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Oct. 16-22, 2013 Oct. 16-22, 20131

Woodstock

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

I NDEPENDENT The

Published every Wednesday

Est. 1987

Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill.

www.thewoodstockindependent.com

$1.00

NEWS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

MARKETPLACE

City manager handles two positions for six months

Fall activities, events beckon

Crystal Lake Marine anchors on Lake Avenue

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THINK PINK

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PAGE 11

The annual Care4 Breast Cancer 5K is one of the largest fundraisers in McHenry County

THE GRATE DEBATE

City pool draws federal attention By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

Despite terrible setbacks, Sue Sauer fought through her breast cancer, defeated it and will proudly participate for the third consecutive year in the Care4 Breast Cancer 5K walk. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

More than 2,700 to participate in 13th breast cancer 5K

INDEX

OBITUARIES OPINION EDUCATION A&E MARKETPLACE

5 6 8 9 11

COMMUNITY CALENDAR CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC NOTICES SPORTS

12 19 20 22 28

Start/ Finish

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Woodstock North H.S. 3000 Raffel Rd.

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RAFFEL RD.

At 2:14 p.m. Dec. 23, 2010, 46-yearold Sue Sauer learned she had breast cancer. “If you ever ask anyone, they can tell you the exact time, place, where they were … it’s crazy,” Sauer said. With a mastectomy followed by multiple rounds of chemotherapy, Sauer’s cancer should have been relatively easy to cure. However, her cancer continuously tested doctors’ limits as she seemed to defy every statistical standard, turning typically unlikely risks into common occurrences. After her mastectomy, Sauer’s first chemotherapy cocktail caused a severe allergic reaction, resulting in a “chemo crash.” Sauer woke up in the hospital 10 days later. Her doctors decided she could never receive any chemo treatments again. Instead, she was put on a daily hormone blocker she would have to take for at least five years to keep her cancer at bay. With several other setbacks, reactions and

“excruciating pain” throughout her treatment, Sauer continued to fight with the support of friends, family and prayer to defeat her cancer. A speech and language pathologist at Indian Hill Elementary School in Round Lake, Sauer had to take several medical leaves. She said she was so blessed to have the support of her co-workers, who donated their sick days and vacation time so she could remain on salary while recovering at home in Woodstock. In honor of her fight, Sauer completed her first Care4 Breast Cancer 5K walk in 2011, barely making it through due to exhaustion from her treatments. is year will be her third walk. She is in much better health and has a growing team called “Sauer Power.” For the 13th year, the Family Health Partnership Clinic will host its annual Care4 Breast Cancer 5K run/walk starting at 8:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, at Woodstock North High School. Event coordinator Wendy Pierzchalski said the race is growing significantly each year.

SW

By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

MANKE LN.

Walk route

After nine years at Lippold Park in Crystal Lake, the race was moved to Please see Cancer walk, Page 3

OBITUARIES

END QUOTE

Janice K. Bielski, 64, Woodstock Greg McCoy, 62, Woodstock Mary D. Kiefer, 83, Woodstock Matthew John Porter, 39, Woodstock

“People can arrive like they are coming to the Academy Awards.” — John Scharres, Page 12

While Woodstock Water Works patrons were glad to see the water slides reopen for the last half of the summer, inspectors of the Illinois Department of Public Health were not as thrilled. After a state inspection in March identified a water intake grate at the pool noncompliant with the Virginia Graeme Baker Anti-Entrapment Act, the water slides remained closed until July, when they were opened for Independence Day. Despite state inspections July 17 and Aug. 2 ordering the slides closed, the pool slides stayed in operation for the remainder of the season, drawing federal attention from the Consumer Product Safety Commission last month. Recreation Director Dave Zinnen said when the Virginia Graeme Baker Act went into effect in December 2008, the city replaced all drain covers and some mechanical devices to meet the standards of the act. A compliance inspection followed, and Zinnen said the facility was approved. In 2011, a recall of some drain covers was announced but not made known to the city by the pool’s vendor until this year. Zinnen said the recalled drain covers were replaced last spring, and a state inspector came out to the pool in March to check compliance. Zinnen said the inspector found the grate, a 14-feet-by-4-feet cover over a set of water intake pipes, noncompliant. Zinnen said the grate was installed in 2002 and passed inspections each year after Virginia Graeme Baker was enacted. “Basically, we told our vendor [in 2009], ‘Get us compliant with the new Virginia Graeme Baker law,’” Zinnen said. “And for some reason, the grate did not get replaced.” To meet compliance, the city also needed to cut the intake pipes to clear the grate by at least 1 foot. Doing this meant finding an engineer to submit plans for a custom-grate cover and Please see Pool, Page 3

The Woodstock Independent 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 www.thewoodstockindependent.com


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Oct. 16-22, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

NEWS


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

3

Six months in, city manager adjusting to new job By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent Almost six months after taking on the role of city manager, Roscoe Stelford is finally close to handing off his past duties as finance director. After 12 years as finance director for the city of Woodstock, Stelford was chosen to be the city manager, taking over the role in April when Tim Clifton retired. e appointment kept the city moving forward with its projects and priorities, but he continued to handle the duties of the vacant finance director position. “It’s not a true transition yet, because you’re kind of doing both jobs, but the department heads have been very supportive of me, and they’ve been very helpful in that regard,” Stelford said. “We’ve been able to get a lot of things done in the first six months. It’s been pretty productive.”

Pool

Since April, Stelford has been working with staff to fill executive positions with the hire of Public Works Director Paul Ruscko and searching for an economic development coordinator and Roscoe a finance director. Stelford Stelford said the search for a finance director is coming to a close with the new director to be announced soon. “e hiring of the executive teams obviously is a big project because it has such implications in the future for the community and the city,” Stelford said. Mayor Brian Sager said Stelford has played an important role in hiring a part-time grant writer and developing a request for proposal and marketing

plan in hopes of securing the future of the Old Courthouse. Sager also said Stelford has tackled short- and long-term projects including capital improvements like initiating roadway and resurfacing projects, as well as working on efforts to improve Route 47 and Highway 14. “He has remarkable strengths in terms of his ability to work with the residents, to identify areas of need and opportunities to address those needs and derive resolution. He has equally the ability to work with City Council and staff to approach areas of high priority and has effectively moved forward with some very positive, progressive steps to move those priorities forward,” Sager said. Sager said he is eager for the hire of a finance director to allow Stelford to focus more on areas of priority. “We have to be honest and say that Roscoe has played double-duty here, and that certainly takes a toll on any

individual, but he’s a very dedicated individual who wants to make sure that everything is done and everything is done to the very best possible manner,” Sager said. “His strong degree of perfectionism and his degree of professionalism has required of him that he spend many, many hours doing both jobs.” With time to dedicate to his city manager position, Stelford said he looks forward to working with City Council, staff and residents to secure new business with the hire of the economic development coordinator. He also is looking at a process to fast-track permits for business owners and is excited to see the developments with the Old Courthouse. is past week, Stelford took time out to officially move to Woodstock with his wife, Susan, his son, Alex, 22, and his daughter, Samantha, 20, who is currently attending Northern Illinois University.

were denied, the IDPH sent a cease and desist order to the city July 26. Another inspection followed in August, which verified the city had ignored the closure orders and continued to operate the slides. On Aug. 5, the IDPH contacted the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office to enforce the slide closure. “We received this email from Undersheriff Andrew Zinke that the Department of Public Health had contacted him to have me arrested if we wouldn’t close the slides,” Zinnen said. But Arnold said the undersheriff declined to enforce the order, which resulted in the IDPH contacting the Illinois Office of the Attorney General the next day to proceed with an injunction. “We also contacted the Consumer Product Safety Commission to inspect the facility,” Arnold said. “ey inspected

the facility and verified that the suction intake for the water slide did not meet the federal suction entrapment requirements.” Arnold also said the federal inspector came out in September after the pool was closed and also found a drain cover in the baby pool — a cover that was replaced in the spring — to be noncompliant. “We’ve been open for 12 years and have never had a federal inspector come out,” Zinnen said. In regard to the drain cover, Zinnen said, “What is kind of frustrating is that we have these inspections, they say we’re compliant … then we have a federal inspector come out and say, ‘No, these are not compliant.’” “Ultimately, I think the Illinois Department of Public Health took a very ultra-conservative position, and I can’t blame them for it … . But from more of a common sense approach, I think the city’s actions were justified,” said City

Manager Roscoe Stelford. “No one has been harmed since 2002, when the pool was first opened with that grate.” Zinnen said the drain cover in the baby pool is being replaced free of charge by the manufacturer. e city submitted a permit application last month for a new grate. e estimated total for the project including engineering, manufacturing and installation is $25,000. “I think that it’s important to say that on behalf of the city and its residents, our desire and intent is to be totally compliant with all state and federal regulations,” said Sager. “Our request was simply to allow us to make these improvements after the season was completed, which would allow our residents the opportunity to utilize the amenities and also would be a practical time, as the pool was drained, to approach such improvements.”

Continued from Page 1

obtaining a permit from the state, which Zinnen said would take about eight weeks to process. With the pool opening in May, he said the city could not wait for the lengthy process, so instead he closed the pool slides until July. Zinnen said the city requested a variance from the IDPH, since the suction from the pipes behind the grate was basically “nonexistent.” He said the grate was well behind the base of the slide, lifeguards diligently manned the slides, and the area where the grate is located was sectioned off, but the variance was denied. For the Fourth of July holiday, Mayor Brian Sager had the slides reopened with extra lifeguarding precautions. A state inspector came out in July requesting the slides be shut off, but the city chose to keep them open. Melaney Arnold, an IDPH spokesperson, said, after the requests

Cancer walk

Continued from Page 1

neighborhoods around WNHS because Pierzchalski said the event outgrew the park. With $189,000 raised last year, the race has become one of the largest fundraising events in McHenry County. With 94 teams, 2,700 participants and almost $100,000 raised already from donations and corporate sponsors, Pierzchalski said the event is on track to exceed this year’s fundraising goal of $185,000. Proceeds from the event go directly to breast cancer services at Family Health Partnership Clinic, which serves uninsured patients in McHenry County. “I think the biggest thing is that it supports McHenry County residents, and I think people feel very strongly about supporting their own people,” said Pierzchalski. “It’s great to give to the American Cancer Society, or it’s great to give to some other big conglomerate, but you don’t know how it’s impacting your neighbors.” Suzanne Hoban, director of Family Health Partnership Clinic, said since the race and other awareness efforts have begun, she has data that shows women are getting diagnosed earlier. She said McHenry County has a higher incidence of breast cancer than surrounding counties, but with increasing access to breast exams and mammograms through funding the clinic’s breastcare services, she hopes it can result in earlier detection and more successful

recoveries. “Our mortality rate for breast cancer is still fairly high,” Hoban said. “It’s higher than it should be in the county, and we’ve always linked that to the fact that, often times, the diagnosis was at a much later stage, so that’s a real problem.” As awareness increases and the event’s attendance grows, each year demands more volunteers. is year, about 650 volunteers will help the event run smoothly and direct participants along the race route. Volunteer chief of signs Peggy Graysley has assisted with the Care4 Breast Cancer run/walk for the past six years. While an honorary member of the clinic’s staff, Graysley’s main involvement with the event is handling the signage. She creates, collects and distributes more than 300 signs – everything from small labels to large banners and direction arrows guiding participant traffic to and through the event. Graysley said graphics students in Sandi Brainard’s class at Woodstock High School helped create signs for the event as part of a community service assignment. She also said WHS art teacher Herb Kruse and his students are decorating a bench in honor of breast cancer awareness to display at the race. “It’s wonderful to be able to give back to the community,” Graysley said. “Knowing that I’m helping other people,

not directly in patient care but what I do as far as the fundraising and helping with events, inadvertently, it helps other people in the community.” With community and family support, Sauer is now cancer-free. She said she fervently supports research, fundraisers and cancer causes and, especially, enjoys buying jewelry whenever she can to

support her friends who are still fighting cancer and to show her pride in defeating it. “I’m proud to be a breast cancer survivor,” Sauer said. “I never asked why I got cancer. I just need to accept the blessings, move on and pay-it-forward, so that’s why I do everything I can to support the cause.”


