC40 chain gills, GN8 intersecting machine, worsted cards and ERA combing machines to improve the speed and efficiency of their productions’, he says. These machines are versatile and can be used in defelting, blending, combing, recombing spinning preparation, semi worsted process for wool, cashmere, any long staple 182

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chemical fibres as well as flax tow. They are dedicated to process fibre in the range of 18 - 25 microns. The GC40 chain gills are used for converting - stretch breaking defelting - dyeing - blending combing - recombing spinning preparation semi-worsted process for wool, long staple chemical fibres and flax tow. It uses high performance drafter speed of up to 600m/min, and offers a high level of productivity and textile quality, as well as optimal textile control at high speed. It utilises a cleaning system, drafting head with a light moving assembly, and low maintenance costs. N Schlumberger worsted carding machines are sensitive to wool fibre and are adapted to 17 to 33 µ. It has a high productivity based particularly on swift high speed, optimal use of the carding surfaces, with a working widths of up to 3,5 meters. Its hopper works with continuous flow and constant feeding density and high powered burr removal capability. Its

low “Inactive angle” achieves a high material yield. The new cards have a new frame with a totally new concept. ‘We have developed very sturdy frameworks. The reinforced structure of the roller has a large working width. It works quietly and is equipped with double safety controls on the feeding drives’, says Mr Strehle. N Schlumberger ERA combing machines have been in high demand recently, particularly by customers in Europe. They achieve progressive combing by a circular comb pinned over 360° and turning at a constant speed. It is very gentle to the fibres with a high production level of more than 50 kg/h for 21/22 µ wool. ‘We can achieve precise and recordable adjustments, ensuring consistent high levels of cleanliness as well as reduced operational and maintenance costs. Electrical adjustments, from the machine screen or remotely, can be made without stopping the machine. It can also be integrated into internal


TEXTILE MACHINERY

N Schlumberger nsc fibre to yarn management team from left to right: Eric Fessler, Florent Kiene, Philippe Kohler, Anita Trandafir, and Patrick Strehle

or external overlooking networks’, he says. The company’s GN8 intersecting machine has been designed to process any wool or wool-like fibre. It is particularly adapted to process delicate, fine and short fibres such as cashmere, silk, and any kind of fibres with low cohesion. It offers a revolutionary intersecting design based on the latest technology in chain gill drives combined with the universal drafting head in the GN series. The GN8 head sits in a double pinned field with fallers driven by double threaded screws giving a mechanical speed up to 2,000 drops per minute. It can be equipped with an electronic auto leveller RE type. Lines with GN8 intersecting are particularly adapted to units with small lots.

N Schlumberger engineering team - working on innovative new designs for next generation machines

‘We provide fast installation service for all of our machines as well as a comprehensive genuine spare parts service all around the world’, he concludes. For more information please contact - Patrick Strehle at patrick.strehle@nsc.fr

nsc fibre to yarn offers a complete range of long staple roller cards worsted cards, semi-worsted cards, and flax cards

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Spinning rings perform at the highest level

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hen the biggest names in spinning rely on one particular company for their spinning rings you can be assured that the rings are of the highest quality. ‘We use PROSINO rings because they achieve optimal performance to our spinning machinery’, says Zhou Xiaotian, General Manager Zhejiang XinAo Textiles Inc.

Dr. Pietro Prosino

XinAo is one of the largest worsted yarn manufacturers and exporters in China with an annual capacity of 6,000 tons of worsted knitting yarn and 9,000 tons of top dye and yarn dye, operating 40,000 spindles. XinAo now uses PROSINO in all of its yarn processing. ‘We must ensure that our yarn is of the highest quality and we depend on our machinery to work with less breakage throughout the spinning process’, says Zhou Xiaotian. PROSINO has been manufacturing spinning rings since 1946. Today it supplies to Original

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Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) companies including ZINSER, COGNETEX, and GAUDINO. It also supplies spinning rings to top end spinners such as Sudwolle-Safil, Zegna Baruffa, Reda, Lugang, Shandong RuYi, Nanshan, XinAo and many others. Daniel Lippuner former CEO of Saurer Group, manufacturer of Zinser spinning machinery, says, ‘customers often request a certain brand of ring. Very often they demand Prosino rings because they value their quality and durability’. ‘Keeping frame performance at the highest level and maintaining optimum yarn quality standards is fundamental to profitable yarn production’, says Dr Pietro Prosino. ‘Our Steel Conical Rings provide extra strength and speed and are a solution to reduce yarn breakage, reduce yarn hairiness, and provide a longer lasting life to our customers machinery and therefore reduces additional cost in the longrun.’


‘Many of these customers request a certain brand of ring. Very often they demand Prosino rings because they value the quality and durability they provide. Wear and tear over time alters the geometry of the ring and the surface will lose its initial characteristics and level of roughness. The coefficient of friction between ring and traveller starts to change and the tension differences that are generated require an increase in weight of the traveller with increased possibility of breakage and less control over the spinning process. ‘The exceptional performance of our rings is achieved because of the latest innovation in manufacturing and close co-operation with yarn manufacturers that we have all around the world. We have developed a special conical/concave running path with an extremely smooth surface, in order to allow the best ring/traveler contact. The special low-roughness polish finish assures a consistent performance’, he says. Prosino uses 100Cr6 ball bearing steel for all its rings. It supplies a complete range of ring holders and ring-rails for the short and long staple segment, as well as sintered metal rings for technical textiles including carpet, fiber glass, and synthetic fibers. The “4+4” Lubrication System ensures that the right amount of lubrication is released, not too much and not too little. This specific“4+4”micro holes lubrication system, ensures that every 45° the traveler finds the perfect amount of oil – brought on the ring surface by 100% selected wool wicks – in order to run smoothly for a number of years. PROSINO has a yearly production of 9.000.000 rings. It specialized in spinning ring manufacturing and marketing for any frames operating in the market for long and short staple fibre. It provides spinners with custom made products, technical coatings, and engineering solutions for all types of yarn. ‘Best performance in manufacturing is our goal, and we have been working on it for over 70 years. We offer a continuously evolving range of products. Our client base appreciate the reliability, flexibility and innovation that our rings provide’, says Dr Prosino. For more information Dr Prosino can be contact at pprosino@prosino.com wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Left to right: Silvio Givone, Mario Ploner, and Marco Ploner

