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Feb. 5-11, 2014 Feb. 5-11, 20141

Woodstock

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

I NDEPENDENT The

Published every Wednesday

Est. 1987

Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill.

www.thewoodstockindependent.com

$1.00

EDUCATION

ENTERTAINMENT

COMMUNITY

District 200 announces two new administrators

Woodstock Square Dance Club to celebrate 30th year

Groundhog Days third-grade art contest winners

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» CITY COUNCIL

SIX. MORE. WEEKS.

Woodstock abates taxes for bond debt

Woodstock's most famous forecaster sees his shadow at the Groundhog Day prognostication

By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent e city of Woodstock won’t dip into taxpayers’ pockets to pay off bond debt, instead pledging alternative revenues to cover the costs. e Woodstock City Council’s approval of a property tax abatement ordinance as part of its consent agenda Jan. 21 means the city will not raise property taxes to cover HOW THEY the cost of VOTED paying off To approve an orcity-issued dinance abating debt. property taxes: Finance director Paul Yes Christensen Julie Dillon said abating Maureen Larson the taxes is Brian Sager something of Mark Saladin a formality, Joe Starzynski because the Mike Turner city has done so for several years and has plans to continue abating them in the future. An ordinance must be filed with the McHenry County Clerk each year to remove the potential property tax revenue from the city’s tax roll. Christensen said the county looks at it as “being taken off the shoulders of the taxpayers.” Instead of using property tax as a source of revenue, Christensen said other sources like park impact fees, sales tax and telecommunications taxes have been pledged to pay off the bonds. “We have all the revenue that we anticipated we would have, and we’re abating these taxes off,” Christensen said. “We will use those revenue sources to pay it as opposed to having the taxpayers pay it through property taxes.”

Screenwriter Danny Rubin, right, gestures to Woodstock Willie after the groundhog was said to have seen his shadow, as animal handler Mark Szafran, left, and Woodstock’s Craig Krandel look on. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Hundreds gather at chilly prognostication

GROUNDHOG DAY PREDICTIONS, 2014 There was no clear consensus among groundhog prognosticators this year. Here are a few of their predictions.

Shadow (More winter)

No shadow (Early spring)

Woodstock Willie, Woodstock, Ill. Punxsutawney Phil, Punxsutawney, Pa.

By KATELYN STANEK The Independent Maybe it was inevitable. Maybe it was truthful. Whatever it was, it was brave. Facing a crowd of hundreds of shivering onlookers, Woodstock Willie predicted six more weeks of winter after seeing his shadow shortly after 7 a.m. during the city’s

Gen. Beauregard Lee, Atlanta Staten Island Chuck, New York Winnipeg Willow, Winnipeg, Manitoba Fred la Marmotte, Val d’Espoir, Quebec

Please see Groundhog, Page 3

Wonder Lake native named Sailor of the Year By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

INDEX

Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Monica

OBITUARIES

5

COMMUNITY

12

OPINION

6

CALENDAR

16

EDUCATION

8

CLASSIFIEDS

17

9

PUBLIC NOTICES

19

SPORTS

24

A&E MARKETPLACE

11

Reeves, a Wonder Lake native, was recently named the 2013 Sailor of the Year for Navy Medicine. “e process of her being picked is a

OBITUARIES Wanda S. Kiefer, Woodstock Jessie M. Winkelman, Woodstock, Mayland D. Flood, Woodstock Rae M. Miller, Marengo Doris Marie Graikowski, Woodstock Della V. Retzke, Woodstock Bernard F. Kisly Jr., Altmar, N.Y.

Monica Reeves wins honor for Navy medicine

very robust process,” said Master Chief Corpsman Michael Sam, one of Reeves’ overseers. Working as leading petty officer for

Naval Branch Health Clinic, Marine Corps Recruit Depot at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego, Reeves earned the honor of

END QUOTE “I think ... I have left the facility better than when I found it.” — Dave Reeve, Page 3

Please see Navy award, Page 3

The Woodstock Independent 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 www.thewoodstockindependent.com


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Feb. 5-11, 2014

NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

A Woodstock Willie mascot greets crowds the morning of Feb. 2.

People gather in the Park in the Square for the Groundhog Day prognostication.

Children watch as Woodstock Willie emerges during the prognostication.

Woodstock Willie gives his verdict Feb. 2 on the Woodstock Square.

A band entertains onlookers during Groundhog Day.

Crowds wait for chili during the chili cook-off Feb. 1 at the Woodstock Opera House. Michael and Brianna Dee, Palatine, were winners of the annual contest.

Storyteller Jim May shares groundhog stories at Home State Bank Feb. 1.

This page is brought to you by these community-minded sponsors: Air Management Apple Creek Flowers Boe, Hanlin & Emery Group LLC Crossroads Mechanical Inc. Indepth Graphics & Printing John Jones Insurance

Julian Agency Inc. Majercik Physical Therapy Murphy's Flooring Napoli Pizza Nierman Landscape & Design

Nihan & Nihan Ltd. Accounting and Tax Service Pizza Hut / WingStreet Read Between the Lynes Woodstock Jazzercise


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Reeve retires from Opera House By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent ough his work has been primarily behind-the-scenes, Dave Reeve has spent a life in the lights. After almost 21 years at the Woodstock Opera House, the 74-year-old production manager is retiring. “e reason I’m retiring is that I promised myself – and my wife – that I would not be working when I was 75 years old,” Reeve said. He said he had always planned to retire at 70, but when his longtime push for new stage lights and dimmers was finally approved in the city’s budget just before his 70th birthday, he said, “I can’t quit now. at’s my project.” Reeve was promised the budget would allow full completion of the light project, and he was able to see it through. “I think I could look back and say I have left the facility better than when I found it,” Reeve said. “We have an all new electronic, computer-assisted sound system and a computerized lighting system with LEDs. We have cut our power consumption during shows by about 85 to 90 percent. e visual elements, the sound elements, those things that assist any production that comes here … we have enhanced the technical elements.” Opera House Director John Scharres said replacing Reeve will be an interesting task, since he is the first fulltime employee to retire from the Opera House and the first to have the position of production manager. “It’s not like we have a regular system

Groundhog

“I think I could look back and say I have left the facility better than when I found it.” — Dave Reeve, Woodstock Opera House to deal with this because it’s the first time it’s ever happened,” said Scharres, who is approaching 37 years as director. “We haven’t looked at the job description since we hired Dave. It’s a very important position here. … “He’s been a big part of how we’ve gotten to where we are right now.” Scharres said Reeve was instrumental in designing the lighting for Stage Left Café and upgrading several production systems during his time at the Opera House. ough he endured many years of late nights, early mornings and heavy lifting – some of the burdens that come with show business – Reeve said he never thought of it as a job. “I had a professor tell me, ‘you’re probably never going to make much money in this job,’ and he was right,” Reeve said. “But he told me, ‘if you can find something in your life that you enjoy doing and would do for free, if you could find somebody, if you could convince them to pay you to do that job, you’ll never have a job in your life.’ I kind of feel that way.” Since he was 13 years old, Reeve has not been a day without work. Starting as a stock boy in a grocery store,

he said he found joy and interest in every position he has ever held. After college and graduate school he taught theater, theater history and speech at Lycoming College, Williamsport, Penn.; Youngstown State University, Youngstown, Ohio; and Governors State University, University Park. At the colleges, he held many positions as a technical director and box office manager and built scenery, coordinated makeup and costumes and designed lighting for productions. In his 61 years of work, he also worked on scenery and lighting for productions in Chicago, produced some original shows in Chicago and at the Woodstock Opera House and designed lights, dimmers and computerized dimmer consoles at Vara-Light, Dimatronics and Hub Electric Company in Crystal Lake. Reeve had even worked as a salesman selling lamps, light bulbs and fixtures. Although he and his wife are moving to Florida after his retirement, he said he plans to come back to the area often to visit children, grandchildren and two great-grandchildren and to catch a few holiday productions like “e Nutcracker” and Christmas Guitar Night. He said he will definitely miss his Opera House family and working with youth to develop their interest in theater. ough his wife prefers he relax and enjoy his time off or use his production skills to design their new living room, a university theater near their Florida home may steal Reeve’s attention. “Maybe I can wander over and see what I can stick my nose in.”

Continued from Page 1

annual Groundhog Day prognostication in the Park in the Square. e famed groundhog emerged unwillingly from his ceremonial tree stump, the festivities delayed for a minute as even he seemed reluctant to brave the unrelentingly cold temperatures that have slammed the region for weeks on end. When one observer in the crowd suggested this was an omen for Willie’s prediction, another shook her head: “Oh, he wouldn’t dare.” But he did, according to Danny Rubin, the screenwriter for the film “Groundhog Day” who was on hand to read the formal declaration calling for six more weeks of winter. Rubin’s 1993 cult classic was filmed in Woodstock, an event that formed the basis for the city’s popular festivities. In addition to the prognostication, Groundhog Days includes a dance, pancake breakfast, movie screenings and walking tours, among other things. Cathy Aschbacher traveled to the prognostication from Barrington. She said she had always wanted to partake in the event but said this year’s was the first she had ever attended. “We’re really hoping it’s going to be the end of the winter around here,” she said optimistically, just a few minutes before the groundhog emerged. Lisa Morgan, Lake in the Hills, also was in attendance for the first time. She

Crowds dressed in groundhog gear gather on the Woodstock Square for the Groundhog Day prognostication Feb. 2. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

said she is a fan of the film and the holiday. “I love Groundhog Day,” Morgan said. “I love the history of it, the fact that it gives us a little hope in the middle of winter, a little something to be excited about when there’s not much between Christmas and Easter.” Willie’s forecast — which elicited boos from the crowd and at least

one suggestion he be eaten — only temporarily dampened the mood at the annual event. Still, just prior to the prediction, Rubin offered an apology to those assembled, people who he said were keeping “the dream alive.” “Somebody just mentioned to me that if it weren’t for my script, you’d all be in bed right now,” Rubin said. “So I’m sorry.”

IN BRIEF

County health department opens survey The 2014 McHenry County Healthy Community Study is available to be completed by county residents. The survey, hosted by the McHenry County Department of Health, asks for feedback on dif-

ferent aspects of living and working in McHenry County to identify trends and to guide community planning efforts. Residents can access the 2014 survey at www.mcdh.info under the “Healthy McHenry” link from now until Saturday, Feb. 15. A paper version of the survey, both in English and Spanish, also is being distributed. A self-addressed, stamped en-

velope will be provided to return the paper version. All answers received will be combined with other responses to ensure confidentiality. Results of the Healthy Community Study will be presented at a community forum at McHenry County College Wednesday, May 21. For information, email healthymchenry@gmail.com or call 815-334-4456.

Feb. 5-11, 2014

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Navy award Continued from Page 1 Sailor of the Year at several levels of the competition. She will advance to the first of the final two boards, competing against highly qualified petty officers Navywide. Sam said the 16-year Navy officer was first selected among immediate peers for Directorate Sailor of the Year. She competed against several other directorates in the hospital to win Medical Center San Diego Sailor of the Year. Reeves was then recognized over other Sailor of the Year winners for hospital and large commands along the entire West Coast from San Diego, to Washington, as well as Hawaii, Japan and Guam. After competing in Washington, D.C., against other regional winners, Reeves was awarded Sailor of the Year for Navy Medicine. Reeves is in charge of the Branch Health Clinic, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, working with aspiring marines in boot camp. As an Monica independent duty Reeves program manager, she evaluates patients and makes medical decisions like a physician assistant would. She manages the daily operations of the clinic and supervises other enlisted personnel to keep her department performing at a high level. Sam said Reeves’ department has been receiving high praise on Navy-wide inspections. She also is a sailor advocate and an active volunteer in the civilian communities where she has been stationed. “It’s a very highly competitive process,” Sam said. “ere are a lot of people and a lot of layers to it. ... I think that’s one of the biggest things she hasn’t forgotten is that it was about what she did, but it was also about what her junior sailors accomplished under her guidance. It’s like a good NFL head coach. You’re only as good as your players. She’s definitely able to put out that philosophy that will get them to be winners. She did a good job.” During the selection processes, Reeves said she had to recite the Navy creed by memory, a mantra she lives by, and had to be prepared to answer any question about current events and 238 years of naval heritage. “I was completely surprised and shocked to hear the surgeon general to say my name as the winner,” Reeves said. “It still seems so surreal.” Reeves, who was a Woodstock School District 200 student through her freshman year in high school, graduated from McHenry West High School. She said she joined the Navy three weeks after her 18th birthday, to train in the medical field, travel the world and continue a naval tradition in her family. Both of her grandfathers and some uncles were in the Navy, but Reeves is the first in her generation to join and the only female from her family to join. When she started, she said there were no openings in the medical field, so she spent her first three years as a seaman, working on a ship stationed in Italy. During her 16 years in the service, Reeves said she has lived in Italy, Germany, France, Cyprus, Malta, Spain, Hawaii, Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia, Tasmania and the Persian Gulf. Reeves is married to a sailor, Aircrew Survival Equipmentman 1st Class Charles Reeves. ey have two children. She is currently a senior at George Washington University, studying clinical health science. She said once she retires from the service, she will be applying for a master’s degree program for physician assistant.


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Feb. 5-11, 2014

NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Former Panera employee arrested on intimidation charge By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent A former Panera Bread employee was arrested Jan. 24 on a felony intimidation charge after allegedly blackmailing staff at the restaurant and bakery. Charles R. Wagner, 47, Woodstock, allegedly told staff at Panera Bread, 925 S. County Club Road, he would release

information to the public that would damage the company’s reputation if he was not given financial compensation. A statement from police said he had been fired from the restaurant in early January. e Woodstock Police Department was notified of the allegations by representatives of Chicago Bread LLC, Panera’s parent company, Jan. 17.