4

Oct. 16-22, 2013

NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

» CITY COUNCIL

City awards lighting contract By KATELYN STANEK The Independent e Woodstock City Council approved an $18,000 contract with Oswego-based Temple Display Ltd. for the installation of holiday lights in and around the Woodstock Square. e contract calls for about 1,200 strands of lights to be draped on 13 trees in the city’s downtown area by Friday, Nov. 15. ey are to be removed by Monday, Feb. 3, 2014. e city’s budget had allocated $30,000 for the project. Before voting to approve the contract, Councilwoman Maureen Larson said she heard multiple complaints last year from residents regarding the city’s decision to have entire trees draped in lights, rather than have their individual limbs wrapped, as part of the lighting contract. “I think, because last year was the first year we didn’t wrap the trees, there wasn’t the same level of enthusiasm,” Larson said. Other members of the council indicated they had heard similar complaints. Mayor Brian Sager said the decision to forgo wrapping the tree limbs again

HOW THEY VOTED To award a holiday lighting contract to Temple Display Ltd: Yes Joe Starzynski Mark Saladin Maureen Larson

Brian Sager Julie Dillon RB Thompson Mike Turner

this year was a way to decorate more trees at a lower cost. “When you wrap them, you use a lot of lights, but you don’t hit a lot of trees,” Sager said. “It allows us to light more trees without using as many lights.” “For what it’s worth, I’d go up rather than down and talk to the contractor,” Larson said. By consensus, the council requested city staff discuss with Temple Display the possibility of increasing the number of lights to be installed for the holiday season. e contract was approved as part of the City Council’s consent agenda, with Julie Dillon, Larson, RB ompson, Mike Turner, Mark Saladin, Joe Starzynski and Sager voting for approval.

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e McHenry County Sheriff’s Office is asking for help in identifying a man accused of trying to rob a Wonder Lake liquor store. Police said a man entered Sunrise Food and Liquor, 5313 E. Wonder Lake Road, Wonder Lake, the night of Oct. 4, demanding money from an employee before leaving the store empty-handed. He did not show a weapon. e suspect was described in a statement from police as being a “softspoken” white male, about 5 feet 6 inches and weighing more than 230 pounds. He was wearing black shoes with white soles and a white stripe down the side, faded and torn blue jeans rolled at the ankles and a brown hooded sweatshirt with the word “G-Unit” across the front. His sweatshirt was marked with brass knuckles and skulls.

Security footage of the suspect in an attempted robbery in Wonder Lake. COURTESY OF THE MCHENRY COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

He also was wearing a pair of black sunglasses and a gold-colored bandana on his face. Anyone with information regarding this investigation can call the McHenry County Crime Stoppers Tip Line at 800-762-7867 or the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office Tip Line at 815-3382144, or email tipline@co.mchenry. il.us. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the arrest and prosecution of the offender. — Katelyn Stanek, The Independent

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NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

5

OBITUARIES

Janice K. Bielski

Janice K. Bielski, 64, Woodstock, died Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013, at home. She was born Dec. 8, 1948, in Woodstock to Lyle and Dora (Henning) Widmayer. On March 29, 1969, she married Raymond J. Bielski Jr. in Woodstock. She was a loving mother, grandmother and mother-in-law, who dedicated her life to spending as much time with her family as she could. Survivors include two sons, Scott (Kathi Krueger) Bielski and Craig (Sherri) Bielski; four grandchildren, Tyler, Austin, Reiss and Brianna Bielski; a brother, Arvid (Ingrid) Widmayer; and her dearest friends, Sue Koeser and Peggy Dhom. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; and dear friend, Larry Dhom Jr. Visitation and the funeral were Oct. 7 at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. Interment followed at McHenry County Memorial Park Cemetery, Woodstock. Memorials can be sent to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, 1359 Broadway, Suite 10018, New York, NY 10018.

Greg McCoy Greg McCoy, 62, died Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, in Woodstock. He was born March 9, 1951, to Robert K. and Modelle (Medlar) McCoy. He married Tricia Burden in Woodstock in 1977. He was a lifelong resident of Woodstock. His family came to the area in the early 1850s, and his great- grandfather started Medlar Photo Studios in WoodGreg stock. McCoy He was a master craftsman and owned and operated Greg McCoy Glass Studio. The equipment in his beveling shop was from the 1890s and originally was powered by steam. He created original stained-glass architectural pieces and restored antique lampshades and windows. He was most proud to have restored the Tiffany Mermaid window in the Field Museum in Chicago. He also was associated with Rich’s Incredible Pyro as a special effects pyro technician for more than 16 years. He had a great love for boating and

enjoyed spending time at his cottage in Lake Geneva, Wis. Survivors include his wife; a daughter, Lori Hageli; two grandchildren, Kate and Morgan; a sister, Nancy McCoy; and his lifelong friend, Tim Meyers. He was preceded in death by his parents. A celebration of his life will take place from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at Stage Left Café, 125 W. Van Buren St. Arrangements were made by Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. Memorials can be sent to a charity of the donor’s choosing.

Mary D. Kiefer

Mary D. Kiefer, 83, Woodstock, died Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, at Centegra Hospital-Woodstock, surrounded by her loving family. She was born Nov. 7, 1929, in Woodstock to Walter and Vera (Hughes) Fehrman. On June 25, 1950, she married George A. Kiefer. She worked as a secretary at Dean Street Elementary School for many years. She was a member of the Woodstock Moose Lodge and always enjoyed staying active and participating in many events. She also enjoyed traveling, especially to Hawaii, and in her more recent years she took a cross-country train trip to Oregon. Watching soap operas was another favorite pastime. But, most of all, she enjoyed spending time with her loving family, especially her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Survivors include a daughter, Dena (Eric) Reinbolz, Harvard; a son, Doug (Michelle) Kiefer, Harvard; five grandchildren, Jennifer (Pierre) Derrer, Wally (Erica) Czarnecki, Nick (Kayla) Roberts, Gretchen (Mandy Sokolnik) Roberts and Andrea (Josh) Shrum; six great-grandchildren, Brandon Roberts, Nathan Roberts, Avary Shrum, McKenna Shrum, Landon Czarnecki and Emily Roberts; a sister, Irene Kayser; a niece, Lisa (Mike) Caulfield; and a nephew, Steve Henry. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, April 29, 2011; and a sister, Jean Schiller. Visitation was Oct. 7 and 8 at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. The funeral was Oct. 8 at the funeral home. Burial was at McHenry County Memorial Park Cemetery, Woodstock. Memorials can be sent to the family for

POLICE BLOTTER Q Rafeael Avalos, 55, 751 Dartmoor Drive, Crystal Lake, was charged Oct. 4 with driving under the influence, improper lane use and improper turning in the 1200 block of South Eastwood Drive, Woodstock. Avalos posted $100 bond. Court date was set for Nov. 22. Q Joshua J. Robson, 23, transient, was charged Oct. 4 with battery in the 100 block of Church Street. Robson was turned over to the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office. Bond was set at $1,500. Court date was to be set. Q Jennifer L. Moy, 31, 209 Greenwood Ave., Woodstock, was charged

Oct. 4 with retail theft in the 1200 block of Lake Avenue. Moy posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Oct. 24. Q Brody J. Budmayr, 27, 1440 Commons Drive, 2D, Woodstock, was charged Oct. 5 with driving while license was suspended and not wearing a properly adjusted seat belt at Irving and McHenry avenues. Budmayr posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Nov. 21. Any charges are merely accusations, and defendants or suspects are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

STREET SMARTS The Woodstock Police Department will host an AARP driver safety program from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 22 and 23. The program is $12 for AARP members and $14 for nonmembers. For information or to register, call Tamara Reed at 815-338-6787.

Average gas price

$3.46

/GAL.

0.06

Reflects average price of regular unleaded gasoline at Woodstock gas stations the morning of Oct. 14.

designation at a later date.

Matthew John Porter Matthew John Porter, 39, Woodstock, died unexpectedly Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, at his home in Woodstock. He was born Dec. 15, 1973, in Champaign-Urbana. He worked at Centegra Hospital - Woodstock in the material services department. He was attending Judson College where he was one course away from his bachelor’s degree in counseling. He was a member of the Woodstock Assembly of Matthew John God Church where he Porter served as a youth pastor for several years. He enjoyed participating in several prison ministry programs. He also was an active speaker with several Alcoholics Anonymous groups.

He was an avid reader and deep intellectual and scholar. But, most of all, he was a great father to his girls, and they were the love and the joy of his life. Survivors include three daughters, Kylie Elizabeth Tennessen-Porter, Madison Rose Porter and Ava Jean Porter; his mother, Nancy J. (Schuster) (Bill) Wilson; his father, John (Sharon L.) Porter; his sister, Kimberly (Eric) Porter-Hendrickson; his fiancée, Shannon Moerschbaecher; and many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and very dear friends. He was preceded in death by his maternal and paternal grandparents. Visitation was Oct.14 at Schneider-LeuchtMerwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. A memorial gathering and service were Oct. 15 at Woodstock Assembly of God Church. All other services were private. Memorials can be sent to the M. Porter Memorial Fund, c/o BMO Harris Bank, 101 S. Benton St., Woodstock, IL 60098, which will be used as a trust fund for his daughters’ educations.