Orders increase for Sant’Andrea ‘It has been a very busy year for us at Sant’Andrea’, says Marco Ploner managing director. ‘We have experienced a lift in demand from both our customers in Europe and in China. Topmakers are replacing their old European and Chinese made machines with the latest European machinery. They are also increasing capacity by adding our new machines to their current operations.’ ‘Topmakers realise they cannot stay still in this competitive market. To deliver the consistent quality that customers demand today and the speed with which delivery has to be made, new lines are essential’, says Marco Ploner.

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In 2016 Sant’Andrea increased its production by more than 15% and it is looking at 20% growth in 2017.

which is fully automatic a sensible choice,’ he says. One of our biggest customers in China has been replacing its old Chinese machinery and adding new machinery to increase capacity. ‘In 2015 they purchased two new lines and 4 additional lines in 2016. And we received a new order for an additional 2 lines earlier this year.’

‘The increased cost of labour in China, in particular, makes investment in new machinery

‘The RF5E new vertical finisher, is in demand by topmakers around the world’, says Marco


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Ploner. ‘13 of these RF5E machines have already been installed and are up and running with more orders to be installed’. The new lines offer excellence in quality and performance. They combine the best from the old machines and include a fully electronic gear box that provides greater efficiency in both operation and quality. Marco Ploner comments that ‘all machines are now completely electronic and there are no manual parts. The adjustments to speed can be made at just the press of a button, without stopping the machine’. The RF5E vertical rub apron finisher prepares the long fibres for spinning. Its working speed and excellent mechanical reliability make the RF5 series the leading equipment in terms of efficiency and quality results. The RF5E finisher is available in two versions. The RF5a version is recommended for medium/fine and extra-fine counts, for wool and noble fibres. The RF5b version is suitable for medium/large counts in wool and synthetic fibres. The RF5 can now be equipped with a highaccuracy electronic traversing device. The

device works by varying the twister’s traversing speed as a function of the bobbin’s diameter. This enables optimal winding and results in maximum bobbin cohesion and compactness. In addition, the perfect roving crossing prevents loosening and therefore avoids the formation of marriages during unwinding in spinning. In case of roving breakage or incorrect winding the delivery control photoelectric cells stop the machine. The machines can be fitted with an optional count detector. To achieve optimal operation and improve machine productivity the pergola-type creel is located in a frontal position, away from the operating area. ‘The RF5E is safe and practical to operate. Machine controls are adjusted from the same position and the frontal creel reduces working distance’, he says. ‘It has international safety standard compliance certification. When a door is open the machine may only work in ‘jog’ mode, using the nearest pushbutton.’ ‘Our follow-up service and spare parts are part of the design and construction package we provide our customers for all our machinery’, says Mario Ploner. ‘Our designs provide extreme flexibility to track and resolve customer needs. Each project is tailor-made and delivered on time. For more information please contact Silvio Givone and Marco Ploner at info@santandreatm.it

The increase in the drafting values significantly improve the evenness of processed material. The lower sleeve on the intermediate rollers improves the fibre control and prevents lappings, even at high speed (up to 400m/min)

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SRL

Quality combs for all machines

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oppa Biella manufactures combs for NSC, Sant’Andrea, OKK, and Cognetex machines. Manufacturers around the world can order combs specific to the machinery they have at their plant. ‘Combs can be made to specific order for individual machines’, says Mario Ploner. ‘There are a variety of combs available on the market today but our Coppa Biella combs have been used in all types of machines for over 50 years because they are recognised for their superior quality’, he says. Combs manufactured from the highest quality steel, using highly accurate processes and the most modern machines are produced at the Coppa Biella factory, in Biella Italy and deliveries are made anywhere in the world.

Member of Beppe Ploner Group

The textile machinery industry for combing, preparation, and twisting of wool and synthetic fibres has been moving forward with steady innovation to enhance the quality of production, saving in energy, and to meet the stringent demands that textile machinery manufacturers work under today. Head-treatments are carried out by the most up-to-date technology and the product undergoes the most rigorous tests. This guarantees that Coppa Biella products have longevity, durability, minimum maintenance and simple needle replacement. The company work closely with leading textile machinery manufacturers to produce the best performing and the longest lasting combs for any machinery, but in particular, for linen and woollen fibres. Such collaboration has cemented Coppa Biella’s position as a preferred supplier to all manufacturers of textile machinery for spinning preparation for long fibres.’ For more information: commerciale@coppabiella.it

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Member of Beppe Ploner Group


TEXTILE MACHINERY

New ideas in machinery for fibre processing

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hen it comes to the design of textile machinery the simplest and most straightforward solutions are usually the best. This is according to Hubert Hergeth, third generation engineer and designer and CEO at HERGETH GmbH, a German textile machinery manufacturer. ‘Some of the machines that we design and manufacture, perform exceptionally well with fibre such as wool. We have new and innovative technology that is not well known within the wool industry’, says Hubert Hergeth. ‘Our machines are designed to occupy little space and they have fewer moving parts so maintenance is simple and quick. Performance is superior to other more complex designs that are more expensive to run. Uncomplicated solutions are usually the best.’ Hergeth GmbH supplies machines and production lines for handling all kinds of fibres. It has been primarily focused on machinery for cotton

