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23-29, 2013 Oct.Oct. 23-29, 20131

Woodstock

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

I NDEPENDENT The

Published every Wednesday

Est. 1987

Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill.

www.thewoodstockindependent.com

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EDUCATION

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

COMMUNITY

Movie’s Woodstock premier to benefit D-200 technology PAGE 10

WNHS strikes up marching band program PAGE 12

Librarian chosen as one of 40 in NASA Mars program PAGE 16 » CITY COUNCIL

NO TASTE LIKE HOME City implements

With homebrewing as popular as ever, a group of residents gather to mix up their own suds

maintenance ordinance Tenant group says ordinance will be a ‘tool’ to take on landlords By KATELYN STANEK The Independent e Woodstock City Council approved the adoption of a property maintenance ordinance Oct. 15, amending the city code to include standards HOW THEY VOTED found in the To approve the adopInternational tion of a property mainProperty tenance ordinance: Maintenance Code. Yes e new Maureen Larson ordinance Brian Sager — which Mark Saladin city officials Joe Starzynski said would RB Thompson be enforced Mike Turner only when Absent inspectors Julie Dillon received complaints about violations — goes further than Woodstock’s previous standards, regulating minimum interior temperatures, insect extermination and disposal of garbage, among other things. “It goes so far as to say if there’s peeling paint, we can come knock on your door,” said Councilman Mark Saladin, who, like the rest of the council in attendance,

Woodstock’s Ric Larson pours a homebrewed IPA at his basement bar. Larson is part of a growing number of Americans who brew their own beers. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KATELYN STANEK

Local homebrewers give new meaning to ‘microbrew’ By KATELYN STANEK The Independent Ask Ric Larson how much he’s spent on the homebrewing operation he runs out of his garage, and you won’t get a direct answer. “Oh, wow. I don’t even — wow.”

Homebrewing beer for private consumption is rising in popularity in the United States, but it’s not because it’s cheap or simple. Part art, part science, the weeks-long process of mixing, heating, cooling and fermenting in specialized equipment goes on in garages, basements and sheds every day. For Larson and fellow homebrewers Kent Frisbie and Luke Lohmeyer, gathering every other week to oversee batches of India Pale Ale, rye beers and whatever else interests their palates means a lot of work, a sizable investment, and an even bigger payoff.

A thermometer tracks the temperature inside a kettle used for brewing at Ric Larson’s Woodstock home. INDEPENDENT

Please see Homebrew, Page 3

Please see Maintenance, Page 3

PHOTO BY KATELYN STANEK

» CITY COUNCIL

Assisted-living facility receives extension Downtown Company LLC will have another 18 months

to begin construction on a four-story, 56-unit assistedliving facility in Woodstock, a project that was first approved in 2009.

At its Oct. 15 meeting, the Woodstock City Council approved a second extension for the Woodstock assistedliving, special-use permit for the southwest corner of West Calhoun and Tryon streets. “What we’re trying to do is create an in-town location for the facility so there’s more access to the town and

INDEX

By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

OBITUARIES OPINION EDUCATION A&E MARKETPLACE

so it can become part of the community,” said petitioner Ed Jacobs of Downtown Company. “e biggest challenge right now is financing.” Jacobs said he has been trying to secure a financier since the request was first approved in 2009. Mayor Brian Sager said while first extensions are almost perfunctory, second extensions are offered, but more critically analyzed. “I would have to indicate to

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC NOTICES SPORTS

16 22 23 25 32

the petitioners … that, certainly, if we were to approve the second extension tonight and development did not come to fruition, then the likelihood of an additional extension beyond that would be next to zero,” Sager said. “I would have to be very frank.” James Kastner, planning and zoning administrator, said the Plan Commission was not in support of the project when it was first requested in 2009, Please see Extension, Page 5

The Woodstock Independent 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 www.thewoodstockindependent.com

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Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

NEWS


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 23-29, 2013

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Wonder Lake Chamber president retires Jim King will take over the position Dennis Palys held for 15 years By RHONDA MIX The Independent Wonder Lake Chamber of Commerce President Dennis Palys recently retired, stepping down from the role he’s held for the last 15 years. Palys said his decision to retire was tied to his new position as a village trustee. “I still plan to be active in the village,”

Homebrew

Palys said. “I took on the role as trustee because I thought it would be unfair to do both jobs.” Palys had positive things to say about his time as chamber president and his plans for the future. Dennis “It was a great way Palys to work with other businesses,” he said. “As a business owner, you have a feeling you want to give something back to the community. e chamber offers that opportunity.”

Palys said he hopes to continue on with his goal of creating a unified Wonder Lake. Jim King, formerly the chamber treasurer, will now take on Palys’s former presidential duties. “[King] is a great asset to the chamber,” Palys said. “He is taking on an admirable role as the president.” Chamber Executive Director Donna Sullivan said Palys was a great asset for the organization during his time as president. “Dennis Palys embodies the definition of volunteer,” she said. “He was the driving force and backbone of Wonder Lake’s largest festival – our Fourth of July celebration – for years and continues to be an

important part of these events.” Sullivan said Palys can be found volunteering not only at the chamber, but within almost all the clubs and organizations within Wonder Lake. She said he has regularly removed buoys, and participated in sportsman club fishing events and also was involved on the homeowners association board for many years. “He was a leader in being a liaison between businesses, organizations and the citizens of this community,” Sullivan said. “As a friend and neighbor of Dennis and of his wife, I firmly believe this new journey in Dennis’s life will continue to benefit those around him.”

Continued from Page 1

“It’s like most hobbies,” said Frisbie. “You’ve got to enjoy it, because you’re not doing it to save money.” According to the American Homebrewers Association, nearly 1 million Americans brew their own beer, a trend that has been increasing in recent years. Woodstock resident Doug Wilson, a former brewer at Emmett’s Brewing Company who now works as a craft brewery sales representative for Malteurop North America, said he believes homebrewers are partly responsible for the recent explosion in the craft brewery movement. “Homebrewers are a big reason for craft brews,” said Wilson, himself a former homebrewer. “But likewise, craft brewing is a big reason you see so many people interested in homebrewing.” Larson, Frisbie and Lohmeyer buy many of their ingredients from suppliers that specialize in homebrewing, but some of their batches contain a

Maintenance

Luke Lohmeyer adds hops to a kettle of homebrewed beer. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KATELYN STANEK

decidedly local twist. “I grow some hops up the chimney,”

Continued from Page 1

voted in favor of the measure. “I think we have to be cautious about interpretation.” e new ordinance was presented in a memo from city staff as an attempt to ensure health and safety by enacting standards of living not previously regulated by the city’s building code, giving inspectors an opportunity to issue citations in instances in which homes and apartments “do not meet basic occupancy ... standards.” Many surrounding municipalities, including McHenry, Harvard and Crystal Lake, have approved similar ordinances. Cort Carlson, Woodstock’s community and economic development director, said inspectors would only hold property owners to the code’s guidelines if they received complaints from neighbors or tenants. “It would be a complaint-based code,” Carlson said. “We’re not out driving through town looking for [violations].” Mayor Brian Sager, who was also supportive of the measure, nonetheless cautioned that the complaint-based enforcement policy could be used to further personal disputes between residents. “I would hate to see us in a position in which neighbors would use the opportunity outlined in the ordinance to create … a less-than-neighborly approach,” Sager said. But Carlson said building inspectors already must distinguish between legitimate concerns and petty arguments. “Honestly, these are some of the same issues we already deal with on the codeenforcement side of things,” Carlson said. “We look at it from a common-sense approach.”

e measure was approved in a 6-0 vote by the City Council, with Maureen Larson, Brian Sager, Mark Saladin, Joe Starzynski, RB ompson and Mike Turner voting in favor of the ordinance. Councilwoman Julie Dillon was absent.

Tenant group supports property ordinance A represenative from a group of aggrieved tenants said Woodstock’s adoption of a property maintenance ordinance is an important step, something that will help them take on the landlords they say fail to maintain their rental units and allow them to fall into total disrepair. “is is something our group wanted to see enacted,” said Patrick Rozhon, who was one of about 20 current and former renters who first approached the City Council in September to ask for the city’s help in settling their disputes with their landlords. But Rozhon, who addressed the council in support of the measure, cautioned that it won’t address all of the tenants’ concerns, which include existing code violations and other issues pertaining to renters’ rights. “It’s not a cure-all,” Rozhon said. “It’s another resource, it’s another tool in helping us achieve our goals, which is to simply maintain basic minimum standards.” — Katelyn Stanek, The Independent

Larson said. “It’s fun Woodstock-grown hops.”

to

have

Following a carefully regimented procedure tracked by smartphone apps, the homebrewers nonetheless inject their own creativity into the process, undertaking experiments to see which water fares the best in brewing — spring water is good, but avoid the municipal supply — and which grains add the most to a batch. “It’s been a learning experience,” Frisbie said. e group brews at one of their three houses for four consecutive months, “until we wear out our welcome,” according to Lohmeyer. en it’s on to the next house, where the biweekly process of setting up beakers, kegs, kettles and heat-exchangers starts anew. “It’s cooking ... it’s science, it’s just fun to get together,” Frisbie said. “And we have really, really, really good families,” Larson said, “who will put up with us.”


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Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

NEWS


NEWS

Council OKs fee waiver for Welles event e Woodstock City Council approved a fee waiver for the use of the Woodstock Opera House by a community group planning a series of events commemorating the life and works of Orson Welles. e waiver, granted to Woodstock Celebrates Inc. at the council’s Oct. 15 meeting, marks the first time in about four years the City Council has approved such a request. A fee-waiver moratorium was enacted in Woodstock in 2009, when financial concerns led the City Council to eliminate free use of public facilities by community groups and related nonprofits. Woodstock Celebrates will use the Opera House as part of its May 2014 series marking the 80th anniversary of the Todd School eatre Festival, an event held on the Woodstock Square that featured a young Welles, who had been a student at the Woodstock boarding school. Fees for rental of the Opera House would have cost $275 plus 10 percent of gross ticket sales. e Woodstock Opera House Advisory Commission recommended the City Council approve the fee waiver. e waiver passed 6-0 as part of the council’s consent agenda, with Maureen Larson, Brian Sager, Mark Saladin, Joe Starzynski, RB ompson and Mike Turner voting for approval. Julie Dillon was absent. — Katelyn Stanek, The Independent

IN BRIEF

WPD seeks Explorers for training program The Woodstock Police Department is now recruiting young adults ages 14 through 21 who are interested in careers in law enforcement for participation in its Police Explorers program. There will be an orientation at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24 in the WPD training room at 656 Lake Ave., Woodstock. The program will enable participants to assist police officers with traffic and crowd control at community events. Once a participant passes a basic police proficiency exam, he or she will be eligible to take part in police ride-alongs and learn more about what a police officer does on a day-to-day basis. Participants also will have the opportunity to assist officers on nonhazardous calls. No new Explorers will be accepted into the program after Dec. 15. For information, call Sgt. Constantino Cipolla at 815-338-2131 or email ccipolla@woodstockil.gov.

CORRECTION In the Oct. 16 issue of The Woodstock Independent, in the article “Plenty of fall fun for families this season,” a location for the Zombie Pub Crawl was misidentified. Main Street Pour House, 214 Main St., will participate in the event. In the same article, the age limit for participants in the Haunted Square was misstated. The event is for people ages 14 and older. The Independent regrets the errors.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 23-29, 2013

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BREAST CANCER 5K EXCEEDS FUNDRAISING GOAL Runners emerge from the mist at the Care4 Breast Cancer 5K Oct. 20. More than 2,500 runners and walkers participated in the event at Woodstock North High School. Hosted by Family Health Partnership Clinic, organizers said they expected the annual fundraiser to exceed its goal of $185,000. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Extension

Continued from Page 1

but the council voted for approval because of its potential benefit to Woodstock. “Based on [Downtown Company’s] market studies and what the city knows, there is a demand for this type of use, not just in Woodstock and McHenry County, but throughout Illinois, there is a demand for it,” Kastner said. Kastner said Downtown Company received a variance for the height and setback of the facility, allowing it to be slightly closer to the street and taller than what’s usually allowed for buildings outside of downtown. Downtown Company has 18 months

to start the project, which Kastner said could cost at least $5 million. Jacobs said once he secures a financier, he estimates construction will take about 10 months. “I hope there’s no reason for another extension,” Jacobs said. Councilman RB ompson said he believed the council should hold off on granting another extension until the project was reassessed. “I just feel that is too long. Standards change,” ompson said. e resolution for a second extension passed 5 to 1, with Sager, Mark Saladin, Joe Starzynski, Maureen Larsen and

HOW THEY VOTED To grant an extension for a special-use permit for an assisted-living facility: Yes Maureen Larson Brian Sager Mark Saladin Joe Starzynski Mike Turner

No RB Thompson Absent Julie Dillon

Mike Turner voting in favor. ompson opposed the extension. Councilwoman Julie Dillon was absent.

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Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

NEWS


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 23-29, 2013

7

OBITUARIES

Caroline H. Musser

Caroline H. Musser, 92, San Diego, formerly of Woodstock, died Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, in San Diego. She was born Aug. 2, 1921, in Woodstock to John and Elizabeth (Schiller) Musser. She graduated from Woodstock Community High School and always referred to Woodstock as “Woodstock the Wonderful.” She joined the U.S. Naval Reserve (Women’s Reserve), commonly known as WAVES, during World War II. She served the nation during the war. When the war ended, she moved to Los Angeles, where she had a long career as an escrow officer in the banking industry. Upon retirement, she moved to Portola Country Club in Palm Desert, Calif. She enjoyed many years of retirement, living as an avid golfer, swimmer and gardener, and had many friends. Survivors include a sister, Lillian Elliott, Rockford; two sisters-in-law, Trudy Musser, Las Vegas, and Dolores Musser, Ukiah, Calif.; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by a sister, Mary Chambers, and six brothers, John, Joseph, Elmer, Harold, Matthew and William (“Bill”) who was killed during World War II. Interment was Oct. 19 at Oakland Cemetery, Woodstock.

Dennis P. Lannert

Dennis P. Lannert, 73, Lake Geneva, Wis., died Oct. 16, 2013, at the JourneyCare Hospice Inpatient Care Unit, Barrington. He was born Oct. 14, 1940, in Pekin to Frederick and Helen (Schreiber) Lannert. On Dec. 28, 1963, he married Tobey Emery. He graduated from Lake Forest College in 1962. Survivors include his wife; two sons, Jeff (Julie) Lannert and Frederick (Holly) Lannert; a daughter, Jennifer (David) Widger; eight

grandchildren; and a sister, Carol (Gordon) Duprey. He was preceded in death by his parents and a brother, Donald Lannert. Visitation was Oct. 18 at SchneiderLeucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. A gathering for family and friends was Oct. 19 at the funeral home, followed by burial at Calvary Cemetery, Woodstock. A memorial Mass was Oct. 19 at St. Benedict Catholic Church, Fontana, Wis. Memorials can be sent to the JourneyCare Foundation Pepper Family Hospice Center, 405 Lake Zurich Road, Barrington, IL 60010, the St. Benedict Catholic Church Music Ministry, 137 Dewey Ave., Fontana, WI, 53125, or to William Guy Forbeck Research Foundation, 23 Peninsula Drive, Hilton Head Island, S.C., 29926.

Bruce E. Steinke

Bruce E. Steinke, 96, Woodstock, died Oct. 9, 2013, at JourneyCare Hospice Inpatient Unit, Woodstock. He was born Sept. 8, 1917, in Woodstock to Herman and Louise (Higel) Steinke. An avid amateur short-wave radio operator, he received his first operator license at the age of 14. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. On June 7, 1942, he married Evelyn Fincannon in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. He worked for the U.S. Post Office in Woodstock for 37 years, retiring in 1975 as assistant postmaster. He was a lifelong member of St. John’s Lutheran Church, where he served as a Sunday school teacher, head usher and on the finance committee. He served on the former District 72 School Board for 13 years. He was a member of the McHenry Wireless Club and the Northern Illinois DX Association. Survivors include his wife; a daughter, Julie Fee, Woodstock; a son, Terry, San Fran-

POLICE BLOTTER Q Francisco Javier Sanchez, 23, 1050 Kishwaukee St., Marengo, was charged Oct. 15 with driving without a valid driver’s license, failure to leave information after striking an unattended vehicle and operation of an uninsured motor vehicle at the intersection of Route 120 and Highway 14, Woodstock. Sanchez posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Nov. 21. Q Kenneth Nepras, 22, 715 Clay St.,

Woodstock, was charged Oct. 16 with battery in the 700 block of Clay Street. Nepras was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond and court date were to be set. Any charges are merely accusations, and defendants or suspects are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

STREET SMARTS Zimmerman Road, between Country Club and McConnell roads, will be closed to thru traffic from about 7 a.m. until 6 p.m., Wednesday to Friday, Oct. 23 to 25, to install a storm sewer manhole structure. The road will be re-opened each evening after 6 p.m.