Woodstock detectives obtained an arrest warrant for Wagner, who turned himself in to police Jan. 24. Wagner was released shortly after posting $2,500 bond. WPD Detective Sgt. Jeff Parsons said Wagner’s alleged threats, aimed to cause “irreparable damage” to Panera’s image, were made in person to members of the staff. A statement from police said the WPD used “covert surveillance techniques” to investigate the issue, using officers undercover to communicate with him. “e Woodstock Police Department really wasn’t worried that damaging material may have existed that went against Panera Bread,” Parsons said. “e fact of the matter is, he was

threatening them in order not to disclose this stuff. at’s where it became a crime.” Parsons said the department tried to investigate the validity of Wagner’s accusations against the company, but Wagner did not cooperate. “Without his cooperation, it would be pretty much impossible to verify its existence,” Parson’s said. “He chose not to cooperate with us. … At this point in time, we don’t have any avenues to continue on with our investigations.” A representative from Panera responded to an email requesting comment but said the company had no further information to share. Wagner’s preliminary court hearing was set for Feb. 18.

IN BRIEF

Applicants sought for McHenry County Ethics Commission

The McHenry County Board is accepting applications from persons interested in appointment to the McHenry County Ethics Commission. Two vacant positions are available for terms ending Feb. 1, 2016. Application forms are available at the county board office, Room 209, McHenry County Government Center, 667 Ware Road, or the county’s website www.co.mchenry.il.us/home/ showdocument?id=12290. Applications deadline is 2 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 20. If mailing, certified or registered mail is recommended. Mailing address: McHenry County Board, 2200 N. Seminary Ave.,

Woodstock, IL 60098.

Chinese New Year party for adoptive families

To celebrate Chinese New Year, a party will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9, for area families with children adopted from China. The annual event was started by Rick and Ellen Bellairs, Woodstock, who have adopted two children, Mallory, in 1996, and Jade, in 2001. The party will be held at Green Garden, 1678 S. Eastwood Drive. It is open to all, but reservations are required. Contact Rick Bellairs at 815-334-2618 or Rick@RickBellairs.com.


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Feb. 5-11, 2014

5

OBITUARIES

Wanda S. Kiefer

Wanda S. Kiefer, 59, Woodstock, died Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, at her home. She was born Nov. 17, 1954, to Frank and Nancy (Thompson) Wilson, in Woodstock. In October of 1978, she married James Kiefer in Woodstock. She was lifelong resident of Woodstock, and retired from AT&T after 28 years of service. She spent the last 10 years working for AFC in Lake In The Hills. She enjoyed knitting and vacationing in Minnesota, and Texas, but most of all, she enjoyed her family and spending cherished time with her grandchildren. Survivors include her husband; three children, Jennifer (Tim) Tierney, Jeffrey Kiefer, and Rebecca (Ryan) Whiting, all of Woodstock; two grandchildren, Kaela and Daniel Tierney; her mother, Nancy Wilson, Woodstock; three sisters, Debbie Randels, Sue Sturlis and Cheryl (Dan) Johnson; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her father and a brother, Rick Wilson. A memorial gathering was held Jan. 31 at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home. Interment was private. Memorials may be made to either JourneyCare Hospice, 405 Lake Zurich Road, Barrington, IL., 60010-3141; or Alexian Brothers Cancer Center, 3040 Salt Creek Lane, Arlington Heights IL 60005.

Jessie M. Winkelman

Jessie M. Winkelman, 81, Woodstock, died Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, at JourneyCare Inpatient Hospice Unit, Woodstock. She was born March 7, 1932, to Isaac A. and Iva E. (Parker) Northup in Selma, Iowa. On Feb. 23, 1952, she married Wilbur “Swede” Winkelman in Woodstock. She was a member at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Woodstock. She worked at both Guardian Electric and Elco Hillcrest in Woodstock, and she was an avid reader. Most importantly she loved her family. She was loved and will be missed. Survivors include a son, Steve (Linda) Winkelman; a daughter Denise (Gary) Wedoff; five grandchildren, Nicholas (Jamie) Wedoff, Adam (Bridget) Wedoff, Andrew (Sheila) Winkelman, Brian (Kari) Winkelman and Laura Winkelman; 11 great-grandchildren, Audrey, Adalynn, Magdalen, Levi, Lucas, Carson, Kaden, Savanna, Lily, Gabriel and Elijah; four brothers, Glen (Lucy) Northup, Arlo Northup, Jack (Elaine) Northup and Robert Northup; three sisters, Arda Downing, Donna Marzahl and Helen (Jay) Murrell; and many relatives in her extended family. She was preceded in death by her parents and husband; a brother, Clair Northup; and a sister, Mary Huffstutler. Visitation and funeral service were Feb. 1 at St. John’s Lutheran Church, Wood-

stock. Burial was at McHenry County Memorial Park. Memorials can be made to JourneyCare Hospice, 405 Lake Zurich Road, Barrington, Illinois 60010-3141.

Mayland D. Flood

Mayland D. Flood, 92, Woodstock, formerly of New York and New Orleans, died Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, at his home. He was born Nov. 29, 1921, to Joel and Juana (Yramis) Flood in the Philippines. On May 19, 1954, he married Carolina Platero in Manila. He was a merchant marine and operated out of New Orleans until his retirement in 1986. He enjoyed boating and fishing. Survivors include his wife; two daughters, Cynthia and Catherine Flood; a son, Mayland P. Flood; two grandchildren, Elizabeth Flood Davis and Richard Flood. He was preceded in death by his parents and four brothers. Visitation and funeral were held Jan. 29 at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home. Burial was at McHenry County Memorial Park, with military honors provided by the VFW post 5040, Woodstock.

Rae M. Miller

Rae M. Miller, 85, Marengo, died Sunday, Jan. 26, 2014, at JourneyCare Hospice Inpatient Care Unit, Woodstock surrounded by her loving family. She was born Feb. 17, 1928, to Andrew and Margaret (Rieber) Miller in Chicago. She worked as an accountant for Field Container in Elk Grove for 15 years and took early retirement in June 1977, moving to Manitowish Waters, Wis., with her dear and cherished friend Irene Polka. After Irene died, Rae relocated to Marengo. She then worked at Northrop Grumman, Rolling Meadows. She retired for the second time Feb. 26, 1993. She loved God, her family, friends and life. She loved the beautiful Northwoods and all the animals that passed through. She enjoyed playing cards, a good game of golf, bowling and cheering for the Cubs and Bears. She could cut a rug on the dance floor (thanks to her mom and dad being ballroom medalists). Family gatherings meant the most to her, and she considered all her nieces and nephews to be her children. She loved family parties. She was loved by all and will be deeply missed. Survivors include her loving and devoted sister, Andrea (Ken) Chapman; a brother-inlaw, Bob Cenar; her nieces and nephews, Andrea (Sig) Doerdelmann, Carlene (Marty) Bauwens, Kristy (Michael) Wallin, Chad (Diana) Warner, Karen (Jim) Wellhausen, Dian Cenar, Lori (Paul) Trost, Christopher Chapman, Erin Wallin, Lucas Wallin, Megan Doerdelmann, Ken Doerdelmann, Emily Bauwens, Amanda Bauwens, Jessica Bauwens, Jamie Wellhausen, James

POLICE BLOTTER Q Kaitlyn Cecelia Rangel, 21, 100 N. Madison St., Woodstock, was charged Jan. 21 with retail theft at 1275 Lake Ave. Rangel posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Feb. 13. Q Colton J. Williams-Dority, 18, 2455 Savanah Grove Lane, Woodstock, was charged Jan. 16 with possession of a controlled substance at 501 W. South St. Williams-Dority posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Feb. 6.

Q Saloman Arrellano, 34, 1909 Sebastian Drive, Woodstock, was charged Jan. 18 with driving under the influence and unlawful lane usage at Route 47 and Lucas Road. Arrellano posted $300 bond. Court date was set for Feb. 20. Any charges are merely accusations, and defendants or suspects are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

STREET SMARTS The driver side of the Woodstock Department of Motor Vehicles service is still closed until further notice. The vehicle side is open. The DMV will be closed for Lincoln’s birthday Wednesday, Feb. 12.

Average gas price

$3.33

/GAL.

0.08

Reflects average price of regular unleaded gasoline at Woodstock gas stations the morning of Feb. 3.

D. Wellhausen, Jackie Wellhausen, Melissa Karr, Andy Warner and Holly Warner; as well as many extended family and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents; two sisters, Diane Warner and Carolyn Cenar; and a nephew, Bob Cenar. A memorial gathering and Mass in celebration of her life were held Jan. 31 at St. Mary Catholic Church. All other services were private. Memorials can be made to JourneyCare Hospice, 405 Lake Zurich Road, Barrington, IL 60010.

Doris Marie Graikowski

Doris Marie Graikowski, 82, Woodstock, died Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, at Valley Hi Nursing Home. She was born April 8, 1931, to Stanley and Elizabeth (Oberman) Graikowski, in Thorp, Wis. Survivors include three sisters, Alice (John) VanLanduyt, Elaine Perry, and Phyllis Bickford; two brothers, Gerald (Joyce) Graikowski and Dan (Ginger) Graikowski; and many nieces and nephews, great-nieces and greatnephews, and great-great-nieces and greatgreat-nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; and a brother, Arthur (Phyllis) Graikowski. All services were private.Interment will be in St. Jerome’s Cemetery in Oconomowoc, Wis. Arrangements were made by SchneiderLeucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home.

Della V. Retzke

Della V. Retzke, 92, Woodstock, died Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014, at Hearthstone Manor. She was born June 2, 1921, to Arthur J. and Edna (Nielson) Erickson in Chicago. On Aug. 30, 1941, she married Kenneth W. Retzke in Chicago. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church, Woodstock. She lived in Rolling Meadows for 27 years, moving to Woodstock in 1996. She volunteered at the Northwest Community Hospital, Arlington Heights, and was active at the Bethel Lutheran Church, Palatine. Survivors include a brother, Arthur (Barb) Erickson; nieces and nephews, Kristeen Redemske, Kerry (Tom) Wallner, Joyce (Jason) Smith, Janis Wiegerling, Wendy Durling,

Randy (Kelly) Redemske, Carl (Misty) Erickson and David (Melissa) Erickson; and greatnieces and -nephews, Austin, Adam, Arran, Greg, Joel, Heather, Kyle, Jenna, Ryan, Kendell, Hannah, Daniel, Luke, Stephanie and Annika. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; a sister and brother-in-law, Virginia and Willard Redemske; a nephew, David Retzke; and a great-niece, Molly Redemske. Entombment services were private at McHenry County Memorial Park, Woodstock. Memorials may be made to either the Senior Care Volunteer Network, P.O. Box 1638, Arlington Heights, IL 60006; or Hearthstone Manor, 920 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock, IL 60098. Arrangements were made by SchneiderLeucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home.

Bernard F. Kisly Jr. Bernard F. Kisly Jr., 57, Altmar, N.Y., died Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014, at Francis House, Syracuse, N.Y. He was born July 3, 1956, to Bernard F. and Anne Piorkowski Kisly Sr. in Summit, N.J. On Sept. 11, 2013, he married Debra Skinner. He graduated from Bridgewater-Raritan High School East, Bridgewater, N.J. He also graduated from Villanova University, Philadelphia. He was head of operations for Unilelver, formerly Quest International, for its North American Division. He was also a financial advisor for Merrill Lynch. Survivors include his wife; three sons, Michael Kisly, Stevens Point, Wis., John Fischer, Leesburg, Ga., and James Fischer, Pulaski, N.Y.; two daughters, Lauren Kisly, Austria, and Robbyn Fischer, Pulaski, N.Y.; two brothers, Kevin (Susan) Kisly, Shelton, Conn., and Paul (Anne) Kisly, Rushville, N.Y.; and one sister, Judith (Robert) Ward, Lacona, N.Y. He was preceded in death by a son, Eric Kisly, who died in 2012. A memorial service was held Feb. 1 at the Pulaski Congregational Church, Pulaski, N.Y. Memorials can be made to Francis House, 108 Michaels Ave., Syracuse, NY 13210; the Upstate Cancer Center, 750 E. Adams St., CAB 326, Syracuse, NY 13210; or directly to the Kisly family, 208 County Route 28, Pulaski, NY 13142.


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Feb. 5-11, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Opinion THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT Woodstock, IL Š 1987

CHERYL WORMLEY Publisher, Co-Owner

PAUL WORMLEY Co-Owner

JOHN C. TRIONE General Manager

THE EDITORIAL BOARD Cheryl Wormley John C. Trione Katelyn Stanek Jay Schulz Lisa Kucharski Sandy Kucharski

KATELYN STANEK Managing Editor

» OUR VIEW

Despite prediction, there’s plenty to cheer about It wasn’t the news we had hoped for, and judging by the boos, it wasn’t the news most at this year’s annual Groundhog Day prognostication on the Square had hoped for, either. But although Woodstock’s favorite rodent, Woodstock Willie, predicted another six weeks of winter in this already brutal season, there is still plenty to cheer about this year’s festivities. We’re thankful to the Woodstock Groundhog Days Committee, a group of hardworking Woodstockians who made this, the 20th such celebration in town, a success. Planning, promotion and execution of the event, which includes movie symposiums, tours and other events, is a time-consuming labor of love for committee members. Likewise, employees of the city of Woodstock were hard at work preparing the Square for visitors, promoting the event on social media platforms and undertaking a host of other tasks that cleared the way for a successful event that brought hundreds — including many visitors — to Woodstock’s downtown area. Many businesses opened early or ran groundhog-themed specials to take advantage of added patrons and add to the festival atmosphere downtown. But most of all, we’re grateful to the residents and visitors who made this year’s Woodstock Groundhog Days another success. Woodstock Willie is among an elite group of groundhogs in North America, his prediction being one of only a handful that generally make their way into regional and national news. e Midwest’s go-to prognosticator — and the celebrations that surround his emergence from his “magic” tree stump — would be nothing without the faithful (and occasionally nutty) fans who trudge through ice and snow to spend a few minutes at sunrise awaiting the ceremonial declaration. Sure, it’s silly, lighthearted and a little bit absurd. And sure, it’s not meteorologically sound. But it’s exactly what Woodstock, still under the darkness of winter and the chill of early February, needs.

weigh in Email letters to the editor to letters@thewoodstockindependent.com or mail them to 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098.