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and synthetic fibres but has developed some new machines that also work well for woollen sector. Its range of machines includes handling fibre bales, opening bales, mixing, cleaning, blending, metering and feeding of fibres, carding and web formation as well as optical inspection systems. All machinery is designed and built in Germany. ‘Our experience also includes the handling of very short and long fibres. We have a standard range of machines, but our strength is especially custom-made machines for individual or extreme applications. ‘We are constantly researching and investing in new design options and we are particularly focused on machinery for fibre blending machines specific to wool and other natural fibres. We believe that this is an area of design that has not kept pace with development possibilities and our new machines are achieving some very gratifying results for our


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customers, particularly customers with very specific requirements’. HERGETH offers a wide range of bale opening machines. For the wool industry a maxiFLOC bale opener is suitable as the opening roll is much bigger than the one used in short staple, also wool and synthetic fibres up to 200 mm can be processed. Now it is possible for more than 100 bale blends of wool to be processed giving a superior blend.

of the most dangerous and laborious jobs in any mill, leading to injuries particularly with high density bales. Our bale strap cutter safely cuts the bail straps in such a way that the bail opens evenly. It works with greasy wool packs and is small and easy to use. It cuts the whole bale in 8-10 seconds. Its power consumption is low and no hydraulics are used. The cutting knife is manufactured from special steel and is replaceable at low cost.

The Big Bin machine is suitable for batch blending. It is offered for batches in 3 sizes for batches up to 1500 kg. A batch comprising any amount of components out of bales or loose fibres is ready in 30 minutes. It takes about 2 minutes to clean the system as there are no spiked aprons and no belts. ‘When it comes to the initial opening of bales, it is one

Hergeth GmbH’s new card for small compact carding machines can handle crossbred wools only. Its running 100mm length is ideal for the felt industry, with a running speed of any large commercial card. It is very easy to clean and takes only minimum floor space. For more information please contact Mr Hergeth at Hergeth GmbH - mail@hergeth.de

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Compact card adaptable to many fibres

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ergeth GmbH’s new card works for crossbred wools and for the felt industry. It has a small footprint but has a running speed equal to any large commercial card. It can be easily integrated into an existing line.

‘Our carding unit offers many new and unique advantages in efficiency, operation, web forming and maintenance. The carding feed and carding unit stay the same for all applications’, says Hubert Hergeth CEO. The system processes fibre from 10-100mm in length including coarse wool. It provides great flexibility and variety in its use including the option to produce multi-layered products. ‘Simple operation and low maintenance were the main reasons for creating the new card. Spare part costs are low as only two roll diameters are used’. The vertical design allows for easy access of rollers and carding elements. The process starts with a fine opening unit that allows feeding to the card with a very low air volume producing finely opened fibres. A circular feed line ensures that the fibres are well distributed in the chute feed. The fibres are 192

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separated in the chute by profiled bars that reduce the risk of fibres intertwining around the bars and blocking the system. The fibres leave the chute feed and are pressed by a segmented pre-stressed adjustable feed plates. This ensures good control of the fibres. A PID regulator controls the linear units that position the segments to achieve a uniform weight across the width of the web. The fibres enter the card through a large diameter feed roll with uni-directional feed. The use of three cylinders ensures that the fibres are accelerated gently and carded from both sides. The carding is achieved by up to fifteen carding strips, producing a carding power that is similar to a double card. The carding strips are easily exchanged and moderately priced. The carding strips can be adapted to the material processed. For more information please contact Mr Hergeth at Hergeth GmbH - mail@hergeth.de


TEXTILE MACHINERY

Enhance your credibility Build your customers’ trust with safe, healthy Joma Wool®. Over the past 30+ years Joma Wool® has built an enviable reputation for high quality, premium natural fiber. Our clients – and their customers – trust us for our continuous provision of clean, sanitized wool which is allergen free, flame resistant and naturally sourced. Find out how our brand reputation can help build yours. Email Peter Crone (Managing Director) today at peter@joma.nz www.joma.nz wool2yarnglobal 2017

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BEDDING

Expanding market for bedding products

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ynthetic fibre products are no match for wool when it comes to bedding products. To meet the environmental demands made by customers bedding manufacturers are using increasing amounts of wool. They are creating wool products that are chemical free, non toxic and flame resistant. In addition, a research study by the Woolmark Company and numerous other studies show that wool bedding products breathe more naturally than their synthetic counterparts. Wool bedding provides increased REM sleep so that the body enjoys a comfortable sleeping temperature sooner and can maintain it longer. ‘This message is getting across to customers and bedding manufacturers around the world that want to produce quality bedding products to meet this demand that they must look to wool’, says Peter Crone Managing Director of J. Marshall & Co and manufacturer of Joma® Wool. Joma® Wool is used by leading bedding manufacturers in the USA. John Marshall & Co is one of the oldest wool export companies in New Zealand. Joma® Wool is grown in New Zealand where a combination of climate, care, and expert farming practices produce some of the highest quality wool in the world. The special manufacturing process increases the wools bulk by between 40 - 50% and decreases felting and fibre migration by 40%.

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‘This wool goes through a special crimping process and this adds unparalleled resilience and resistance to compression and loft to an already premium natural mattress ingredient. It also provides a high level of thermal comfort. Together these features help to regulate body temperature and humidity, providing a more rested night’s sleep for your customer. So, it is an ideal product for bedding manufacturers interested in tapping into this environmentally conscious, growing market’, says Peter Crone. When using Joma® Wool bedding manufacturers can promote their products as non-allergenic, flame resistant, liquid repellent, vapour absorbent. Joma® Wool has ticked all the boxes that bedding manufacturers need to attract the retail customer’, he says. ‘It is also an extremely profitable investment commanding a margin up to 10 times that of polyester’. Peter Crone can be contacted at peter@joma.co.nz