Average gas price

$3.39

/GAL.

0.07

Reflects average price of regular unleaded gasoline at Woodstock gas stations the morning of Oct. 21.

Woodstock Independent Fall Subscription Special

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cisco; and several cousins. He was preceded in death by his parents. A private family memorial service will be held at a later date. Memorials can be sent to JourneyCare online at www.journeycare.org

Mary Lou Jensen

Mary Lou Jensen 83, Woodstock, died Friday, Oct. 18, 2013, at her home in Woodstock. She was born June 6, 1930, in Richmond Township to Howard and Vera Frances (Bumsted) Vogel. On Sept. 10, 1949, she married Vernon Jensen at Greenwood Methodist Church. She was born and raised on a farm in Richmond Township and as a child she was active Mary Lou in 4H. She graduated Jensen from Richmond High School in 1947. After marriage, she moved to the Woodstock area and joined the First United Methodist Church, where she and her husband were members for more than 60 years. She was active in the women’s group at the church and taught Sunday school. She worked with her husband at Jensen Plumbing and started the bath shop section at the store. She was a member of the Women’s Auxiliary of Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors and the Eastern Star. She will be remembered as a loving wife, mother and grandmother and will be dearly missed. Survivors include her husband; a son Allan (Kathy) Jensen, Woodstock; two grandchildren Meghan and Matthew Jensen; a sister Nancy Vogel, Loves Park; a brother Gerald (Jean) Vogel, Elkhorn, Wis.; and a sister-inlaw, Phyllis Vogel, Arizona. She was preceded in death by her parents;

a son, Craig; two daughters, Susan and Cara; and a brother, Evan Vogel. Visitation was Oct. 21 at Schneider-LeuchtMerwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. Visitation continued Oct. 22 at First United Methodist Church, followed by the funeral. The Rev. Kurt Gamlin officiated. Burial was at McHenry County Memorial Park, McHenry. Memorials can be sent to Journey Care Hospice, 405 Lake Zurich Road Barrington, IL 60010, First United Methodist Church, 201 W. South St., Woodstock, IL 60098, or the Woodstock Fire/ Rescue District, 435 E. Judd St., Woodstock, IL 60098.

DEATH NOTICE

Carol Fuller

Carol Fuller, Woodstock, 84, died Oct. 19. Visitation will be from 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at Grace Lutheran Church, 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road. The funeral will follow at 11 a.m. Burial will be in McHenry County Memorial Park.


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Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Opinion

Woodstock, IL Š 1987

CHERYL WORMLEY

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Publisher, Co-Owner

Cheryl Wormley John C. Trione Katelyn Stanek Jay Schulz Rhonda Mix Lisa Kucharski

PAUL WORMLEY Co-Owner

JOHN C. TRIONE General Manager

KATELYN STANEK Managing Editor

» OUR VIEW

Amid the pink of October, some people make a real difference If the pink sweatshirts, pink football helmets, pink motorcycles and pink everything else weren’t enough to clue you in, October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month. e annual push to raise awareness of — and funds for — breast cancer screenings and treatments seems to grow bigger every year, with corporations pitching ubiquitous pink products and groups around the world hosting big-ticket charity events. e campaigns have become so common they’ve even begun to raise eyebrows among some watchdog groups and media outlets — witness the NFL being taken to task for its “A Crucial Catch” campaign, with Business Insider reporting that less than 10 percent of the proceeds from the sale of its pink merchandise actually goes to cancer research. But beyond the noise of marketing campaigns are the real efforts, made by real people, to raise awareness of this deadly disease and help more of their neighbors have access to lifesaving prevention, detection and treatment. ere are schools, churches and community organizations holding raffles and bake sales, and organizations like the Family Health Partnership Clinic, which hosted its Care4 Breast Cancer 5K here in Woodstock Oct. 20. e annual event, the largest of its kind in McHenry County, drew thousands of people from throughout the region who were united in their desire to raise money for cancer research and awareness — and to have a good time doing it. e area around Raffel Road was awash in pink sported by runners and walkers, and tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars were raised in the process. Fundraisers such as the Care4 Breast Cancer 5K, rooted in community activism and organized to benefit rather than to advertise, are a welcome contrast to the commercialization of October we’ve witnessed in recent years. e organizers, volunteers, participants and supporters who came together to make the event possible deserve our gratitude and our wishes for even more success in the future.

weigh in Email letters to the editor to letters@thewoodstockindependent.com or mail them to 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098.

» YOUR VIEW

Celebrate Woodstock ank you for the editorial supportive of Woodstock Celebrates [“Welles should take center stage,” Oct. 16-22]. Memberships in Woodstock Celebrates Inc. cost $15. Additional donations are very much appreciated as well. WCI is an Illinois nonprofit registered with the Illinois Attorney General as a charity and is a federally tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization. To join, please mail checks to Woodstock Celebrates, Inc., P.O. Box 342, Woodstock, IL 60098. Kathleen Spaltro, Woodstock Celebrates, Woodstock

Football isn’t worth the risk for kids My dad played football in college to pay for his scholarship, and without any encouragement from him, I played high school football and have a messed-up shoulder to show for it. My cousin played for the NFL, and when he left the game, he never even watched it on television. He said, “It’s just a business.” Last week, I saw PBS’s Frontline program “League of Denial” reporting 20 years of research on brain damage in NFL football players. is weekend, I read the New York Times’ article “Tackling, at the Turn of the Century” about Teddy Roosevelt’s attempts to eliminate the brutality of football. He had to settle for only a few minor rule changes.

QUOTABLE

Players are still being told that if a player hits you in the head and “rings your bell,” just suck it up and keep playing. Damaged knees and shoulders are a given when you play high school and college football, but brain damage from concussions and sub-concussive hits is subtle and invisible and most often doesn’t show up until much later in life. I am convinced that kids under the age of 14 should not to be playing football no matter how it’s taught or how much padding they wear. eir young brains are still developing and are especially vulnerable to getting shaken and injured, and they and their parents won’t necessarily have any idea of the damage being done. Is it worth risking permanent brain damage just to play a little football? Jerry Powers, Harvard

Motocross organizers think of neighbors I’m not here to make a big argument about the motocross races story, but I am the announcer at the motocross races at the fairgrounds, and just want to make one fact known. [In response to the article “Moto event makes some residents cross,” Oct. 9-15], the latest I ever talked on the mic was 11:01 p.m. (not 11:30 p.m. as quoted in the story) and that was at the Sept. 13 event, our largest of the season. We were told by the county before we ever had a race that the races cannot go past 11 p.m., and we strived to be done well before

that time at each event. In fact, most events were done before 10:30 p.m. and the first two were actually done before 10 p.m. But, as the racer attendance grew, the races went longer, but that 11:30 time was definitely embellished. I thought about the residents at each event, and we documented everything on paper. Start times, end times, intermission, everything. I looked at my phone that night, when I shut off the sound system and it was 11:01, and I was worried about it, to be honest. e races ended a few minutes earlier. After every event, I thank the sponsors and remind people of the next event we are going to have, then turn off the sound system immediately so nobody can mess around on it. en, I run out to turn off all the lights as soon as possible, thinking of the residents each time I do it as well. We want to work with the neighbors and make everyone happy, we are not thinking, “We have our races, so screw everyone around here.” at is absolutely not the case. Many of the local businesses have told us they have seen increased traffic and business from the racers on Fridays and have thanked us and also jumped on board for sponsorships, too. We are done racing this season but plan to be back next year. We hope we can work with all the neighbors, residents and businesses in the community, and we have a few ideas for that, too. Dave Deringer, Woodstock MX announcer, Spring Grove

“Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.”

— Marie Curie


OPINION

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 23-29, 2013

9

Âť COLUMN

Be an Independent person, family For me, Sunday nights are for connecting with family and friends and for looking forward to the week to come. e connecting with family friends is almost like a calling or something inherent in my being. It’s a must do, before I can move on to the week to come – or on most Sunday nights to writing Declarations for the upcoming week’s newspaper. It may be, in part, the example set by my mom. I remember her calling her parents or writing letters to them on Sunday nights. She seemed to catch up on her correspondence with friends then, too. When I was in college, I received letters on Tuesdays that she had written on Sunday nights. Her calls to her parents seemed to mean a lot to her. I know her letters meant the world to me, and I imagine her friends eagerly anticipated them, too. e urge I feel to connect arises with the setting of the sun on Sunday nights. So, on Sunday nights, before I write Declarations or review what I’ll be doing in the week to come, I send emails, call my older sister, Nann, and or have family over for supper. Well, it’s Sunday night, and I have nearly ďŹ nished connecting with family

and friends. Writing Declarations is going to be easy, because it is a letter to all of you who are reading The Independent this week. is is a special edition. It’s being mailed to all Cheryl of our subscribers and to everyone who Wormley lives in the 60098 Declarations and the west part of the 60097 zip codes. To be more speciďŹ c, every household and business within the boundaries of Woodstock School District 200 is receiving this week’s newspaper in the mail. In newspaper lingo, what we’re doing is called a total-market mailing. e staff and I total-market The Independent about ďŹ ves times a year, for two reasons. First, it gives our advertisers the opportunity to share information about their goods and services with more than 16,000 households. Second, the staff is proud of its delivery of news and information and wants to encourage more people to stay abreast of what’s happening by subscribing to The Independent. We’re giving those of you who aren’t already

subscribers the opportunity to see and read what our subscribers look forward to receiving every Wednesday. We are proud of The Independent and of it being an award-winning newspaper for more than 25 years in regional and state newspaper association contests. We have high reporting and editorial standards, and winning awards veriďŹ es we are succeeding. We also are proud of the high-quality, award-winning photography in each and every issue of the paper. We, the ownership and the staff, are passionate about people and what happens in Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley because we were born here, live here or have worked here for years. e news we publish affects us, too. In addition to publishing The Independent weekly, we also publish e Torch, our total-market feature paper, seven times a year. In addition, we maintain a website and The Independent’s Facebook page. We put some of what’s in the newspaper on the website, and we use Facebook to report sports scores and news alerts. Many people go to our Facebook page to see the dozens of photos we take at community events each week. If you go to

The Woodstock Independent Facebook page, you can see the dozens of photos taken at 2013 Care4 Breast Cancer walk/run this weekend. But it’s The Independent that has everything – all of the news stories, editorials, editorial cartoons, letters to the editor, columns, calendars, news briefs, births, weddings, engagements, anniversaries, entertainment features and reviews, business updates and sports stories. Frequently, someone will stop me and say, “I have friends who live in [another state] who subscribe to The Independent. ey know more about what’s happening in the community than I do.� How would you respond to such a statement? You would probably say what I do, “Here’s an idea. Why don’t you subscribe, and you’ll know what’s happening, too.� If you aren’t already a subscriber, join The Independent people. Check out the special offers on pages 7 and 10. If you are already a subscriber, thanks. I look forward to connecting with all of you again next week.

very anxiety-provoking at times. I’ve worried about what lies around the bend on many occasions. Yet, there have been numerous instances where the mystery was fully welcomed, despite the fear of Rhonda what could happen Mix out there in the great Mix Messages beyond. One reason for this was because I knew things were exactly as they should be. When I ďŹ rst started freelancing for e Independent two years ago, I looked at the opportunity as a good way to develop my writing skills and get to know Woodstock. When I was hired on a few months later as a full-time staff writer, I found myself loving the job. During my time at e Independent, I’ve met many memorable people, some of whom have shared interesting insights. After interviewing Woodstock resident Kady Rachford for the story

“Flying High At 80,� she reinforced my belief that it’s never too late to pursue your dreams and reach for, or for that matter, jump from, the sky. Speaking with the monks of Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple on a few different occasions, their perspectives and Woodstock’s acceptance of the temple reinforced my belief that people of different religions can be respectful and accepting of one another and live harmoniously without compromising their own religious convictions. And Fred and Sue Young, the couple who’d dated in high school, lost touch, found each other again later in life and married at 81 and 80 respectively, reminded me that love is one of the most powerful gifts we’ve been given – that not even time can sever its connection. I’ve enjoyed getting to know the people of Woodstock and working with the staff of e Independent. I want to thank Cheryl Wormley and John Trione for providing such a wonderful opportunity, and I wish all staff members at e Independent much success and happiness, wherever their own roads may lead.

As Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “Take the ďŹ rst step in faith. You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the ďŹ rst step.â€? I’m conďŹ dent that everything happens for a reason – one experience paving the way for the next, leading on like stepping stones across a pond. I’m ready to move up to that next step, and, in time, I know I’ll end up exactly where I’m supposed to be. As my writing goals expand and I enter into this next phase of my life, I hope to gain fresh inspiration to bring my writing to a new level. Without change, we’d all be stuck in that caterpillar stage forever. With change, we’re ultimately propelled into cocoons of reection and growth, where we gradually transform into what we were always meant to be. ank you for taking the time to read my column. And thank you again, to e Independent, for having me on as part of the team. You will be missed but not forgotten.

Cheryl Wormley is publisher of The Woodstock Independent.

Âť COLUMN

A fond farewell It seems kind of ďŹ tting that it is with mixed emotions that I write my last ‘Mix Messages’ column for e Independent. is is in fact, my last week at the newspaper, though I will still contribute to the paper with the ‘Roaming with Rhonda’ monthly travel section. I’ll be getting married Nov. 2 and focusing on a freelance writing career for the time being. Taking on new endeavors, leaving the past behind and changing the course of one’s life can be exciting, but also frightening. I realize I’ve written several times about adventure and welcoming change. But I just wanted to reiterate my feelings that it’s important to look at life as something to be experienced, not just merely lived. e unknown is uncomfortable and

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Rhonda Mix is a staff writer for The Woodstock Independent.

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Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER c.wormley@thewoodstockindependent.com

The Woodstock Independent (USPS #001287) is published weekly at 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Periodicals postage paid at Woodstock, Illinois. POSTMASTERS: Forward address changes to The Woodstock Independent, 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Subscription rates/year: $35 in Woodstock and Wonder Lake, $37 in McHenry County, $42 for snowbirds and $50 outside McHenry County. Letters to the editor: We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarity or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter per month. Letters are due at noon Wednesday and must be signed and include the writer’s address and a telephone number for veriďŹ cation purposes only. Corrections: The Woodstock Independent strives for accuracy. To suggest corrections or clariďŹ cations, email news@ thewoodstockindependent.com.