» YOUR VIEW

From board of education, a thanks to community Dear Woodstock Community Members, Over the last several months the Woodstock Community Unit School District 200 Board of Education has been working to identify and select a new superintendent who will support the district’s mission of “Changing the Future rough Education.” During this time, it was imperative for the Board of Education to ask the community to have a voice in all phases of the process. On behalf of the Board of Education, I would like to thank

the community for completing the online survey and attending focus groups that assisted us in developing a leadership profile that included desired characteristics. In addition, the board was pleased with the number of community members who attended the open forums, met the candidates, posed thoughtful questions and provided invaluable input. Your participation was much appreciated. Over the course of the next few weeks, the Board of Education will make a decision about who will be the next superintendent of schools for District 200. We appreciate your continued support and look forward to serving the community alongside

FOR YOUR INFORMATION Christmas tree collection results The Department of Public Works has completed its curbside collection of live Christmas trees. Almost 800 trees were collected in a three-week period, slightly less than in previous years. The city plans to collect trees each year as a service to the residents. If you still have a tree or notice a tree by the curb in your neighborhood, please call the Department of Public Works at 815-338-6118. Employment opportunities with the city of Woodstock The city of Woodstock is accepting applications for 2014 summer seasonal workers for recreation lifeguards and playground program counselors, with a minimum age of 16. The Public Works Department is recruiting summer maintenance workers, with a minimum age of 18. A valid driver’s license is required. The deadline to apply is Friday, March 7.

the new superintendent. Sincerely, Paul J. Meyer, President District 200 Board of Education

What would happen if townships disappeared? After listening to Bob Anderson for over a year, we are starting to think he might be right. Mr. Anderson’s question is “What would happen if township governments were gone?” We ask county representatives to provide us with an answer to his question. is way, we can make a wellinformed decision. Jim and Carole Romano, Wonder Lake

QUOTABLE

“And Winter slumbering in the open air, wears on his smiling face a dream of Spring!” — Samuel Taylor Coleridge


OPINION

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Feb. 5-11, 2014

7

Âť COLUMN

Our role in town is to ‌ From time to time, I have written about the goals the staff and I have for e Independent. Often, when Woodstock has endured a particularly challenging weather event, I have written about it and mentioned e Independent’s role as a historical record of our community. I’ve also written about our goal of being the source of information about what’s going on in the community. We publish briefs of upcoming events and two weekly calendars – one with all sorts of meetings and events and the second of entertainment venues only. e staff also covers events from what’s happening in business to high school sports to community celebrations. We now have three venues for publishing information: the print edition, our Facebook page and our web page. Having two means of delivering news electronically allows us to connect with our audience as often as hourly. One of our goals that I don’t write about often is the foundation of our news coverage – to build strong relationships with our readers and to ask the questions

they would ask if they had the opportunity. Katelyn Stanek, TWI managing editor, wrote about that goal this week in an email, “I want to have a relationship with my readers in particular Cheryl and with the citizens in general.â€? Wormley What she wrote next added substance Declarations to the goal: “As I see it, it’s my job to ‌ ask the questions thousands of other people don’t have time to ask because they’re busy at work or living their lives. At its simplest, I think that’s all a reporter is: a person who is paid to dig through the stuff other people don’t have time to dig through.â€? And so, under Katelyn’s direction, e Independent staff will continue digging on your behalf. Couple more thoughts: First, a huge thanks and congratulations to everyone who played a role in the success of our

2014 Groundhog Days. One of the joys of Groundhog Days is that so many committees, organizations and city departments work together so residents and visitors can forget winter and have lots and lots of fun. Second, I was a spectator at two youth basketball games this weekend. I watched granddaughter Reagan’s team of ďŹ rst- and second-graders play Saturday morning. I had seen the two teams play earlier in the season, and I was amazed at how much the players on both teams had improved. And, Saturday, all of the girls seemed to be having a really good time. ey were smiling and so were the coaches. Saturday afternoon, I watched grandsons J.T. and Calvin and their team play. Fifth- and sixth-grade boys are more competitive and more skilled, but the sense of purpose is the same. I admire the coaches and referees. eir focus is on teaching the tenets of basketball and what it takes to play a team sport. e morning game was at Mary

Endres Elementary School and the afternoon game was at Creekside Middle School. As a taxpayer, it feels good to see the schools in use on a weekend. As a community member, it feels good to see cooperation between the schools and Woodstock Recreation Department, sports leagues and organizations. ird, a cat is missing. Junior is a medium-sized, yellow-and-white beauty. Last summer, he eliminated the chipmunks, gophers or ground squirrels, whatever the pesky rodents are called, from my backyard and the yards of my neighbors. His family moved from Margaret Drive to Kimball Avenue in early January. Junior hadn’t acclimated to his new surroundings before he charged out of an open door at his new home. He’s been missing for more than three weeks. If you see Junior, call his family at 815-575-9696 or email junior@ petrik.me.

home care workers went to court. And on Jan. 21, their case was heard by the United States Supreme Court. I found the case intriguing, so I traveled to Washington to hear Scott it argued. Reeder It’s important to remember Reeder Report that Harris doesn’t consider herself anyone’s employee, let alone someone ripe for union organizing. It turns out Gov. Pat Quinn had issued an executive order saying home care workers like Harris were state employees for the purposes of “collective bargaining.� Just why would an “employer� try to assist “employees� in joining a union? After all, during my more than 30 years in the private-sector workforce, I’ve never had a boss come up to me and say, “Hey, guys let me help you start a union.� But I guess Quinn is a different sort of boss. For that matter so was his predecessor, Rod Blagojevich, who also issued orders like this. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito expressed skepticism of the past governor’s

motivations to help unions. “I thought the situation was that Gov. Blagojevich got a huge campaign contribution from the union, and virtually, as soon as he got into ofďŹ ce, he took out his pen and signed an executive order that had the effect of putting, what was it, $3.6 million into the union coffers?â€? Hmmm, Sam, that’s an interesting observation. By the way, between 2002 and 2012, Quinn received $2,971,582 in campaign contributions from government worker unions, of which $1,385,955 came from SEIU. If Harris wins her case, it could reshape labor law for government workers across the nation. Her attorney asked the high court to rule that government workers can’t be forced to pay union dues or “representation feesâ€? to unions. Please remember that’s how half of the states already operate. And why should someone be forced to give money to a union to advocate for something they don’t believe? After all, there is that little thing called Freedom of Speech in our Constitution. SEIU – and other government unions – could see the perils of losing a lawsuit like this. It could result in them being dependent on dues from folks who want to belong to a union, not people forced to give

money to it. So not surprisingly, they pulled out all the stops. ey even brought out folks in wheelchairs – in the middle of a snowstorm – to tell reporters on the front steps of the U.S. Supreme Court that they hope their home care workers are unionized. And some home care workers who want to belong to a union told reporters why they thought organized labor was just swell. But glancing around at all the TV cameras and microphones, one couldn’t help but wonder: Where is Pam Harris? After all, it’s not every day one has a case argued before the highest court in the land. But Pam was nowhere to be found. She didn’t see the justices in their robes enter the marble courtroom or hear the clerk call out: Oyez! Oyez! Oyez! And Pam certainly didn’t see the TV cameras and reporters on the front steps of the high court. Pam Harris was back home in Illinois looking after her son. After all, she isn’t an activist – just a mom doing what’s best for her son.

Cheryl Wormley is publisher of The Woodstock Independent.

Âť COLUMN

A mother’s story could reshape labor laws Pam Harris is an unlikely activist. She is just a Lake County mom looking after her disabled adult son. Rather than place her son, Josh, in an institution, she entered a program where she receives state assistance to care for him at home. But one Sunday morning, an organizer for Service Employees International Union knocked on her door and asked her to vote to join a union. It threw her for a loop. You see, if a majority of home care workers voted to join a union, she would have to give money to the union – whether she wanted to belong or not. And she didn’t think she should have to give money to some union boss in order to care for her son. So she led a push among caregivers to reject union representation – and won. But the story doesn’t end there. SEIU can keep calling for votes. Faced with this prospect, Harris and seven other

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Scott Reeder is a veteran statehouse reporter and the journalist in residence at the Illinois Policy Institute. He can be reached at sreeder@illinoispolicy.org.

st a f f

&$BMIPVO4Ut8PPETUPDL *- 1IPOF 'BY XXXUIFXPPETUPDLJOEFQFOEFOUDPN

Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER c.wormley@thewoodstockindependent.com

The Woodstock Independent (USPS #001287) is published weekly at 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Periodicals postage paid at Woodstock, Illinois. POSTMASTERS: Forward address changes to The Woodstock Independent, 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Subscription rates/year: $35 in Woodstock and Wonder Lake, $37 in McHenry County, $42 for snowbirds and $50 outside McHenry County. Letters to the editor: We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarity or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter per month. Letters are due at noon Wednesday and must be signed and include the writer’s address and a telephone number for veriďŹ cation purposes only. Corrections: The Woodstock Independent strives for accuracy. To suggest corrections or clariďŹ cations, email news@ thewoodstockindependent.com.

Katelyn Stanek M ANAGING EDITOR katelyn@thewoodstockindependent.com

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Other Advertising Jen Wilson, jenwilson@ thewoodstockindependent.com; Barb Gessert, barb@thewoodstockindependent.com Columnists John Daab, Lisa Haderlein, Dick Hattan, Lisa Kelly, Paul Lambert, Debbie Skozek, Tony Casalino, Laura Witlox, Paul Lockwood, Nick Weber Editorial Cartoonist Jim Pearson

Lisa Kucharski ASSOCIATE EDITOR lisa@thewoodstockindependent.com

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Feb. 5-11, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Education

New administrators set to join District 200 New transportation director, assistant superintendent will replace retiring staff By ELIZABETH HARMON The Independent Superintendent Ellyn Wrzeski isn’t the only Woodstock District 200 administrator retiring at the end of the current school year.

Nancy Reczek, assistant superintendent for early childhood and elementary Education, and Transportation Director Linda Van Dyke also will step down, effective June 30, 2014. e district recently announced the selection of Dr. Dana Davis as assistant superintendent for early childhood and elementary education and Diane Carter as director of transportation. “It’s hard to see Nancy and Linda go, and we appreciate everything they’ve done,” said Wrzeski. “ey’ve left big

shoes to fill, and we’re pleased to have found such strong replacements.” Davis is currently the director of educational support services for Mundelein School District 75. A Park Forest native, he grew up in a family of educators. “I was able to see the positive effects that a teacher could have on students,” he said. His experiences as a student at Marian Catholic High School in Chicago Heights inspired him to pursue a career in education. He holds a master’s degree from North Central College and a doctorate in education from DePaul University. He has served as a teacher, assistant principal, principal and technology director. Wrzeski said Davis’ central office, technology and data analysis experiences made him an especially strong candidate. “He holds a position similar to what he’ll have in our district. He’s also well-spoken and very personable,” she said. is is an especially exciting time to work in education, Davis said. “Adjusting students’ learning experiences to meet the rigor of the Common Core state standards is a challenge that all districts are currently facing. With the changes in expectations and the way that achievement will be measured, we have a lot of important work to accomplish,” he said.

He will begin working with Reczek during May and June to prepare for the transition. Carter, of Wonder Lake, has been with District 200 since 1990. “Like a lot of our drivers, I started driving a school bus so I could be at home with my children,” Carter said. In 1995 she became a dispatcher, and in 2006 was promoted to transportation coordinator, assisting VanDyke. “Diane started her career with us. She brings so much experience and knowledge. Having held a variety of positions within the transportation department, she’s well-rounded as a leader,” Wrzeski said. Carter said that the biggest changes she’s seen are the dramatic growth of the district and the professional approach to driver training and performance. “When I started, there were about 30 routes, now there are more than 70. And our drivers have become true professionals, with a training program that’s been built up since 1995, so it’s nice to see that,” Carter said. e district interviewed eight candidates for Reczek’s position and six for VanDyke’s. “In both cases, there were administrators and staff involved in the process, so there was lots of input,” Wrzeski said. Reczek joined District 200 in 1999. VanDyke came to the district in 2003.

DAY OF REMEMBRANCE

Students visiting the Challenger Center for Science & Technology Woodstock, gather for NASA’s National Day of Remembrance Jan. 31. The event honored the fallen astronauts of the Apollo I, Challenger and Columbia missions. The children lit candles and released balloons during the ceremony. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

COLLEGE CURRENTS

UW-Whitewater announces fall dean’s list

The following students from Woodstock were named to the University of WisconsinWhitewater, fall 2013 dean’s list: Samantha Ahr, Taylor Brown, Allissa Carroll, Aidan Donahoe, Kelly Holck, Jennifer Jones, Samantha King, Johana Klay, Taylor LeFever and Katelyn Wirtz. Also named were Natalie Bruchsaler, Shawna Nutter and Adam Szafran, Wonder Lake.

WIU announces fall dean’s list

The following students from Woodstock were named to the Western Illinois Univer-

sity, Macomb, fall 2013 dean’s list: Joanna Tilstra, Jessica Soltys, Courtney Johnson, Diana Dominguez, Courtney Dalton and Astoncia Bhagat.

Creath earns bachelor’s

James Creath III, Woodstock, recently graduated from Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in construction engineering.

Finely named to dean’s list

Sig Finley, Wonder Lake, was named to University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse, fall 2013 dean’s list.


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Feb. 5-11, 2014

9

A&E 30 YEARS AND DANCING...