British wools perform in bedding  

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apan and South Korea are a most demanding market when it comes to bedding products. Customers in these markets demand the best in quality and excellent environmental credentials when choosing their sleeping surface. UK superwash processor Speciality Processors Bradford (SPB) in Bradford UK has been supplying bedding manufacturers in South Korea and Japan for many years. ‘Our South Korea and Japanese customers choose our wool as a best choice option for their bedding. Wool treated at our plant is destined for use in high end bedding products including mattresses, duvets, and pillows around the world and to well established markets around the world. Trends include wool waddings for mattresses and wool balls for bedding which are in high demand from manufactures who value the ease of use and added resilience for fillings in doonas and quilts’, says Albert Chippendale of SPB. SPB has been treating wool for use in bedding products using a tried and proven method for many years and the veracity of its success is clear. ‘We know European wools and we know how to get the best out of European wools’, maintains Albert Chippendale. ‘For the consumer looking for bedding with a bit of volume British wools are the best’, says Albert Chippendale. Merino bedding products are a little flatter and heavier as the fine merino fibres don not have the bounce or bulk of British wools, which trap more air. More merino is needed to produce the same insulating qualities as British wool. ‘Consumers are actively thinking about what they are sleeping on or under and they want to know that it will provide a comfort sleep. They also want to know that it is ethically manufactured. Demand for natural products such as wool in bedding is increasing. New collections and product ranges for babies and children are also on the increase’, he says. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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SPB uses Superwash treatment for tops and loose wool. The company was one of the first companies in the UK to receive approval under stringent European legislation as integrated pollution prevention and control plant. ‘We have developed our own process to render the wool machine washable without the use of chlorine. However, even chlorine treated wool from our plant contains less chlorine than drinking water!’, he points out. ‘Our treatment out-performs other shrink proofing techniques’. ‘Our processing eliminates inconsistencies in early wool shrink proofing processes. The superior results include improved colour and soft handle, better dyeing properties and reduced pilling. A finished product made from shrink resistant wool can exceed the equivalent of 50 domestic washing cycles 196

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without any deterioration due to compacting or felting and can prolong its life considerably. SPB is a commission processing company with a long established and loyal clientele. ‘Our customers have precise requirements and their ongoing business points to our ability to deliver a quality product to this sophisticated niche market. Customers can send their wool to us for treatment with confidence that their wool will be processed to their specification. We have a quick turnaround time and customers usually receive their product back within days’, he says. ‘Our plant operates to ISO 9001 quality standards. We are also registered with the Environmental Agency in the UK. Our products are independently tested and certified by OEKO TEX. This independent system for textile products from all stages of production from fibre to yarn to fabric is particularly important for bedding manufacturers as many of our products are used in children’s bedding. ‘We offer a personal service to our customers and welcome enquiries from companies big and small’. For more information please contact Albert Chippendale at speciality. processors@btopenworld.com


For Results you can Trust


WOOL TESTING

Bridging the gap between research & commercial applications ‘The benefit of AWTA certification to wool processors is considerable. They can confidently expect that wool purchased to their price and processing specifications and bearing AWTA certification will perform to their requirements, and growers are assured of being paid according to the objective specification of their wool’, says Ian Ashman, Australian Wool Testing Authority (AWTA) Raw Wool general manager in Melbourne. AWTA is the largest wool testing organisation in the world. It provides independent and objective wool certification services including sampling, testing and certifying the yield, fibre diameter, vegetable matter content, staple length and staple strength of greasy wool before it is sold. ‘We play a major role in providing a bridge between the research and the commercial application of testing technology, by facilitating further research and development, sponsoring and participating in practical trials, and developing and implementing relevant national and international standards, procedures, methods and technology. This provides major benefits to all segments of the wool industry in Australia and overseas. Virtually all Australian wool is now measured prior to sale. Wool is prepared for sale according to objective rather than

subjective clip preparation standards, with some growers preparing classed lines on the basis of individual fleece measurements. The wool is generally displayed for sale in sample boxes rather through the old show floor technique. It is valued and bought with the aid of actual measurements for Fibre Diameter, Yield, Vegetable Matter Content, Length, Strength and sometimes Colour. ‘Measurement has also facilitated the electronic expansion of data processing and market reporting, and the establishment of auction and individual clip databases which provide unparalleled and exhaustive information to all segments of the industry. Equal access to that information on a commercial basis is applied’. Today woolgrowers can receive a premium price for better quality wool and processors can order buy specific wool types with confidence when Objective Measurement is done.. Our principle business has always been the certification of greasy wool for trading’, says Ian Ashman. ‘For more than 50 years we have been providing assurance to wool trading globally. The overall benefit of objective measurement has been great. It is clear that it has transformed the way the wool processing industry operates and relies on the information these measurements provide’, Ian Ashman says. ‘The cost of purchasing wool with the wrong parameters can cost dearly during processing’, says Ian Ashman. Most processors today use a more diverse mix of combing wool types. It is essentialthat all lots purchased are tested for Staple Length and Strength. This is even more important in skirting types where the variability within sale lots will be higher than fleece types. Prices for these wools are high as demand increases and objective measurement tests become even moreessential. The certification process that AWTA undertakes includes supervision of all samples from the time they are taken from the bales and is trusted by both the buyer and seller. AWTA is an independent wool testing house, IWTO licensed and is Interwoolabs accredited.

Ian Ashman Raw Wool general manager at AWTA Melbourne

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‘Buyers and sellers of Australian wool require a quick return of certified test results. At AWTA we offer three different


WOOL TESTING

levels of service to meet customer needs. The Express Service issues 95% of certificates the following morning of sampling, Fast Service issues 95% of certificates within 3 days of sampling, and the Normal Service issues all certificates within 5 days of sampling’. To achieve this quick service AWTA testing laboratories operate in Australia day and night, 5 days a week. Sampling is conducted in 38 cities and towns throughout Australia and many of these sampling locations are in remote locations across Australia.

The AWTA website provides a variety of information to users of Australian wool to assist them in understanding testing methods and technical aspects of Australian wool. The website includes information on testing raw wool, scoured and carbonised wool and speciality fibres such as Mohair, Alpaca and Cashmere.It also provides information on sampling, testing and certifying the yield, fibre diameter, and vegetable matter content, staple length and staple strength of greasy wool before it is sold.