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10

Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Education

Movie’s Woodstock premier to benefit district By ELIZABETH HARMON The Independent Hollywood. Cannes. Woodstock. Following a tradition that began with the 1993 Bill Murray comedy “Groundhog Day,” Woodstock will be part of the debut of another major motion picture. On Sunday, Oct. 27, Woodstock School District 200 will host the Woodstock pre-

mier of “Free Birds,” an animated comedy starring the voices of Owen Wilson, Woody Harrelson and Amy Poehler. “People have really rallied around this. Our kids have rallied around this, and it’s going to be a great event,” said District 200 Superintendent Ellyn Wrzeski. “Free Birds” producer Cary Granat, also the producer of “e Chronicles of Narnia” and the “Spy Kids” and “Scary Movie”

franchises, approached the district with the fundraiser idea about six weeks ago, Wrzeski said. Some of Granat’s family are Woodstock natives. “It’s a wonderful thing that they offered it to us. It’s a very unique fundraiser, and we’re very grateful to them for thinking of District 200,” Wrzeski said. e Woodstock premier will serve as a fundraiser for the Woodstock School District 200 technology department. “We considered our needs, and as we move into one-to-one computing, this will help put more computers directly into the hands of students,” Wrzeski said. e PG-rated film tells the story of two turkeys from opposite sides of the tracks who travel back in time in an attempt to persuade the pilgrims to serve pizza, not turkey, for the first anksgiving. e movie opens nationwide Nov. 1. “We’ve seen the trailer. It’s very cute,” said Carol Smith, director of community services. “is is an exclusive premier and an opportunity for Woodstock to see the movie before it’s released to the general public.” e movie will be shown on three screens at the Woodstock eatre, at 10:30 a.m., and students from Woodstock North High School’s yearbook staff will serve as “paparazzi,” photographing movie-goers on the red carpet as they enter the theater. Following the movie, beginning at noon, there will be a variety of family events on the Woodstock Square, including pumpkin and scarecrow decorating, a Feed the Flock canned food drive to benefit local food pantries and a “From our Flock to Yours” card signing for U.S. troops. At 12:30 p.m., Woodstock Mayor Brian Sager and District 200 School Board President Paul Meyer will pardon a tur-

‘'FREE BIRDS' WOODSTOCK PREMIER Where: Woodstock Theatre, 209 Main St. When: 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 Tickets: $15 adults, $10 children 12 and younger. Must be purchased in advance at a District 200 facility. key. At 12:45, District 200 dance teams will perform to music provided by KISSFM radio. A live auction will take place in the Park in the Square beginning at 1 p.m. Auction items include two all-access tickets to Selena Gomez’s Friday, Nov. 22, concert at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont, signed “Free Birds” posters, tickets to upcoming Chicago Bears, Chicago Bulls and Chicago Blackhawks games, original collectors art work from “e Hobbit,” “e Lord of the Rings” and “e Chronicles of Narnia.” e Family Alliance Haunted House in the Square will be open from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Food and beverages will be available for purchase, and some of the events have a nominal cost, said Smith. “is wouldn’t have been possible without our volunteers, students, staff and people from the community,” Smith said. “Family Alliance has been great, offering to open their haunted house in the afternoon when it wouldn’t be open otherwise, and the mayor’s office has been extra helpful.” Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for children 12 and younger. Tickets must be purchased in advance at any District 200 school or at the district’s Administrative Services Center, 227 W. Judd St. Seating is limited to about 550, and no tickets will be sold at the theater box office.

HIGHLIGHT

‘Marian Cares’ to help those in need By JANET DOVIDIO The Independent Marian Central Catholic High School Key Club will sponsor a day of service called “Marian Cares” from 1 to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, at the school, 1001 W. McHenry Ave. Key Club advisor Amy Kelly and student members have organized a day of services for people in need in Woodstock, Hebron, Harvard, Hartland, Marengo and Wonder Lake. e day will include a mobile food pantry from the Northern Illinois Food Bank. Tickets will be distributed at 1 p.m. in the school’s gymnasium, with food distribu-

tion starting at 2 p.m. One ticket per family will be issued. Spanish Honor Society members will be on hand to translate. Additional services at the event are the distribution of gently used clothing, courtesy of Blessings Barn, and free blood pressure screenings from Centegra’s Mobile Medical Unit, both from 1 to 3 p.m. “e students volunteered for leadership roles, public relations, hospitality, recycling, refreshments and other responsibilities to make this a positive experience for clients,” said Kelly. “One crew will use about 20 wagons to transport groceries to clients’ cars.” Kelly added, “is is a major effort for our members and a labor of love. We have supportive families, administration and staff, along with amazing kids and trustworthy clients whom we have come to adore.” News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.

Woodstock Independent Fall Subscription Special

1-Year Subscription Only $25! Call 815-338-8040 and mention "Fall Special" or email subs@thewoodstockindependent.com. "vviÀÊÛ>ˆ`ÊvœÀʘiÜÊÃÕLÃVÀˆLiÀÃÊUÊ"vviÀÊÛ>ˆ`Ê՘̈Ê œÛ°ÊÈÊÊ


EDUCATION

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 23-29, 2013

11


12

Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

A&E Pep band marching to its own beat WNHS is launching a marching band program By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent Marching to the beat of its own drums with a new practice schedule, the Woodstock North High School pep band is preparing for a future as a marching band. “It’s not a full-on marching band yet,” said band director Bill Simpson, who has been working with students to integrate marching band fundamentals into pep band performances. For more effective teaching and learning, Simpson said the WNHS music department worked out a change in the curriculum this year to allow for band instruction to be instrument-specific with full-band practices on Monday evenings. With past marching band experience as part of the University of Illinois Marching Illini, Simpson is enthusiastic about providing the experience at WNHS. He said the summer band camp just before school is usually used to prepare music, but this year, the students began learning marching fundamentals and various marching commands. A drum major – a

student leader who conducts the ensemble at games and makes marching calls – also was instituted. Simpson said the pep band also began to add formations during home football game halftime shows, forming a “WN” on the field. While they are not yet moving to new formations during a performance, Simpson said the students are learning positions and fundamentals of movements. “It’s small steps at this point,” he said. “It’s not an overnight, giant change, but we are going to be continually working toward adding more and more to the program.” With smaller, more individualized classes this year, Simpson said the students are seeing positive change and are advancing much quicker. He said having separate practices that focus on specific techniques that vary between instruments saves time when the band of about 45 students practices together. “ese kids are getting a great education with it this year,” Simpson said. “It’s something that’s athletic as well as artis-

“I think it really will be a great asset to what this district has to offer, VSHDNLQJLQÀQHDUWV terms.” — Riley Kohler, WNHS senior

tic, so it opens up their minds in different ways than just the classroom.” Senior sousaphone and tuba player Riley Kohler said he was happy to make band a priority again with the education and experience that is coming from the new schedule and introduction to marching band fundamentals. “It’s really a neat thing to be a part of, because it adds a whole different dynamic to what we do as musicians,” he said. Kohler said compared to other high schools like Hampshire, Huntley and Crystal Lake South, which have gained strong reputations as marching band schools, he did not think there was enough support in Woodstock School District 200 for its high schools to participate at higher levels. However, with the change in curriculum, Kohler said he is more hopeful for the future of marching bands at Woodstock North. “I think it will be a really cool thing to see develop over the next, like, 10 years or however long it takes to really develop into something bigger,” Kohler said. “I think it really will be a great asset to what this district has to offer, speaking in fine arts terms. e more interest we can gain – and we can gain that by improving the way we perform – I think that will really help to draw interest.” Junior trumpet player Cooper Goerlitz said he is looking forward to having at least two years of marching band experience since he plans to study music in college. He said he attributes the motivation to form a marching band to the school spirit created by last year’s successful football team. “We kind of feed off the football team during our performances, so I think we are a lot more motivated this year to make ourselves look good

Junior Cooper Goerlitz, a Woodstock North High School trumpet player, practices for pep band with fellow brass players. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY LISA KUCHARSKI

too,” Goerlitz said. WNHS Principal Brian McAdow said he is happy to see the band and choir programs grow, which used to be taught by one person. He said he agreed that splitting the high schools was the best decision for the students academically, but admits it was a challenge for fine arts and athletic departments. “We’re in our sixth year now, and this is the natural progression,” McAdow said. “Now we have two stand-alone programs, and we’re just looking for them to grow more and more.” McAdow said students’ enthusiasm keeps the programs alive and allows for curriculum changes, and he attributes a growing involvement to Simpson’s previous band direction at Northwood Middle School, which helped promote student interest. This year, WNHS offered jazz ensemble and jazz combo classes. “It really has turned into an ideal situation for these students here,” Simpson said. “It’s the first year we have a full, encompassing music program here at Woodstock North.”


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 23-29, 2013

13

» COLUMN

A rare glimpse into a president’s world It’s not very often America sees images of President Obama scooping his daughter up into his arms or sitting with his wife, Michelle – their heads pressed close together intimately, silhouettes barely visible against a backdrop of Fourth of July fireworks. ese were just a couple of the photos John Bredar, National Geographic filmmaker/author and current vice president of national programming for WGBH, presented during his lecture at the fall opening of the Woodstock Fine Arts Association Creative Living Series Oct. 17. Bredar’s lecture, based on his 2010 documentary film and accompanying book, “e President’s Photographer: Fifty Years Inside the Oval Office,” discussed the evolution of presidential photographers. e film and book tell the stories behind well-known as well as rare presidential photographs, images depicting our nation’s leaders experiencing moments of joy, reflection and heartache. Documentary-style presidential photography first became popular with photographer Cecil Stoughton during the John F. Kennedy administration. “His photography humanized the

Faculty concert to raise funds for LAM Foundation By KATELYN STANEK The Independent A benefit concert featuring Woodstock School District 200 music faculty members and guests is returning to Woodstock High School for its fifth year Sunday, Oct. 27. e event, which benefits the LAM Foundation — a nonprofit that supports research of lymphangioleiomyomatosis, a rare lung disease — will feature a silent auction, raffle and performances. Representatives from the LAM Foundation also will be on hand. “e music teachers always wanted to put on a recital so they could show their students and their families that they can do what they teach,” said Kathy Peiffer, who is organizing the event and whose husband, Duane Peiffer, teaches music at Creekside Middle School. Kathy Peiffer was diagnosed with LAM in 2007, something she said inspired her to organize the event. “People come and continue to support it by helping to organize it ... because they want to support the LAM Foundation,” she said. “I know a lot of these people. ey’re colleagues and they’re friends.” e concert is presented by D-200 Music Boosters and Woodstock Friends of the LAM Foundation. Doors open at 2 p.m. e concert starts at 3 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults and $3 for students and senior citizens.

D-200 MUSIC FACULTY CONCERT Where: Woodstock High School, 501 W. South St. When: Doors open at 2 p.m., concert begins at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27 Tickets: $5 each, $3 for students and senior citizens

president and the first family,” Bredar said. e first official U.S. presidential photographer was Yoichi Okamoto, who served during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. Bredar said Okamoto developed such Rhonda a comfortable relationMix ship with the president that Johnson wouldn’t Arts Review even know the photographer was in the room, allowing Okamoto to capture a variety of candid, powerful moments. ough many presidential photographers may be “apolitical,” according to Bredar, through what he conveyed in his lecture it seems each photographer seeks to build a certain relationship with the president – a sort of trust, allowing the photographer to quietly fade into the background, unnoticed.

Bredar showcased photos from various presidential administrations and discussed different facets of a presidential photographer’s job. He said traditional photographer duties include capturing ceremonial shots – the more typical photos people often see in the media. But perhaps the most important aspect of the job, Bredar said, is documentary-style photography – where images convey a story about each president’s administration in what Bredar described as “four- or eight-year-long photo essays.” President Obama’s photographer, Pete Souza, snaps around 20,000 images per week and all have to be looked at by the president’s photo editor. e photos end up in the president’s photo library as soon as an image is exposed. “As soon as he pulls the disk out of the camera, the photos [are no longer his],” Bredar said. Bredar described the job as critical, since it captures the commander-in-chief’s most public and private moments, showing the

public that the president is also a mortal. “Americans invented the president,” Bredar said.“ese images are a way for us to stay connected to [him].” Regardless of our individual political standings (or lack thereof), I think Bredar’s presentation provided an emotional and personal look into the lives of America’s leaders. I’m glad I attended and had the opportunity to view some amazing snapshots that made me rethink how I may judge President Obama and presidents who served before him. People can get mad and blame all the problems of the country on one man, but the issues of this country are too much for just one man to be responsible for. e truth is, every president has his own private burdens to bear behind closed doors, away from the pointing fingers of the public. Bredar’s lecture helped remind the audience that, at the end of the day, the president is, after all, only human.

Rhonda Mix is a staff writer for The Woodstock Independent.


14

Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

your night and assist you in your quest for raw illumination.”

The Entertainer

WOODSTOCK’S ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS

» MUSIC STAGE LEFTOVERS Oct. 23, Nov. 13, 7: 30 p.m. Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. Free 815-334-3555 The band will include Rich Prezioso, Joe Pesz, Brian Murphy, Laurel Palma, Pete Jonsson and Les Urban. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Oct. 25, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Expressly Leslie Vegetarian Specialties Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. Free expresslyleslie.com The Kishwaukee Ramblers will perform. OPEN MIC NIGHT Oct. 25, Nov. 8, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org Open Mic is sponsored by Off Square Music. Various artists will perform in 15-minute slots. D-200 MUSIC FACULTY CONCERT Oct. 27, 2 p.m. Woodstock High School 501 W. South St. $5 adults, $3 students and senior citizens 815-245-8616

kdpeiffer@ameritech.net The concert will feature a raffle, silent auction, refreshments and performances by D-200 music and theater teachers. Proceeds will benefit the LAM Foundation, an organization dedicated to patient support seeking a cure for lymphangioleiomyomatosis. JAZZ JAM Nov. 1 and 15, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 815-338-4212 $5 donation jazzonthesquare.com John Nellson and Billy Denk will host jazz on the Square. FIRST SATURDAY MUSIC Nov. 2, 7 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. $3 donation 815-337-3534 Visitors can participate in the open-mic night or enjoy the show. Doors will open at 6:30. GEARY SMITH BAND Nov. 2, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. Donation requested 815-338-4212 The band is described as an “in your face blues band with enough rockin tunes to fill

D-200 JAZZ FESTIVAL Nov. 4, 15, 7 p.m. Woodstock High School 501 W. South St. $2 815-338-4370 The jazz bands from the school district’s two middle schools and two high schools will perform.

» STORYTELLING SPOKEN WORD CAFÉ Nov. 9, 7 to 10 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $5 donation 815-338-4212 Jim May will be featured.

» THEATER ‘DRACULA’ Oct. 27, 3 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $26 adults, $23 students, senior citizens, groups of 10+ 815-338-5300 woodstockoperahouse.com Experience the emotional thrill of Bram Stoker’s gothic masterpiece in this elegantly horrific one-woman show by Meagan Wells. ‘THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER’ Nov. 8, 9, 15,16, 7 p.m. Nov. 16, 2 p.m. Woodstock North High School 3000 Raffel Road $10 adults, $5 students and senior citizens 815-334-2127 seatyourself.biz/north The three-act comedy by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart follows what happens when an outlandish radio personality is invited to dinner at the home of a rich factory owner and he is injured upon entering the house.

» LECTURE CREATIVE LIVING SERIES Nov. 21, 10 a.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $24 815-338-4212 Lee Rhodes is the creator of Glassybaby,

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT a multi-million dollar company that creates small handmade glass votives that are distributed all over the world and used as fundraisers to help raise more than $1.3 million for charities.