Square dance club promenades into third decade By SANDY KUCHARSKI The Independent For many, mention square dancing and awkward images of grade-school gym class come to mind – boys and girls forced to hold hands with one another, following recorded instructions to the tune of old-fashioned music. But nearly 40 people who gather each week at McHenry Township Senior Center see square dancing differently. “e social aspect is wonderful, and the square-dance people are wonderful people,” said Deb Pickard, lesson chair for McHenry B’n’B and Woodstock Square Dance Club. “It’s good physical

as well as mental exercise, and there’s all kinds of music used for square dancing. It’s not necessarily your grandparents’ music, and it’s not square dancing like we all did in grade school.” In its heyday, every community had a square dancing club and Woodstock was no exception. In 1984, Woodstock policeman Ted Pierce and his wife decided to get a caller and form a club, holding dances in the grade school, now known as Vierda Dierzen Early Learning Center. irty-year member Chris Schidlt and her husband had neighbors who danced, and they decided to give it a try. “It was just a good time in our lives,” she said. “e kids were a little

older, so we could go and do lessons.” Although several local clubs have disappeared, Woodstock Square Dance Club will be celebrating its 30th anniversary in April. Current president Barb Zamastil said the club is one of the bigger clubs in the area with 42 members, ranging in age from 9 to 81, drawing members from several communities. When the cost of holding weekly lessons at the school became prohibitive, the club moved its events to the McHenry Township Senior Center in Johnsburg. At the senior center, Woodstock Square Dance Club combines with McHenry B’n’B – the

IN BRIEF

Champion fiddler to perform at Open Mic Night Illinois state grand champion fiddler Georgia Rae Mussared will be the featured artist at Open Mic Night, Friday, Feb. 14, at Stage Left Cafe, 125 W. Van Buren St. Scheduled to perform for a half hour, starting at 8:30,

she will be playing her contest repertoire and also will be joined for a few songs by her band, Georgia Rae Family Band. The band is raising money to fund its trip to Weiser, Idaho, in June for the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest. All donations at the door will go to the “Weiser” fund. For more information or to reserve a table, call 815-337-1395.

Illinois chapter of Bachelors ‘n’ Bachelorettes, a plus level singles modern Western square dance club – to offer weekly lessons from September through May. Beginning dancers learn about 100 square dance calls in Mainstream and Plus, the first two levels in square dancing. New students are assisted each week by 30 to 40 “angels,” more experienced dancers who come to help the new dancers learn. e average cost of a night of dance lessons is $6 per person. “It’s challenging,” said Christine Steffy, a member currently participating in the lessons. “When you really watch it, square dancing is a math prob-

lem. What the caller does is she take four couples in a square, she mixes them up, and then she puts them back together before they’re done with the call.” Lottie Buckbee, Dundee, got involved in square dancing and was so intrigued that she went on to become a caller. “I’d always wanted a career in music and in mathematics, and calling is music and mathematics. It all has to come out in the end.” On occasion she goes to schools to teach square dancing, and she always emphasizes the mathematics part of it, as well as explaining that it’s a sport. She says, “It’s a team of eight people who must work together for success.”


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Feb. 5-11, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

The Entertainer WOODSTOCK’S ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS

» MUSIC WEDNESDAY JAM GROUP Feb. 5, 1 to 4 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun Free 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org Acoustic musicians meet weekly to play music together. Everyone is welcome to attend to join in or to listen. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Feb. 7, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Woodstock Square Mall 110 Johnson St. 815-338-2833 Free Big Fish will perform. A TRIBUTE TO THE ROLLING STONES Feb. 8, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $38 815-338-5300 One Zero Charlie Productions will present the Glimmer Twins performing as young Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, singing the hits of the Rolling Stones. MUSIC ACROSS THE DECADES Feb. 9, 2 p.m. Woodstock Public Library

414 W. Judd St. 2 p.m. Free 815-338-0542 Cheryl Niemo and the Down Home Boys will bring their American Roots show to the library, with a mix of oldtime country, folk, blue grass, country blues and oldtime rock ‘n’ roll. No registration is necessary.

STAGE LEFTOVERS Feb. 12, 26, 7:30 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. Donation woodstockoperahouse.com Rich Prezioso, Joe Pesz, Brian Murphy, Laurel Palma, Pete Jonsson and Les Urban will perform. OPEN MIC NIGHT Feb. 14, 28, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org Open Mic is sponsored by Off Square Music. Various artists will perform in 15-minute slots. Georgia Rae Mussared and the Georgia Rae Family Band will be the featured performers at 8:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14. WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Feb. 15, 9 a.m. to noon McHenry County Farm Bureau 1102 McConnell Road

Free woodstockfarmersmarket.org 11 a.m. Mark Hobbs A TRIBUTE TO JOE COCKER Feb. 15, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $38 815-338-5300 One Zero Charlie Productions will present Alan Kaye performing the hit songs of Joe Cocker. A TRIBUTE TO JOHN DENVER Feb. 22, 8 p.m. Feb. 23, 3 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $38 815-338-5300 One Zero Charlie Productions will present Tom Becker performing John Denver’s greatest hits.

» THEATER ‘SYLVIA’ Feb. 7, 8, 7 p.m. Feb. 8, 2 p.m. Woodstock High School Black Box Theatre 501 W. South St. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 “Sylvia” is a modern, romantic comedy about a couple dealing with the unknowns of middle age, career changes and a stray dog.

» LECTURE CREATIVE LIVING SERIES Feb. 20, 10 a.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $24 815-338-5300 Michael Williams and Richard Cahan will present the urban American photographic work of Vivian Maier, taken while working as a nanny on Chicago’s North Shore.

» MOVIES Previews by Jay Schulz of films currently playing at the Woodstock Theatre unless otherwise noted. ‘LABOR DAY’ Kate Winslet (“Titanic”) plays a young mother who gives a suspicious stranger, played by Josh Brolin (“No Country for Old Men”), a ride that could change the

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT life of her family. “Labor Day” is directed by Jason Reitman (“Thank You For Smoking”) and also stars Tobey Maquire (“Spider-Man”), Clark Gregg (“The Avengers”) and James Van Der Beek (“Varsity Blues”). RATED PG-13, 111 MINUTES ‘THE MONUMENTS MEN’ George Clooney (“Syriana”) directs and stars in the true story of a World War II platoon tasked to rescue art masterpieces from the Nazis and return them to their owners. “The Monuments Men” also stars Matt Damon(“Good Will Hunting”), Cate Blanchett (“Babel”), John Goodman (“The Big Lewbowski”), Bill Murray (“Caddyshack”) and Jean Dujardin (“The Artist”). RATED PG-13, 118 MINUTES ‘RIDE ALONG’ A security guard, played by Kevin Hart (“Grudge Match”), joins his future brother-in-law, played by Ice Cube (“Boyz N the Hood”), for a ride-along to prove he is worthy to marry his sister. “Ride Along” is directed by Tim Story (“Fantastic Four”) and also stars John Leguizamo (“Spawn”), Bruce McGill (“Cinderella Man”) and Tom Waite (“Jarhead”). RATED R, 94 MINUTES ‘THE LEGO MOVIE’ In a world made up of LEGOS, a LEGO minifigure, voiced by Chris Pratt (“Moneyball”), is recruited to help stop an evil LEGO tyrant.”The LEGO Movie” also stars the voices of Will Arnett (“Ratatouille”), Elizabeth Banks (“W”), Will Ferrell (“Blades of Glory”) and Jonah Hill (“21 Jump Street”). RATED PG, 100 MINUTES ‘THE NUT JOB’ A squirrel and his friends plan to rob Maury’s Nut Store in order to survive the winter. “The Nut Job” is directed by firsttime director Peter Lepeniotis and stars the voices of Will Arnett, Brendon Fraser, Liam Neeson, Katherine Heigl, Maya Rudolph, Jeff Dunham and Gabriel Iglesias. RATED PG, 85 MINUTES ‘THAT AWKWARD MOMENT’ Three best friends try to understand where their dating relationships are going. “That Awkward Moment” is the directorial debut of Tom Gormican and stars Zac Efron (“17 Again”), Michael B. Jordan (“Fruitvale Station”) and Miles Teller (“The Spectacular Now”). RATED R, 138 MINUTES ‘LONE SURVIVOR’ Directed by Peter Berg (“Hancock”), and starring Mark Wahlberg (“The Perfect Storm”), Taylor Kitsch (“Friday Night Lights”) and Emilie Hirsch (“Kindred: The Embraced”), “Lone Survivor” is a true story based on the failed June 28, 2005, Operation Red Wings mission, in which four members of SEAL Team 10 were tasked with capturing or killing notorious Taliban leader Ahmad Shahd. RATED R, 121 MINUTES


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Marketplace » COLUMN

Analogies in business For the first time in my life, I am playing organized soccer. I am in an over-40 indoor men’s league. When I tell people, I equate myself to John Candy’s character Dewey Oxberger in the ’80s movie “Stripes.” Anyone who knows the movie understands the “lean, mean, fighting machine” analogy and not to expect much from me on the field. To draw upon our elementaryschool learnings, an analogy draws a comparison between two things that are considered John different but have Buckley similarities. Unlike Oxberger, I did Minding Your not join the Army Business to become more aggressive and lose weight. However, I am clumsy and joined a soccer league to lose weight. Beyond comedic self-deprecation, we use analogies to convey meaning and understanding, to help others understand complex concepts in more simple terms. We use analogies to create common purpose – perhaps to get a staff or team to all understand a current situation and the way to move forward. We use sports analogies – “bottom of the ninth” and “two-minute drill,” We use nautical analogies – “sinking ship” and “any port in a storm” We use fish – “big fish in a small pond” and “fish out of water” However, analogies are only effective if the listener understands them. If you haven’t seen the movie “Stripes,” you won’t understand my Oxberger analogy. When it is time to create analogies for your staff or business, keep three things in mind: What end message do you want to convey? – I will most likely be a liability to my soccer team, but I will be entertaining. What parallel can you draw that is common to you and the listener? – “Stripes” was a popular movie. Oxberger was not soldier material at all, but he was a good team member and entertaining. How often can I repeat it? – I remind anyone who will listen as often as possible, including putting clips from the movie on my Facebook page. In a previous job, we used a melting iceberg (thanks to John Kotter’s book “My Iceberg is Melting”) as the analogy to our organization, which was slowly, almost imperceptibly melting away, and we were the soon-to-be-stranded penguins if we did not take action. We used that analogy throughout the next 18 months of change. Every staff member had the book; we had penguins on notepads, on wall posters, on the agendas for staff meetings. Analogies are a great tool to use in your business to help you convey the important concepts and messages that you want your staff, vendors and customers to understand. If you use them properly, you can stand back and say “it’s in the hole.” John Buckley is the director of Adult and Child Therapy Services. Buckley has more than 15 years of nonprofit and business experience.

Feb. 5-11, 2014

11

Progress continues on theater By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

Like the groundhog’s prediction of an extended winter, Classic Cinemas predicts at least six more weeks of construction on the Woodstock eatre. Classic Cinemas marketing manager Mark Mazrimas said now that the concrete has been poured for the risers for the stadium seating in the large auditorium, the project should move along. “Our goal is for spring break, to have everything open,” Mazrimas said, hoping to open the large and small auditoriums, lobby and new concession stand the last week of March. “We’re keeping our fingers crossed. After another two weeks, we’ll probably know more on how we’re going.” With the foundation set and framework for the risers complete, the next step is to install the seats. Mazrimas said the large theater will seat about

275 viewers, the largest of all the auditoriums. e six other auditoriums seat about 100 to 180 people. e last auditorium, located where the original theater stage used to be, will seat about 40. Mazrimas said everyone is working hard to finish the projects. He said the electricians will be working feverishly on the lobby and the concessions in the seven weeks between now and spring break. “At this point, where we’re at, a lot can happen in seven weeks to get it done,” Mazrimas said. Mazrimas said there were some setbacks with the weather and freezing temperatures, since there was still some facade work necessary and a lot of in-and-out movement working on the auditoriums. Mazrimas said custom windows were eventually installed on the outside of the building a couple weeks ago when the temperatures were not so low. Despite the state of the theater,

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Filed in the McHenry County Recorder’s Office Jan. 8 to 15: Q Residence at 812 Northampton St., Woodstock, was sold by Mary and Ricardo Rodriquez, Woodstock, to Steven Pollace, Woodstock, for $165,000. Q Residence at 10530 Bull Valley Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Donna Davis, Woodstock, to Kim Olson and Cynthia Rooney-Olson, Woodstock, for $360,000. Q Residence at 10102 Country Club Road, Woodstock, was sold by Susan Knaak n/k/a Susan B. Concialdi, Woodstock, to John and Lesley Palenske, Woodstock, for $175,000. Q Residence at 2612 Michael St., Wonder Lake, was sold by Stacey Napoleoni f/k/a Stacey Holzkamp, to Martin Lugo, Wonder Lake, for $30,500. Q Residence at 8516 Memory Trail, Wonder Lake, was sold by Mary Lou Wecker, Wheaton, to Barbara Freeman, Wonder Lake, for $35,000. Q Residence at 7428 Maple Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by State Bank, Wonder Lake, to Rutkowski Living Trust, Wonder Lake, for $35,000. Q Vacant lot at 4605 E. Lake Shore Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Chicago Title Land Trust Co., Chicago, to Gerald Guanci and Georgiann Faso, Chicago, for $20,000. Q Residence at 2422 Aspen Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Carrollton, Texas, to Norma Valdez, Woodstock, for $89,900. Q Residence at 210 Clover Chase Circle, Woodstock, was sold by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Carrollton, Texas, to Jose Rodriguez, Woodstock, for $156,000. Q Residence at 4410 Lake Shore Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by William Shimuk, Chicago, to Dawn and Noah Miller, Lake Zurich, for $70,000. Q Residence at 606 Park St., Woodstock, was sold by Daniel and Judith Beck, Hebron, to Nicholas Weber, Woodstock, for $110,000. Q Residence at 8913 Oriole Trail, Wonder Lake, was sold by Amando Cruz, Wonder Lake, to Elizabeth Bowman, Wonder Lake, for $62,500.

Mazrimas said hundreds of Groundhog Days fans came to see the movie in the theater during the weekend, a larger turnout than in years past. He said 226 people attended the Feb. 1 showing of “Groundhog Day,” and 553 people came to see the showings Feb. 2. is was the first year the theater offered a showing at 8 a.m. Feb. 2, which brought in 253 patrons. Mazrimas said “Groundhog Day” screenplay writer Danny Rubin had never seen a digital presentation of the movie and ended up staying to watch the entire film. ough progress has slowed, Mazrimas said he thanks everyone for their continued support of the project. “It’s taken longer than what we would have liked, but the end result will be worth the wait,” he said. “It will look really good.” To see photos of the theater’s ongoing construction, visit www.facebook. com/woodstocktheatre.classiccinemas.