Testing equipment measuring cashmere fibre length officially recognised in China

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LASSIFIBRE KCF-W supplied by Mesdan, an Italian company, is an officially recognised testing method in China for cashmere fibre length measurement. Mesdan Lab division is a leading supplier of testing equipment to the textile industry worldwide for natural and manmade fibres. It is electronic standardized equipment that measures fibre length, short fibre content and length distribution automatically. It is particularly suitable for Cashmere or any other similar “luxury” fibre up to 80 mm length. ‘We have over 30 sets in operation worldwide to measure Cashmere fibre length’, says Dejan Lalevic of Mesdan. ‘And since 2015 it has been an officially recognised testing method in China (FZ/T 20028 - 2015)’. Using the stabilized optical system with uniform linear light source makes the results free from light variation and the complicated calibration of the instrument is not required.

It provides easy and uniform sample preparation by using the sampler with the horizontal carding method rejects the bias among operators. The Classifiber is much faster than manual testing. It performs a complete test in about 20 seconds. A manual test takes about 30 minutes. Statistically it is more reliable using a sample of 20 grams, whereas the manual method only uses 0.5 gram. ‘All data obtained is saved in the database together with the information on fibres, suppliers, lot number, and more’, says Mr Lalevic. ‘And statistical data of each group within a certain period of time can be easily recalled.’ For more information please contact: Dejan Lalevic in Italy on Tel: + 39 0365653142 or at sales@mesdan.it Fred Kwan at Kar Ming Industrial Supplies Co. Ltd in Hong Kong - fred@karming.com Tel: 00852-24130688 wool2yarnglobal 2017

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Recent Innovations at NZWTA The current NZWTA website has a number of new features, while still offering the popular features of the past. A series of videos on wool testing are now available through the NZWTA website through the link https://www.nzwta.co.nz/wool-testing/video-tour/. The videos describe the sampling and testing processes used at NZWTA for the certification of key wool characteristics. These videos are designed to provide a better understanding of the wool testing process. The videos include sampling, testing, and certification. Many of these videos were filmed at the NZWTA laboratory. News clips are already featured on the website. genuine certificates. This process can be accessed on the website by entering the test number and the verification code from the copy of the certificate.

Duane Knowles

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ertificate verification has been a popular service offered through the NZWTA website. Purchasers of wool can verify the certificates they have been sent by fax or email, to ensure they are

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MyWTA an internet portal is currently being rolled out by NZWTA allowing its Wool Testing customers to access to their test results 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The portal includes functionality designed to make it easier to follow tests through the laboratory and access results of completed tests. ‘Seeing test results as they become available, printing and downloading certificates and invoices, initiating checktests, re-issuing certificates can all be done in real time from anywhere that has internet access’, says Duane Knowles Chief Executive at NZWTA. The portal will maintain a security of the certificate and only a client can access their own details. NZWTA Wool Trade Diary and My WTA can be accessed in electronic format via a smartphone, PC, iPad or tablet. Users can create a shortcut link to any page of the NZWTA website directly to their smartphone. This provides instant access to all local wool industry contacts, latest testing statistics, NZWTA news, annual sale roster dates and MyWTA.

NZWTA Ltd Wool Trade Diary

he 2016/17 edition of the NZWTA Ltd Wool Trade Diary is now available. Feedback from customers confirms that the diary is still widely used for connecting with the various sectors of the local industry. The Trade Diary includes dates and rostered volumes of national wool auctions; a comprehensive list of NZWTA and wool industry contacts to assist local and international communications; and trends in testing statistics of New Zealand wool. To receive a free copy please contact NZWTA on testing@nzwta.co.nz

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WOOL TRADE DIARY 2017 – 2018

Autumn Muster (Mount) Otekaieke Station, Duntroon Photo courtesy of Cody Pickles

22 Bridge Street, PO Box 12065 Ahuriri, Napier 4144, New Zealand Phone: +64 6 835 1086, Fax: +64 6 835 6473 Email: testing@nzwta.co.nz Website: www.nzwta.co.nz www.nzwta.com

Setting the Standard in Wool and Textile Measurement


WOOL TESTING

Accurate testing from fibre to fabric

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ou will hardly find a yarn or fabric manufacturer in Europe that does not use Mesdan Lab testing equipment in its quality control and production. Mesdan Labs specialises in the production of testing equipment for analysing textile materials from fibre to fabric.

ABRASION & PILLING TESTER

MARTINDALE

AQUA-LAB determines additional test results based on optional test parameters including Dry Weight, Wet Weight, Commercial Weight, Statistical results of moisture regain and content (CV%), Moisture regain %, Moisture content % and Mass correction %.

Testing for the control of abrasion and pilling can be carried out on almost any kind of woven and knitted fabrics, non-wovens, socks, gloves, natural and artificial leather, both dry and wet samples

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Our equipment guarantees accuracy in performance’, says Dejan Lalevic. ‘They are operator friendly and almost all wool mills in Italy use our equipment including Ermenegildo Zegna, Loro Piana, Zegna Baruffa, Pettinatura di Verrone, Reda, Tollegno, Botto Guiseppe, Safil, and more. All our testing equipment complies with international standards’. ‘An absolute must for textile manufacturers is to measure moisture content in fibre. AQUALAB automatically calculates the commercial weight and other information useful to business transactions based on the amount of water content in the tested material. It is suitable for any textile fibre such as cotton, linen, wool, cashmere, viscose, silk, acrylic, synthetics as well as blends. ‘AQUA-LAB is an innovative instrument for an instantaneous and accurate assessment of regain and moisture content in textile materials. It allows high volume control of moisture throughout every stage of the textile chain, raising the quality of the process and of the final product’, says Mr Lalevic. ‘AQUALAB speed and absolute correlation with the regain oven-drying system (the main Standard Reference instrument for moisture measurement in textiles) make it indispensable to optimise production management and commercial transactions.’ ‘The first companies who introduced the Aqualab are indeed Italian mills processing wool and other similar expensive fibres such as cashmere, angora, and alpaca, mainly due to the following factors: the higher the fibre moisture regain the stronger the impact on costs (and faster pay-back) wool fibre static electricity enables the use of other quick testing methods non-destructive tests (when a


Since 1952

Testing Equipment traditional oven is used, tested samples become waste) Mesdan also offers the Martindale pilling and wear tester to its worldwide clientele. ‘Pilling and wear are one of the most important physical tests performed on wool fabrics’, says Mr Lalevic.