» MOVIES Previews by Jay Schulz of films currently playing at the Woodstock Theatre unless otherwise noted. PREMIER SHOWING OF ‘FREE BIRDS’ Oct. 27, 10 a.m. $15 adults, $10 children younger than 12 or D-200 students with ID 815-338-8555 This special premier will benefit D-200 technology efforts. There also will be red carpet activities before the showing at 10 a.m. and festivities, food, and a turkey-pardoning ceremony on the Square by Mayor Sager following the show from noon to 2 p.m. ‘GRAVITY’ George Clooney (“Syriana”) and Sandra Bullock (“Speed”) are astronauts who are adrift in space after an accident. “Gravity” is directed by Alfonso Cuaron (“Children of Men”) and also stars Ed Harris (“The Firm”). RATED PG-13, 90 MINUTES ‘CAPTAIN PHILLIPS’ The true story of Captain Richard Phillips and the 2009 hijacking of the USflagged MV Maersk Alabama by Somali pirates. “Captain Phillips” is directed by Paul Greengrass (“United 93”) and stars Tom Hanks (“Big”) and Catherine Keener (“The 40-Year-Old Virgin”). RATED PG-13, 134 MINUTES ‘ESCAPE PLAN’ Sylvester Stallone (“Rocky”) and Arnold Schwarzenegger (“The Terminator”) come together on the big screen as two men desperately trying to escape a secret prison. Action ensues. “Escape Plan” is directed by Mikael Hafstrom (“The Rite”) and also stars Jim Caviezel (“The Thin Red Line”) and Amy Ryan (“Gone Baby Gone”). RATED R, 116 MINUTES ‘CARRIE’ Chloe Grace Morentz (“Let Me In”) stars as the title character in the remake of the classic 1976 horror film. “Carrie” is directed by Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”) and also stars Julianne Moore (“Magnolia”) and Judy Greer (“What Women Want”). RATED R, 92 MINUTES ‘THE COUNSELOR’ A lawyer who gets involved in drug trafficking finds himself in way over his head. “The Counselor” is directed by Ridley Scott (“Alien”) and stars Michael Fassbender (“Inglorious Basterds”), Brad Pitt (12 Monkeys”), Penelope Cruz (“Vanilla Sky”), Cameron Diaz (“There’s Something about Mary”) and Javier Bardem (“No Country for Old Men”). RATED R, 117 MINUTES ‘JACKASS PRESENTS BAD GRANDPA’ Johnny Knoxville (“The Last Stand”) stars as Irving Zisman, who is traveling across the country with his 8-year-old grandson. Hilarity ensues. “Bad Grandpa” is directed by Jeff Tremaine (“Jackass”). RATED R, 92 MINUTES ‘SHAUN OF THE DEAD’ Midnight Friday, Oct. 26 A group of people come to realize that they are in the middle of a zombie invasion. “Shaun Of The Dead” is directed by Edgar Wright (“Hot Fuzz”) and stars Simon Pegg (“Star Trek”) and Nick Frost (“Paul”). RATED R, 99 MINUTES


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Marketplace » COLUMN

A champion of youth e Woodstock Independent’s cofounder and publisher Cheryl Wormley is being honored by the Black Hawk Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America as its 2013 Distinguished Citizen. e council gives the Distinguished Citizen Award to a group or individual that is a “Champion of Youth” in McHenry County. Cheryl will be honored at a dinner Nov. 6 at Boulder Ridge County Club, Lake in the Hills. e proceeds for John C. the dinner go to further Scouting in Trione McHenry County. Minding Your Cheryl’s deepest passion has always Business been helping young people grow beyond themselves into a larger and more productive life. Mentoring young people into growing into their full potential is the hallmark of any truly great leader. In this regard, Woodstock has been truly blessed to have had Cheryl’s dedication to youth. Cheryl joins an impressive list of previous winners: Vince Foglia (2007), Greg Bradshaw (2008), Chuck Ruth (2009), Charie Zanck (2010), Billy and Jean Rinn (2011) and Ron Ludwig and Girls on the Run (2012). I’ve been involved in Scouting for almost 39 years. I’ve been a personal witness to the transformative effects Scouting and the mentoring that occurs within that program have had on young men and women. ere is a lot of common ground between the philosophy the B.S.A. has used for more than 100 years and the philosophy Cheryl has used with her involvement with young people. I’m also a product of the philosophy Cheryl has used in mentoring young people. Cheryl and her former partner, Denise Graff Ponstein hired me as e Woodstock Independent’s very first advertising representative for in 1987. I was a wet-behindthe-ears recent college graduate with little sales experience. It didn’t matter. Cheryl made sure I grew into a superb salesman and was the first person to shake my hand when that training and success translated into a higher-paying job somewhere else a few years later. She took a lot of pride in my achieving more, even when it meant losing my help at her company. It’s an unselfish attitude that is at the heart of Cheryl’s treatment of the many young people who’ve had the good fortune to have had her mentorship. From all of us that you’ve mentored, thank you. e 2013 Distinguished Citizen Award Dinner is open to the public. I encourage you to honor Cheryl and support Scouting by attending the dinner. For reservations or more information, call 815-397-0210 or visit www.champions.kintera.org. John C. Trione is general manager of The Woodstock Independent.

Oct. 23-29, 2013

15

Relocation, rejuvenation for ReEnergize By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

With a new location, massage therapists Ashley Ryan and Jen Freeman look forward to rejuvenating their massage business, ReEnergize. As a basement facility with ongoing construction on an upper-level office, their old location did not suit the calm and relaxing nature of their business. So in August, ReEnergize officially relocated from 666 W. Jackson St. to 105 N. Jefferson St., a quiet location just off the Square. Heading into its second year of business, owner Ryan said she’s eager to further integrate ReEnergize into the community. “is is where we want to be,” she said. “We’re settled and comfortable but ready to venture out.” At ReEnergize, the duo of licensed massage therapists said they focus on massage as physical therapy for stress relief, injury healing, improving range of

motion, increasing the rate of recovery, regaining mobility and creating a relaxing and calming experience. ey offer several kinds of massages, including hot stones and foot scrubs. Although they have been lifelong residents of Woodstock, Freeman and Ryan did not meet until they were attending school at Cortiva Massage Institute, Crystal Lake. “My entire family is in health care and I always wanted to kind of follow and be part of that, but couldn’t really deal with the blood and guts, so I went down another path,” Ryan said. Freeman, on the other hand, did not develop an interest in health care until her four sons became involved in sports. “I was finding myself massaging them, kind of doing sports massage on them,” she said. “I was just kind of reading books from the library and decided to go back to school for that.” As busy moms, the two appreciate the accommodating nature of the business – having the opportunity to schedule ses-

REENERGIZE Address: 105 N. Jefferson St. Email: ReEnergize58@comcast.net Web: amtamembers.com/reenergize sions with clients around their children while still having other employment. In the future, Ryan and Freeman hope to grow their business into a full-time career. “We hope to gain a lot of local business,” Freeman said. With experience working as a massage therapist in Algonquin, Freeman said she hopes she and Ryan can fill a need in the community. “It was incredible, the number of my clients that would come from Woodstock out to there, so you know a lot of people travel out of town to seek massage therapy.” Freeman said she encourages people to integrate massage into their lives as well as their health-care routines to accompany chiropractic and physical therapies.

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Filed in the McHenry County Recorder’s Office Oct. 2 to 7: Q Residence at 801 Wicker St., Woodstock, was sold by Chicago Title Land Trust, Chicago, to GWE Realty, LLC, Marengo, for $70,000. Q Farm at 12512 Pleasant Valley Road, Woodstock, 41+ acres, was sold by Patricia Leclair Trust, Crystal Lake, to Crestwood Farms 2013-1 LLC, Woodstock, for $525,000. Q Residence at 8601 W. Sunset Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Federal National Mortgage Association, Dallas, to Cecil and Donna Napier, Wonder Lake, for $50,100. Q Residence at 3186 Shenandoah Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Federal National Mortgage Association, Dallas, to Enrique Cruz Ortiz and Maribel Ayllon Cruz, Woodstock, for $91,900. Q Residence at 1230 Hickory Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Wilber and

Mary Anne Nelson, Lake Geneva, Wis., to Gerald and Rebecca Childs, Woodstock, for $225,000. Q Residence at 921 E. Irving Ave., Woodstock, was sold by David Bernal, Crystal Lake, to Roberto Perez, Woodstock, for $59,000. Q Residence at 1733 Sebastian Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Centex Homes, Schaumburg, to LeRoy and Jennifer Otterson, Woodstock, for $186,530. Q Residence at 7621 Wonder View Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Louis and Natalie Meskers, Erie, Colo., to Larry Brastad III, Wonder Lake, for $103,000. Q Residence at 1061 Greenwood Circle, Woodstock, was sold by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Carrollton, Texas, to Helen Mahr, Woodstock, for $50,000. Q Residence at 1015 Golden Ave., Woodstock, was sold by Gary and Evelyn Sullivan, Aiken, S.C., to Patricia Thecker,

Woodstock, for $210,000. Q Farm on Hartland Road, Woodstock, 380 acres, was sold by Chicago Title Land Trust Company, Rolling Meadows, to Reliable Partners, Highland Park, for $2,584,000. Q Residence at 743 Duvall Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Association, Dallas, to Andrew Dziewior and Edyta Zagorska, Woodstock, for $125,000. Q Residence at 3116 Eastwood Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Maira Cortes Rodarte, Wonder Lake, to SERC LLC, Chicago, for $116,000. Q Residence at 506 Hickory Road, Woodstock, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois LLC, Oak Brook, to Ginmeng LLC, Crystal Lake, for $71,901. Q Residence at 4403 E. Wonder Lake Road, Wonder Lake, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois LLC, Oak Brook, to Gimeng LLC, Crystal Lake, for $32,341.


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Oct. 23-29, 2013

Community THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Librarian has the right stuff for NASA Ryan is one of only 40 people across the country to be chosen to train with NASA scientists during MAVEN project By RHONDA MIX The Independent Woodstock Public Library Youth Ser-

vices Librarian Mary Ryan recently received an invitation to participate in a NASA program that allows educators to join training for the Mars Atmospheric

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and Volatile Evolution program – otherwise known as MAVEN. “I was shocked I was picked,� Ryan said. “I thought they were never going to pick me, but I’m really excited. Space is one of the few areas of science that really appeals to everyone.� e basis of NASA’s mission is to launch a Marsbound spacecraft that will help determine certain facts about the red planet – such as how atmospheric gas has changed the Martian climate and how and why water on Mars Mary vanished. Ryan Ryan and the other educators will partake in the mission’s training course. While attending an American Library Association conference over the summer related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics education, Ryan heard a group of NASA representatives discuss the MAVEN program and how educators could apply to be participants in its training course. Ryan applied for the program Oct. 4 and received a letter of acceptance Oct.7. She is one of 40 educators across the nation chosen to participate

in the training. Training in the MAVEN program will take place in Cocoa Beach, Fla., in November. Participants also will have the opportunity to visit the Kennedy Space Center and attend the MAVEN launch. Ryan said she is excited about the trip and the training she will receive. “During the course, librarians are also going to be trained on how to do space-based programs,â€? Ryans said. When she returns, Ryan said she hopes to work with the staff at Woodstock’s Challenger Learning Center for Science & Technology to implement cross-cooperative programming for young people in the community. “Next summer’s reading theme [at the library] will be science-based,â€? Ryan said. “I hope to work with local schools and attract student interest. Space exploration is exciting ‌. People forget all the practical things that have come about through NASA and space study.â€? Ryan said she has already spoken to other librarians in McHenry County and would like to bring higher quality science technology into the community, while also getting groups such as 4-H more involved. “I’m hoping to show patrons the wonders [of science] as well as the nuts and bolts of why it matters,â€? she said.


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Oct. 23-29, 2013

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mentor program By JANET DOVIDIO The Independent Teachers Laura Littner, Woodstock, and Lynn Widhalm, McHenry, serve as co-advisors of a mentoring program established in 2007 at Marian Central Catholic High School. Each spring, Marian faculty members nominate students who will serve as mentors in their junior and senior years. ey are paired with incoming freshmen to facilitate the adjustment to high school and serve as friends to whom the freshmen can turn with questions and concerns. ree freshmen are assigned to each mentor. is year, the program expanded to include sophomores paired in a 5-to-1 ratio to mentors. “Parents are overwhelmingly positive about this program and feel it greatly contributes to their child’s success,” said Littner, a graduate of Marian. “ere are far fewer disciplinary actions. e kids become barometers for one another’s choices.” Senior Charles Shin is the student president of the mentor program. “My mentor paved the way for my adjustment to high school,” he said. “I feel it’s a great strategy to use student mentors, because the freshmen do not want to disappoint their mentors.” In addition to one-on-one interactions, the mentors and their students meet in larger groups in extended homerooms several times a year to address the progress and needs of the new students. “is program allows us to address disciplinary concerns immediately,” Littner said. “It is now very rare to have a problem with teasing or bullying of students. ere are valuable teachable moments for all involved.”

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Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

e sixth annual Pedal for PADS Bike-a-on at Larsen Park in Lake in the Hills Sept. 22 raised about $4,000 for McHenry County Public Action to Deliver Shelter, a program of Pioneer Center for Human Services. Woodstock resident Larry Ferrarini chaired the outside committee of eight volunteers who ran the event, in conjunction with the Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Rotary Club. is was his third year as chairman. e riding path spanned 50 mile for advanced riders. ose with less experience could participate in shorter options. e 100 riders ranged in age from toddlers to senior citizens. is was not a race, but a rally in which riders solicited donations from friends and family for PADS. Speakers included Ferrarini, Melissa O’Donnell of PADS and Don Brewer of the Algonquin-Lake in the Hills Rotary Club. Jacobs High School Interact Club students assisted with the rally and programs. “Our event was a huge success.” Ferrarini said. “All of our participants worked hard for the benefit of PADS.” News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.


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FLASHBACKS 25 years ago Q Three-hundred-sixty workers continued their strike at Woodstock Die Cast manufacturing plant on Wheeler Street. The workers had walked off the job the previous week after rejecting a proposal from the company’s management. Q Wonder Lake resident Ed Hall took third place in the National Finger-Picking Guitar Championship held at the annual Walnut Valley Festival in WinďŹ eld, Kan. Q A groundbreaking ceremony was held for Wally World Video on Route 47 across from the Eastwood Shopping Center. Q Woodstock High School sophomore football coach Ed Brucker earned his 100th coaching win as the Blue Streaks defeated Riverside-BrookďŹ eld 46-8. 20 years ago Q WHS graduate Tom Kramer, a sophomore at Beloit College, starred in the school’s production of Agatha Christie’s “Ten Little Indians.â€? Q Marian Central Catholic High School senior Scott Smith ďŹ nished seventh in the IHSA Class A state golf tournament in Bloomington.

Oct. 23-29, 2013

21

RELIGION NOTES 15 years ago Q A special census conducted in April of 1998 showed Woodstock’s population at 18,251, up 2,072 from the census in 1994. Q The Illinois Theatre Association honored WHS Director of Theater Tony Casalino with the 1998 Secondary School Award. Q Marian Central began a campaign to raise $1.5 million to build a sports complex on 27 1/2 acres across from the school on Route 120. Q The WHS girls volleyball team won the eighth annual Woodstock Round Robin Tournament behind Jackie Schmeiding, who scored 34 points and had two aces and 21 kills. 10 years ago Q Woodstock resident Helen Lueck celebrated her 105th birthday. Q Woodstock School District 200 was awarded ďŹ ve grants over a two-week period totaling $1,135,216. Q The Independent proďŹ led Westwood Elementary School teacher Margaret Meron, whose husband Steve proposed to her on the TV show “Wheel of Fortune.â€? Q The Marian Central girls tennis team

won the IHSA sectional tournament by two points over Prairie Ridge. No. 1 singles player Lauren Dallas defeated WHS’ Kay Anderson 6-0, 6-1.

CHRIST LIFE ÂŁĂŽĂˆÂŁ{ĂŠ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡{™Î{ĂŠ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-iÂ˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ĂŠ9ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂ€ÂœĂ•ÂŤ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°Ê/Â…Ă•Ă€Ăƒ`>Ăž

Five years ago Q More than 100 grandparents and their families attended the Hearthstone Village Celebration of Grandparents. Q The Woodstock City Council approved a lease for Trax Depot, a coffee shop, for the Woodstock train depot. Q Woodstock Community High School and St. Mary High School classes of 1945 met at Woodstock Country Club for a joint 63rd reunion. Q The WHS football team defeated Jacobs 30-7 behind quarterback Derek Brown, who threw three touchdown passes.