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Oct. 16-22, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Opinion THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT Woodstock, IL Š 1987

CHERYL WORMLEY

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Publisher, Co-Owner

Cheryl Wormley John C. Trione Katelyn Stanek Jay Schulz Rhonda Mix Lisa Kucharski

PAUL WORMLEY Co-Owner

JOHN C. TRIONE General Manager

KATELYN STANEK Managing Editor

» OUR VIEW

Welles should take center stage ere are few figures, if any, in Woodstock history who command as much respect at Orson Welles, the film and theater luminary who spent much of his childhood at Woodstock’s Todd School for Boys. As a student of headmaster Roger Hill, the young Welles honed his skills as a writer, director and performer, even organizing a theater festival on the Woodstock Square just a few short years before he went on to direct “Citizen Kane.” Indeed, his first movie, a simple short called “e Hearts of Age,” was filmed in the city’s downtown area. Despite this, little attention has been paid to the man who called Woodstock home through some of the most formative years of his life. One group is trying to change this. Woodstock Celebrates — a volunteer organization made up of area residents who want to commemorate Welles and, eventually, other influential people in Woodstock — is going to host a celebration of Welles’ works this May, featuring expert speakers and other events. It’s the second in a series of events the group is organizing to remember this giant of culture, the first having taken place when the Opera House’s stage was named in his honor. e group has asked for consideration from the city of Woodstock, including free use of the Opera House stage for its events. It has also sought support — and memberships — from Woodstock residents who believe in the importance of honoring the city’s past and educating the public on the important role personalities like Welles played in American culture. Woodstock Celebrates deserves support not just from the city of Woodstock, but from the neighbors and business community that will benefit from its efforts. When one of the group’s organizers, Kathleen Spaltro, described Woodstock Celebrates to the Woodstock City Council, she described the history they aim to preserve as “something that cuts to the heart of our understanding of ourselves.” at noble goal is one that should be celebrated by all of Woodstock.

weigh in Email letters to the editor to letters@thewoodstockindependent.com or mail them to 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098.

» YOUR VIEW

Main Street program could have brought Woodstock success I read with interest Cheryl Wormley’s column in the Oct. 2-8 Independent about her recent visit to Franklin, Tenn. In her column, Wormley notes the similarity of historic character between Franklin’s downtown to our historic Woodstock. She also notes the vitality and diversity of shops in Franklin and the obvious economic prosperity of the downtown. “Franklin storeowners,” she notes, “must work well together and have a marketing plan.” Hmm … I bet Franklin’s downtown prosperity has something to do with its Main Street Program, a premier downtown economic development driver sponsored by the National Trust. In 2005, volunteers in Woodstock worked tirelessly to establish a Main Street Program, and after five years of effort almost made it to becoming a fully designated Main Street Program by the National Trust. One of the many contributions of Woodstock’s developing program was its successful three-year collaborative downtown marketing plan that pulled together the resources of 30-plus businesses and got city support with hotel/motel tax revenue. Yes, downtown Woodstock did work well together and did have a model marketing strategy and plan that brought visitors and locals alike to the downtown. Unfortunately, the program ran head-on into a brick wall from many who believed that a Main Street Program was unneeded

or irrelevant for Woodstock and a critical mass of support could not be achieved. As I walk the Square today and see empty storefronts and a revolving door of businesses that were here yesterday but are gone today, I wonder how the downtown economic landscape would look had Woodstock embraced the Main Street Program in 2010. e statistics of the Main Street Program on reversing the economic decline of small downtowns across the nation are nothing less than impressive. Perhaps it is time for city administration and the City Council, the Chamber of Commerce, the downtown businesses and the citizens of Woodstock to take a second look and together work to support the development of a 501(c) (3) Main Street Program focused on economic downtown vitality. e Main Street Program could likely do for Woodstock what it has done for Franklin, Tenn., and 2,000 other small downtowns across the nation. Merida Johns, Woodstock

With taxes, the only option is to sell and leave I am dismayed once again that Woodstock School District 200’s operating budget for 2013-14 is going for a 5.4 percent increase. 88 percent of the operating budget is slated for salaries and benefits. With assessed property values dropping by 11 percent, the magic property-tax multiplier will

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

make up for this decrease. Homeowners should be enraged that school districts cannot control their salary expenses and limit budget increases to a more sustainable level. With property taxes rising to levels that homeowners cannot tolerate, the only option is to sell and leave this state. Chuck Stevens, Woodstock

Support fairgrounds motocross

In response to the recent article in e Independent (“Moto event makes some residents cross,” Oct. 9-15), I wanted to express an opinion on the McHenry County Fairgrounds motocross race. We brought our children to watch a couple of the races, and we all enjoyed the events tremendously. Like Ms. Jones, we also live near the Square, on Tryon Street, and while at home we could hear the races going on at the fairgrounds as well. I understand her complaint; however, I believe that starting the races earlier and, therefore, finishing earlier, and especially turning the public address system down, would be a reasonable compromise. While actually sitting in the spectator stands, the PA volume was deafening. I think Woodstock is a town that is diverse enough to allow a wholesome, kid-friendly activity such as motocross racing to take place at the fairgrounds. It would be a shame to lose these great familyoriented events. Todd Hendrickson, Woodstock

The Oct. 23-29 issue of The Woodstock Independent may arrive in your mailbox a day late. This delay comes because the issue will be delivered to all households and businesses in the 60098 zip code and the

west side of Wonder Lake. We thank you for your patience and your readership. If you have any questions, please call our office at 815338-8040 or stop in at 671 E. Calhoun St.


OPINION

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

7

Âť COLUMN

Dear Jane/John letters end relationship e Centegra Board of Governors sent “Dear Jane� and “Dear John� letters to me and I assume to more than 250 other community members and Centegra associates in Woodstock and greater McHenry County last week. All of us were previously designated corporate members in Centegra’s bylaws. I can’t remember how long my husband, Jim, and I were members, but I know our membership dates to long before the 1996 merger of Memorial Hospital in Woodstock and Northern Illinois Medical Center in McHenry. My uncle Virgil Smith encouraged us to become Memorial Hospital members when we moved to Woodstock in 1983. He was proud of Woodstock’s hospital. Appreciating the value of a community hospital, Jim and I paid the annual member fees and later became life members, transitioning from Memorial Hospital members to Centegra members with the merger. Not only was I a Memorial Hospital member, I served on the Memorial Hospital Foundation Board in the early 1990s and on the combined foundation board after the merger. e letter began, “Dear Centegra Supporter, anks to the unwavering support of our community, these are very good times for Centegra Health

System.â€? e rest of the ďŹ rst paragraph highlighted Centegra’s recent accomplishments, including the Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board’s Sept. 24, Cheryl 2013, reafďŹ rmation of its support for Wormley Centegra HospitalDeclarations Huntley; the 1,000th Centegra cardiovascular program open-heart surgery in early October; the “unparalleled treatment for thousands of members of our communityâ€? at the Centegra Sage Cancer Center; and the addition of in-house physicians at Centegra’s hospitals. e three-page letter signed by the 14 members of the Board of Governors continued: “In order to align Centegra’s governance structure with all the other positive advances our organization has made the last decade, the Centegra Board of Governors has exercised its authority to make changes in the way in which the organization is governed.â€? e purpose of the letter was then given: to provide a “brief overview of and explanation for the two most im-

portant changes.� First change: “e concept of ‘regular’ corporate members has been discontinued and members of the community at large will no longer serve as regular members. However, those corporate members who have been designated as ‘life members’ will continue to be recognized as such.� Second change: “e corporate members who have been retained will no longer vote.� e vote was to elect board members. e letter documented the need for the changes – “will bring Centegra Health System into alignment with industry best practices� and will place Centegra “on equal footing with each and every one of our competitors.� It continued, “e need to have corporate members in order to engage the community has been mitigated by the transparency and processes required of tax-exempt hospital systems. ese requirements have led Centegra to change the way in which we communicate with our community. Receiving and conveying information directly from the 330,000 residents of McHenry County presents a more accurate picture of the needs of our community.� e letter closed: “We as the Board of Governors are, and will remain, com-

mitted to our community. We are all members of the community, and we depend on Centegra Health System ‌. We are conďŹ dent you understand our reasoning behind the changes outlined above, and we very much appreciate your continued support of, and commitment to, Centegra Health System.â€? Health care and its delivery have changed and will continue to change. In addition, political forces now have say over health care in Illinois and nationally. As a result, Woodstock no longer has a community hospital. Now, McHenry County has a corporate health care system with a self-perpetuating board of governors that has found reason to move beyond having community members. Fortunately, one of its hospitals remains in Woodstock. Like any break up, it’s not so much the message. After all, often both parties beneďŹ t from going their separate ways. It’s the way the message was delivered, impersonally in a letter – no matter the decades-long commitment of its members. P.S. e letters were mailed this month, the same month as the bylawspeciďŹ ed annual meeting.

In fact, last year, Blitz USA, then the nation’s largest gascan-maker, went out of business after spending $30 million defending itself in court and still owed $3 million in lawyer fees Scott at the time of its Reeder bankruptcy, accordThe Reeder ing to news reports. Report How often do you see a company such as Blitz, with 75 percent of the domestic market, shut its doors? It wasn’t the vagaries of the marketplace that put the ďŹ rm out of business, but because of the legal system. Some products can never be perfectly safe, particularly when people don’t use them wisely. According to e Wall Street Journal, most of the lawsuits came from folks who tried to pour gasoline onto ďŹ res and were burned. Who speaks for the rest of us who are wise enough not to pour gasoline onto open

ďŹ res but are still forced to pay more for products that are harder to use? e cost of litigation gets passed on in the price of products. For example, I had a ďŹ ve-gallon steel gasoline can stolen from my garage last month. It cost more than $70 to replace. at’s about $30 more than the stolen one cost. While Blitz was an Oklahoma company, Illinois businesses are even more vulnerable to lawsuits. In 2012, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for Legal Reform ranked Illinois 46th of the 50 states for its legal fairness. Both Cook and Madison counties have been labeled “litigation hell holesâ€? by the group, noted Travis Akin, executive director of Illinois Lawsuit Abuse Watch. “is hurts commerce within the state,â€? he said. “Small businesses don’t have the resources to budget for this type of litigation.â€? ere are a variety of reasons for why Illinois has a less favorable litigation climate, Akin said. “Part of it is our political culture,â€? he said. “Judges here are more likely to be tolerant of frivolous lawsuits and

more likely to accept lawsuits from other jurisdictions.â€? Certain jurisdictions, such as Madison and Cook counties, are perceived to be desirable locations in which to ďŹ le lawsuits because judges and juries are viewed as more favorable to plaintiffs. Ed Murnane, president of the Illinois Civil Justice League, said it is time for lawmakers to restrict this type of “forum shoppingâ€? by plaintiffs’ attorneys. Murnane added that the state needs to look for ways to restrict “pain and sufferingâ€? judgments. “If someone is truly hurt and fault is found, they should be compensated for their economic damages – but not for perceived pain and suffering,â€? he said. After all, 117 factory workers in Oklahoma are suffering because their plant shut down. And consumers are suffering with harder to use, more expensive products. Where is our societal concern for those people?

Cheryl Wormley is publisher of The Woodstock Independent.

Âť COLUMN

Frivolous lawsuits hurt us all I pulled up to a gas pump earlier this month and noticed a fellow struggling with a gas can. He gave me an exasperated look and said, “ese new cans are almost impossible to use.â€? ere is no doubt about that. Gas cans are being made with removable funnels instead of spouts. Or if a can does have a spout, it also has some sort of check valve on it that makes it difďŹ cult to empty or ďŹ ll. But don’t blame the engineers. Blame the trial lawyers. Litigation has imperiled the domestic safety can industry.

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Scott Reeder is the journalist-in-residence at the Illinois Policy Institute. He can be reached at sreeder@illinoispolicy.org.