CLASSIFIBER TYPE W Automatic cashmere fibre length measurement

(complies with FZT20028-2015 standard)

‘Due to its accuracy and resultant consistency, our pilling and wear tester has spread quickly across China and is becoming the most popular model of Martindale in use in prominent international testing houses as well as government inspection bureaus’, he says.

AQUA-LAB Istantaneous measurment of moisture & regain content

In conformity with International Standards, the fabric specimen tested is brought into contact and rubbed against a Standard reference fabric (abrasion test), or against the same type of specimen (pilling test) following a predetermined number of specific rotary motions known as “Lissajous figure” paths. The abrasion test end point is reached once the operator visually detects the first two broken threads on the tested fabric specimen, whereas the Pilling test is accomplished by observing (after e certain number of laps), the created pill effect (fuzzing surface) on the fabric specimen and comparing it with the special photographic Standards. For Pilling tests according to ISO EN and EMPA (also called “Swiss Pilling”) Standards, a particular sample holder is required (with special dimensions and weight) as well as special photographic Standards: EMPA 991 for woven fabrics, and EMPA 992 for knits. Other special International Standards required for specific abrasion tests can be supplied. ‘The Martindale pilling and wear tester is extremely versatile, accurate, silent, vibration free, 100% made in Italy. Supplied with a kit of top quality consumables complete with traceable certificate. For more information please contact Dejan Lalevic in Italy E sales@mesdan.it or Tel + 39 0365653142 Jeff Dong at Fineetex, Shanghai E: jeffd@fineetex.com Tel 0086-21-52680739 0086-21-52680742

MARTINDALE Pilling and wear tester

Yarn Splicers

HAND-OPERATED

AUTOMATIC

MESDAN S.P.A. Via Masserino, 6 25080 Puegnago del Garda (BS) - Italy Tel. +39 0365 653142 Fax +39 0365 651011 sales@mesdan.it www.mesdan.com

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Precision and accuracy with IWTO recognised OFDA

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he OFDA 4000 instrument directly measures diameter, length, hauteur and barbe of fibres in one single measurement - in real time. This is an advantage to the entire wool to garment production chain. ‘For textile mills, research institutes and arbitrators, the OFDA 4000 opens a world of possibilities never before available’, says Mark Brims, the inventor of OFDA technology and CEO of BSC Electronics that manufactures the instruments in Australia. OFDA 4000 is specifically recognised for measuring diameter and hauteur in test method IWTO-62 which was granted 7 years ago. It is a major advancement over the previous generation of hauteur measurement using the Almeter.’OFDA 4000 is the only instrument that measures the fibre length directly and provides a more accurate measurement of length and short fibre than by hauteur which is the cross section biased length. Since the diameter of short fibre is usually much finer than longer fibres, the short fibre content can be very different when measured by length rather than by hauteur. Previously unexplained processing results such as nep formation may be resolved with new measurements’ says Mark Brims. Blends of different fibre types can be measured accurately for the first time since the OFDA 4000 uses optical measurement rather than capacitance based measurement. The incorporation of diameter measurement allows the customer to replace 3 instruments (Fibroliner, Almeter and OFDA 100) with 204

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the OFDA 4000. The results are available in a single printout, file and spreadsheet which avoids the work and potential error involved with combining results from different sources. The user can judge results safely and with confidence. Improved feedback on fiber characteristics and processing performance provides the spinning mill manager the ability to systematically introduce remedial action if necessary, instead of proceeding by trial and error. ‘Now users can analyze not only the raw material, but also the entire spinning process,’ says Mark Brims. ‘Today there are more than 400 OFDA 100, 2000 and 4000 units in use in 30 countries worldwide playing a vital role in both on-farm and factory testing of greasy fibre and of top. The original OFDA 100 instrument is no longer available and has been replaced by the OFDA 2000. OFDA 2000 is used for diameter measurement of both greasy staples and clean snippets, which is recognised by IWTO test method 47. It is now the most widespread instrument for fast and accurate grading of wool, alpaca, cashmere, mohair, silk and other luxury fibres. ‘The portability of the OFDA 2000 instrument enables its use in any farming condition and recently governments in countries such as Mongolia, Peru and Turkey have been supporting purchases of OFDA 2000 to improve the quality of their animal stock.It is a vital step to better product and income’, says Mark Brims. ‘If a local industry can sort its breeding and fleeces then everyone will be a winner. And any country that wants to enhance the quality of its fibre, whether man-made or natural fibre, will benefit from using OFDA testing instruments’, he notes. ‘The high speed, accuracy and reliability of OFDA instruments providesa lower overall purchase and operation cost. We still service the oldest OFDA100, which is now 26 years old!’, says Mark Brims. ‘Of course the new OFDAs include the latest software with full control via internet, are PC / Windows compatible and we provide five years free support via internet’. Mark Brims can be contacted by email at info@ofda.com for any inquiries on all OFDA products.