EDEN BAPTIST £™äÎÊ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡nÂŁ{‡Çn{Ç Worship: 3 p.m. Sunday (Spanish)

One year ago Q Ehrke’s Used Appliances & More opened at 144 Washington St. Q Family Health Partnership Clinic announced it would move to Crystal Lake after nearly 10 years in Woodstock. Q The Woodstock North High School football team defeated Hampshire 46-14 to ďŹ nish 7-2 and clinch a playoff spot for a second consecutive year.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST ÂŁÂŁÂŁĂŠ7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÓÇΣ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]Ê£äÊ>°“° FIRST PRESBYTERIAN nĂŠ °Ê,ÂœĂ•ĂŒiĂŠ{ÇÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă‡ĂŠĂŠ Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?ĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠ>Â?Â?]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠ>°“° UĂŠ ÂœÂ“Â“Ă•Â˜ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ`ˆ˜˜iÀÊx\Îäʍ°“°Ê7i`˜iĂƒ`>Ăž FIRST UNITED METHODIST Óä£Ê7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎΣäÊ Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]ĂŠ`Ă•Ă€ÂˆÂ˜}ʙÊ>Â°Â“Â°ĂŠĂƒiĂ€Ă›ÂˆVi°Ê FREE METHODIST ™Î{ĂŠ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡Î£näÊ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday; 8:30 a.m. (traditional), 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) Sunday HERITAGE BAPTIST CHURCH 4609 Greenwood Road *°"°Ê "8ĂŠ{ĂˆÂŁĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡xÇx‡££™ä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION 8617 RidgeďŹ eld Road, Crystal Lake 815-455-1810 Worship: 6:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. Saturday REDEEMER LUTHERAN £ÎÓäÊ i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡™ÎÇä Worship: 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž UĂŠ˜ˆ“>ĂŒiĂŠ>ÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂŠÂ™\ÂŁxĂŠĂŠ>°“ÊÊ-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž UĂŠ*Ă€>ĂžiÀÊÊÇʍ°“°Ê/Ă•iĂƒ`>ÞÊ>˜`ĂŠĂˆĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠ/Â…Ă•Ă€Ăƒ`>Ăž UĂŠ"ÂŤiÂ˜ĂŠ}Ă€ÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠÂ˜Âˆ}Â…ĂŒĂŠĂŠĂˆĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠĂ€Âˆ`>Ăž RESURRECTION CATHOLIC 2918 S. Country Club Road 815-338-7330 Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL xäÎÊ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ä™xäÊ Worship: 8:30 and 10 a.m. Sunday ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN {ä£Ê-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠÂœÂ…Â˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡xÂŁx™Ê Worship: 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]棊\ÎäÊ>°“° ST. MARY CATHOLIC ĂŽÂŁĂŽĂŠ °Ê/Ă€ĂžÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎÇÇÊ Worship: 7:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday; 5 and 6:30 p.m. (Spanish) Saturday; 7:30, 9 and 10:30 a.m., noon (Spanish), 5 p.m. Sunday THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă¤ĂŠ Ă€Âˆ`}iĂŠ>˜iĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡{Â™ĂˆÂ‡Ă¤x{n Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Ă“Ă¤ÂŁĂˆĂŠ>Ă€ĂŒÂ?>˜`ĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎ{‡£ÇäÎ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE VINE ÂŁÂŁĂŽĂ“ĂŠ °Ê>`ÂˆĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎnä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER Ă“Ă“xĂŠ7°Ê >Â?Â…ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎLJÎxĂŽ{ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠˆ˜`ĂƒÂ…ÂˆvĂŒiĂ€Ăƒ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°]ĂŠ/Ă•iĂƒ`>Ăž WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD £Óä£Ê i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°UĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ÂŁĂŽÂŁĂˆ Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday prayer service, 10 a.m. worship service WOODSTOCK BIBLE ÇÇäÊ °Êˆ“L>Â?Â?ĂŠĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ĂŽĂ¤Ă¤ĂˆĂŠ Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ °,° °° Â°ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ˜ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂ€Ăž]ĂŠÂŁÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ>Â°Â“Â°ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ p.m. Sunday


22

Oct. 23-29, 2013

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CALENDAR Upcoming events in the Woodstock area U Events are free unless otherwise noted

PHOTO: MUFFET

23 | WEDNESDAY SOCIAL SKILLS AND SELFESTEEM SUPPORT GROUP Recovery Outreach Center 101 Jefferson St. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. 815-338-3590 The monthly free group meetings will be ongoing and no reservations are needed. STAGE LEFTOVERS Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7:30 p.m. 815-334-3555 See The Entertainer, page 14.

24 | THURSDAY THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com A 7,000-square-foot interactive haunted house is set up on the Square. All proceeds will benefit Family Alliance and help restore the Courthouse on the Square.

25 | FRIDAY SENIOR CARE VOLUNTEER NETWORK BREAKFAST FUNDRAISER Woodstock Country Club 10310 Country Club Road 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Donations to SCVN encouraged 815-455-3120 A complimentary breakfast will be offered with donations to benefit Senior Care Volunteer Network. THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 24. OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 14. FILL THE BOOT FUNDRAISER Intersections of Madison, Lake and South streets noon to 6 p.m. Facebook.com/MDANational Woodstock Fire/Rescue District Local 4813 will collect donations to support and provide services for those affected with Muscular Dystrophy.

26 | SATURDAY HABITAT RESTORATION Boger Bog 2399 S. Cherry Valley Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-455-1537 Individuals, students, small groups and families with children older than age 6 can participate in restoring native habi-

tat at the conservation area. HOWL-O-WEEN PARTY Harley-Davidson 2050 S. Eastwood Dr. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 815-337-3511 woodstockharley-dav.com The Halloween-themed party will include a costume parade, games, crafts, prizes and trickor-treating. DAY OF THE DEAD CELEBRATION Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 2 to 4 p.m. 815-338-0542 Activities will be available for the whole family to celebrate “Day of the Dead,” and a traditional altar will be on display. D-200 MUSIC FACULTY CONCERT Oct. 27, 2 p.m. Woodstock High School 501 W. South St. $5 adults, $3 students and senior citizens 815-245-8616 kdpeiffer@ameritech.net See The Entertainer, page 14. HOLLYWOOD HALLOWEEN Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $25 815-338-5300 woodstockoperahouse.com The evening will include entertainment and appetizers, dancing, magic, and a cash bar. Guests who dress as a movie character or actor can participate in the costume contest for a chance to win $250. Costumed guests can walk the red carpet from 7 to 7:30 p.m. THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 24. THE HAUNTED SQUARE ZOMBIE PUB CRAWL Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $30, ages 21and older thehauntedsquare.com Each Zombie Pub Crawl ticket will provide entrance into Madness Manor, 3 drink passes good at any of the eight participating bars and restaurants and entry into a costume contest. HOWL-O-WEEN AFTER HOURS PARTY Harley-Davidson 2050 S. Eastwood Dr. 7 to 10 p.m. 815-337-3511 woodstockharley-dav.com This adults only party will include a costume contest with prizes, food and beverages, live entertainment and more.

209 Main St. 10:30 a.m. $15 adults, $10 children younger than 12 or D-200 students with ID 815-338-8555 See The Entertainer, page 14. ‘DRACULA’ Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 3 p.m. $26 adults, $23 students, senior citizens, groups of 10 or more 815-338-5300 woodstockoperahouse.com See The Entertainer, page 14. THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 24.

28 | MONDAY MONDAY MORNING MOVIE Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 10 a.m. 815-338-0542 woodstockpubliclibrary.org “October Sky” will be shown. MEN’S BOOK CLUB Read Between the Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. 815-206-5967 The group will discuss “Einstein” by Walter Isaacson. VILLAGE OF BULL VALLEY BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPEALS The Stickney House 1904 Cherry Valley Road 7 p.m. ‘GOLD FEVER’ Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. 815-338-4838 US-El Salvador Sister Cities/ Friends of Chilama will present the documentary that portrays the lives of three women upon the arrival of Goldcorp. Inc. into their Guatemalan village. Discussion will follow the film. The event is free, but donations are welcome.

31 | THURSDAY HALLOWEEN ON THE SQUARE Woodstock Square 4 p.m. A costume contest will include prizes for the scariest, funniest and most original costumes in four age categories. The event is followed by trick-or-treating on the Square until 5 p.m.

27 | SUNDAY

WOODSTOCK TRICK-ORTREATING Woodstock neighborhoods Recommended hours are 4 to 7 p.m.

PREMIER SHOWING OF ‘FREE BIRDS’ Woodstock Theater

WONDER LAKE TRICK-ORTREATING Wonder Lake neighborhoods

Recommended hours are 3 to 8 p.m. TRUNK OR TREAT St. John’s Lutheran Church 401 St. John’s Road 4 to 6 p.m. 815-338-5159 Children can trick-or-treat from church members in the parking lot. TRUNK OR TREAT Woodstock Free Methodist Church 934 N. Seminary Ave. 4 to 7 p.m. 815-338-3180 Children can trick-or-treat from church members in the parking lot. THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 24.

1 | FRIDAY ROCKET NIGHT Challenger Learning Center 222 Church St. $12 6 to 8 p.m. 815-338-7722 challengerillinois.org Families participating will receive one model rocket and the supplies to build the rocket at the event, with the help of Fox Valley Rocketeer members. Pizza and soda included. THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14+ thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 24. JAZZ JAM Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $5 donation 815-338-4212 jazzonthesquare.com See The Entertainer, page 14.

2 | SATURDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET McHenry County Farm Bureau 1102 McConnell Road 9 a.m. to noon woodstockfarmersmarket.org HABITAT RESTORATION Harrison Benwell 7055 McCullom Lake Road 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-575-1684 Individuals, students, small groups and families with children older than 6 can participate in restoring native habitat at the conservation area. HONEYCRAFT INDIE CRAFT MARKET Mixin Mingle 124 Cass St. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. honeycraftmarket.com

Oct. 23 to Nov. 2 Honeycraft is a monthly Indie craft market where artists, makers and crafters showcase oneof-a-kind handmade wares. GEARY SMITH BAND Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. Donation requested 815-338-4212 See The Entertainer, page 14. THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 24.

ONGOING WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Tuesdays and Saturdays thru Oct. 29 Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org Voted No. 1 in Illinois for midsize markets in 2012. COFFEE AT THE CAFÉ FOR SENIORS Tuesdays Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 1 to 3 p.m. Senior citizens are invited to drop in for coffee. DIVORCECARE Tuesdays Woodstock Assembly of God 1201 Dean St. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 815-338-1316 divorcecare.org The weekly support group and seminar will be conducted by people who understand the pain of separation or divorce. BINGO Wednesdays Woodstock Moose Lodge 406 Clay St. 7 to 9:30 pm. 815-338-0126 Games will include crossfire. Food will be available. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. SOBER MOMS AA MEETING Thursdays Blue Lotus Temple 221 Dean St. 10 a.m. 847-809-1104 Moms with a desire to stop drinking are invited to meet with the group. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Fridays Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 815-338-2833 See The Entertainer, page 14.

BEST BET SELECTION To submit calendar items, e-mail pr@thewoodstockindependent.com or visit thewoodstockindependent.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 23-29, 2013

Service Directory

Small blocks are $40 for 4 weeks. Call 815-701-9268 and ask for Jen for details. ATTORNEY

CARPENTRY

AC/HEATING

23

Heating, Cooling, Plumbing and Water Heaters

Woodstock 815-337-4200

e on r servic 24 -hou & models es all mak

Boiler & h heating ot water speciali sts!

Full Service Law Firm

24-Hour Service CONSTRUCTION

ASPHALT SERVICES

CLEANING SERVICES

ELCTRC. CONTRACTOR MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF SERVICE CALL - Service upgrades Since - Repairs 1986 - Maintenance Residential - Commercial

Delaware Electric Co. Fully Insured Fully Licensed

815-338-3139 CLEANING SERVICES

COLLISION REPAIR

FINANCIAL SERVICES

HANDYMAN

ENGINE REPAIR

HOUSEHOLD FILTERS

B&J SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

Authorized and stocked service center for Briggs & Stratton, Tecumseh & Kohler Engine Co., Honda, Subaru-Robin, Engs., Murray & M.T.D. products.

Chain saws serviced & sharpened.

Call 815-648-2813

10302 Alden Rd., Alden, IL

GUTTER CLEANING

Cleaning

HEALTH INSURANCE

INSURANCE

yrs. r 35 Ove rience e exp

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847-658-8512

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HOME EXTERIORS

SPACE FOR RENT Party? Anniversary? Baby Shower? Birthday? Retirement? Wedding Reception? Meeting? Woodstock Church Hall with full kitchen available daytime or evenings. Reasonable rates.

Redeemer Lutheran Church For details, call (815) 338-9370 www.rlcw.com

TECHNOLOGY

WINDOW CLEANING

INSURANCE

Mark Mitchell Insurance Agency 5RXWH‡:RRGVWRFN

815-334-1000 www.markismyagent.com

PAINTING Professional interior and exterior painting. Fully insured. 35+ yrs exp. Free estimates. Local references. Senior discounts.Winter Rates

J.B. Decorating 847-658-8512


24

Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS tXPSETPSMFTTBSF'3&& t"ETPWFSXPSETBSFaXPSE

ClassiďŹ ed Ads FOR SALE

HELP WANTED

Southwest Airlines travel voucher value $100, asking $85. Must use by Dec. 25th. Transferable. 815-353-6238

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SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 - MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext. 300N Foreclosed Cabin On 4 Acres! Just $89,900. Bring your hamPHU QDLOV*UHDWÂż[HUXSSHU on beautiful wooded rolling land. Enjoy wildlife, creeks, ponds, lake access. Must see! Call 877-888-0267, x435. HUNTING ACREAGE & BUILDING SITES! 65 Acres for $1700 Per Acre. Mountain Views and 0DJQLÂżFHQW5RFN)RUPDWLRQV Located on Cumberland Plateau in TN. Call 877-282-4409

HELP WANTED TanTara Transportation is now hiring OTR Company Flatbed Drivers and Owner Operators. Competitive Pay and Home Time. Call us @ 800-650-0292 or apply online at www.tantara. us CDL-A Drivers: Looking for higher pay? New Century is hiring exp. company drivers and owner operators. Solo and teams. Competitive pay package. Sign-on incentives. Call 888-705-3217 or apply online at www.drivenctrans.com â&#x20AC;&#x153;Partners In Excellenceâ&#x20AC;? OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass passenger policy. 2012 & Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. Butler Transport 1-800528-7825 Drivers - CDL-A SOLO & TEAM DRIVERS NEEDED! Top Pay & )XOO%HQHÂżWV(YHQ025(3D\ for Hazmat! New Trucks Arriving Daily! CDL Grads Welcome! 888-928-6011 www.TotalMS. com CDL-A Drivers: Up to $5,000 Sign-On Bonus. Solo and Teams. Excellent Home Time & 3D\%&%6%HQHÂżWV-RLQ6XSHU Service! 877-294-2777 DriveForSuperService.com Tanker & Flatbed Company Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business CALL TODAY 800-277-0212 or www. primeinc.com

Make Top Pay DRIVING FLATBED - We Pay for Experience! BIG CPM, 10,000 miles/ month average. ALL late-model equipment. CDL-A, 1-Year OTR Required. 888.476.4860 www. chiefcarriers.com Flatbed Drivers New Pay ScaleStart @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus Home Weekends Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800-6489915

MISC. AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE - BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE.JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312.

t"MMBETSVOGPS5808&&,4 t%FBEMJOF/00/5IVSTEBZ UPHFUJOOFYUXFFLTJTTVF

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WANT TO BUY

FOSTERS WANTED K9 Lifeline Rescue, Inc and Dalmatian Rescue of Wisconsin is a licensed, non SURÂżWF5HVFXHJURXS:H have several dogs and puppies available for adoption, however our biggest need right now is obtaining more foster homes. Please visit our website for more information www.K9Lifeline.com

WANTED TO BUY Old or new working or not outboard motors, chainsaws, motorcycles, mopeds, bicycles, ďŹ shing tackle, all sorts of stuff. CASH ON THE SPOT 815-322-6383

Read the whole story in

FOR LEASE

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Industrial shop For Lease

671 E. CALHOUN ST., WOODSTOCK, ILt  

To Advertise, Call Jen at 815-338-8040

2000 Sq Feet ofďŹ ce and shop, air conditioned, 2 toilets, large overhead door, 3 phase, ideal for tool shop or light manufacturing. Price: $950 per month. Call 815-338-4068.

Need Legal Help? FREE REFERRAL Call 877-270-3855 Courtesy of the Illinois State Bar Association at www.IllinoisLawyerFinder.com Need to place your ad in more than 300 newspapers throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-2411700 or visit www.illinoispress. org

MOTORS THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & Consign Used Boats! 217-7937300 theboatdock.com Colmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RV - We Buy And Consign Used RVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s And Campers 217-787-8653 www. colmansrv.com

NOW HIRING Gymnastics Coach needed part-time in McHenry at Corkscrew Gymnastics. Some gymnastics experience required. Call Sam for information at 815-345-5400.

Promote Woodstock Talent Get Your Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name Out...

BE A SPONSOR

The Woodstock Independent is looking for sponsors of weekly features such as: Student of the Week, Athlete of the Week, and The College Report.