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Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER c.wormley@thewoodstockindependent.com

The Woodstock Independent (USPS #001287) is published weekly at 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Periodicals postage paid at Woodstock, Illinois. POSTMASTERS: Forward address changes to The Woodstock Independent, 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Subscription rates/year: $35 in Woodstock and Wonder Lake, $37 in McHenry County, $42 for snowbirds and $50 outside McHenry County. Letters to the editor: We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarity or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter per month. Letters are due at noon Wednesday and must be signed and include the writer’s address and a telephone number for veriďŹ cation purposes only. Corrections: The Woodstock Independent strives for accuracy. To suggest corrections or clariďŹ cations, email news@ thewoodstockindependent.com.

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Oct. 16-22, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Education » BOARD OF EDUCATION

Department heads present goals to school board By ELIZABETH HARMON The Independent In September, administrative teams from Woodstock School District 200’s elementary, middle and high schools presented their improvement plans and goals for the upcoming school year. At the Board of Education’s Oct. 7 meeting, it was the district department heads’ turn. “It’s so important to look at how we operate as a business, because we are a business,” said Superintendent Ellyn Wrzeski. “Instruction is our heart and soul, but there are many components that support the district.” Among the goals for the department of teaching and learning, which oversees classroom instruction, is to improve communication with parents about classroom learning and instruc-

tional goals. School board member Carl Gilmore said that as a district parent, he is pleased to see a greater emphasis on communication. “It can be somewhat frustrating not to be able to see what the goals are for your children and what the expectations are,” he said. A second goal is to increase the connection of the library media specialists to classroom teaching activities. A third goal is to better integrate elementary school health curriculum into the science curriculum. “We don’t want it to be seen as an add-on,” said Nancy Reczek, assistant superintendent for early childhood and elementary education. Keely Krueger, director of grants, language and culture, said that one of her team’s primary goals for this year is the roll-up of the dual-language program

“Instruction is our heart and soul, but there are many components that support the district.” — Ellyn Wrzeski, superintendent into 11th and 12th grades. “To see it progress from prekindergarten up to 12th grade is pretty exciting,” she said. Krueger also said since many of the larger federal grant programs have been reduced or discontinued, her department is shifting toward helping teachers apply for smaller grants for classroom use. Jerry Swedberg, director of technology, said his department’s responsibilities are to maintain and improve the district’s technology resources. is year’s priorities include more efficient customer support to users throughout the district and equitable distribution of equipment. Swedberg’s team is also in the midst of implementing Virtual Desktop Computing in time for students to take the new online standardized assessment supporting the Common Core. One to One technology, the shift to provide every student with a laptop or tablet, is a growing trend in education and needs to be considered, said Wrzeski. “We’re limited by funds, but it has a lot of potential,” she said. “Of course, you can’t just hand out devices, there’s a whole staff development component involved. We’re not behind the times

but need to have a plan.” Lisa Tate, the district’s director of nursing and health services, said school nurses have completed training on a new electronic system to monitor student medications. e department also is expanding safety programs, such as a concussion screening that is now offered to middle school athletes and an EKG program offered at the high school. e department is continuing its search for an operating partner for the new district health clinic, which is scheduled to open in August 2014. e special education department is including school nurses in development of students’ individual education plans, to better understand how their health issues affect learning, according to Lisa Pearson, director of special services. Other goals include administrative tasks associated with the district’s decision to withdraw from the Special Education District of McHenry County. Goals for other support departments include posting bus routes online for quicker updating, including more enrichment components into the Kids Club afterschool program and containing costs in food service and buildings and grounds. Ken Roiland, director of buildings and grounds, said his department will strive to have summer work projects completed two weeks before the start of the school year. e community services department is considering other communication tools, including Twitter, and the financial department will begin work on a five-year budget proposal.

HIGHLIGHT

Hurricane Award winners announced By JANET DOVIDIO The Independent Marian Central Catholic High School’s Hurricane Award honors people who have contributed outstanding service to the school over many years. is year’s four winners were announced in September during halftime of a Hurricanes football game. Tom Olsen, Crystal Lake, has served on the Marian Central Council of Administration. He was a Father’s Club bingo officer and continues as a bingo volunteer.

Judy Nothnagel, Woodstock, was a volunteer for the school’s fine arts program while her children attended Marian. She has continued as an ongoing volunteer in this program long after her children graduated. Marengo’s Carole Bartman has held many leadership roles in Marian’s capital campaigns. She also has assisted with the school’s financial aid program. e Rev. James McKitrick is a retired Rockford diocesan priest and former pastor of St. Patrick Catholic Church, McHenry. He was president of the Council of Administration in the 1980s and 1990s, when he oversaw the initial strategic planning process for the first capital campaign for a major school expansion in 1995-96. News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.

COLLEGE CURRENTS

Kirsten Leslie

Kirsten Leslie, Woodstock, recently graduated from the University of Houston with a degree in performance and pedagogy.

the spring 2013 dean’s list at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.: Nelly Carisa Thill and Kathryn Uidl, both of Woodstock.

Uidl Purdue University announces Kathryn Kathryn Uidl, Woodstock, recently graduated from Purdue University, Lafayette, dean’s list Ind., with a Bachelor of Science degree The following students were named to

from the school of nursing.


A&E THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

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Plenty of fall fun for families this season By RHONDA MIX The Independent Fall is kicking into full gear in Woodstock, and in celebration, there are a number of events happening around the community for people of all ages to enjoy. Below are just a few autumn events in and around Woodstock and Wonder Lake. Autumn Drive 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday to Sunday, Oct. 18 to 20 Bringing together crafters, artists, farmers, musicians and the general public, the event will stretch several square miles from Woodstock to Marengo. For information, visit autumndrive. net. The Haunted Square Weekends until Nov. 2. Check thehauntedsquare.com for complete schedules Madness Manor – a 7,000-squarefoot haunted house on the Square – takes teens and adults through all sorts of scary haunts. For people brave of heart and older than 18, a ticket into the creepy manor is $12. ‘Shaun of the Dead’ Midnight Friday, Oct. 25 ere will be a midnight showing of the movie “Shaun of the Dead” Friday, Oct. 25, at Woodstock eatre on Main Street. Tickets to the movie, which is being sponsored by the theater and e Independent, will cost $5. Hollywood Halloween 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26 e Woodstock Opera House will hold a Hollywood Halloween party to benefit the Friends of the Opera House. It will feature a Hollywoodstyle evening of fun and entertainment. Guests will be welcomed to the party by way of a red-carpet roll out. e evening will feature music, entertainment, dancing, food, a cash bar and a costume contest with cash prizes. For more information, see page 12.

e $30 ticket price will include entrance to Madness Manor, an entry into the pub crawl costume contest and three drink passes that can be used at any of eight participating bars and restaurants on the Square. Seasons by Peg, e Public House, Oddfellows and D.C. Cobb’s will be a few of the participants. For information, visit thehauntedsquare.com. ‘Dracula’ 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27 e Woodstock Opera House will feature “Dracula.” e Jim May & Nippersink Stories Inc. production will feature actress Megan Wells as she performs what the Opera House website

calls “an elegantly horrific one-woman show.” Tickets are $26 for adults and $23 for senior citizens. More information can be found at woodstockoperahouse.com. Costume contest and trick-or-treating 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31 To top off the Halloween festivities, a costume contest at the gazebo on the Square will take place Halloween day at 4 p.m. ursday, Oct. 31. Prizes will be given for the scariest, funniest and most original costumes in four age categories. e contest will be open to people of all ages. Trick-or-treating around the Square will follow, and Woodstock neighbor-

In Wonder Lake, season means fundraisers Wonder Lake is getting into the spirit of the fall season. The Wonder Lake Ski Show Team will host a haunted hay ride from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, Oct. 18, 19, 25 and 26, at Peterson Park, 4300 Petersen Park Road, McHenry. The ski show team hosts the hayride for five weekend nights every year in October. The hayride opened Oct. 12. “Riders can expect a wagon ride through a dark ‘forest’ for approxi-

mately 15 to 20 minutes with a lot of surprises,” said ski team board member Jen Blaksley. Blaksley said the hayride will benefit the ski show team, which in turn will donate a portion of the proceeds from ticket sales to local charities. “The hayride provides a fun and inexpensive Halloween event for families to attend for three weekends in October .” Tickets are $8 per person.

A Place to Shine Music to hold concert A Place to Shine Music will host a concert from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, at A Place to Shine Music, 107 Dean St., Woodstock. The event will feature musicians RUNE, Serena Isabelli, Steve Sebby, Sandie Kindschy, Will Kruger, Tim Merkel and Cassandra Vohs-Demann. Tickets are $7 and will include light beverages. Tickets can be purchased in advance at miixinmingle.com. For information, call Cassandra VohsDemann at 847-507-1352, email aplacetoshinemusic@gmail.com or visit www. aplacetoshinemusic.com.

Woodstock Farmers Market 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays through Oct. 29 As October marches toward November, the days of the Woodstock Farmers Market on the Square will wind to a close. People interested in taking a look at products such as honey, eggs, wine, cheese, candles, plants, body products and baked goods will have the chance to do so every Tuesday and Saturday until Oct. 29 on the Square. e indoor Farmers Market will be open from 9 a.m. to noon starting the first Saturday in November at the Farm Bureau building, 1102 McConnell Road.

Ski team, MPOA hosts food drive Moving on into the fall, in early November the Wonder Lake Ski Show Team and Master Property Owners Association will host a food drive. The food drive will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the corner of Hancock and East Wonder Lake roads. Volunteers will collect monetary donations. Residents can drop off nonperishable food and personal items at Wonder Lake State Bank, 7526 Hancock Drive. All donations will be given to the Wonder Lake Neighbors Food Pantry.

Woodstock City Square Dental Care www.citysquaredentalcare.com

Zombie Pub Crawl 7 p.m. to midnight Saturday, Oct. 26 Halloween fun will continue with the Zombie Pub Crawl Saturday, Oct. 26. e pub crawl, open to people 21 and older, is sponsored by Family Alliance and all proceeds from ticket sales will benefit the organization.

IN BRIEF

hood trick-or-treat hours will run from 4 to 7 p.m.

Elli Emmons, DDS Susan Nguyen, DDS Cosmetic and General Dentistry One Hour Whitening ANTI-SNORE devices Same Appointment Crowns

Insurance Accepted Senior Citizen Discount


10

Oct. 16-22, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

815-337-3534 Visitors can participate in the open-mic night or enjoy the show. Doors will open at 6:30.

The Entertainer

WOODSTOCK’S ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS

» MUSIC LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Oct. 18, 25, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Expressly Leslie Vegetarian Specialties Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. Free expresslyleslie.com Oct. 18: John and Carol will perform. Oct. 25: Kishwaukee Ramblers will perform. JAZZ JAM Oct. 18, Nov. 1, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 815-338-4212 $5 donation jazzonthesquare.com John Nellson and Billy Denk will host jazz on the Square.