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Feb. 5-11, 2014

» REGIONAL TRAVEL

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Community

Get lost in the Northwoods of Boulder Junction An escape to the Northwoods of Wisconsin can be a delightful winter or summer getaway. Back when we were dating, when my husband first mentioned his family frequented Boulder Junction, I thought he was referring to Colorado. I’d never heard of Boulder Junction, Wis. Otherwise known as the Muskie Capital of the World, the town of Boulder Junction lies in central Vilas County and encompasses the basin of the Trout and Manitowish rivers, which flow into the nearby Flambeau River. Boulder Junction is located near the Northern Highland-American Legion State Forest. Trees such as aspen, red and white pines, yellow birches and sugar maples can be found in the area. One allure of Boulder Junction is that it provides a welcome retreat any time of year. I’ve visited in both winter and summer and have become smitten with its many charms. ough Boulder Junction is about a five-and-a-half-hour drive from Woodstock, the scenic trip is well worth it. Like me, I’m sure many people will fall in love when they first lay eyes on the towering pines that lead into a comforting fortress of nature and away from concrete buildings, cubicles and traffic. When first entering Vilas County, visitors may feel as if they’ve stepped into a scene from an old-world

fairytale. ere also is an abundance of wildlife in the area’s forests – including eagles, loons, osprey, black bears, owls and albino deer. e albino deer herd of Boulder Junction Rhonda is said to be one of Mix Wisconsin’s great Roaming With national treasures. e deer also are re- Rhonda ferred to as white or ghost deer and have pure white coats, pink noses, ears and hooves. About 1,000 people live year-round in town. ere are a variety of souvenir shops and a small selection of restaurants and hotels. ere’s also a cafe. e Dancing Bear Cafe offers coffee, tea, small gifts and one of the best massage chairs ever created. e cafe is a popular tourist attraction due to the massive rocking chair that sits outside – perfect for photo ops. Another interesting place in town is McGann’s Cafe and Wine Bar. e owners are very friendly, and the bar menu features a variety of coffee, teas, domestic and imported wines and microbrews. ere are a number of activities happening in the town year-round.

But the main reason my husband and I enjoy visiting the Boulder Junction area is not just to shop or hang out at the bar. e wilderness surrounding Boulder Junction is a nature-lover’s paradise. People who can’t tolerate bugs or don’t enjoy camping, fishing or exploring the great outdoors will probably not have much fun. But people who don’t mind roughing it for a few days will enjoy the abundance of earthy treasures. Here are just a few things the area has to offer. In winter Boulder Junction is located in what is known as the Lake Superior Snowbelt. is means heavy snowfall in the form of lake-effect snow is common, which translates to opportunities for a lot of fun winter activities. Snowmobiling is popular, and there is a large snowmobile rental facility in town. Visitors also can take part in ice fishing, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Equipment for outdoor sports can be rented at several shops. In summer With the warm weather, visitors can participate in camping, horseback riding, bicycling, hiking, swimming, birdwatching, canoeing, kayaking and,

of course – fishing. Boulder Junction has been called the “Muskie Capital of the World” for good reason – there are 194 lakes within nine miles of the town and 50 of the lakes are known for their Muskie concentrations. ere also are many walleye, bass and panfish. Sports Afield magazine recently recognized Boulder Junction as one of the best outdoor sports towns in America. I love Boulder Junction and Vilas County for many reasons, one of them being my husband proposed to me on what we’ve dubbed our own island, on a lake in those northern woods. But I also love the area for its wild beauty and mystery. e land, which once belonged to Native Americans, many of whom still live in the county, holds a lot of magic and many secrets. Perhaps only the ghost deer know them all. For information, visit boulderjct. org. How to get there Take I-90 north to Highway 51 all the way to Minocqua. en take Highway M to Boulder Junction.

Rhonda Mix maintains a travel blog at www.midwesternadventures.com.

IN BRIEF

WHS dress donation drive and dress sale Woodstock High School’s class council of 2015 is hosting a dress donation drive from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16, to collect dresses for a sale in March. Tax deductions are available for donated dresses. On Saturday, March 1, the class council will host a Prom Fashion Show in the high school auditorium. At that time, all donated dresses will be resold at a fraction of their original cost. All proceeds will be used to help reduce the cost of tickets for the prom in May. For more information, call the school at 815-338-4370.

Rethink your drink with MCDH The McHenry County Department of Health is partnering with other Illinois health departments to kick off the Rethink Your Drink monthlong campaign to encourage residents to limit sugary beverages to make healthy beverage choices. The campaign is an initiative of Illinois Alliance to Prevent Obesity, a diverse coalition made up of more than 140 organizations across the state, which has focused on raising awareness of the health harms of sugary beverages since 2010. The department will collaborate with the schools to educate students about the health effects of drinking sugar sweetened beverages. The goal of the IAPO is to ensure trends in obesity in Illinois are stable by 2015 and moving downward by 2018. To learn more about the campaign, visit preventobesityil.org.


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Feb. 5-11, 2014

HIGHLIGHTS

Woodstock supports Operation Christmas Child By JANET DOVIDIO The Independent Woodstock plays an important part in the network of participants in the Samaritan’s Purse program Operation Christmas Child. e Woodstock Assembly of God Church is one of the Illinois relay centers for contributions from McHenry County residents. Heather Vierck, a member of the Woodstock Assembly of God Church, serves as the Woodstock relay center coordinator for Operation Christmas Child. She shared information about many generous participants this year. Contributions came from 14 churches, Around the Clock Restaurant, Catalent Pharma Solutions, Given Sports and Physical erapy, and Sherwin-Williams. Read Between the Lynes, on the Woodstock Square, offered shoe boxes and fliers to its shoppers. e Woodstock Relay Center processed 3,037 shoe boxes from churches, individuals, organizations and businesses. Simultaneously, the North Suburban Chicago team, of which Woodstock is a part, collected 31,000 boxes. Nearly 10 million boxes were sent to needy children in more than 100 countries. A special airlift of 65,000 shoe boxes went to the Philippines for children affected by Typhoon Haiyan. 65,000 boxes were also sent to Iraq

for children fleeing Syria. “For many of the children who receive these gifts, this shoe box will be the first gift they have ever received,” Vierck said. “A simple gift packed with love can communicate hope and transform the lives of children worldwide.” For information about this worldwide program, visit www.samaritanspurse.org/occ.

Dennis Anderson, A d CFP® Jenny Murray, M AAMS® Branch Manager Assistant Branch Manager Senior Vice President Senior Registered – Investments Financial Associate

The Reilly Team

ĐĐНĐĐН

Rausch named Director of Note Choral Director magazine publishes an annual “Directors of Note” report in which it showcases a handful of outstanding vocal music educators from around the country. Woodstock High School choral director Paul Rausch was nominated by the magazine’s readers and selected by the editorial staff to represent Illinois. He was chosen from a large group of talented elementary, middle and high school choral directors, vocal music directors and music teachers who specialize in voice. e 2013 “Directors of Note” feature was published in the January 2014 issue of Choral Director. Paul Rausch joined the Woodstock High School staff in the fall of 1984 as a vocal music instructor and has worked there ever since. He was recognized at the Jan. 21 District 200 board meeting for this recent honor. News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.

BBrian i RReilly ill Senior Vice President – Investments

David D id RReilly ill Financial Consultant

The Wormley Team

James Wormley, W l CFP® Senior Vice President – Investments

Matt Wormley M W l Financial Consultant

Ryan Wormley, W l AAMS® Senior Vice President – Investments

SSandy d PPeterson Senior Registered Financial Associate

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ONCE IN A WHILE SOMETHING NEW CAN HAVE HISTORY Founded by a financial services veteran with a family legacy of serving investors that spans six generations and 120-years, Benjamin F. Edwards & Co. is an investment firm that strives to put our clients first and provide the informed investment advice you deserve. Trust. Integrity. Respect. These are the principles that guide us as we help you build a plan that fits your unique financial goals and objectives.

Proudly serving all investors in the McHenry County area. Stop by or give us a call.

Benjamin F. Edwards & Co. 11621 Catalpa Lane, Woodstock, Illinois 60098 Phone: 815-337-4485 Toll Free: 855-337-4485

benjaminfedwards.com 2013-1473 Exp. 9/30/2015 Member SIPC


14

Feb. 5-11, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

COMMUNITY


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

FLASHBACKS 25 years ago Q The Woodstock Plan Commission recommended an amendment allowing for churches and other places of worship to have temporary lodging of homeless persons. Q Tom Kennelly was named Wonder Lake Fire Protection District chief. Q The Woodstock Musical Theatre Company held auditions for its production of “Cinderellaâ€? at the Woodstock Opera House. Q The Woodstock High School boys basketball team defeated Marian Central Catholic High School 78-64 behind Mark Granzetto, who scored 20 points. 20 years ago Q The Woodstock School District 200 Board of Education voted to not pass a resolution asking local municipalities for a moratorium on residential building. Q WHS graduate and Northern Illinois University student Amy Kunzie began a college internship at Walt Disney World. Q New York University student Patricia Kennelly, a WHS graduate, took ďŹ rst place in shot put in the Metropolitan Athletic Congress/New York Road Runners Club

Feb. 5-11, 2014

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RELIGION NOTES Invitational. 15 years ago Q The Punxsutawney Phil-let, created by Tavern on the Square, won the Mayor’s Trophy at the annual Taste of Groundhog Days competition. Q Woodstock City Council member Brian Sager announced he would run to retain his council seat in the upcoming election. Q The McHenry County Catholic Education Foundation purchased 27.5 acres of land for a future Marian Central athletic complex. Q The Marian Central girls basketball team defeated Montini 41-36 behind 14 points from Michelle Stilling. 10 years ago Q U.S. Rep. Phil Crane, obtained $500,000 in funding to be split between Illinois’ two Challenger centers, Woodstock and Bloomington. Q The Independent proďŹ led the new D-200 dual-language program. Q Marcus Belgrave’s Octet performed “The Louis Armstrong Traditionâ€? at the Opera House. Q The WHS freshman wrestling team won the Fox Valley Conference Freshman

Wrestling Invitational with 266 points behind Mike Millare, who defeated the No. 1 seed to win the 98-pound weight class. Five years ago Q Private fundraising efforts began to raise $325,000 to build a 7,000-squarefoot skatepark in Bates Park. Q A book signing for “Cubbie Blues: 100 Years of Waiting Till Next Yearâ€? was held at Read Between the Lynes with Ronnie “Woo-Wooâ€? Wickers – self-proclaimed Cub mascot – entertaining the crowd. One year ago Q Woodstock residents celebrated the 20th anniversary of the release of the motion picture “Groundhog Day.â€? Q Greenwood resident Bill Schuette received the Award of Excellence at the D-200 Education Foundation Groundhog Days fundraiser. Q The McHenry County Habitat for Humanity opened a ReStore home improvement retail location in the former K-Mart building on Route 47. Q The Woodstock North High School dance team became the ďŹ rst team from the school to qualify for an IHSA state tournament.

CHRIST LIFE ÂŁĂŽĂˆÂŁ{ĂŠ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡{™Î{ĂŠ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-iÂ˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ĂŠ9ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂ€ÂœĂ•ÂŤ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°Ê/Â…Ă•Ă€Ăƒ`>Ăž EDEN BAPTIST £™äÎÊ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡nÂŁ{‡Çn{Ç Worship: 3 p.m. Sunday (Spanish) FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST ÂŁÂŁÂŁĂŠ7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÓÇΣ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Testimonal Service: 8 p.m. UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]Ê£äÊ>°“° FIRST PRESBYTERIAN nĂŠ °Ê,ÂœĂ•ĂŒiĂŠ{ÇÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă‡ĂŠĂŠ Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?ĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠ>Â?Â?]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠ>°“° UĂŠiÂ?Â?ÂœĂœĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤĂŠ`ˆ˜˜iĂ€]ĂŠx\Îäʍ°“°Ê7i`˜iĂƒ`>Ăž FIRST UNITED METHODIST Óä£Ê7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎΣäÊ Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]ĂŠ`Ă•Ă€ÂˆÂ˜}ʙÊ>Â°Â“Â°ĂŠĂƒiĂ€Ă›ÂˆVi°Ê FREE METHODIST ™Î{ĂŠ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡Î£näÊ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž GRACE FELLOWSHIP ÓääÊ >ÂˆĂ€Â˜ĂƒĂŠ ÂœĂ•Ă€ĂŒĂŠUĂŠnÂŁxÂ‡ĂŽĂŽĂ‡Â‡Ăˆx£ä UĂŠĂœ>˜>ĂŠ Â?Ă•LĂƒ]ĂŠĂˆ\Ă“xĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠn\ÂŁxʍ°“°]ĂŠ7i`˜iĂƒ`>Ăž GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday (casual); 8:30 a.m. (traditional), 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) Sunday UĂŠ `Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂ…ÂœĂ•Ă€]ʙ\{äÊ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž HERITAGE BAPTIST 4609 Greenwood Road *°"°Ê "8ĂŠ{ĂˆÂŁĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡xÇx‡££™ä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]ʙÊ>°“° MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION 8617 RidgeďŹ eld Road, Crystal Lake 815-455-1810 Worship: 6:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. Saturday REDEEMER LUTHERAN £ÎÓäÊ i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡™ÎÇä Worship: 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž UĂŠ*Ă€>ĂžiĂ€]ÊÇʍ°“°Ê/Ă•iĂƒ`>ÞÊ>˜`ĂŠĂˆĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠ/Â…Ă•Ă€Ăƒ`>Ăž RESURRECTION CATHOLIC 2918 S. Country Club Road 815-338-7330 Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL xäÎÊ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ä™xäÊ Worship: 8:30 and 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]ĂŠÂ“ÂœĂƒĂŒĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂƒ]Ê£äÊ>°“° ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN {ä£Ê-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠÂœÂ…Â˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡xÂŁx™Ê Worship: 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]棊\ÎäÊ>°“° ST. MARY CATHOLIC ĂŽÂŁĂŽĂŠ °Ê/Ă€ĂžÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎÇÇÊ Worship: 7:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday; 5 and 6:30 p.m. (Spanish) Saturday; 7:30, 9 and 10:30 a.m., noon (Spanish), 5 p.m. Sunday THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă¤ĂŠ Ă€Âˆ`}iĂŠ>˜iĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡{Â™ĂˆÂ‡Ă¤x{n Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Ă“Ă¤ÂŁĂˆĂŠ>Ă€ĂŒÂ?>˜`ĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎ{‡£ÇäÎ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE VINE ÂŁÂŁĂŽĂ“ĂŠ °Ê>`ÂˆĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎnä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER Ă“Ă“xĂŠ7°Ê >Â?Â…ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎLJÎxĂŽ{ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠˆ˜`ĂƒÂ…ÂˆvĂŒiĂ€Ăƒ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°]ĂŠ/Ă•iĂƒ`>Ăž WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD £Óä£Ê i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°UĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ÂŁĂŽÂŁĂˆ Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday prayer service, 10 a.m. worship service WOODSTOCK BIBLE ÇÇäÊ °Êˆ“L>Â?Â?ĂŠĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ĂŽĂ¤Ă¤ĂˆĂŠ Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Sunday school: 9:30 a.m. (3 years through ďŹ fth grade) UĂŠ °,° °° Â°ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ˜ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂ€Ăž]ĂŠÂŁÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ>Â°Â“Â°ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂŁ\ÂŁxʍ°“°Ê Sunday


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Feb. 5-11, 2014

COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

CALENDAR

Feb. 5 to 18

Upcoming events in the Woodstock area U Events are free unless otherwise noted

PHOTO: ANDY B

5 | WEDNESDAY D-200 KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION FAIR Verda Dierzen Early Learning Center 2045 N. Seminary Ave. 6 to 8 p.m. 815-338-8883 An informational registration fair will be held for parents of children entering kindergarten.