Call for details 815-338-8040


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Oct. 23-29, 2013

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PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY - WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS 13 CH 01099 -30RUJDQ&KDVH%DQN1DWLRQDO$VVRFLDWLRQ PLAINTIFF 9V &KDUOHV ) (FNHO 'HFODUDWLRQ RI 7UXVW GDWHG  8QNQRZQ %HQHÃ&#x20AC;FLDULHV RI WKH &KDUOHV ) (FNHO 'HFODUDWLRQ RI 7UXVW GDWHG  8QNQRZQ 6XFFHVVRU 7UXVWHH RI WKH &KDUOHV ) (FNHO 'HFODUDWLRQ RI 7UXVW GDWHG  8QNQRZQ 2ZQHUV DQG 1RQUHFRUG &ODLPDQWV 5LFKDUG .XKQ DV 6SHFLDO 5HSUHVHQWDWLYH IRU &KDUOHV ) (FNHO GHFHDVHG  0DSOHV DW WKH 6RQDWDV +RPHRZQHUV$VVRFLDWLRQ//& DEFENDANTS 127,&(%<38%/,&$7,21 NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: &KDUOHV ) (FNHO 'HFODUDWLRQ RI 7UXVW GDWHG 12/16/2002 8QNQRZQ%HQHÃ&#x20AC;FLDULHVRIWKH&KDUOHV)(FNHO Declaration of Trust dated 12/16/2002 8QNQRZQ6XFFHVVRU7UXVWHHRIWKH&KDUOHV) Eckel Declaration of Trust dated 12/16/2002 8QNQRZQ2ZQHUVDQG1RQUHFRUG&ODLPDQWV 7KDW WKLV FDVH KDV EHHQ FRPPHQFHG LQ WKLV &RXUW DJDLQVW \RX DQG RWKHU GHIHQGDQWV SUD\LQJ IRU WKH IRUHFORVXUH RI D FHUWDLQ 0RUWJDJH FRQYH\LQJ WKH SUHPLVHV GHVFULEHG DVIROORZVWRZLW THAT PART OF LOT 1 IN THE MAPLES AT THE SONATAS PLANNED DEVELOPMENT, %(,1* $ 5(68%',9,6,21 2) /276  180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, AND 188 IN THE SONATAS PLANNED DEVELOPMENT, %(,1* $ 68%',9,6,21 2) 7+( :(67 HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 28 AND THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 7 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED 129(0%(5   $6 '2&80(17 180%(5 5 '(6&5,%(' $6 FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT: THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST, A ',67$1&(2))((7)257+(32,17 2) %(*,11,1* 7+(1&( &217,18,1* NORTH 71 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST TO A POINT ON A CURVE, $ ',67$1&( 2)  )((7 7+(1&( $/21*$&859(1257+($67(5/<%(,1* CONCAVE EASTERLY, HAVING A RADIUS 2)  )((7$1'$ &+25' %($5,1* OF NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST TO A POINT ON A CURVE, A ',67$1&(2))((77+(1&(6287+ 61 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 18 SECONDS ($67$',67$1&(2))((77+(1&( SOUTH 28 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 42 6(&21'6 :(67 $ ',67$1&( 2)  )((7 72 7+( 32,17 2) %(*,11,1* ,1 0&+(15<&2817<,//,12,6 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 644 Handel Lane Woodstock, IL 60098 DQGZKLFKVDLG0RUWJDJHZDVPDGHE\ &KDUOHV ) (FNHO H[HFXWHG WKH PRUWJDJH KRZHYHUWKLVLQGLYLGXDOLVGHFHDVHGDQGLVQRW QDPHGDVDGHIHQGDQWLQWKLVODZVXLW WKH0RUWJDJRU V WR&RPPXQLW\/LIH0RUWJDJH //&DV0RUWJDJHHDQGUHFRUGHGLQWKH2IÃ&#x20AC;FH of the Recorder of Deeds of McHenry County, ,OOLQRLVDV'RFXPHQW1R5DQG IRURWKHUUHOLHIWKDWVXPPRQVZDVGXO\LVVXHG RXW RI VDLG &RXUW DJDLQVW \RX DV SURYLGHG E\

PUBLIC NOTICES

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT ODZDQGWKDWWKHVDLGVXLWLVQRZSHQGLQJ 12:7+(5()25(81/(66<28Ã&#x20AC;OH\RXU DQVZHU RU RWKHUZLVH Ã&#x20AC;OH \RXU DSSHDUDQFH LQ WKLVFDVHLQWKH2IÃ&#x20AC;FHRIWKH&OHUNRIWKLV&RXUW .DWKHULQH0.HHIH Clerk of the Circuit Court 16HPLQDU\ Woodstock, IL 60098 RQRUEHIRUH1RYHPEHU$'()$8/7 0$< %( (17(5('$*$,167 <28$7$1< TIME AFTER THAT DAY AND A JUDGMENT 0$<%((17(5(',1$&&25'$1&(:,7+ 7+(35$<(52)6$,'&203/$,17 &2',/,6 $662&,$7(63& Attorneys for Plaintiff :1RUWK)URQWDJH5RDG6XLWH %XUU5LGJH,/ (630) 794-5300 'X3DJH :LQQHEDJR 2XU)LOH1R 127(7KLV ODZ Ã&#x20AC;UP LV GHHPHG WR EH D GHEW FROOHFWRU I566825 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW October 16, 2013, October 23, 2013) L8848

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME 3XEOLF 1RWLFH LV KHUHE\ JLYHQ WKDW RQ 2&72%(5   D FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;FDWH ZDV Ã&#x20AC;OHG LQ WKH 2IÃ&#x20AC;FH RI WKH &RXQW\ &OHUN RI 0F+HQU\ &RXQW\ ,OOLQRLV VHWWLQJ IRUWK WKH QDPHV DQG SRVWRIÃ&#x20AC;FH DGGUHVVHV RI DOO RI WKH SHUVRQV RZQLQJ FRQGXFWLQJ DQG WUDQVDFWLQJ WKH EXVLQHVVNQRZQDV5($&7,21$50·6ORFDWHG at 543 Sandy Ct, Harvard, IL 60033 'DWHG2&72%(5 V.DWKHULQH&6FKXOW] &RXQW\&OHUN

3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW October 16, 2013, October 23, 2013) L8850

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MCHENRY COUNTY- WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS -30RUJDQ&KDVH%DQN1DWLRQDO$VVRFLDWLRQ VXFFHVVRU LQ LQWHUHVW E\ SXUFKDVH IURP WKH )',&DV5HFHLYHURI:DVKLQJWRQ0XWXDO%DQN ).$:DVKLQJWRQ0XWXDO%DQN)$ Plaintiff, YV /DZUHQFH7<RXQJV $SSOHZRRG 1HLJKERUKRRG $VVRFLDWLRQ 8QNQRZQ+HLUVDQG/HJDWHHVRI/DZUHQFH7 <RXQJVDND/DZUHQFH7KRPDV<RXQJV0DU\ <RXQJV 8QNQRZQ 2ZQHUV DQG 1RQ5HFRUG &ODLPDQWV 'HIHQGDQWV 10 CH 1501 3URSHUW\$GGUHVV 411 South Shannon Drive, Woodstock, IL, 60098 127,&()2538%/,&$7,21 7KH UHTXLVLWH DIÃ&#x20AC;GDYLW IRU SXEOLFDWLRQ KDYLQJ EHHQ Ã&#x20AC;OHG QRWLFH LV KHUHE\ JLYHQ \RX 8QNQRZQ+HLUVDQG/HJDWHHVRI/DZUHQFH7 <RXQJV DND /DZUHQFH 7KRPDV <RXQJVDQG UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, defendants in the above entitled FDXVHWKDWVXLWKDVEHHQFRPPHQFHGDJDLQVW you and other defendants in the Circuit Court for the 22nd Judicial Circuit, McHenry County, E\ VDLG SODLQWLII SUD\LQJ IRU WKH IRUHFORVXUH RI D FHUWDLQ PRUWJDJH FRQYH\LQJ WKH SUHPLVHV GHVFULEHGDVIROORZVWRZLW /27  ,1 %/2&.  ,1 6+$1121:22' 81,77:2%(,1*$68%',9,6,212)7+( WEST 1/2 OF GOVERNMENT LOTS 1 AND 2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 44 NORTH, RANGE 6, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 9, 1972 AS DOCUMENT 180%(5  ,1 0&+(15< &2817< ,//,12,6 3,1 6DLG SURSHUW\ LV FRPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV  South Shannon Drive, Woodstock, IL, 60098,

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I566387 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW October 16, 2013, October 23, 2013) L8851

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS 86 %$1. 1$$6 75867(( )25 :$08 2003-S4 Plaintiff, Y 6$1'< .$//,&. 6+(55, , .$//,&. :(//6)$5*2),1$1&,$/,//,12,6,1& Defendant 09 CH 1574 127,&( 2) 6$/( 38%/,& 127,&( ,6 +(5(%<*,9(1WKDWSXUVXDQWWRD-XGJPHQW of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above FDXVH RQ$XJXVW   DQ DJHQW IRU 7KH -XGLFLDO6DOHV&RUSRUDWLRQZLOODW30RQ 1RYHPEHU   DW WKH 1/7 7LWOH //&  &RQJUHVV 3DUNZD\ 6XLWH ' &U\VWDO /DNH ,/  VHOO DW SXEOLF DXFWLRQ WR WKH KLJKHVWELGGHUDVVHWIRUWKEHORZWKHIROORZLQJ described real estate: /RW  LQ 3LQH 5LGJH 6XEGLYLVLRQ 8QLW 1R  EHLQJ D SDUW RI WKH 1RUWKHDVW 4XDUWHU RI 6HFWLRQ  7RZQVKLS  1RUWK 5DQJH  (DVW RI WKH 7KLUG 3ULQFLSDO 0HULGLDQ DQG SDUW RI WKH1RUWKZHVW4XDUWHURI6HFWLRQ7RZQVKLS 1RUWK5DQJH(DVWRIWKH7KLUG3ULQFLSDO 0HULGLDQDFFRUGLQJWRWKH3ODWWKHUHRIUHFRUGHG $XJXVWDV'RFXPHQW1RLQ McHenry County, Illinois &RPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV  6ZDUWKPRUH :RRGVWRFN ,/  3URSHUW\ ,QGH[ 1R  7KH UHDO HVWDWH LV LPSURYHG ZLWKDVLQJOHIDPLO\UHVLGHQFH7KHMXGJPHQW DPRXQW ZDV  6DOH WHUPV 7KH ELGDPRXQWLQFOXGLQJWKH-XGLFLDOVDOHIHHIRU $EDQGRQHG5HVLGHQWLDO3URSHUW\0XQLFLSDOLW\ 5HOLHI)XQGZKLFKLVFDOFXODWHGRQUHVLGHQWLDO UHDO HVWDWH DW WKH UDWH RI  IRU HDFK  RUIUDFWLRQWKHUHRIRIWKHDPRXQWSDLGE\WKH SXUFKDVHUQRWWRH[FHHGVKDOOEHSDLGLQ FHUWLÃ&#x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´$6,6µFRQGLWLRQ 7KHVDOHLVIXUWKHUVXEMHFWWRFRQÃ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\ WKHFRXUW8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOORIWKHDPRXQW

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PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME 3XEOLF 1RWLFH LV KHUHE\ JLYHQ WKDW RQ 2&72%(5   D FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;FDWH ZDV Ã&#x20AC;OHG LQ WKH 2IÃ&#x20AC;FH RI WKH &RXQW\ &OHUN RI 0F+HQU\ &RXQW\ ,OOLQRLV VHWWLQJ IRUWK WKH QDPHV DQG SRVWRIÃ&#x20AC;FH DGGUHVVHV RI DOO RI WKH SHUVRQV RZQLQJ FRQGXFWLQJ DQG WUDQVDFWLQJ WKH EXVLQHVVNQRZQDV'5($06+((76ORFDWHG DW*UDQW6W+DUYDUG,/ 'DWHG2&72%(5 V.DWKHULQH&6FKXOW] &RXQW\&OHUN

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3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW October 23, 2013) L8855

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WOODSTOCK, MCHENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS -3025*$1 &+$6( %$1. 1$7,21$/ ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, YV UNKNOWN SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE 3$75,&,$ $ +$/3(5 75867 81'(5 7+( PROVISIONS OF A TRUST AGREEMENT DATED THE 30TH DAY OF MAY, 2005, AND KNOWN AS PATRICIA ANN HALPER TRUST, 'HIHQGDQW 13CH 1388 3523(57<$''5(666$9$11$/1 WOODSTOCK, IL 60098 127,&(%<38%/,&$7,21 127,&(,6*,9(1<288QNQRZQ6XFFHVVRU 7UXVWHH RI WKH 3DWULFLD$ +DOSHU 7UXVW XQGHU WKHSURYLVLRQVRID7UXVW$JUHHPHQWGDWHGWKH WKGD\RI0D\DQGNQRZQDV3DWULFLD $QQ +DOSHU 7UXVW 'HIHQGDQW WKLV FDVH KDV EHHQFRPPHQFHGLQWKLV&RXUWDJDLQVW\RXDQG RWKHUVDVNLQJIRUIRUHFORVXUHRIWKH0RUWJDJH KHOGE\WKH3ODLQWLIIRQWKHSURSHUW\ORFDWHGDW 6DYDQQD/Q:RRGVWRFN,/PRUH SDUWLFXODUO\GHVFULEHGDV /RW  LQ 6SULQJULGJH 6XEGLYLVLRQ 3ODQQHG 'HYHORSPHQW EHLQJ D 6XEGLYLVLRQ RI SDUW RI WKH 1RUWKZHVW  RI WKH 6RXWKHDVW  RI 6HFWLRQ  7RZQVKLS  1RUWK 5DQJH  (DVW RI WKH 7KLUG 3ULQFLSDO 0HULGLDQ DFFRUGLQJ WR the Plat thereof recorded October 29, 2002 DV 'RFXPHQW 1XPEHU 5 LQ 0F+HQU\&RXQW\,OOLQRLV 3HUPDQHQW,QGH[1XPEHU &RPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV  6DYDQQD /Q Woodstock, IL 60098 81/(66<28),/(\RXUDQVZHURURWKHUZLVH Ã&#x20AC;OH\RXUDSSHDUDQFHLQWKLVFDXVHLQWKH2IÃ&#x20AC;FH of the Clerk of this Court at the MCHENRY &RXQW\ &RXUWKRXVH  1RUWK 6HPLQDU\ $YH :RRGVWRFN ,/  RQ RU EHIRUH 1RYHPEHU   $ -8'*0(17 25 '(&5(( %< '()$8/7 0$< %( 7$.(1 AGAINST YOU FOR RELIEF ASKED IN THE &203/$,17)25)25(&/2685( CLERK OF THE COURT THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO &2//(&7$'(%7 $1' $1< ,1)250$7,21 2%7$,1(' :,// %(86(')257+$7385326( +($91(56&277%(<(56 0,+/$5//& $WWRUQH\VDW/DZ 32%R[ Decatur, IL 62525 111 East Main Street Decatur, IL 62523 7HOHSKRQH   I566132 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW October 23, 2013) L8856

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME 3XEOLF1RWLFHLVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDWRQ2&72%(5   D FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;FDWH ZDV Ã&#x20AC;OHG LQ WKH 2IÃ&#x20AC;FH of the County Clerk of McHenry County, ,OOLQRLV VHWWLQJ IRUWK WKH QDPHV DQG SRVW RIÃ&#x20AC;FHDGGUHVVHVRIDOORIWKHSHUVRQVRZQLQJ

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3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW October 23, 2013) L8857