A PLACE TO SHINE MUSIC CONCERT Oct. 18, 7:30 p.m. A Place to Shine 107 Dean St. $7 847-507-1352 Aplacetoshinemusic.com The concert will be hosted in partnership with Mixin’ Mingle and will feature musicians RUNE, Serena Isabelli, Steve Sebby, Sandie Kindschy, Will Kruger, Tim Merkel and Cassandra Vohs-Demann. STAGE LEFTOVERS

Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m. Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. Free 815-334-3555 The band will include Rich Prezioso, Joe Pesz, Brian Murphy, Laurel Palma, Pete Jonsson and Les Urban. OPEN MIC NIGHT Oct. 25, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org Open Mic is sponsored by Off Square Music. Various artists will perform in 15-minute slots. D-200 MUSIC FACULTY CONCERT Oct. 27, 2 p.m. Woodstock High School 501 W. South St. $5 adults, $3 students and senior citizens 815-245-8616 kdpeiffer@ameritech.net The concert will feature a raffle, silent auction, refreshments and performances from D-200 music and theater teachers. Proceeds will benefit the LAM Foundation, an organization dedicated to patient support seeking a cure for lymphangioleiomyomatosis. FIRST SATURDAY MUSIC Nov. 2, 7 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. $3 donation

» THEATER ‘DIXIE SWIM CLUB’ Oct. 18, 19, 7 p.m. Oct. 19, 2 p.m. Woodstock High School Black Box Theater 501 W. South St. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 The play tells the story of five Southern women who were high school swimming teammates and, as adults, they get together for a long weekend every August to recharge those relationships. ‘SHOUT! THE MOD MUSICAL’ Oct. 18, 19, 8 p.m. Oct. 20, 3 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $23 adults, $20 students and senior citizens 815-338-5300 “SHOUT!” is the mod musical magazine that brings back the beautiful birds and smashing sounds that made England swing in the ‘60s. The show is a Woodstock Musical Theatre Company production. ‘DRACULA’ Oct. 27, 3 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $26 adults, $23 students, senior citizens, groups of 10+ 815-338-5300 woodstockoperahouse.com Experience the emotional thrill of Bram Stoker’s gothic masterpiece in this elegantly horrific one-woman show by Meagan Wells.

» LECTURE CREATIVE LIVING SERIES Oct. 17, 10 a.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 815-338-4212 $24 John Bredar, author of “The President’s Photographer,” will talk about the workday life of President Obama’s photographer and other chief White House photographers going back to JFK.

» STORYTELLING SPOKEN WORD CAFE

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Oct. 19, 7 to 10 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 815-338-4212 $5 donation “Sleight of Heart,” an evening of tales and magic with Will Tremont, will include an opening from radio host Joe Cicero from 105.5.

» MOVIES PREMIER SHOWING OF ‘FREE BIRDS’ Oct. 27, 10 a.m. Woodstock Theatre 209 Main St. $15 adults, $10 children under 12 or D-200 students with ID 815-338-8555 This special premier showing is a benefit for D-200 technology efforts. There also will be red-carpet activities before the showing at 10 a.m. and festivities, food and a pardoning ceremony on the Square by Mayor Sager following the show from noon to 2 p.m.

Previews by Jay Schulz of films currently playing at the Woodstock Theatre unless otherwise noted. ‘CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2’ Flint Lockwood and all his friends return to defend the world against food that has gone out of control. “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2” is directed by Cody Cameron and Kris Pearn and stars the voices of Bill Hader (“Turbo”) and Anna Faris (“The House Bunny”) RATED PG, 95 MINUTES ‘GRAVITY’ George Clooney (“Syriana”) and Sandra Bullock (“Speed”) are astronauts who are adrift in space after an accident. “Gravity” is directed by Alfonso Cuaron (“Children of Men”). RATED PG-13, 90 MINUTES ‘INSTRUCTIONS NOT INCLUDED’ A single man finds himself as a father and the results change his life. Eugenio Derbez directs and stars in this Spanish language film with English subtitles. RATED PG-13, 100 MINUTES ‘CAPTAIN PHILLIPS’ The true story of Captain Richard Phillips and the 2009 hijacking of the US-flagged MV Maersk Alabama by Somali pirates. “Captain Phillips” is directed by Paul Greengrass (“United 93”) and stars Tom Hanks (“Big”) and Catherine Keener (“The 40-YearOld Virgin”). RATED PG-13, 134 MINUTES ‘MACHETE KILLS’ The sequel to “Machete” finds the main character recruited by the government to take down an arms dealer who is trying to launch a weapon into space. “Machete Kills” is directed by Roberto Rodriguez (“El Mariachi”) and stars Danny Trejo (“Spy Kids”) and Michelle Rodriguez (“Avatar”). RATED R, 107 MINUTES

‘ESCAPE PLAN’ Sylvester Stallone (“Rocky”) and Arnold Schwarzenegger (“The Terminator”) come together on the big screen as two men desperately trying to escape a secret prison. Action ensues. “Escape Plan” is directed by Mikael Hafstrom (“The Rite”) and also stars Jim Caviezel (“The Thin Red Line”) and Amy Ryan (“Gone Baby Gone”). RATED R, 116 MINUTES ‘CARRIE’ Chloe Grace Morentz (“Let Me In”) stars as the title character in the remake of the classic 1976 horror film. “Carrie” is directed by Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”) and also stars Julianne Moore (“Magnolia”) and Judy Greer (“What Women Want”). RATED R, 92 MINUTES


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

» COLUMN

Oct. 16-22, 2013

11

Marketplace

Collaborate in event planning It always amazes me when a community event celebrates a milestone. Whether it’s five, 13 or 50 years, it’s something to celebrate. Events take many hands, time and money. What can your community do to collaborate and create engagement in event planning? For starters: Match the person to the task. Find out what your volunteers are great at Laura and assign them a duty in that area. Witlox Get the word Middaugh out early and often. Depending Minding Your Business on what you are trying to accomplish and how many attendees you project, structure your marketing/ promotional plan accordingly. A fast rule of thumb is to create 90-, 60and 30-day marketing plans. Make the event free or as inexpensive as possible. Budget carefully and support the event through sponsorships. Attendees will tend to spend freely within the event, supporting your vendors. Plan plenty of activities for children. Children will bring parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and neighbors. Plant your own people in the crowd to create conversations. Create energy within the event by conversing with the crowd and informing them of the day’s activities. Learn and evaluate. Meet with your team to hear about successes and room for improvement. Some successful longstanding events include the following: Q 13th annual Ceramic Art Show and Sale is underway through Nov. 3 at the Old Court House Arts Center, 101 N. Johnson St., Woodstock. Enjoy the show from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. ursday to Saturday and from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. www.clayworkersguild.com Q 26th annual Autumn Drive runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 18 to 20, located between Woodstock and Marengo, 3607 Franklinville Road. Visit 16 family farms. GPS address : 16105 Garden Valley Road. www. autumndrive.net Q 29th annual McHenry County College Craft Fair runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, with more than 120 crafters. McHenry County College, 8900 Highway 14, Crystal Lake. Call 815-455-8580. Q 13th annual Care4 Breast Cancer 5K run/walk Oct. 20 will take place at Woodstock North High School, 3000 Raffel Road, Woodstock. Organized by Family Health Partnership Clinic, this event raises money for breast cancer education, outreach, screenings and other services for uninsured and underinsured women of McHenry County. www.hpclinic.org. To learn more about the marketing and promotional efforts of the McHenry County CVB, contact Laura Witlox Middaugh, manager of Group Sales at laura@mchenrycountycvb.com or 815-893-6280.

» NEW BUSINESS

Marine drops anchor in Woodstock By KATELYN STANEK The Independent When Dave Piersall, owner of Crystal Lake Marine, moved his company from its namesake city to Woodstock — a city without a lake or river in sight — he said he got some funny looks. “Some people questioned my decision to move here,” Piersall said. “But I’ve always said that when I was a boater, before I got into this business, I would travel a little bit to get the right kind of service at the right kind of price.” Piersall’s boat repair, restoration and storage business moved to 1151 Lake Ave. in August, the result of building problems he said the company encountered at its previous location in Crystal Lake. Today, Crystal Lake Marine sits in a 7,500-square-foot facility that houses a workshop and storage space that Piersall said serves his business well, with

or without immediate access to a shore. Most of Crystal Lake Marine’s customers use their boats on Crystal Lake, the Chain o’ Lakes and lakes in southern Wisconsin. e company offers indoor and outdoor storage, fiberglass fabrication, winterization and upholstery services, among other things. It also undertakes major repair and restoration jobs. “I like taking something that most people would consider trash and turning it back into a beauty and bringing the life back into it,” Piersall said. “Anybody can take a new boat and keep it running, but there’s few that can take a dilapidated mess and make it beautiful again.” Piersall’s team is even working on a project to create a so-called Batman boat, a replica of the Caped Crusader’s watercraft. e project is especially exciting for Crystal Lake Marine’s head

CRYSTAL LAKE MARINE Where: 1151 Lake Ave. Phone: 630-536-9596 Website: www.crystallakemarine.com mechanic, Bill Lunt. “I always tell people I work on people’s toys for a living,” Lunt said. “It’s a pretty cool way to make a living.” Like Piersall, Lunt said he’s passionate about boating and understands his customers’ passions, too. “ere are emotional attachments,” Lunt said. “Back in the day, it was not uncommon for a man to go back and buy the car he had as a teenager. Now we have people coming to us saying, ‘is is the boat my dad had when I learned how to ski or went fishing with him,’ and they’re going in that direction. ere is that sentimental value.”