BSC Electronics


WOOL TESTING

NZWTA research in crossbred wools provide benefits

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he characteristics of length and strength are key factors in the price paid for greasy Crossbred wool because they are relevant to processing performance. Recent research at NZWTA has shown that objective staple length and strength measurements can be performed on Crossbred wool using the same instrumentation and methodology as is currently applied to greasy Merino wool. The use of this test provides the industry with a reliable and cost-effective means of determining these key staple characteristics. Work done at NZWTA has demonstrated that objective staple measurements of greasy Crossbred wool can be used to predict the processed length as determined by the Length after Carding Test on commercial consignments of scoured wool. The trial used consignments comprising almost 17,000 bales

and covered a wide range of wool types seen in New Zealand wool. Models for predicting the Barbe and Hauteur lengths of scoured wool, as determined by the Length after Carding test have been developed. Predictions of Barbe and Hauteur were within 4mm of their actual measurements on approximately 80% of consignments. The models were proven to be robust through a cross-validation process. This information provides commercial exporters and processors with greater confidence that Crossbred wool purchased using objective measurements of staple length and strength can reduce the risk in meeting product performance specifications. This application has demonstrated considerable value to the Merino industry for many years and can now be expected for the Crossbred sector.

New look certificates from SGS SGS New Zealand Wool Testing has introduced an online verification service for its testing certificates. It has also updated the design of these certificates. ‘Our customers will see that our new certificates have been updated and have a different look - and all the information they need is displayed clearly in an easy to negotiate format’, says Jeremy Wear SGS Business Manager, Wool Testing Services. SGS has also introduced a service whereby its certificates can be verified from anywhere in the world. ‘Wool can change hands several times and our new security measures ensure that when the 206

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correct certification number is typed in using the code number a verification certificate can be emailed to the customer at any time’, says Jeremy Wear. Designed in Geneva, with an extra level of encryption, certificates cannot be faked. ‘We have been asked just how secure the digital signing service is’, says Jeremy Wear. ‘We provide protection to all parties in the trading chain using secure procedures. Customers can verify the certificates they receive using the SGS website. By putting the certificate number and password a customer can receive the certificate in pdf format to verify the certificate supplied to him is in fact genuine’, he says.


WOOL TESTING

SGS Wool Testing Services is based in Wellington New Zealand and is extensively used by wool producers, buyers, brokers, and wool export companies in New Zealand, as well as by animal fibre growers, sellers and buyers worldwide. ‘Our customers depend on us for independent wool testing certification. We provide buyers and sellers of wool and wooltop with the data they need for their processing. Our testing services include Yield, Mean fiber diameter, and Color. ‘We also perform additional tests as required’, says Jeremy Wear. ‘Such tests can include Staple length and strength, bulk, fibre curvature, fibre diameter distribution,

diameter-length profile, and medullation. We can also test greasy wool samples using a variety of low-cost fleece testing methods that are specifically designed for animal selection purposes.

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Comprehensive range of testing services Virtually the entire South African clip is tested and certified by the Wool Testing Bureau (WTBSA) for Yield and Mean Fibre Diameter. These tests are performed in accordance with procedures laid down by the International Wool Textile Organisation (IWTO). WTB is accredited to ISO 17025, a requirement for recognition as an IWTO Licensed Laboratory.

Wian Heath

‘We are a non-profit organisation with the main object of researching and testing wool on behalf of the South African wool industry’.

“Wool is a unique fibre and the main purpose of testing is to provide buyers with the necessary objective information to make sound processing decisions”, says Wian Heath WTB Managing Director from the company’s office in Port Elizabeth. “We provide a range of fleece testing services to growers, stud breeders and research institutions, as well as post sale services to buyers of wool on the international and domestic market”. “The number of yield and diameter tests have been increasing steadily every season”, says Wian Heath. “The adoption rate for staple length and strength tests has remained relatively stable at 60% of all lots tested. The application of additional objective measurements has direct

benefits for buyers and processors, who can use the information to predict the processing performance of the product they purchase. Predictions, by means of the TEAM 3 formulas, allow mills to optimise raw wool inputs to meet the required specifications in the top.” “We also offer a comprehensive range of top, yarn and apparel testing services in accordance to accredited test methods. These services include, amongst others, conditioning testing and fibre length testing” Samples are taken from all bales at wool broker sites under full time supervision by WTB to confirm the integrity of test certificates. During the testing process IWTO Regulations and Test Methods are followed closely to ensure accurate and consistent results. “We are actively involved in IWTO to ensure the correct application of the latest technical standards relating to wool testing and certification within the Company and the local industry. Participation in proficiency testing programs such as Interwoollabs and the ILRT group enables the harmonisation of test results with other major international Test Houses”, he comments. WTB provides clients with electronic certificates to simplify and speed up the documentation process related to the sale and export of wool. These documents are available as encrypted, digitally signed PDF files. Buyers and processors can confirm the authenticity of certificates by using the online verification service available at http://verify.wtbsa.co.za.

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Accuracy Efficiency Integrity

041 583 2195


WOOL TESTING

Falkland Island wools to benefit from better certification

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or over 20 years the New Zealand Wool Testing Authority (NZWTA) has been testing wool from the Falkland Islands in theremote South Atlantic. Wool from the Falkland Islands has traditionally been tested for Yield, Fibre Diameter and Colour which has enabled buyers to better understand the merits of the wool grown in such a remote location. The Falklands wool clip comes from around half a million sheep with a total production of approximately 1.7m kg. Its raw wool product is primarily suitable for the interior textile market although the capacity to produce more apparel wool is evident.Fibre diameter ranges from 18 to 31 micron with average of 24.5. Falkland Island wool possesses several core attributes. The wool has relatively low Vegetable Matter, good colour and is packed in traditional packing common in New Zealand and Australia. These attributes include a clearly defined geography, a clean environment, good animal husbandry practices, and limited supply which could be incorporated in a branding opportunity linked to the raw wool. Falkland Island wool is also 100% non-mulesed – a

feature which is becoming a key requisite for wools participating in high value, traceable, downstream branded wool products. There are also many clips which are either pesticide free or organically certified. ‘Falkland Island woolgrowers may not, however, be fully rewarded for the quality of wool they produce’, says Phil Cranswick Customer Services Manager NZWTA. ‘If these wools were additionally measured (Length and Strength) then buyers could make informed decisions which would be reflected in bids they put in for the wool being offered’. NZWTA have been developing systems which will allow certification of staple length and strength on Falklands wool. Initial trials carried out last year highlighted the presence of clips with excellent staple strength (40+ Newtons / Kilotex) at 18 to 20 micron. ‘With strong demand for mid-micron and Merino wool there is an opportunity for buyers to purchase wool with a growing reputation for quality, and a wonderful growing heritage’, says Phil Cranswick.