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS &,7,0257*$*(,1& Plaintiff, Y *$5<-5,77(5HWDO Defendant 12 CH 2564 127,&( 2) 6$/( 38%/,& 127,&( ,6 +(5(%<*,9(1WKDWSXUVXDQWWRD-XGJPHQW of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above FDXVHRQ$XJXVWDQDJHQWIRU7KH -XGLFLDO6DOHV&RUSRUDWLRQZLOODW30RQ 1RYHPEHU   DW WKH 1/7 7LWOH //& &RQJUHVV3DUNZD\6XLWH'&U\VWDO/DNH ,/VHOODWSXEOLFDXFWLRQWRWKHKLJKHVW ELGGHU DV VHW IRUWK EHORZ WKH IROORZLQJ described real estate: &RPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV  %85%$1. $9(18( :RRGVWRFN ,/  3URSHUW\ ,QGH[ 1R  7KH UHDO HVWDWH LV LPSURYHG ZLWK D VLQJOH IDPLO\ UHVLGHQFH 7KH MXGJPHQWDPRXQWZDV6DOHWHUPV GRZQRIWKHKLJKHVWELGE\FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;HGIXQGV DWWKHFORVHRIWKHVDOHSD\DEOHWR7KH-XGLFLDO 6DOHV&RUSRUDWLRQ1RWKLUGSDUW\FKHFNVZLOOEH DFFHSWHG 7KH EDODQFH LQFOXGLQJ WKH -XGLFLDO VDOH IHH IRU $EDQGRQHG 5HVLGHQWLDO 3URSHUW\ 0XQLFLSDOLW\5HOLHI)XQGZKLFKLVFDOFXODWHGRQ UHVLGHQWLDOUHDOHVWDWHDWWKHUDWHRIIRUHDFK RUIUDFWLRQWKHUHRIRIWKHDPRXQWSDLGE\ WKHSXUFKDVHUQRWWRH[FHHGLQFHUWLÃ&#x20AC;HG IXQGVRU ZLUH WUDQVIHU LV GXH ZLWKLQ WZHQW\ IRXU   KRXUV 1R IHH VKDOO EH SDLG E\ WKH PRUWJDJHHDFTXLULQJWKHUHVLGHQWLDOUHDOHVWDWH SXUVXDQWWRLWVFUHGLWELGDWWKHVDOHRUE\DQ\ PRUWJDJHH MXGJPHQW FUHGLWRU RU RWKHU OLHQRU DFTXLULQJ WKH UHVLGHQWLDO UHDO HVWDWH ZKRVH

ULJKWV LQ DQG WR WKH UHVLGHQWLDO UHDO HVWDWH DURVH SULRU WR WKH VDOH 7KH VXEMHFW SURSHUW\ LVVXEMHFWWRJHQHUDOUHDOHVWDWHWD[HVVSHFLDO DVVHVVPHQWV RU VSHFLDO WD[HV OHYLHG DJDLQVW VDLGUHDOHVWDWHDQGLVRIIHUHGIRUVDOHZLWKRXW DQ\ UHSUHVHQWDWLRQ DV WR TXDOLW\ RU TXDQWLW\ RIWLWOHDQGZLWKRXWUHFRXUVHWR3ODLQWLIIDQGLQ ´$6,6µFRQGLWLRQ7KHVDOHLVIXUWKHUVXEMHFWWR FRQÃ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOO RIWKHDPRXQWELGWKHSXUFKDVHUZLOOUHFHLYHD &HUWLÃ&#x20AC;FDWHRI6DOHWKDWZLOOHQWLWOHWKHSXUFKDVHU WRDGHHGWRWKHUHDOHVWDWHDIWHUFRQÃ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQ RIWKHVDOH7KHSURSHUW\ZLOO127EHRSHQIRU LQVSHFWLRQDQGSODLQWLIIPDNHVQRUHSUHVHQWDWLRQ DVWRWKHFRQGLWLRQRIWKHSURSHUW\3URVSHFWLYH ELGGHUV DUH DGPRQLVKHG WR FKHFN WKH FRXUW Ã&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOOLQIRUPDWLRQ,IWKLVSURSHUW\LVD FRQGRPLQLXPXQLWWKHSXUFKDVHURIWKHXQLWDW WKHIRUHFORVXUHVDOHRWKHUWKDQDPRUWJDJHH VKDOO SD\ WKH DVVHVVPHQWV DQG WKH OHJDO IHHV UHTXLUHG E\ 7KH &RQGRPLQLXP 3URSHUW\ $FW  ,/&6  J   DQG J   ,I WKLV SURSHUW\LVDFRQGRPLQLXPXQLWZKLFKLVSDUWRI D FRPPRQ LQWHUHVW FRPPXQLW\ WKH SXUFKDVHU of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than D PRUWJDJHH VKDOO SD\ WKH DVVHVVPHQWV UHTXLUHG E\ 7KH &RQGRPLQLXP 3URSHUW\ $FW  ,/&6  J  ,) <28 $5( 7+( MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS 0257*$*( )25(&/2685( /$: )RU LQIRUPDWLRQ FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII·V DWWRUQH\ HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, /7'  6RXWK /D6DOOH 6WUHHW  6XLWH  &+,&$*2,/  3OHDVH UHIHU WR Ã&#x20AC;OH QXPEHU  7+(

PUBLIC NOTICE

REAL ESTATE NOTICES IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS 681758670257*$*(,1& Plaintiff, YV 9(51 6,(%(57 %(77< - 6,(%(57 CRESTVIEW PROPERTY ASSOCIATION OF HARTLAND, ,1& Defendants, 11 CH 831 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW 38%/,& 127,&( LV KHUHE\ JLYHQ WKDW SXUVXDQW WR D -XGJPHQW RI )RUHFORVXUH entered in the above entitled cause on $XJXVW   ,QWHUFRXQW\ -XGLFLDO 6DOHV &RUSRUDWLRQ ZLOO RQ 7KXUVGD\ 1RYHPEHU  DWWKHKRXURIDPLQWKHRIÃ&#x20AC;FHVRI %RWWR*LOEHUW*HKULV/DQFDVWHU0F+HQU\ Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell WR WKH KLJKHVW ELGGHU IRU FDVK WKH IROORZLQJ GHVFULEHGSURSHUW\ 3,1 &RPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV  &5(67 /$1( :22'672&.,/ 7KH LPSURYHPHQW RQ WKH SURSHUW\ FRQVLVWV RI D VLQJOH IDPLO\ UHVLGHQFH ,I WKH VXEMHFW PRUWJDJHG UHDO HVWDWH LV D XQLW RI D FRPPRQ LQWHUHVW FRPPXQLW\ WKH SXUFKDVHU RI WKH XQLW RWKHU WKDQ D PRUWJDJHH VKDOO SD\ WKH DVVHVVPHQWV UHTXLUHG E\ VXEVHFWLRQ J  RI 6HFWLRQRIWKH&RQGRPLQLXP3URSHUW\$FW 6DOH WHUPV  GRZQ E\ FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV EDODQFH ZLWKLQ  KRXUV E\ FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV

1RUHIXQGV7KHSURSHUW\ZLOO127EHRSHQIRU LQVSHFWLRQ8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOORIWKHDPRXQW ELGWKHSXUFKDVHUZLOOUHFHLYHD&HUWLÃ&#x20AC;FDWHRI 6DOHZKLFKZLOOHQWLWOHWKHSXUFKDVHUWRD'HHG WRWKHSUHPLVHVDIWHUFRQÃ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQRIWKHVDOH )RU ,QIRUPDWLRQ 9LVLW RXU ZHEVLWH DW KWWS VHUYLFHDWW\SLHUFHFRP %HWZHHQ  SP DQG  SP RQO\ 3LHUFH  $VVRFLDWHV 3ODLQWLII·V $WWRUQH\V  1RUWK 'HDUERUQ 6WUHHW &KLFDJR ,OOLQRLV7HO1R  5HIHUWR )LOH1XPEHU INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION 6HOOLQJ2IÃ&#x20AC;FHU   I565226 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW October 9, 2013, October 16, 2013, October 23, 2013) L8837 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 22ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS '(876&+( %$1. 1$7,21$/ 75867 COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE 5(6,'(17,$/ $66(7 6(&85,7,=$7,21 75867 $&% 0257*$*( 3$66 THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005H UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2005, Plaintiff, YV LAURETTE DELLINGER, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE LAURETTE 0 '(//,1*(5 '(&/$5$7,21 2) 75867 '$7(''(&(0%(5$1'.12:1$6 75867 $*5((0(17 12  1$7,21$/ &,7<%$1. Defendants,

11 CH 1739 NOTICE OF SALE 38%/,& 127,&( ,6 +(5(%< *,9(1 WKDW SXUVXDQW WR D -XGJPHQW RI )RUHFORVXUH DQG Sale entered in the above entitled cause on January 9, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales &RUSRUDWLRQ ZLOO RQ 7KXUVGD\ 1RYHPEHU  DWWKHKRXURIDPLQWKHRIÃ&#x20AC;FHVRI %RWWR *LOEHUW *HKULV /DQFDVWHU  0F+HQU\ Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell at SXEOLF DXFWLRQ WR WKH KLJKHVW ELGGHU IRU FDVK DV VHW IRUWK EHORZ WKH IROORZLQJ GHVFULEHG PRUWJDJHGUHDOHVWDWH 3,1 &RPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV  7DUD 'ULYH :RRGVWRFN,/ 7KH PRUWJDJHG UHDO HVWDWH LV LPSURYHG ZLWK D VLQJOH IDPLO\ UHVLGHQFH ,I WKH VXEMHFW PRUWJDJHG UHDO HVWDWH LV D XQLW RI D FRPPRQ LQWHUHVW FRPPXQLW\ WKH SXUFKDVHU RI WKH XQLW RWKHU WKDQ D PRUWJDJHH VKDOO SD\ WKH DVVHVVPHQWV UHTXLUHG E\ VXEVHFWLRQ J  RI 6HFWLRQ  RI WKH &RQGRPLQLXP 3URSHUW\ $FW   6DOH WHUPV  GRZQ E\ FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV EDODQFH E\ FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV ZLWKLQ  KRXUV1RUHIXQGV7KHSURSHUW\ZLOO127EH RSHQ IRU LQVSHFWLRQ  3URVSHFWLYH ELGGHUV DUH DGPRQLVKHGWRFKHFNWKHFRXUWÃ&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOO LQIRUPDWLRQ )RULQIRUPDWLRQFDOO6DOHV&OHUNDW/DZ2IÃ&#x20AC;FHV RI ,UD 7 1HYHO  1RUWK )UDQNOLQ 6WUHHW &KLFDJR,OOLQRLV   INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION 6HOOLQJ2IÃ&#x20AC;FHU   I565230 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW October 9, 2013, October 16, 2013, October 23, 2013) L8838


PUBLIC NOTICES JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105 CHICAGO, IL 60603 (312) 372-2020 Attorney File No. 12-2222-20977 Case Number: 12 CH 2564 TJSC#: 33-20889 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are DGYLVHGWKDW3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\LVGHHPHGWREH a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I565999 (Published in The Woodstock Independent October 16, 2013, October 23, 2013) L8843 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.KATHY L. MULLEN, et al Defendant 13 CH 00621 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on July 2, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on November 13, 2013, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 927 WHEELER STREET, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098 Property Index No. 13-05-111-010. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25%

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT GRZQ RI WKH KLJKHVW ELG E\ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV DW the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by WKHSXUFKDVHUQRWWRH[FHHGLQFHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG funds/or wire transfer, is due within twentyfour (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to FRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOO of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHRI6DOHWKDWZLOOHQWLWOHWKHSXUFKDVHU WRDGHHGWRWKHUHDOHVWDWHDIWHUFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQ of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court Ă&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOOLQIRUPDWLRQ,IWKLVSURSHUW\LVD condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE

MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For LQIRUPDWLRQ H[DPLQH WKH FRXUW Ă&#x20AC;OH RU FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\&2',/,6 $662&,$7(6 P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 7943OHDVHUHIHUWRĂ&#x20AC;OHQXPEHU THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-35712 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 13 CH 00621 TJSC#: 33-15826 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised WKDW3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\LVGHHPHGWREHDGHEW collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I566654 (Published in The Woodstock Independent October 16, 2013) L8847 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU 2003-S4 Plaintiff, -v.SANDY KALLICK, SHERRI I. KALLICK, WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL ILLINOIS, INC. Defendant 09 CH 1574 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS

Oct. 23-29, 2013 HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on November 13, 2013, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7920 Swarthmore, Woodstock, IL 60098 Property Index No. 14-06-101-003. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $601,051.83. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HGIXQGVLPPHGLDWHO\E\WKHKLJKHVWDQG best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. 7KH VDOH LV IXUWKHU VXEMHFW WR FRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQ E\ the court. Upon payment in full of the amount ELGWKHSXUFKDVHUZLOOUHFHLYHD&HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHRI Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed WRWKHUHDOHVWDWHDIWHUFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQRIWKHVDOH The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court

27

Ă&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOOLQIRUPDWLRQ,IWKLVSURSHUW\LVD condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For LQIRUPDWLRQ FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII¡V DWWRUQH\ HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the 0RUWJDJHH¡VDWWRUQH\7+(-8',&,$/6$/(6 CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Case Number: 09 CH 1574 TJSC#: 33-22503 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection 3UDFWLFHV$FW \RX DUH DGYLVHG WKDW 3ODLQWLII¡V attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I567038 (Published in The Woodstock Independent October 16, 2013) L8852

SPORTS SCOREBOARD

Âť COLUMN

Krolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Panthers dominate EKU, Austin Peay Oh, sweet victory. Eastern Illinois Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ben Krol, a Marian Central Catholic graduate, has won, and helped the EIU Panthers win more than their fair share of football games. But, for Tom Discher, a Woodstock High graduate and Knox College senior, winning football games, at least this year, is a very rare feeling indeed. At Eastern Illinois University, the Panthers won their ďŹ rst two Ohio Valley Conference football games. Krol, a 6-foot-6, 247-pound redshirt sophomore quarterback, played in both conference clashes. In the league opening win over Eastern Kentucky University, Krolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longest pass was for 56 yards in the 42-7 EIU victory. In the more recent 63-7 drubbing of Austin Peay State University, Krol had 16 passing yards on 3-of-4 passing. Eastern Illinois is 5-1 overall and 2-0 in the OVC. At Knox College, the Prairie Fire defeated Beloit College 31-21, for not only their ďŹ rst conference win of the year, but their ďŹ rst win overall.

Discher led Knox in total tackles (nine) and solo tackles (six). North Central College, the fourth-ranked team in the country among NCAA Division III Dan teams, thumped Chamness Millikin UniverThe College sity 55-7. Greg Report Whalen (Marian Central) started at right tackle for the NCC Cardinals and helped them post 550 yards of offense. Fellow NCC player Ryan Szudarski (Marian Central) caught one pass for eight yards. North Central is 5-0 overall and 2-0 in the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin. Soccer Susan Thomas (Marian Central) assisted Lewis Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nal goal for a 3-1 win over University of Illinois-SpringďŹ eld.

Golf Jamie Hagen (Woodstock), a Clarke University senior, ďŹ nished 33rd in the Ronnie Eastman Invitational at the LaCrosse Country Club in Onalaska, Wis. Hagen shot a 156 for 36 holes. e University of Dubuque carded a 592 to win the team title. Volleyball Eastern Kentucky Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dena Ott (Marian Central) had 18 digs as EKU snapped their fourmatch losing streak by topping Eastern Illinois University 3-0. Ott also had six assists. Earlier in the week, EKU lost a 3-2 decision to Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. Aurora University senior Sarah Olesen (Woodstock) had nine kills, ďŹ ve blocks (two solos) and two digs in Auroraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-1 loss to Marian University. Olesen hit .286 in the contest. Dan Chamness follows the college athletic careers of Woodstock-area athletes.

MARIAN Boys cross-country Q Oct. 15: MC took 6rd place in the Pumpkin Run Boys soccer Q Oct. 16: MC 2, CLC 2 Girls cross-country Q Oct. 15: MC took 3rd place in the Pumpkin Run Girls volleyball Q Oct. 19: MC ďŹ nished 2-3 at the Crystal Lake Central Doug Blundy Invitational WOODSTOCK Boys soccer Q Oct. 15: WHS 0, GLC 7 Girls volleyball Q Oct. 19: WHS ďŹ nished 3rd in the Pecatonica Classic Q Oct. 17: WHS 2, WNHS 0 (25-18, 25-16) WOODSTOCK NORTH Boys soccer Q Oct. 15: WNHS 0, CLC 4 Girls volleyball Q Oct. 19: Woodstock North ďŹ nished 6th in the Woodstock North Invite. Q Oct. 17: WNHS 0, WHS 2 (18-25, 16-25) CO-OP Girls swimming Q Oct. 19: Varsity placed 7th in the Blue Devil Invite.