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Filed in the McHenry County Recorder’s Office Sept. 22 to Oct. 1: Q Residence 8609 Dorr Road, Wonder Lake, was sold by Federal Mortgage Association, Dallas, to Michael Greif, Wonder Lake, for $24,900. Q Residence at 119 S. Valley Hill Road, Bull Valley, was sold by Carollee Vernon, Atlanta, to Mark Stolar, Bull Valley, for $580,000. Q Residence at 7607 Orchard Road, Wonder Lake, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois LLC, Oak Brook, to MLP LLC, Woodstock, for $29,751. Q Residence at 416 Lake Ave., Woodstock, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois, Oak Brook, to Edin Mehanovic, McHenry, for $66,000. Q Residence at 7408 Wooded Shore Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Eric and Debora Strom, Wonder Lake, to Heather Ryan, Wonder Lake, for $90,000. Q Farm at 5211 Swanson Road, Woodstock, 6 acres, was sold by Chicago Title Land Trust Company, Chicago, to MAB Real Estate Holdings LLC, Lakewood, for $925,000. Q Residence at 7407 Lookout Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Alexander and Alisa Woerner, Crystal Lake, to Friedl and Waltraud Koeberlein, Wonder Lake, for $78,000. Q Residence at 1350 Winslow Circle, Woodstock, was sold by Randall Thomson, Verona, Wis., to Tamara Tomasalleo, Woodstock, for $271,500. Q Residence at 697 Dane St., Woodstock, was sold by Chicago Title Land Trust Company, Chicago, to Wayne and Linda Heidtke, Woodstock, for $190,000. Q Land at 120 Washington St., Woodstock, 5,300 square feet, was sold by Scherston Real Estate Investments, Schaumburg, to Dale Brown, Woodstock, for $4,250. Q Residence at 2110 Greenview Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Chad and Michelle Werkema, Woodstock, to John Nelson, Woodstock, for $187,500. Q Land at 15213 Rose Lane, Woodstock, 2.2 acres, was sold by Prairie Community Bank, Marengo, to Adrian Halimi, Woodstock, for $28,500. Q Residence at 14913 Route 176, Woodstock, was sold by Agnes Jakubiec,

Berwyn, to James and Kelly Hoffman and Joel and Debra Penkuhn, Woodstock, for $239,400. Q Residence at 2045 Woodside Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Ryan and Jamie Walsh, Woodstock, to Olivia and Joseph Yuskis, Woodstock, for $81,000. Q Residence at 9706 Creekside Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Joseph and Cheri Jette, Wonder Lake, to Edward Donahue, Wonder Lake, for $144,500. Q Residence at 2440 Aspen Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Ruven and Juana Mendes, Elgin, to William and Melissa Hughes, Woodstock, for $70,000. Q Residence at 8413 Richmond Road, Wonder Lake, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois LLC, Oak Brook, to Ginmeg LLC, Crystal Lake, for $40,001. Q Land at 1381 W. Longwood Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Illinois State Bank, Woodstock, to Ryan Matthews and Eric Anderson, Woodstock, for $50,000. Q Residence at 8404 Alden Road, Wonder Lake, was sold by Linda Simon, McHenry, to David Smith, Wonder Lake, for $118,000. Q Farm at 2900 Deep Cut Road, Woodstock, 91 acres, was sold by Spencer Weisz, Chicago, to Medical Solutions Ministries Inc., Belvidere, for $475,000. Q Residence at 7213 Loras Lane, Wonder Lake, was sold by Norma Mae Dose, Crystal Lake, to Thomas Jones, Arlington Heights, for $76,000. Q Residence at 617 Handel Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Maples at the Sonatas LLC, Plainfield, to Kathleen Detlman, Woodstock, for $189,000. Q Residence at 1832 Butterfield Road, Woodstock, was sold by Centex Homes, Schaumburg, to Seth Johnson, Woodstock, for $158,680. Q Residence at 1840 Butterfield Road, Woodstock, was sold by Centex Homes, Schaumburg, to Ernest and Mary Paul, Woodstock, for $213,000. Q Residence at 250 Schryver Ave., Woodstock, was sold by U.S. Bank, Irvine, Calif., to Steve Case, St. Charles, for $40,000. Q Residence at 7704 Sunset Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by the Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, Atlanta, to Alejandro Tolentino and Karina Flores, Wonder Lake, for $32,000. Q Residence at 3612 Fawn Lane,

Wonder Lake, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois Inc., Oak Brook, to AH4R-IL 4 LLC, Agoura Hills, Calif., for $56,000. Q Residence at 2511 Lakeview Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois Inc., Oak Brook, to American Homes 4 Rent Properties Four LLC, Oak Brook, for $84,178. Q Residence at 290 Macintosh Ave., Woodstock, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois LLC, Oak Brook, to AH4R-IL 4 LLC, Agoura Hills, Calif., for $53,615. Q Residence at 220 Sparrow Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Lender Sales of Illinois LLC, Oak Brook, to AH4R-IL LLC, Agoura Hills, Calif., for $106,001. Q Residence at 575 Silver Creek Road, Woodstock, was sold by Therese Thompson, Woodstock, to Esther Hettinga, Woodstock, for $75,000. Q Residence at 8404 Acorn Path, Wonder Lake, was sold by the Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, Atlanta, to Sonia Salazar, Wonder Lake, for $41,000. Q Residence at 2153 Sweetwater Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation, Chicago, to IH2 Property Illinois LP, Chicago, for $134,000. Q Residence at 2122 Serenity Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Carrollton, Texas, to Corey Cusack, Woodstock, for $194,000. Q Residence at 861 Dakota Drive, Woodstock, was sold by David and Elizabeth Stumpf, Woodstock, to Shilo Walker, Woodstock, for $200,000. Q Residence at 2460 Applewood Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Nancy Lingl, Geneva, to Pablo Carbajal and Carmen Gallegos, Woodstock, for $96,336. Q Residence at 715 Judd St., Woodstock, was sold by American Community Bank and Trust, Woodstock, to Robert Meyer, Genoa City, Wis., for $170,000. Q Residence at 1841 Havens Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Otto and Irene Corzo, Woodstock, to Rainy Investments LLC, Elgin, for $94,000. Q Commercial building at 228 Main St., Woodstock, was sold by American Community Bank and Trust, Woodstock, to Oak Creek LLC, Woodstock, for $395,000.


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Oct. 16-22, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Community

Opera House to host Halloween fundraiser By RHONDA MIX The Independent e Friends of the Opera House will roll out the red carpet this fall in an evening full of fun and entertainment. A Hollywood Halloween party will begin at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St., Woodstock. e evening will feature a cash bar, finger food, soft drinks, musical entertainment, a magician, ventriloquists, dancing and more. ere also will be a costume contest with a grand-prize award of $250. Cash prizes in the amounts of $75 and $100 also will be awarded. “e [nonprofit group] Friends of the Opera House was looking to do something fun and different,” said John Scharres, managing director at the Woodstock Opera House. “ere were some brainstorming sessions, and then we came up with

the idea … ‘Hollywood Halloween’ works well with the time of year and events [as well as] performing arts and theater going on on the Square.” Scharres said people are invited to come to the party dressed up as their favorite movie characters or celebrities. “At arrival time, they [will have the opportunity to] walk down the red carpet. ere will be a red runner going out the Opera House door down to the curb,” he said. “People can arrive like they are coming to the Academy Awards, and an emcee will announce their arrival.” e costume contest will be judged at 9 p.m. by a panel of celebrity judges, including Barbara Scharres, executive director of the Gene Siskel Film Center, Chicago; Susan Stelford, an area film teacher; Joanne Gitlin, an active contributor to community arts events; and Kathie Comella, production coordinator for Wood-

HOLLYWOOD HALLOWEEN Where: Woodstock Opera House, 121 Van Buren St. When: 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26 Tickets: $25 Phone: 815-338-4212 stock Musical eatre Company. Scharres said people do not have to wear costumes if they don’t want to, and costumes are not a requirement for admittance into the event. “It’s going to be a night of fun, and it will be open to anyone who wants to get in,” he said. “ere [also] will be no age restrictions.” Tickets are $25 per person. Proceeds will benefit the Woodstock Opera House. For tickets or information, call 815-3384212 or visit woodstockoperahouse.com.

IN BRIEF

WHS Class of 1968 to hold reunion The Woodstock High School Class of 1968 will hold its 45th class reunion beginning at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at Holiday Inn, 800 S. Route 31, Crystal Lake. The evening will begin with cocktails followed by dinner at 7 p.m. There will be a per person charge of $48, and people must RSVP by Thursday, Oct. 24. For information or to RSVP, call Betty (Blumhorst) Eslick at 815-690-4258.

WHS to host faculty concert The fifth annual Woodstock School District 200 music faculty concert and LAM Foundation Benefit will begin at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27, at Woodstock High School, 501 W. South St., Woodstock. The event will feature raffles, a silent auction, refreshments and performances by D-200 music and theater teachers.Tickets will be $5 per person or $3 for students and senior citizens. Proceeds will benefit the LAM Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to patient support and research into a treatment and cure for the rare disease lymphangioleiomyomatosis. For information, call Kathy at 815245-8616 or email kdpeiffer@ameritech.net.

Senior Care Volunteer Network to hold breakfast fundraiser Senior Care Volunteer Network will hold its annual fundraising breakfast from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 25, at the Woodstock Country Club, 10310 Country Club Road, Bull Valley. There will be a complimentary breakfast, and donations to SCVN will be encouraged. Proceeds benefit Senior Care Volunteer Network. Reservation deadline is Friday, Oct. 18. To make reservations, call 815-455-3120 or email linda@scvnmchenrycounty.org.


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

13

Âť COLUMN

What’s the beef? In early August this year, scientists held a taste-testing for burgers made from laboratory grown meat. is report came out just about a year-and-ahalf after the pink slime report of March 2012. For anyone who missed that story, pink slime is ďŹ ller that was found to be present in 70 percent of the ground beef sold in supermarkets and at the time constituted about 25 percent of every hamburger. It is gelatinous material made from the most contaminated parts of the cow formerly used only for dog food and cooking oil. To make it USDA-approved “safeâ€? for human consumption, trimmings are simmered at a low temperature, fat is separated from tissue by centrifuge, and the result is sprayed with ammonia gases to kill germs. Safe and delicious. Really? Now we have burgers created by extracting stem cells from the muscle tissue of a dead cow, nourishing them in a chemical broth and engineering them to produce something like muscle tissue. Strands of tissue are compacted into pellets and frozen, then defrosted for cooking. e artiďŹ cial meat starts out white, so dyes are added to make it look more like the real thing. And there we have it ‌ tissue created in a laboratory from a dead cow’s stem cells bathed in chemicals and dyed to the appropriate

color. Safe and potentially delicious when they get the chemicals right. Really? e arguments in favor of this “magic meatâ€? are that it requires killing fewer animals, is more sustainable and vastly Leslie more environmentally Cook friendly. I get it. But there are other paths Vegetating With to the same goal. For Leslie me, at least, those paths are healthier, tastier and more spiritually satisfying. Speaking of magic meat, I was curious if the concoction would be considered kosher. e Jewish dietary laws are centered primarily around meat, ďŹ sh, poultry ‌ and insects — in other words, living creatures. I understand this body of laws as an expression of reverence for life. I did a little research and found that while there is as yet no deďŹ nitive ruling on this question, there is an interesting Talmudic discussion about the status of magic meat, meat that descends from heaven or is miraculously created by human beings. e argument was presented (in the 16th century!) that this meat could be eaten without kosher slaughtering. e meat could even be eaten live, limb from limb — otherwise forbidden — since normal laws do not apply to it. Biblical and Jewish dietary regulations express deep and important values about living creatures, the line between life and death and our place as human beings. e discussion of magic

meat along with the rest of the discussion about the status of this manufactured meat expresses those same values and lays bare the complexity of ethical dilemmas involved in meat eating. I’m often asked why I’m vegetarian. e assumption is that it is for reasons of health. It isn’t. It also isn’t environmentally driven. Although I disagree with the agribusiness model for meat production current in our country and believe it is dangerous for our ecosystem, our health and our spiritual balance, I can see there is a way to include meat in one’s diet that is healthy for ourselves and the planet. For those who do eat meat ‌ as author Michael Pollan says, pay more and eat less. ere are options other than meat from factoryfarmed animals. My own vegetarianism is driven by my spiritual values. In that context, pink slime and magic meat are no more an option for me than supermarket plasticwrapped packages. Meat from grass-fed animals also is not an option for me. I never eat or make meat substitutes. I make good food from plants, which offer a world of delicious and spiritually satisfying options. Here’s one: falafel. When eaten in the traditional way with tahina, falafel are a complete protein package. Along with protein, this combo packs essential fatty acids and high ďŹ ber. Falafel were not created to substitute for anything, and in their long history were never anything but falafel. e beans are not cooked, just soaked, so they retain a wonderfully crunchy texture. ey can be loaded with lots of green stuff and seasoned with some of my favorite

seasonings. Occasionally frying foods in good oils at the correct temperature is, in my opinion, much less likely to damage to your health than magic meat or pink slime. Certainly it will do less damage to your soul.