6 | THURSDAY WOODSTOCK SENIOR CLUBS Hearthstone Communities 840 N. Seminary Ave. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. $2.50 for lunch 815-344-3555 The activities will include tai chi, coffee klatch, cooking demonstration, trivia, bingo and card games. Registration required. D-200 KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION FAIR Verda Dierzen Early Learning Center 2045 N. Seminary Ave. 6 to 8 p.m. 815-338-8883 See Feb. 5 JAIL BRAKERS Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. 6:30 p.m. 224-422-7431 jailbrakers@gmail.com Jail Brakers is a support group that provides a safe place for children and families to express their emotional reactions to separation from a family member who has been incarcerated.

7 | FRIDAY TLC CONSERVATION WORK DAY Hennen Conservation Center 4622 Dean St. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservemc.org The Land Conservancy of McHenry County seeks volunteers to help with the restoration project. Dress to work outside. Tools and refreshments will be provided. FAMILY MISSION NIGHT Challenger Learning Center 222 Church St. 6 p.m. $12 per person 815-338-7722 challengerillinois.org Participants will fly a mission to rendezvous with a comet as it streaks across the galaxy. SHARING OUR ONENESS READING AND DISCUSSION GROUP Unity Spiritual Center 7 p.m. 225 W. Calhoun St. 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org The ongoing group based on Mark Nepo’s, “The Book of Awakening,” meets every Friday to read a selection, discuss it, reflect on practice steps and share experiences. ‘SYLVIA’ Woodstock High School Black Box Theatre 501 W. South St. 7 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 See The Entertainer, page 10.

8 | SATURDAY HABITAT RESTORATION Dufield Pond 11750 Country Club Road 9 a.m. to noon 815-337-9315 Individuals, students, small groups and families with children older than 6 can participate in restoring native habitat at the conservation area. RECYCLING DRIVE Farm Bureau 1102 McConnell Road 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 815-338-0393 mcdef.org McHenry County Defenders will collect fluorescent tubes, rechargeable batteries, car batteries, button batteries and block white styrofoam for recycling with a suggested donation of 50 cents per pound and 50 cents for each fluorescent. Electronics such as computers, TVs and monitors also will be accepted for a donation. BOOK SIGNING Read Between The Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 1 to 3 p.m. 815-206-5967 The public is invited to meet Annie Hansen, author of “Give Me Chocolate.” ‘SYLVIA’ Woodstock High School Black Box Theatre 501 W. South St. 2 and 7 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 See The Entertainer, page 10. A TRIBUTE TO THE ROLLING STONES Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 8 p.m. $38 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 10.

9 | SUNDAY TLC CONSERVATION WORK DAY Yonder Prairie Area 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservemc.org The Land Conservancy of McHenry County seeks volunteers for to help with the restoration project. Dress to work outside. Tools and refreshments will be provided. CHINESE NEW YEAR PARTY Green Garden Restaurant 1678 S. Eastwood Drive 1 to 3 p.m. 815-334-2618 A party open to all area families who have adopted children from China will be hosted by Rick and Ellen Bellairs. Call 815-334-2618 for reservations. MUSIC ACROSS THE DECADES Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 2 p.m. 815-338-0542 See The Entertainer, page 10.

10 | MONDAY COFFEE WITH THE CHIEF Woodstock Police Department 656 Lake Ave. 815-338-6787 Sergeant Larry Drish from the Cook

County Sheriff’s bomb unit will discuss his 25 year career in explosives detection and he will bring his K-9 partner Ali with him.

11 | TUESDAY BLOOD DRIVE Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 4 to 7 p.m. 815-338-0542 Heartland Blood Centers’ mobile coach will be in the parking lot for a blood drive. Appointments are requested at heartlandbc.org, but walkins are also welcome. ALZHEIMER’S & DEMENTIA FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Valley Hi Nursing & Rehabilitation 2406 Hartland Road 6 p.m. 815-334-2817 Caregiving tips and strategies will be discussed. DISTRICT 200 BOARD OF EDUCATION Clay Professional Development Center 112 Grove St. 7 p.m. woodstockschools.org The meeting will be on the second floor. Use the parking lot behind Clay Academy and enter via Door 5.

12 | WEDNESDAY TLC CONSERVATION WORK DAY Yonder Prairie Area 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservemc.org See Feb. 9. DAYTIME BOOK CLUB Read Between the Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 12:30 p.m. 815-206-5967 The group will discuss, “The Whistling Season,” by Ivan Doig.

Voted No. 1 in Illinois for midsize markets in 2013. See The Entertainer, page 10. MONTESSORI SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE Crystal Lake Montessori School 3013 S. Country Club Road 9 to 11 a.m. 815-338-0013 clms.org Interested families can visit the school that offers programs for children 6 weeks to middle school. A TRIBUTE TO JOE COCKER Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 8 p.m. $38 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 10. DOUBLE BILL CD RELEASE CONCERT Unity Spiritual Center 225 W. Calhoun St. 8 p.m. $10 donation offsquare@gmail.com See The Entertainer, page 10.

16 | SUNDAY DRESS DONATION DRIVE Woodstock High School 501 W. South St. 1 to 3 p.m. 815-338-4370 The class council of 2015 will be collecting gently used prom and homecoming dresses for a fashion show and dress sale on March 1. Donations are tax deductible.

17 | MONDAY PRESIDENTS’ DAY No school, District 200 VILLAGE OF BULL VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION The Stickney House 1904 Cherry Valley Road 7 p.m.

STAGE LEFTOVERS Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7:30 p.m. 815-338-4212 See The Entertainer, page 10.

EVENING BOOK CLUB Read Between the Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. 815-206-5967 The group will discuss “The Monuments Men‚“ by Robert M. Edsel.

14 | FRIDAY

18 | TUESDAY

OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 10.

HELPING PAWS NEW VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION Helping Paws Shelter 2500 Harding Lane 7 p.m. 815-338-4400 helpingpaws.net Helping Paws will welcome new volunteers and offer a monthly orientation.

FOOD FOR FINES Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. All day 815-338-0542 The library will waive overdue fines — $5 maximum — in exchange for canned food donations. Amnesty does not apply to lost or damaged charges.

15 | SATURDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET McHenry County Farm Bureau 1102 McConnell Road 9 a.m. to noon Free woodstockfarmersmarket.org

CITY COUNCIL MEETING Woodstock City Hall 121 W. Calhoun St. 7 p.m. QUILTERS DISCUSSION FORUM Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. 815-338-0542 woodstockpubliclibrary.org The group will discuss topics related to the art of quilting including construction, design, tools and books.

20 | THURSDAY

WOODSTOCK SENIOR CLUBS Hearthstone Communities

840 N. Seminary Ave. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A fee will be charged for lunch, $2 donation for bingo. 815-344-3555 The activities will include a coffee klatch and bingo. Registration is required.

ONGOING OPEN VOLLEYBALL Mondays Woodstock Recreation Center 820 Lake Ave. 6:45 to 9 p.m. Free for members, $4 nonmembers 815-338-4363 woodstockrecreationdepartment.com Teams are formed at random each week to play volleyball. COFFEE AT THE CAFÉ FOR SENIORS Tuesdays Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 1 to 3 p.m. Senior citizens are invited to drop in for coffee. MINDSHIFTERS GROUP Tuesdays Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun 6:30 p.m. $5 suggested love offering 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org A support group focused on the practical use of self-help tools for personal and spiritual growth will be presented weekly by Dr. Michael Ryce. WEDNESDAY JAM GROUP Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun 1 to 4 p.m. Free 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org See The Entertainer, page 10. BINGO Wednesdays Woodstock Moose Lodge 406 Clay St. 7 to 9:30 pm. 815-338-0126 Games will include crossfire. Food will be available. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. SOBER MOMS AA MEETING Thursdays Blue Lotus Temple 221 Dean St. 10 a.m. 847-809-1104 Moms with a desire to stop drinking are invited to meet with the group. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Fridays Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 815-338-2833 See The Entertainer, page 10. VFW FISH FRY Fridays VFW Post 5040 240 N. Throop St. 5 to 8 p.m. $8.50 815-338-5040 Fried fish plus additional menu choices will be served. This event is open to the public. BEST BET SELECTION To submit calendar items, e-mail pr@thewoodstockindependent.com or visit thewoodstockindependent.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Feb. 5-11, 2014

Service Directory AC/HEATING

17

Small blocks are $40 for 4 weeks. Call 815-701-9268 and ask for Jen for details.

CARPENTRY

ATTORNEY

CLEANING SERVICES

COLLISION REPAIR

Heating, Cooling, Plumbing and Water Heaters

Woodstock 815-337-4200

e on r servic 24 -hou & models es all mak

Boiler & h heating ot water speciali sts!

24-Hour Service ASPHALT SERVICES

MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF SERVICE CALL - Service upgrades Since - Repairs 1986 - Maintenance

FINANCIAL SERVICES

ENGINE REPAIR

ELCTRC. CONTRACTOR

B&J SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

Residential - Commercial

Authorized and stocked service center for Briggs & Stratton, Tecumseh & Kohler Engine Co., Honda, Subaru-Robin, Engs., Murray & M.T.D. products.

Chain saws serviced & sharpened.

Delaware Electric Co.

Call 815-648-2813

Fully Insured Fully Licensed

10302 Alden Rd., Alden, IL

815-338-3139

HEALTH INSURANCE

FOLK MUSIC LESSONS

HOME EXTERIORS

PAINTING Professional interior and exterior painting. Fully insured. 35+ yrs exp. Free estimates. Local references. Senior discounts.Winter Rates

J.B. Decorating 847-658-8512

INSURANCE

REMODELING

INSURANCE

Mark Mitchell Insurance Agency 5RXWH‡:RRGVWRFN

815-334-1000 www.markismyagent.com SPACE FOR RENT Party? Anniversary? Baby Shower? Birthday? Retirement? Wedding Reception? Meeting? Woodstock Church Hall with full kitchen available daytime or evenings. Reasonable rates.

Redeemer Lutheran Church For details, call (815) 338-9370 www.rlcw.com

TECHNOLOGY

TUTOR

To Advertise, Call Jen at 815-338-8040 Crossword Answers


18

Feb. 5-11, 2014

SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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HELP WANTED

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HELP WANTED Technician experienced with small engine repair for ATV, UTV, Snowmobile, Outdoor Power Equipment. Must have own tools. Call 815-308-5705 for appointment.

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May the Sacred Heart of -HVXVEHDGRUHGJORULÂżHG loved & preserved throughout the world. Sacred Heart of Jesus pray for us. St Jude worker of miracles pray for us. St Jude helper of the hopeless pray for us. Thank you, St Jude. J.H.

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Subscribe to YOUR TRULY LOCAL NEWS SOURCE

today. Call (815) 338-8040 to receive The Independent every week. Regular price: $35/year in 60098 & 60097 zip codes.