28

Oct. 23-29, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

» CROSS-COUNTRY

SPORTS » GOLF CLASS 2A SECTIONAL

FOX VALLY CONFERENCE MEET

Emricson plays host to conference MC’s Radwanski By JAY SCHULZ The Independent

Emricson Park was a cross-country showcase Oct. 19, hosting runners from 14 teams in the Fox Valley Conference crosscountry meet. e park will have another chance to show off Saturday, Oct. 26, when it hosts the IHSA Class 2A regional meet. “Hosting was very hectic, trying to coordinate everything,” said Woodstock North Head Coach Dan Kremske said. “e regional meet is a little less hectic, a little smaller with nine teams. It was almost like a dress rehearsal. With the regional meet we will know what’s going on and what to expect.” “We’ve done a great job communicating back and forth between all of the coaches, trying to [divide] up goals and jobs,” said Woodstock High School Matt McCulley. “I

Fedmasu

could see other places having real problems coordinating between schools. We work together to give the kids the best experience possible.” e WHS boys team finished eighth out of 14 teams with 198 points. Sophomore Luke Beattie finished eighth with a time of 16:17.9; senior Liam DeWane finished 30th with a time of 16:56.1; senior Zach Bellavia finished 44th with a time of 17:15.9; and freshman Spencer Hanson finished 45th with a time of 17:16.7. e WHS girls team finished fourth with 107 points. Senior Maura Beattie finished second with a time of 18:15.8; freshman Kate Jacobs finished fifth with a time of 18:58.2; sophomore Grace Beattie finished 29th with a time of 20:18.5; and junior Sarah Semmen finished 33rd with a time of 20:29.5. e WNHS boys team finished 13th

with 345 points. Senior Cullen Anderson finished 50th with a time of 17:24.1; senior Sergio Rodriguez finished 61st with a time of 17:39.9; sophomore Jesse Long finished 67th with a time of 17:48.2; and senior Tristin Smith finished 81st with a time of 18:12.1. For the WNHS girls team, sophomore Isabella Mazzanti finished 37th with a time of 20:36.3; junior Brianna Baltes finished 76th with a time of 22:29.5; freshman Peyton Wood finished 82nd with a time of 23:19; and freshman Landis Delgado finished 87th with a time of 24:17. Only nine teams will participate in the regional meet as compared to 14 in the FVC meet. “is will be a lot of teams we’ve raced before,” McCulley said. “It’s going to be a very different look from [the FVC meet].” e regional meet will start at 10 a.m.

Continued from Page 32

state are tough tennis players. I just want Ana to remember its an accomplishment to have made it to state and to really remember to stay in the moment and play one point at a time.” WHS placed sixth out of 10 teams with seven points. Marian Central Catholic High School competed in three state-qualifying matches. Junior Abby Waters lost 6-2, 6-3; the doubles team of Taylor Sledz and Sidney Waters lost 6-2, 6-0; and the

doubles team of Kaitlin Pinter and Rachel Melchionna lost 6-1, 6-3. “As a team, we probably outperformed ourselves,” said Marian Central head coach Ginny Larsen. “ey really stepped up to the plate.” e Waters sisters have decided to play doubles next year, as their brothers Aaron and Riley did in 2011 when they qualified for the state tournament. “e girls are totally into it,” Larsen said, noting the brothers did not start

Thunder

playing doubles together until the middle of season. “[Starting now] is going to be an advantage for them.” “Overall, I think it will be a fun experience,” Abby Waters said. “We just think it would be really cool because our brothers did it.” Marian placed fourth with 14 points. Woodstock North High School finished tied for ninth with zero points. Seniors Kellie Smith and Cally Maire won their first round match 6-1, 6-4.

Continued from Page 32

to be coachable [for] 48 minutes, not three drives and then do our own thing,” said Schroeder. Woodstock North will host Grayslake North High School Friday, Oct. 25. Grayslake North comes in with a 6-2 record overall. In a lineup that is becoming increas-

ingly junior-dominated, Schroeder said he expects his team to start playing with more maturity. “e young kids are in week eight now, so they’re not juniors anymore,” he said. “We need 48 minutes with no excuses. Go out on the field and just make something happen.”

Which IRA is best for you? Let’s talk. Russ Olsen, AAMS® Financial Advisor 1114 North Seminary Ave. (Rt.47) Woodstock, IL 60098 815-337-0777 www.edwardjones.com

makes the cut By JAY SCHULZ The Independent Noah Radwanski had one goal entering the golf season – qualify for the IHSA state tournament. e Marian Central Catholic High School senior achieved the goal Oct. 14 by shooting 78 in the IHSA Class 2A sectional tournament at Park Hills Golf Course in Freeport. “I was relieved more than anything because I had been waiting for this for three years,” Radwanski said. “To just make it down there was a relief.” e state tournament was held Oct. 18 and 19 at Weibring Golf Club, Normal. Radwanski shot 83, 87 to finish tied for 76th place. “I didn’t play as well as I hoped, but I am glad I ended my career downstate and not at sectionals,” Radwanski said. “I think it was a great experience for him,” said Marian head coach Erin Carver. “Out of 3,000 kids that started the beginning of the season, to make it to state is great just in itself. I’m proud he made it down there. He did a great job. … Hopefully he will realize later in life that it really was cool and it really was a big deal to be down there.” Woodstock High School senior Alex Ferguson shot 85 Oct. 14 at the IHSA Class 3A sectional meet at Blackstone Golf Club in Marengo and failed to qualify for the state tournament. “A couple of bad holes got me,” Ferguson said. “It’s disappointing not getting to state, but it’s not like I’m done forever. I have 60 more years to play the game.” Ferguson praised his coaches for their support over the last four years. “Coach [J.C.] Wise and coach [Brent] Filetti make it really enjoyable,” Ferguson said. “I had a lot of fun and really appreciate everything they did for me.” ree golfers from the Marian Central girls golf team competed in the IHSA Class 2A tournament Oct. 14 at Ingersoll Golf Course in Rockford. Freshman Sophia Archos shot 91, junior Kenzie Mocogni shot 92 and junior Emily Johnson shot 106. None of them qualified for the state tournament. Marian head coach Paula Watson said she was very proud of how her team members played and noted “they have improved markedly during the year.”


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WHS evens season record against Thunder Crosstown matchup raises funds for cancer research By JAY SCHULZ The Independent e Woodstock High School girls volleyball team was looking to even its record against crosstown rival Woodstock North Oct. 17. e Blue Streaks lost to the under 2-0 (25-20, 25-20) Sept. 24 in the teamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ďŹ rst meeting but left the court happy in their second meeting, having reversed their fortune by beating the under 2-0 (25-18, 2516). WHS head coach Meghan Mullaney said her team came out with the intensity she had been looking for. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was so proud of my team,â&#x20AC;? Mullaney said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ey played together. â&#x20AC;Ś ey came out with intensity. We minimized our errors. Everything worked in our favor. It was awesome.â&#x20AC;? WNHS head coach Greg Bruns said his team shot itself in the foot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just made too many unforced errors,â&#x20AC;? Bruns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[WHS] played better than us, and I think mentally we got tight.â&#x20AC;? e match was part of Block Out

GAMES OF THE WEEK Woodstock High School vs. Woodstock North High School (soccer) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23, at Marian Central Catholic High School What to look for: The Blue Streaks and the Thunder meet in the ďŹ rst round of the IHSA Class 2A regional tournament. The Streaks and Thunder have played against each other three years in a row in the regional tournament, and the Streaks will be looking to avenge their 5-1 loss to the Thunder Oct. 10. The winner will play the winner of the Marian Central vs. Prairie Ridge/ Crystal Lake Central game at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25. IHSA Class 2A regional cross-country meet â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, Emricson Park What to look for: Woodstock North High School will host eight schools in the regional meet. The Thunder and Streaks will look to advance as many runners as possible to the IHSA sectional tournament Saturday, Nov. 2, at Belvidere High School.

Blue Streaks Andrea Wright, left, and Georgia Wicker prepare to set the ball Oct. 18 against the Thunder.

A player wears pink socks in honor of breast cancer research during the Block Out Cancer game at WHS.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Cancer night at WHS. About $200 was raised for the American Cancer Society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was great,â&#x20AC;? Mullaney said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a couple of last minute challenges, but we have great parents that helped me. It was a really cool night. We had a lot of fans there.â&#x20AC;? e teams will play one more time

Âť FOOTBALL

Monday, Oct. 28, in the IHSA Class 3A regional tournament at WNHS. e winner will play Johnsburg. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun hosting,â&#x20AC;? Bruns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a great facility. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a nice home ďŹ eld advantage, and, hopefully, it will relax the girls.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It should be a good match up,â&#x20AC;? Mul-

laney said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of a better match up. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 1-1, and someone has to come out on top.â&#x20AC;? Blue Streak senior defensive specialist Andrea Wright said she was proud of how the team played together to get the victory and is â&#x20AC;&#x153;looking forward to playing them again in the regionals.â&#x20AC;?

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Streaks show improvement but fall to Crystal Lake Central By JAY SCHULZ The Independent e Woodstock High School varsity football team (1-7) came into its game Oct. 18 against Crystal Lake Central High School (7-1) hoping to compete with a team that, at least on paper, looked much better. e Streaks performed admirably in the ďŹ rst half but eventually lost 48-27. e Streaks fell behind quickly 14-0, but two long touchdown passes from junior quarterback Jace Pohlman to Jordan Sumner (74 yards) and senior Michael Santucci (66 yards) brought the score to 14-13. e Tigers extended the lead to 21-13, but the Streaks answered

with a 4-yard touchdown run from Santucci. At halftime the score was 28-19. Central would score the next 20 points to put the game away. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought in the ďŹ rst half, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We gave them everything we could give them, and I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be more proud of how the team came together and competed,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? said head coach Steve Beard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ey are more physical than us, and it showed in the third and fourth quarter.â&#x20AC;? Sumner would catch another 74-yard touchdown pass to cap the scoring for the Streaks. Pohlman completed 26 of 44 passes for 407 yards for three touchdowns and one interception. Sumner caught

10 passes for 225 yards and two touchdowns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought Jace and Jordan played well, and our offensive line gave our [quarterback] a good amount of time to pass the ball. Mike Santucci did a good amount of blocking at the running back spot.â&#x20AC;? Pohlman said he felt much more comfortable as the starting quarterback in his second week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really have a different mindset coming into [the game],â&#x20AC;? Pohlman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we got out there and got those ďŹ rst few drives going, I just felt a lot more comfortable in the pocket. It really helps when you have guys around that make plays.â&#x20AC;? e Streaks now turn their

attention to the last game of the year, which is homecoming and senior night. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our homecoming, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hoping to have a good crowd for our game,â&#x20AC;? Beard said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ere are a lot of people that will see us for the ďŹ rst time. â&#x20AC;Ś you want to show people that may have not seen you play this year how good you really are.â&#x20AC;? Sumner said he wants to leave the program on a positive note. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just want to win, because it is our homecoming,â&#x20AC;? Sumner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to show we put up a ďŹ ght in our last game. I want to leave the program with a win.â&#x20AC;? e Streaks will host Grayslake Central at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26.

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Sports » TENNIS CARY-GROVE SECTIONAL

WHS junior qualifies for state By JAY SCHULZ The Independent

Marian Central wide receiver Brett Olson runs with the ball after a catch Oct. 18. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

» FOOTBALL

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Marian takes to the air Passing game gives ’Canes a big win over St. Edward By MEGAN IVERS The Independent e Marian Central Catholic High School football team’s passing game led to a 49-21 victory over St. Edward Oct. 18. e Hurricanes relied on five passing touchdowns to rack up 422 yards of offense versus their opponent’s 189. Senior Brett Olson (6-106) received the first three Marian (6-2 overall; 4-2 SCC Blue) touchdowns in the first quarter, and juniors Matt Ricchiuto and Jacob Dehne each added a touchdown reception. Marian’s offensive line also created an opportunity for senior Ephraim Lee (19-149) to record a 13yard touchdown run. Even Marian’s defense turned up strong with a 19-yard interception return from senior om-

» FOOTBALL

as Lesniewski. “Our guys played hard, and it was a great team effort,” said Lee. “We drilled the ball down, got first downs and avoided third downs.” Marian’s strength kept the Green Wave at a distance despite a bold, thirdquarter recovery attempt wherein the Wave scored back-to-back touchdowns within 15 seconds. e Hurricanes kept their poise, however, which pleased head coach Ed Brucker. “We are still getting better each week, and we could be peaking at the right time for the playoffs,” said Brucker. “I think some players are still learning to focus on every play. “We are looking forward to a good week of practice, so we can finish strong.” Junior quarterback Billy Bahl (13-27239) had a field day connecting with an army of Hurricanes including Olson, Lee (2-35), senior Tom Klinger (3-76),

sophomore Jaryd Cabusao (1-11), Ricchiuto (1-11), and Dehne (1-12). e ‘Canes offense also orchestrated openings for several teammates besides Lee to add rushing yards, including junior Jordan Niemeyer (1-6), Bahl (3-6), junior Chris Curnutt (2-8) and Cabusao (2-6). e players are well aware of their need to pack as much as possible into upcoming practices. “We have to execute in practice,” said Lee. “We have to know our assignments — what holes to block and who we need to cover on defense.” “We really want to eliminate as many errors as possible,” said Olson. “We know that the winners of these [playoff] games will be the ones with the fewest mistakes.” For their final regular-season game, the Hurricanes will travel to Wheaton Academy (4-4; 3-0) at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25.

Ana Fedmasu was looking forward to a return trip. e Woodstock High School junior qualified for the IHSA state tennis tournament for the second straight year by placing third in the Cary-Grove sectional tournament Oct. 18 and 19. “I feel wonderful,” Fedmasu said. “I can’t believe I did it. is season wasn’t too good for me. … I’m very excited. I just hope I don’t have to play a top seed as my first match.” “I was really proud of her and the way that she played,” said WHS head coach Jessie Justice. “It seemed like a pretty clear road, but we knew it wasn’t a given. … She played really well.” Fedmasu was the third seed and had a bye in the first round on day one of the tournament. She won her match in the second round 6-3. 6-2, which moved her into the second day and the qualifying round. She won that round 6-0, 6-0, sealing her trip to state. Fedmasu said she learned last year at state she needs to be more conservative. “I’m going to focus on each point and not think of the big picture,” Fedmasu said. “I’m going to live in the point and play each like it’s my last.” Justice said that Fedmasu needs to stay positive given the level of competition she will be facing. “I think its important to keep a positive attitude,” Justice said. “e girls at Please see Fedmasu, Page 28

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Thunder can’t hang on against G’lake Central By JASON LEARMAN The Independent Momentum is often a deciding factor in sports, and it played a huge role in Woodstock North High School’s matchup with Grayslake Central High School Oct. 18 in Grayslake. Grayslake Central came out of the gate firing on all cylinders early in the first

quarter. Woodstock North seemed to take the Rams punch and regain control of the game before eventually falling 28-12. After falling behind 7-0 early in the first quarter, a mishandled kickoff gave the ball right back to Grayslake Central and found the under in danger of trailing by two scores early. e defense held

strong though, forcing the Rams to attempt a long field goal that came up short. e defensive stand seemed to shift momentum in North’s direction. Touchdown runs by senior Grant Wade and junior Jordan Plummer gave the under a 12-7 lead midway through the second quarter. e momentum shift would be short-lived, with Grayslake

Central ending the first half with a long touchdown drive, and a 14-12 lead – a lead they wouldn’t relinquish. “We just lost our momentum,” said WNHS senior running back Alex Mitchell. under coach Jeff Schroeder has seen his team show flashes during what has become a long and frustrating season. Schroeder is looking for his young team to begin to show more consistency. “It’s a matter of we have Please see Thunder, Page 28

Blue Streak Ana Fedmasu returns a shot Oct. 18 in the IHSA sectional tennis tournament at Cary-Grove. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

CROSS-COUNTRY

GOLF

VOLLEYBALL

Emricson Park hosts the Fox Valley Conference meet

Marian’s Noah Radwanski qualifies for state

The Blue Streaks even the season series against the Thunder

PAGE 28

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The Woodstock Independent, October 23rd, 2013  
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