Falafel Ingredients: 3 1/2 cups dried, split, peeled fava beans, soaked and drained 2 cloves or 1 teaspoon garlic, chopped 1/4 large Spanish onion 3 ounces or about 1 bunch parsley 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon allspice 1 teaspoon Szeged hot paprika Directions: Wash and dry parsley. Cut off and discard stems. Chop leaves. Place parsley and seasonings in processor bowl and run 30 seconds. Scrape down and run another 30 seconds. Cut onion, add to processor bowl and pulse 10 times. Drain fava beans thoroughly. Add 3 1/2 cups drained beans to processor bowl with parsley, onion mix. Pulse 10 times, then scrape down. Run processor until mixture holds together, forming a tube around the blade. It should remain textured. Use a 1 1/2-inch scoop to shape into balls. Deep fry for 2 to 3 minutes at 375 degrees. Serve with tahina, salad and a good hot sauce.

Leslie Cook is owner of Expressly Leslie Vegetarian Specialties, 110 S. Johnson St.

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9*_0E4:[[0:\Wee_(_b*_0E4:[[0:\W\\ Jason Mattox of New Albany, Ind., prepares to paint a car at the Iron Invasion car show at the McHenry County Fairgrounds Oct. 12. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

IN BRIEF

Unity to hold pumpkin auction Unity Spiritual Center will hold its annual designer pumpkin auction at 11:15 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, at Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock, 225 W. Calhoun St. Twenty-three pumpkins will be up for auction and will include butteries, fairies, monsters, clowns and cartoon characters. The pumpkin designs were created by Maria Pizzuto-Wubs and Boyd Whitt, and the pumpkins were assembled by Unity congregation teenagers. The bidding will start at $10. Julie Ostrow, a standup comedian, will preside as auctioneer. For information, call 815-337-3534 or

visit unitywoodstock.com.

Bowling event to benefit Turning Point Turning Point Domestic Violence Shelter will host its Bowling and Da Bears event from 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20, at Kingston Lanes, 1330 Eastwood Lane. Tickets are $20 per individual and $60 for a family of four. Proceeds will beneďŹ t Turning Point. For information, visit bowlingdabears.eventbrite.com.


14

Oct. 16-22, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

COMMUNITY COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

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16

Oct. 16-22, 2013

COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

» COLUMN

Holidays at the library With Halloween rapidly approaching, the holiday season is nearly upon us. Come to the Woodstock Public Library and join in the many festivities we have planned. We will have our weeklong Sugar Skull Competition starting Saturday, Oct. 19, which leads up to our

Celebracion del Dia de los Muertos at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26. We’ll also have a spooky story time and craft at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, and Halloweenbased story times during October. Unfortunately, our “Do You Nick Believe in Ghosts?” Weber program scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 20, Check it Out has been cancelled. In November, we’ll feature a number of activities celebrat-

ing Veterans Day, Monday, Nov. 11, and anksgiving. ese include visits to our story times by members of our armed forces, anksgiving-themed story times and a rousing game of Turkey Bingo from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 25. Please note, the library will close at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 27, and will be closed all day ursday, Nov. 28. Moving into December, we will have a number of Christmas and holiday events. ese include a showing of “A Muppet Christmas Carol” Monday, Dec. 9, a visit by Nutcracker Ballet dancers Monday, Dec. 16, and story times and craft sessions. e library will be closed

Christmas Eve, Tuesday, Dec. 24, and Christmas Day, Wednesday, Dec. 25. is is only a partial listing of the events at your library, and we’ll be adding more as we go, so make sure to check out a complete listing on our calendar at https:il.evanced.info/woodstock/lib/eventcalendar.asp. For many of these events, space is limited, so registration is required. You can register online at the calendar site, or by calling the library at 815-3380542. Nick Weber is director of the Woodstock Public Library.

INDE FOCUS

WELLS FARGO DONATES TO LITTLE LEAGUE

BVGC HOLDS OCTOBER MEETING

Wells Fargo Advisors in Woodstock recently donated $1,000 to Woodstock Little League to support its summer recreational baseball program. The donation was awarded on behalf of Tim Oman as part of Wells Fargo’s Volunteer Service Award Program. Pictured, from left, are: Scott Baier, executive vice president, Woodstock Little League; Tim Oman, Wells Fargo Advisors; Will McKay, president, Woodstock Little League; and Tom Hawkins, executive vice president, Woodstock Little League. COURTESY PHOTO

The Bull Valley Garden Club recently held its fall meeting. Renee Blitek and Aneida McDermott taught members how to make autumn flower arrangements. Pictured, from left, are: Judy Reilly, Mary Moltmann, Dinah Hoppe, Blitek and McDermott. COURTESY PHOTO

RINGS GROUP HOLDS MEETING

WHS GRAD WINS TEACHING AWARD RINGS, the combined youth group of area Lutheran and Presbyterian churches, recently met in Hebron for games, a Bible study and a trip to the Dari. Pictured, from left, front row, are: Sierra Trojan, Justine Ellis, Jamie Wikman and John LaRue. Middle row: Amanda Homeier, Desiree Gomez and Braden and Sabina Schmid. Back row: Lexie Morris, Chey Knoll, Chase Woods, Sophie Rogers, Megan Hildreth, Brittnany Nelson, Manda Landrey, Aimee Podgorski, Sarah Schenk and the Rev. Andy Tyrrell. COURTESY PHOTO

Collin Roberts, left, formerly of Woodstock, accepts the Excellence in Teaching Award from La Lumiere School headmaster Michael Kennedy. Roberts, a 2004 graduate of Woodstock High School, teaches in LaPorte, Ind. COURTESY PHOTO


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

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18

Oct. 16-22, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

FLASHBACKS 25 years ago Q Rick Draffkorn and Colleen Ritter were named king and queen of Marian Central Catholic High School’s homecoming. Q P.O. Knuth’s owners Mike and Peggy Palmquist received an OK from architectural engineers to complete restoration work on its building at Main and Benton streets that had been damaged by ďŹ re. Q Woodstock High School cross-country runner Brad Heidtke ďŹ nished ďŹ rst in the McHenry County Cross-Country Meet with a time of 17 minutes, 27.89 seconds. 20 years ago Q Woodstock School District 200 prepared three referendums for voters to consider – to build and staff a new elementary school and to make improvements to Woodstock High School. Q Karl Dreyer and Jenny Marcellis were named king and queen of WHS homecoming. Q Woodstock Fire/Rescue District donated $1,300 to the Illinois Fire Safety Alliance burn camp. 15 years ago

COMMUNITY RELIGION NOTES

Q Woodstock resident John McBride passed away at the age of 84. McBride was batboy for the Chicago White Sox at the age of 84. Q The Woodstock Independent chronicled Pedro Lara-Oliva who was the new principal at Dean Street School. Q Woodstock Cub Scout Pack 350’s bike-a-thon raised $1,000 to help Jan Svoboda, a quadriplegic, purchase a specially equipped van. Q The WHS football team defeated Crystal Lake Central 35-7 behind Dave Davis, who rushed for 142 yards and two touchdowns. 10 years ago Q The Woodstock City Council approved the conceptual plan for development of the Die Cast site from Hummel Development Group LLC and named it developer of record. Q Susan Martino retired after 16 years as director of Adult & Child Rehab Center. Q Barry Frame, owner of Frame’s Men’s Wear, announced he would be closing the store he and his dad, Bill, operated for 39 years. Q The WHS girls swim team ďŹ nished ďŹ fth out of 13 teams at the Jayhawk Invitational at

Rockford Jefferson High School behind Colleen Dougherty who placed second in the 50yard freestyle and third in the 100 freestyle.

CHRIST LIFE ÂŁĂŽĂˆÂŁ{ĂŠ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡{™Î{ĂŠ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-iÂ˜ÂˆÂœĂ€ĂŠ9ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂ€ÂœĂ•ÂŤ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°Ê/Â…Ă•Ă€Ăƒ`>Ăž

Five years ago Q The Woodstock City Council delayed improvements to the Olson Park lift station due to insufďŹ cient funds. Q The Northwood Middle School football team defeated North Boone 22-14 behind touchdowns from Brian Loftin, Ryan Wade and Nick Peters.

EDEN BAPTIST £™äÎÊ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡nÂŁ{‡Çn{Ç Worship: 3 p.m. Sunday (Spanish)

One year ago Q The city of Woodstock was owed $828,349 in income taxes from the state of Illinois for ďŹ scal year 2011-12. Q The Historic Preservation Commission selected the year 1905 as a guideline for preservation purposes for the Old Courthouse Building. Q McHenry County Habitat for Humanity announced its intention to open a ReStore home-improvement shop in Woodstock. Q The Woodstock North High School girls tennis team defeated Round Lake 7-0 behind Sierra Meiners who won No. 1 singles 7-5, 6-0 and Cally Meire who won No. 2 singles 6-1, 6-3.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN nĂŠ °Ê,ÂœĂ•ĂŒiĂŠ{ÇÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă‡ĂŠĂŠ Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?ĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠ>Â?Â?]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠ>°“° UĂŠ ÂœÂ“Â“Ă•Â˜ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ`ˆ˜˜iÀÊx\Îäʍ°“°Ê7i`˜iĂƒ`>Ăž

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST ÂŁÂŁÂŁĂŠ7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÓÇΣ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]Ê£äÊ>°“°