UĂ&#x160;/ Ă&#x160;7"" -/" Ă&#x160; * 671 E. Calhoun St. Woodstock, IL 60098 (815) 338-8040 thewoodstockindependent.com

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WANT TO BUY

WANTED TO BUY Old or new working or not outboard motors, chainsaws, motorcycles, mopeds, bicycles, ďŹ shing tackle, all sorts of stuff. CASH ON THE SPOT 815-322-6383

NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENT

Sunnyside Apartments - Marengo (Section 8 Coupon Welcome) 1 BR $600-700/ month, 2 BR $700-800/month Free parking, coin laundry on premises, near town and school Security deposit special, mention this ad. 1060-2 Briden Drive and 610 E. Grant Hwy. Marengo, IL Habla espanol ->Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;xĂ&#x2C6;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C; ,Â&#x153;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;{ NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENT

Sunnyside Apartments - Woodstock (Section 8 Coupon Welcome) 1 BR $750/ month, 2 BR $800-820/month Free parking, coin laundry on premises, near town and school Security deposit special, mention this ad. 750-756 St. Johns Road, Woodstock, IL Habla espanol ->Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;xĂ&#x2C6;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C; ,Â&#x153;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;{

Read the whole story in Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

To

Northern Illinois Antiques Association Presents Its

54th Annual Antique Show

Forest Hills Lodge Rockford, Illinois Saturday, February 15, 2014 10:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

Sunday, February 16, 2014 11:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. Located 1/2 mile east of Route 251 on Route 173 1601 West Lane Road Loves Park, Illinois Donation $6 - $5 with this ad

FREE PARKING Email: NIADA@aol.com www.NIADAAntiques.com

Jen at

815-338-8040 CLUES ACROSS 1. Yearly tonnage (abbr.) 4. Licenses TV stations 7. Brain wave test 8. Rowing fulcrum peg 10. Arabian Gulf 12. 55121 MN 13. Trash & tin 14. Actress Farrow 16. Egg of a louse 17. Lesion 19. A Scottish cap 20. Poi vegetable 21. Illness from neurosis 25. Moving truck 26. Gallivant 27. Millisecond 29. Trigonometric function 30. Pinna 31. Loud noise 32. Small auto accidents 39. Thin wire nail 41. Many subconciousness 42. Rocket scientist Werner Von 43. Albanian currency 44. Sum up 45. Grapefruit & tangerine hybrid 46. SE Asia palm genus 48. Drew off ďŹ&#x201A;uid 49. Severe & cruel 50. Before 51. It never sleeps 52. Used to be United ___

CLUES DOWN 1. Saucerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s companion 2. Foot controls 3. Administrative unit 4. Residential mortgage authority 5. High quality French brandy 6. Gilbert Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sullivan song 8. Steeped beverage 9. PreďŹ x used in anatomy, biology 11. Nanosecond (abbr.) 14. Mayan language 15. Create mentally 18. Atomic #45 19. 2000 pounds 20. Oceanic rise or fall 22. Did to excess 23. Pouch or baglike structure 24. Browning of the skin 27. A ďŹ tting reward (archaic) 28. Diego, Francisco or Anselmo 29. Cognate 31. Physicians 32. Duplicity 33. Doctor of Education 34. E. Canadian province 35. Beat thoroughly 36. $10 gold coins 37. Monarchs or dictators 38. Duke: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Silver Foxâ&#x20AC;? 39. Dull claptrap 40. Showed old movie 44. Express pleasure 47. Reciprocal of a sine

SPONSORED BY



Advertise, Call

Everyone Loves Puzzles! A good way to draw attention to your business is with a fun puzzle.

For only $50 your Business Logo, Name, Phone Number, and Address will appear below our puzzle every week!

Call 815-338-8040 for details.


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PUBLIC NOTICES Sold for General Taxes of (Year): 2010 Sold for Special Assessments of [Municipality & Special Assessments No.: (N/A), Warrant No.: (N/A), Installment No.: (N/A)] THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD FOR DELINQUENT TAXES Property Located At: Part of 2720 Barreville Rd, McHenry, IL Legal Description or Property Permanent Index No.: 14-14-400-024 This notice is to advise you that the above property has been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of redemption from the sale will expire on: JULY 17, 2014 The amount to redeem is subject to increase at 6 month intervals from the date of sale and may be further increased if the Purchaser at the Tax Sale or his Assignee pays any subsequently accruing taxes or Special Assessments to redeem the property from subsequent forfeitures or Tax Sales. Check with the County Clerk as to the exact amount you owe before redeeming. This notice is also to advise you that a SHWLWLRQKDVEHHQĂ&#x20AC;OHGIRUD7D['HHGZKLFK will transfer title and the right to possession of this property if redemption is not made on or before: JULY 17, 2014 This matter is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of McHenry County, McHenry County Government Center, 2200 N Seminary Ave, Woodstock, Illinois on: August 21, 2014 at 1:30 P.M. in Room 103. You may be present at this hearing, but your right to redeem will already have expired at that time.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Feb. 5-11, 2014

NOTICE TO: Donald L. Naker; Patricia A. Naker; Anastacia C. Naker; Occupants or persons in actual possession of real estate herein described; County Clerk of McHenry County, Illinois; and unknown Owners and Parties interested in said real estate. Tax Deed No 11TX010030 Filed: JANUARY 29, 2014 TAKE NOTICE County of McHenry Date Premises Sold: October 31, 2011 &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWH1R Sold for General Taxes of (Year): 2010 Sold for Special Assessments of [Municipality & Special Assessments No.: (N/A), Warrant No.: (N/A), Installment No.: (N/A)]

THIS PROPERTY HAS BEEN SOLD FOR DELINQUENT TAXES Property Located At: 4301 Bayview Drive, Crystal Lake, IL Legal Description or Property Permanent Index No.: 15-30-253-001 This notice is to advise you that the above property has been sold for delinquent taxes and that the period of redemption from the sale will expire on: JULY 17, 2014 The amount to redeem is subject to increase at 6 month intervals from the date of sale and may be further increased if the Purchaser at the Tax Sale or his Assignee pays any subsequently accruing taxes or Special Assessments to redeem the property from subsequent forfeitures or Tax Sales. Check with the County Clerk as to the exact amount you owe before redeeming. This notice is also to advise you that a SHWLWLRQKDVEHHQĂ&#x20AC;OHGIRUD7D['HHGZKLFK will transfer title and the right to possession of this property if redemption is not made on or before: JULY 17, 2014 This matter is set for hearing in the Circuit Court of McHenry County, McHenry County Government Center, 2200 N Seminary Ave, Woodstock, Illinois on: August 21, 2014 at 1:30 P.M. in Room 103. You may be present at this hearing, but your right to redeem will already have expired at that time. YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY Redemption can be made at any time on or before JULY 17, 2014 by applying to

Index No. 08-31-480-009. The real estate is improved with a residence. Sale terms: 25% GRZQRIWKHKLJKHVWELGE\FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HGIXQGVDW the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the SXUFKDVHU QRW WR H[FHHG  LQ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG funds/or wire transfer, is due within twentyfour (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject WRFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW8SRQSD\PHQW in full of the amount bid, the purchaser ZLOO UHFHLYH D &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWH RI 6DOH WKDW ZLOO entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real HVWDWH DIWHU FRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQ RI WKH VDOH 7KH property will NOT be open for inspection

and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the FRXUW Ă&#x20AC;OH WR YHULI\ DOO LQIRUPDWLRQ ,I WKLV property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, H[DPLQHWKHFRXUWĂ&#x20AC;OHRUFRQWDFW3ODLQWLII¡V attorney: CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630)  3OHDVH UHIHU WR Ă&#x20AC;OH QXPEHU 14-11-37421. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for

YOU ARE URGED TO REDEEM IMMEDIATELY TO PREVENT LOSS OF PROPERTY Redemption can be made at any time on or before JULY 17, 2014 by applying to the County Clerk of McHenry County, 667 Ware Rd, Woodstock, Illinois. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE COUNTY CLERK ADDRESS: 667 Ware Rd, Woodstock, IL 60098 TELEPHONE: 815-334-4242 BOGO, LLC Purchaser or Assignee Dated: JANUARY 29, 2014 (Published in The Woodstock Independent February 5, 2014) L8975

PUBLIC NOTICE

the County Clerk of McHenry County, 667 Ware Rd, Woodstock, Illinois. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT THE COUNTY CLERK ADDRESS: 667 Ware Rd, Woodstock, IL 60098 TELEPHONE: 815-334-4242 BOGO, LLC Purchaser or Assignee Dated: JANUARY 29, 2014 (Published in The Woodstock Independent February 5, 2014) L8976

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on -$18$5<DFHUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHZDVĂ&#x20AC;OHG LQWKH2IĂ&#x20AC;FHRIWKH&RXQW\&OHUNRI0F+HQU\ County, Illinois, setting forth the names and SRVWRIĂ&#x20AC;FHDGGUHVVHVRIDOORIWKHSHUVRQV owning, conducting and transacting the EXVLQHVV NQRZQ DV 5(<1$¡6 5(17$/ AND CLEANING SERVICE located at 769 Dover Court, Crystal Lake, IL 60014 Dated JANUARY 30, 2014 /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent February 5, 2014) L8977

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on -$18$5<   D FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWH ZDV Ă&#x20AC;OHG LQ WKH 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH RI WKH &RXQW\ &OHUN RI McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth WKH QDPHV DQG SRVWRIĂ&#x20AC;FH DGGUHVVHV RI all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as

21

THUNDERBIRD located at 709 W Brink St, Harvard, IL 60033 Dated JANUARY 30, 2014 /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent February 5, 2014) L8978

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on -$18$5<   D FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWH ZDV Ă&#x20AC;OHG LQ WKH 2IĂ&#x20AC;FH RI WKH &RXQW\ &OHUN RI McHenry County, Illinois, setting forth the QDPHV DQG SRVWRIĂ&#x20AC;FH DGGUHVVHV RI DOO of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as NICK NOWAK GLASSWORK located at 809 N River Rd, Algonquin, IL 60102 Dated JANUARY 30, 2014 /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent February 5, 2014) L8979

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on )(%58$5<DFHUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHZDVĂ&#x20AC;OHG LQWKH2IĂ&#x20AC;FHRIWKH&RXQW\&OHUNRI0F+HQU\ County, Illinois, setting forth the names and SRVWRIĂ&#x20AC;FHDGGUHVVHVRIDOORIWKHSHUVRQV owning, conducting and transacting the business known as INSIDE located at 1241 N Green St, McHenry, IL 60050 Dated FEBRUARY 3, 2014 /s/ Katherine C. Schultz (County Clerk) (Published in The Woodstock Independent February 5, 2014) L8980

REAL ESTATE NOTICES IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BEAR STEARNS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I LLC ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-HE2 Plaintiff, -v.DANIEL TORRES, et al Defendant 12 CH 02110 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 21, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on February 24, 2014, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 710 CARLISLE DRIVE, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098 Property

a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-11-37421 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 12 CH 02110 TJSC#: 33-23946 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, \RX DUH DGYLVHG WKDW 3ODLQWLII¡V DWWRUQH\ LV deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I585194 (Published in The Woodstock Independent January 22, 2014, January 29, 2014, February 5, 2014) L8946

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the following property shall be sold at public auction to the highest bidder pursuant to the Judgment of the Circuit Court of the Twenty-Second Judicial Circuit, McHenry County, Illinois, in Case No. 11 CH 2236, Heartland Bank and Trust Company, as successor in interest to Citizens First National Bank v. Chicago Land Trust Company, et al., Defendants. The name, address and telephone number of the person to contact for information regarding the real estate is: Heartland Bank and Trust Company, c/o Timothy L. Owen, Vice President, 401 N. Hershey

? NT TOUR JUNK A W YO OU DO Y D OF ALL I GET R

Rd., Bloomington, Illinois, Telephone: (309) 662-4444. The common addresses and improvements of the real estate are: undeveloped farm land located at in McHenry County at Greenwood Road, Woodstock, Illinois, 60098. The property will NOT be open for inspection, and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the properties. Prospective bidders are DGPRQLVKHGWRFKHFNWKHFRXUWĂ&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\ all information. The time and place of the sale is: Thursday, February 20, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at the McHenry County Courthouse, Room 262, 2200 North Seminary Avenue, Woodstock, Illinois, 60098-2837. Sale terms: This is an â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? sale for cash. The successful bidder must deposit 10% GRZQ LQ FDVK RU FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV DQG WKH EDODQFH LV GXH LQ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV ZLWKLQ 24 hours of the sale, and the required fee for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. There will be no refunds. The real estate is subject to the unpaid general real estate taxes, to any unpaid special assessments, and to all easements, reservations and restrictions of record. (Published in The Woodstock Independent January 22, 2014, January 29, 2014, February 5, 2014) L8950

CALL TODAY!

815-338-8040 6HOOLWLQWKH:RRGVWRFN,QGHSHQGHQW&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV


22

Feb. 5-11, 2014

’Canes

GAME OF THE WEEK

Continued from Page 24

up and play four quarters of basketball.” “Down the stretch we are looking for consistency,” Budmayr said. “I know every coach is saying that right now. I need four quarters of basketball. … When we do that, we’re solid. We come out on top.” Davis said the team is looking to reclaim the regional title and hoping to win a sectional championship. “We need other players to step up

SPORTS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

shooting-wise,” Davis said. “We can’t just rely on Sarah. I think defense always wins games, but I think we need more outside shooters.” Benigni said she is having fun in the moment. “I think we are really good,” Benigni said. “We play together really well. It’s fun to play with everyone on the team.” e IHSA Class 3A regional tournament will start Monday, Feb. 17, at Richmond-Burton High School.

Woodstock vs. Woodstock North (boys basketball) — 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4, at Woodstock North High School. What to look for: The crosstown rivals play for the first time this season. The Blue Streaks swept the series last year, and the

Herendeen

Thunder will be looking for revenge. Look for the Blue Streaks to attempt to use their size inside to dominate in the paint. The Thunder will try to use their speed to create turnovers and easy baskets. The two teams will match up again eight days later, Wednesday, Feb. 12, at Woodstock High School.

Continued from Page 24

versatility on offense and defense and pure energy as assets that will continue to serve him well. “He’s always sprinting and leads by example in how he plays. Any coach would appreciate that,” said Wacker. “A lot of kids say they’re motivated, but Lincoln has walked the walk and stayed on task.” Since picking up the sport at age 4. Herendeen has always felt at home on the baseball diamond. His enjoyment translated to many high school successes as a hitter, pitcher and infielder. He was named to an all-tournament team in a national youth tournament. He also played in the Dominican Republic and on the USA Great Lakes Regional team. During his senior year at Marian, despite injury and not playing in enough games to be eligible for all-conference honors, he was named to the all-area first team by the Northwest Herald. But for all the individual discipline and commitment Herendeen brings to his workouts, he is aware of the constant benefit of his support system, which includes his family, friends and coaches. “Something for which I am grateful is that I have been surrounded by good coaching my whole life,” said Herendeen, referring especially to his father, Jim Herendeen, an assistant coach for the MCC Scots, and Craig Strang, Herendeen’s hitting coach and coach in Lit-

MCC pitcher and former Hurricane Lincoln Herendeen will pitch for New Mexico State. COURTESY PHOTO

tle League and at Marian. “e way I see it is that I’ve had college-level coaching my whole career.” “He will thrive there and it will be a great stepping stone and perfect environment to take him to the next level [of professional baseball],” said Strang. “If he goes there and does what he is capable of doing he will have a long career.” Local fans may still catch Herendeen during the MCC Scots games this spring. e team’s home opener is Wednesday, March 19.