Testing volumes across Europe tell a complicated story

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ool Testing Authority Europe (WTAE) provides objective, cost effective wool testing services to the industry throughout the Northern Hemisphere and the rest of the world, ensuring both independence and integrity of wool certification. WTAE is fully licensed by the IWTO and accredited to ISO 17025 by UKAS. It is also a member of the ILRT Group (including AWTA, NZWTA 210

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and WTB) as well as Interwoollabs. WTAE tests greasy wool, scoured wool and wool sliver, covering almost all commercial requirements for all wool types. In order to provide IWTO Certification, samples are obtained independently by Laboratory staff and accredited agents and rigorously tested according to the IWTO Regulations. WTAE can offer sampling services across most of Europe.


WOOL TESTING

Testing volumes across Europe in 2016 and the first half of 2017 told a complicated story. The excellent Merino wools produced in the Southern and Central European areas were in high demand, as witnessed by the volumes tested by WTAE, while the coarser end of the wool spectrum saw generally diminished volumes being made available to the market except in the UK, where a combination of domestic demand and exports drove volumes higher then would normally be expected. In these unpredictable circumstances it is more important than ever that the Wool Buyer makes the correct commercial choices and by testing with WTAE, and obtaining IWTO Certified wool shipments, the Buyer can be confident that the tested parameters provide an accurate reflection of processing performance. WTAE is a fully neutral party in the commercial process and Wool Buyers and Sellers can be fully confident that the technical ability of the company coupled with its strict quality control and excellent round trial performance gives Certified Results that can be relied on.

WOOL TESTING WOOL TESTING AUTHORITY AUTHORITY EUROPE EUROPE

Wool Testing Authority Europe Ltd Unit 7, Lon Barcud, Wool Authority CibynTesting Industrial Estate Europe Ltd Unit 7, Lon Barcud, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, LL55 2BD Cibyn UnitedIndustrial Kingdom Estate Caernarfon, Gwynedd, LL55 2BD Tel: +44 (0) 1286 678 097 United Kingdom Fax: +44 (0) 1286 678 039 Tel: +44 (0) 1286 678 097 email : info@wtaeurope.com Fax: +44 (0) 1286 678 039 wtaeurope.com email : info@wtaeurope.com wtaeurope.com

WTAE offers an Online Certificate Verification service which provides confirmation to wool users that the details on the IWTO Test Certificate or Test Report in their possession are correct. By entering the Test Number, Verification Code and email address in the appropriate boxes the wool user will receive a PDF copy of the Certificate in return. This will enable a rapid comparison and verification that the documents you hold, and the results in the WTAE database, are the same. For additional information on WTAE’s activities www.wtaeurope.com or info@wtaeurope.com

Accredited to ISO 17025:2005 by United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS). Accredited to ISO 17025:2005 by InternationalWool Textile Organisation (IWTO) Licensed. United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS). Member of the Independent Laboratories Round Trial (ILRT) InternationalWool Textile Organisation (IWTO) Licensed. group of laboratories the Independent Laboratories Round Trial (ILRT) Member of Interwoollabs. group of laboratories Member of Interwoollabs. wool2yarnglobal 2017

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WOOL PROMOTION

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advertising always pays in good times and in bad he old saying goes that when business is good it pays to advertise. When business is bad you must advertise.

Speciality Fibres

BUYERS GUIDE TO WOOL 2017-2018

wool2yarn China Speciality Fibres

中国羊毛与纱线

特种纤维

One thing is for sure, if buyers have never heard about your company it is unlikely that they will buy your product. And if your sales people tell you that you don’t need to advertise because they can do all the selling that is not true. They simply cannot contact 20,000 people, but advertising in trade magazines will. Advertising is important not only to promote your product to new markets but to reassure your existing customers that buying from your company is the right choice. Magazines are where consumers go to for ideas and inspiration. Magazine advertising is targeted and engages readers in very personal ways. Advertising can bring new customers to your door, protect your existing customer base, and build brand awareness of you products. To successfully market your product to your customer base you must let them know what products you have to offer and how quickly you can deliver. To get this message across you must have a profile that your customers and potential customers can see and easily access.

wool2yarn global and wool2yarn china are published once each year and advertising in both of these publications will connect you to all major wool consuming markets every year. wool2yarn global is an English language publication that is circulated to 5000 wool and textile companies in over 60 countries worldwide. It is circulated by direct mail to all major importers and exporters of wool and speciality fibre, wool carbonisers, topmakers, spinners, weavers and fabric, garments, and carpet manufacturers. wool2yarn china is circulated to over 5000 wool importers, wool processors (scouring and carbonising), topmaking mills, spinners and weavers, and fabric and carpet manufacturers in China. It is circulated in China by Nanjing Wool Market. wool2yarn china is also distributed to all delegates (500+) attending the annual Nanjing Wool Market Conference, the major international conference for the wool and textile industry in China attended by all leading Chinese companies from greasy wool importers and processors to garment manufacturers. For more information visit us at www.wool2yarnglobal.com

Been seen, Be recognised – connect with Buyers Everywhere Advertise in www.woolnews.net and reach over 2500 wool and textile companies in more than 56 countries worldwide, and at a fraction of the cost of other traditional advertising medium. An advertising icon in www.woolnews.net will link your company to new buyers worldwide and at just the click of a button our readers can view your company details and be in touch with you in a matter of seconds. Check this out at

http://www.woolnews.net/advertise-with-us/

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