SPORTS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Feb. 5-11, 2014

23

» COLUMN

WHS grad Meyer wins St. Olaf Triangular Indoor track Phillip Meyer, a Woodstock High School graduate, probably wants to run much faster than 4 minutes, 23 seconds in the mile by the time the indoor season is over. But that time is a great place to start. e first month into the indoor season, the St. Olaf College harrier, who helped St. Olaf win a NCAA Division III crosscountry title in the fall, has first-place and third-place finishes already to his credit. Meyer won the St. Olaf Triangular with a time of 4:23.59. He won the event by more than eight seconds over the second-place finisher, Carlton College’s Walter Edstrom. As a team, St. Olaf finished second with 113 points. Elise Beattie (Woodstock) won the mile run as her college team, University of New Hampshire, lost a 221.5-215.5 dual meet to the College of the Holy Cross. Beattie finished the race in 5:05.40. She also was ninth in the mile run at the Joe Donohue Invitational, which was held at the Reggie Lewis Center in Roxbury, Mass. She finished in 5:04.99. Amy Miskowicz and Madison

Smith, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater throwers and Marian grads, have competed in the NAIA vs. NCAA Challenge, which was hosted by Olivet Nazarene University. Miskowicz Dan competed in the shot put (seventh, 12.62) Chamness and weight throw The College (eighth, 13.79). Smith Report finished 24th in the shot put (9.29) and 28th in the weight throw (9.61). Wisconsin-Whitewater was fourth with 87 points. University of Arizona distance runner Kayla Beattie (Woodstock) finished 15th in the mile at the University of New Mexico-hosted Cherry and Silver Invitational. She finished the race in 5:10.64. Team scores were not kept. Brad Lorr (Woodstock) and Cody Johnson (Woodstock) competed at the Private College Invitational at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wis. Lorr finished third in the indoor heptathlon. He fin-

ished with a total of 3,383 points. Johnson competed in the 55-meter dash (20th, :07.05) and 200-meter dash (21st, :24.89). Swimming Western Illinois lost a 146-57 decision to Eastern Illinois University on January 25. Haley Brasile (Woodstock) scored points in three events. Individually, the Western Illinois senior picked up fourth place finishes in the 200-yard freestyle (2:10.68) and 100 freestyle (1:00.98). She also was a member of the Western Illinois 200 freestyle relay, which finished in 1:44.07. One week later, Western Illinois split a double dual with Maryville University and St. Louis University. e outing was hosted by SLU. Western Illinois defeated Maryville (161-34) but lost to St. Louis (146-61). Brasile competed in three events in that outing as well, finishing fourth in the 200 freestyle (2:12.97) and seventh in the 100 freestyle (1:01.80). She also was on the Western Illinois 400 freestyle relay, which finished second in 3:55.11. Loras College won its final two dual

meets before their conference finals, which will occur in a matter of weeks. e men’s swimming team defeated Beloit College (126-65) and Morningside College (125-97). Loras swimmer Matt DeWane (Woodstock) won the 100 breaststroke (1:08.97) and finished fourth in the 200 individual medley (2:26.96) in the win over Beloit. He also was a member of the 200 medley relay, which won in 1:45.76. In the win over Morningside, he competed in the 100 breaststroke (third, 1:09.60) and 50 freestyle (fifth, :24.16). e Loras 200 medley relay, of which DeWane was a member, finished third in 1:47.12. Ice hockey Joe White (Wonder Lake resident) has one goal and three assists for Worcester State University this year. White has played in 14 games. His lone goal was a game winner. Worcester State is 8-8-1 overall and 4-7-1 in the Massachusetts State Collegiate Athletic Conference. Dan Chamness follows the college athletic careers of Woodstock-area athletes.

SCOREBOARD WOODSTOCK Boys Basketball Q Jan. 29: WHS 47, Grayslake Central 50 For WHS, Mitch Kohley scored 12 points. Boys Wrestling Q Jan. 31: The WHS wrestling team placed 10th out of 14 teams in the Fox Valley conference tournament. For WHS, Kevin Zange and Alan Hafer placed 3rd. Girls Basketball Q Feb. 1: WHS 62, Hebron 38 For WHS, Selena Juarez scored 10 points. Q Jan. 31: WHS 54, Johnsburg 46

Wrestling

For WHS, Cody Brand scored 12 points Q Jan. 29: WHS 44, Grayslake North 62 For WHS, Cody Brand scored 13 points. WOODSTOCK NORTH Boys Basketball Q Jan. 29: WNHS 41, Grayslake North 43 For WNHS, Josh Jandron scored 17 points. Boys Wrestling Q Jan. 31: WNHS placed 14th out of 14 teams in the FVC tournament. For WNHS, Cody Barnes placed 3rd and Randy Kline placed 5th.

Girls Basketball Q Feb. 1: WNHS 46, Warren 45 For WNHS, Ashley Jones scored 10 points. Q Jan. 31: WNHS 39, Hampshire 52 For WNHS, Jeni Crain scored 11 points. MARIAN Boys Basketball Q Jan. 31: MC 57, Marmion 68 For MC, Adam Pischke scored 18 points. Q Jan. 29: MC 47, Carmel 60 For MC, Adam Pischke scored 17 points. CO-OP Boys Swimming

Q Jan. 31: Woodstock 71, Cary Grove 79 For Woodstock, Spencer Delgado, Aaron Royer, Andrew Wood and Alex Kovac won the 200-yard medley relay with a time of 2:10.40. Q Jan. 29: Woodstock 44, Huntley 126 For Woodstock, Andrew Wood, Jake Schmitt, Jose Pozo and Alex Kovac won the 200 medley relay with a time of 2:19.71. Girls Bowling Q Jan. 30: The girls bowling team placed 7th out of 8 teams at the FVC Conference tourney.

Continued from Page 24

what I’ve done, and I am ready to go right now.” Taylor said he will continue to approach Remke the same way he has all year. “Last year was last year,” Taylor said. “A lot of wrestlers settle for last year, and they kind of coast on that. … He’s almost forgot about all of that, and he attacks each match like he needs to prove himself again. He’s just one of those kids that sets his sights on something and won’t stop until he achieves it.”

Woodstock e Blue Streaks finished the regular season 7-14 and placed 10th in the Fox Valley Conference Tournament Feb. 1. Sophomore Kevin Zange placed third at 145 pounds; sophomore Nick Sundberg placed fourth at 152 pounds; and senior Alan Hafer placed third at 160 pounds. e Blue Streaks entered seven wrestlers in the tournament and head coach Jon Grell was proud of how they performed given the competition. “We were able to get three medalists, and our conference is very tough,” Grell said. “Every weight class is stacked.” Grell said his wrestlers need to focus and not make mistakes in order to have success going forward. “My focus this week will be to talk about those little things, the details,” Grell said. “In the close matches, it’s the little things that make the difference. e conditioning, the fire, the tech-

nique is there. Keeping their heads in high-pressure situations is what they need to work on. “Everyone knows how to take advantage of your mistakes at this level. You need to be the one who capitalizes on your opponent’s mistakes.” Sundberg, who qualified for the sectional tournament last year, is 23-7 and is currently ranked as an honorable mention in his weight class by Illinoismatmen.com. He defeated three ranked or honorable-mention wrestlers in the past three weeks, and said he will need to relax in order to make it to state this year. “I just have to wrestle the way I know how,” Sundberg said. “I need to wrestle mistake-free, be relaxed and not think about it. I wrestle a lot better that way.” Woodstock North e under did not win a meet this year, but they did have some individuals who stood out. At the FVC Tournament, sophomore Randy Kline placed fifth at 160 pounds and junior Cody Barnes placed third at 220. “[Kline and Barnes] both did well,” said head coach Nate Zentner. “at conference meet is tough with both 2A and 3A schools. It gives a good preview in terms of the state series. … ey took it up a notch and wrestled well in their final matches. ey kept on rising to the occasion.” Barnes, who qualified for the state tournament last year and is currently ranked eighth in his weight class by

Illinoismatmen.com, said an improved mental approach should help his performance at the IHSA state tournament this year. “Last year, I wasn’t really prepared for state,” Barnes said. “Now I have the mental [ability] to place at state. I’ve got to go in there and get the match over with. I’ve got to take shots, pin them when I can and keep my points up. Being aggressive is the key component in

wrestling. “My goal this year is to place at state. To be honest, I believe I have the skill and potential to do it.” Zentner said Barnes is wrestling very well right now, and he will encourage him to continue to be aggressive. “{I’ll tell him] to wrestle his match, his style and just be smart,” Zentner said. “He’s usually a go-getter, and we’ll encourage him to continue that.”


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Feb. 5-11, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Sports » WRESTLING IHSA CLASS 2A REGIONAL

Wrestlers look toward postseason By JAY SCHULZ The Independent

Marian Central’s Ellen Koscielniak looks to pass the ball Jan. 30 against Jacobs High School. The Lady ‘Canes lost 56-48. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

» BASKETBALL MARIAN CENTRAL

Lady ’Canes look for consistency By JAY SCHULZ The Independent Jackie Budmayr knew this season would be different. e Marian Central Catholic High School girls basketball head coach would have to find a way to fill the void left by the graduation of Shannon Wuensch, the Hurricanes’ alltime leading scorer. Strong senior leadership and the surprise development of a younger player have put the Lady ’Canes (11-7, 3-4 Suburban Christian Conference) on track to defend the regional championship they won last year. “Just like I thought, it’s a whole different dynamic,” Budmayr said. “We don’t have the big 3-point shooter, but I am so happy because this team has stepped up as a whole, and we have the whole team contributing. at’s tough to shut down.” Four of the five starters for the Lady ’Canes are seniors – Ellen Koscielniak, Brie Baumert, Hanna Davis and Angie Wuerger. Wuerger just returned to the court after missing about three weeks due to injury.

Budmayr said the seniors have really stepped up their game. “In the last few games, I have really been proud of our seniors,” Budmayr said. “Ellen, Brie and Hanna have really stepped up their play and their leadership. ey have really impressed me.” Davis, who leads the team in rebounding, said the team has come a long way since her freshman year’s five win season. “I do think we dropped a few losses that we definitely shouldn’t have,” Davis said. “However, I’m really proud of how far we’ve come. To be 11-7 is a really huge accomplishment. … But we are still hungry. We still want to take it to the next level.” Stepping up to fill the scoring void from Wuensch’s graduation has been junior Sarah Benigni, who leads the team in scoring. She now holds the Lady ’Canes record for most points in a game with 30, which she scored Dec. 5 against St. Francis. “Sarah really surprised us,” Budmayr said. “We saw a lot of it over the summer.

D-I signing in Marian alum’s future By MEGAN IVERS The Independent Tuesday, April 15, is a day marked on the calendar for McHenry County College baseball player and Marian Central

Catholic High School alum Lincoln Herendeen, and not because of the Scot’s home game that day. e day marks a milestone in Herendeen’s baseball career, when he will officially sign a letter of intent to attend

One, and he’s taken steps to accomplish that. He’s really done a great job, gotten stronger and stayed motivated.” Wacker noted Herendeen’s

Marian Central e Hurricanes finished the regular season 7-14. Head coach Chris Taylor said he is pleased with how his team performed this season and is looking for his young wrestlers to continue to develop and his veteran wrestlers to step up to the regional competition. “We’re very young, so [regionals] will be a good experience for a lot of the kids,” Taylor said. “Individual-wise, I would expect strong performances from [Joe] Herff and [Jack] McGuire. ey’ve been solid all year long. Obviously, [Nick] Remke is a favorite to win it. [Tom] Welch is another [wrestler] at the top of his game right now.” Taylor said Andrew Virzi and Kolton O’Neil could have good days as well. Remke, a junior, qualified for the IHSA state meet last year at 138 pounds and is now wrestling at 145. He is 25-3 this season and is currently ranked seventh in his weight class by Illinoismatmen.com. Remke said he has one goal – to win a state title. “Right now, I just have to stay on the path that I’m on,” Remke said. “I need to stay attacking always and keep my trust in coach and myself. I need to know I can win because I know I can. “I feel extremely comfortable with what I’ve done, trust

Please see Herendeen, Page 23

Please see Wrestling, Page 23

... ose aren’t 3-point field goals. is is her scoring consistently a high percent of her shots and taking good shots.” “I knew Sarah was good, but I didn’t know she was as good as this,” Davis said. “When she broke the school record [for most points in a game], it was crazy. Shannon worked to break that record for the last three years, and Sarah did it in her first 10 games on varsity.” No one was more surprised that she had broken the record than Benigni. “It was exciting,” Benigni said. “I was surprised. I didn’t know what happened until after the game.” e Lady ’Canes will play Wheaton Academy, Immaculate Conception and Chicago Christian before the regional tournament. e team is hoping to avenge earlier season losses against all three teams. Budmayr said until the regional tournament, her coaching staff “will watch a lot of film and try to prepare them the best we can, and hope for them to show Please see ’Canes, Page 22

Lincoln Herendeen will play baseball for New Mexico St.

NCAA D-I New Mexico State University. “Lincoln has been very determined since he came in,” said McHenry County College head coach Jared Wacker. “It was his goal to play Division

e wrestling teams from Marian Central Catholic, Woodstock and Woodstock North high schools wrapped up regular season competition the week ending Feb. 1. All three teams will compete in the IHSA Class 2A regional tournament at 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, at Hampshire High School. e teams are unable to fill all weight classes and will struggle to advance as teams to the sectional tournament. But each team does have individual wrestlers who have their sights set on sectional and state competition.

GAME OF THE WEEK

COLLEGE REPORT

SCOREBOARD

The Streaks and Thunder face off in boys basketball

Dan Chamness follows indoor track, ice hockey and more

Scores, stats and highlights from area teams

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The Woodstock Independent Feb 5th 2014  
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