FIRST UNITED METHODIST Óä£Ê7°Ê-ÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ…ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎΣäÊ Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]ĂŠ`Ă•Ă€ÂˆÂ˜}ʙÊ>Â°Â“Â°ĂŠĂƒiĂ€Ă›ÂˆVi°Ê FREE METHODIST ™Î{ĂŠ °Ê-i“ˆ˜>ÀÞÊĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡Î£näÊ Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday; 8:30 a.m. (traditional), 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) Sunday HERITAGE BAPTIST CHURCH 4609 Greenwood Road *°"°Ê "8ĂŠ{ĂˆÂŁĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡xÇx‡££™ä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION 8617 RidgeďŹ eld Road, Crystal Lake 815-455-1810 Worship: 6:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. Saturday REDEEMER LUTHERAN £ÎÓäÊ i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡™ÎÇä Worship: 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ Â…Ă€ÂˆĂƒĂŒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠi`Ă•V>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ʙ\ÂŁxĂŠĂŠ>°“°Ê-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž UĂŠ˜ˆ“>ĂŒiĂŠ>ÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂŠÂ™\ÂŁxĂŠĂŠ>°“ÊÊ-Ă•Â˜`>Ăž UĂŠ*Ă€>ĂžiÀÊÊÇʍ°“°Ê/Ă•iĂƒ`>ÞÊ>˜`ĂŠĂˆĂŠÂŤÂ°Â“Â°ĂŠ/Â…Ă•Ă€Ăƒ`>Ăž RESURRECTION CATHOLIC 2918 S. Country Club Road 815-338-7330 Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL xäÎÊ7°Ê>VÂŽĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ä™xäÊ Worship: 8:30 and 10 a.m. Sunday ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN {ä£Ê-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠÂœÂ…Â˜Â˝ĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡xÂŁx™Ê Worship: 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ-Ă•Â˜`>ĂžĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?]棊\ÎäÊ>°“° ST. MARY CATHOLIC ĂŽÂŁĂŽĂŠ °Ê/Ă€ĂžÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎÇÇÊ Worship: 7:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday; 5 and 6:30 p.m. (Spanish) Saturday; 7:30, 9 and 10:30 a.m., noon (Spanish), 5 p.m. Sunday THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN Ă“ĂˆĂ“Ă¤ĂŠ Ă€Âˆ`}iĂŠ>˜iĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡{Â™ĂˆÂ‡Ă¤x{n Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Ă“Ă¤ÂŁĂˆĂŠ>Ă€ĂŒÂ?>˜`ĂŠ,Âœ>`ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎ{‡£ÇäÎ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE VINE ÂŁÂŁĂŽĂ“ĂŠ °Ê>`ÂˆĂƒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎn‡ÎÎnä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER Ă“Ă“xĂŠ7°Ê >Â?Â…ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎLJÎxĂŽ{ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UĂŠˆ˜`ĂƒÂ…ÂˆvĂŒiĂ€Ăƒ]ĂŠĂˆ\Îäʍ°“°]ĂŠ/Ă•iĂƒ`>Ăž WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD £Óä£Ê i>Â˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ°UĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ÂŁĂŽÂŁĂˆ Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday prayer service, 10 a.m. worship service WOODSTOCK BIBLE ÇÇäÊ °Êˆ“L>Â?Â?ĂŠĂ›i°ÊUĂŠnÂŁx‡ÎÎnÂ‡ĂŽĂ¤Ă¤ĂˆĂŠ Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday UĂŠ °,° °° Â°ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ˜ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂ€Ăž]ĂŠÂŁÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ>Â°Â“Â°ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂŁ\ÂŁxĂŠ p.m. Sunday


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

CALENDAR

Oct. 16 to 26

Upcoming events in the Woodstock area U Events are free unless otherwise noted

PHOTO: ERIX!

16 | WEDNESDAY WORLD FILM NIGHT Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6:30 p.m. 815-338-0542 “Clandestine Childhood” will be shown. Movies are intended for adults.

17 | THURSDAY WOODSTOCK SENIOR CLUBS Hearthstone Communities 840 N. Seminary Ave. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A fee will be charged for lunch, $2 donation for bingo 815-344-3555 The activities will include a coffee klatch and bingo. Registration is required. CREATIVE LIVING SERIES Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 10 a.m. $24 815-338-4212 See The Entertainer, page 10. THE BASICS OF BUDGETING Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6:30 p.m. 815-338-0542 Preparing a monthly budget, comparison shopping, cutting expenses and tracking a budget will be discussed. Registration is required. Programs are presented by the office of Illinois Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka. THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com A 7,000-square-foot interactive haunted house is set up on the Square. All proceeds will benefit Family Alliance and help restore the Courthouse on the Square.

18 | FRIDAY AUTUMN DRIVE Garden Valley, Franklinville, Route N176 and River roads 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. autumdrive.net The event consists of 14 vendors at various locations in rural Woodstock featuring antiques, produce, arts and crafts and more. FILL THE BOOT FUNDRAISER Intersections of Madison, Lake and South streets noon to 6 p.m. Facebook.com/MDANational Woodstock Fire/Rescue District Local 4813 will collect donations to support and provide services for those affected with Muscular Dystrophy. JAZZ JAM Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $5 donation 815-338-4212

jazzonthesquare.com See The Entertainer, page 10. ‘DIXIE SWIM CLUB’ Woodstock High School Black Box Theater 501 W. South St. 7 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 See The Entertainer, page 10.. THE HAUNTED SQUARE MADNESS MANOR BLACKOUT Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 18 and older thehauntedsquare.com Designed for ages 18 and older, the haunted house will be in complete darkness. A PLACE TO SHINE MUSIC CONCERT A Place to Shine 107 Dean St. 7:30 p.m. $7 847-507-1352 Aplacetoshinemusic.com See The Entertainer, page 10. ‘SHOUT! THE MOD MUSICAL’ Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 8 p.m. $23 adults, $20 students and senior citizens See The Entertainer, page 10.

19 | SATURDAY AUTUMN DRIVE Garden Valley, Franklinville, Route N176 and River roads 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. autumdrive.net See Oct. 18

SUGAR SKULL COMPETITION Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 815-338-0542 Students in sixth to 12th grades are invited to participate in a weeklong event to design a sugar skull celebrating The Day of the Dead Nov. 2. Skulls are available at the library. Registration required. DYNO SHOOT OUT Harley-Davidson 2050 S. Eastwood Dr. 9:30 a.m. 815-337-3511 woodstockharley-dav.com Bike owners test their engine power in a competition. The Performance Division will give a Tech Talk seminar from 2 to 4 p.m. ‘DIXIE SWIM CLUB’ Woodstock High School Black Box Theater 501 W. South St. 2 and 7 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 See The Entertainer, page 10. THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 17.

SPOKEN WORD CAFE Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $5 donation 815-338-4212 See The Entertainer, page 10. ‘SHOUT! THE MOD MUSICAL’ Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 8 p.m. $23 adults, $20 students and senior citizens See The Entertainer, page 10.

20 | SUNDAY CARE4 BREAST CANCER 5K RUN/WALK Woodstock North High School 3000 Raffel Road 8:30 a.m. race start $25 online registration, $30 late registration (Oct. 19, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.) 815-334-8987, ext. 24 hpclinic.org This annual event raises money for the Family Health Partnership Clinic’s Breast Cancer Fund, which provides early detection, screening and educational services to women and men in McHenry County. AUTUMN DRIVE Garden Valley, Franklinville, Route N176 and River roads 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. autumdrive.net See Oct. 18. PUMPKIN AUCTION Unity Spiritual Center 225 W. Calhoun St. 11:15 a.m. 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.com The bidding starts at $10 for 23 decorated pumpkins created by Unity congregation teenagers. BOWLING AND DA BEARS Kingston Lanes 1330 Eastwood Lane 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. $20 per individual, $60 family of four bolwingdabears.eventbrite.com The bowling event will benefit Turning Point Domestic Violence Shelter. ‘SHOUT! THE MOD MUSICAL’ Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 3 p.m. $23 adults, $20 students and senior citizens See The Entertainer, page 10.

21 | MONDAY VILLAGE OF BULL VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION The Stickney House 1904 Cherry Valley Road 7 p.m. EVENING BOOK CLUB Read Between the Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. 815-206-5967 The group will discuss “Let’s Pretend

This Never Happened” by Jenny Lawson.

22 | TUESDAY HELPING PAWS NEW VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION Helping Paws Shelter 2500 Harding Lane 7 p.m. 815-338-4400 helpingpaws.net DISTRICT 200 BOARD OF EDUCATION Clay Professional Development Center 112 Grove St. 7 p.m. woodstockschools.org The meeting will be on the second floor. Use the parking lot behind Clay Academy and enter via Door 5.

19

FILL THE BOOT FUNDRAISER Intersections of Madison, Lake and South streets noon to 6 p.m. Facebook.com/MDANational See Oct. 18.

26 | SATURDAY HOLLYWOOD HALLOWEEN Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $25 See page 12.

ONGOING

23 | WEDNESDAY

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Tuesdays and Saturdays Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org Voted No. 1 in Illinois for midsize markets in 2012.

SOCIAL SKILLS AND SELFESTEEM SUPPORT GROUP Recovery Outreach Center 101 Jefferson St. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. 815-338-3590 The monthly free group meetings will be ongoing and no reservations are needed.

COFFEE AT THE CAFE’ FOR SENIORS Tuesdays Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 1 to 3 p.m. Senior citizens are invited to drop in for coffee.

STAGE LEFTOVERS Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 7:30 p.m. 815-334-3555 See the Entertainer, page 10.

24 | THURSDAY THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 17.

25 | FRIDAY SENIOR CARE VOLUNTEER NETWORK BREAKFAST FUNDRAISER Woodstock Country Club 10310 Country Club Road 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Donations to SCVN encouraged 815-455-3120 A complimentary breakfast will be offered with donations to benefit Senior Care Volunteer Network. RSVP by Oct. 18 . THE HAUNTED SQUARE Woodstock Square 7 p.m. to midnight $12, ages 14 and older thehauntedsquare.com See Oct. 17 OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 10.

DIVORCECARE Tuesdays Woodstock Assembly of God 1201 Dean St. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 815-338-1316 divorcecare.org The weekly support group and seminar will be conducted by people who understand the pain of separation or divorce. BINGO Wednesdays Woodstock Moose Lodge 406 Clay St. 7 to 9:30 pm. 815-338-0126 Games will include crossfire. Food will be available. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. SOBER MOMS AA MEETING Thursdays Blue Lotus Temple 221 Dean St. 10 a.m. 847-809-1104 Moms with a desire to stop drinking are invited to meet with the group. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Fridays Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 815-338-2833 See The Entertainer, page 10.

BEST BET SELECTION To submit calendar items, e-mail pr@thewoodstockindependent.com or visit thewoodstockindependent.com


20

Oct. 16-22, 2013

SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Service Directory

ATTORNEY

CARPENTRY

AC/HEATING

Small blocks are $40 for 4 weeks. Call 815-701-9268 and ask for Jen for details.

Heating, Cooling, Plumbing and Water Heaters

Woodstock 815-337-4200

e on r servic 24 -hou & models es all mak

Boiler & h heating ot water speciali sts!

Full Service Law Firm

24-Hour Service CONSTRUCTION

ASPHALT SERVICES

CLEANING SERVICES

ELCTRC. CONTRACTOR MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF SERVICE CALL - Service upgrades Since - Repairs 1986 - Maintenance Residential - Commercial

Delaware Electric Co. Fully Insured Fully Licensed

815-338-3139 CLEANING SERVICES

COLLISION REPAIR

FINANCIAL SERVICES

HANDYMAN

ENGINE REPAIR

HOUSEHOLD FILTERS

B&J SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

Authorized and stocked service center for Briggs & Stratton, Tecumseh & Kohler Engine Co., Honda, Subaru-Robin, Engs., Murray & M.T.D. products.

Chain saws serviced & sharpened.

Call 815-648-2813

10302 Alden Rd., Alden, IL

GUTTER CLEANING

Cleaning

HEALTH INSURANCE

INSURANCE

yrs. r 35 Ove rience e exp

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847-658-8512

and condos es townhom

HOME EXTERIORS

SPACE FOR RENT Party? Anniversary? Baby Shower? Birthday? Retirement? Wedding Reception? Meeting? Woodstock Church Hall with full kitchen available daytime or evenings. Reasonable rates.

Redeemer Lutheran Church For details, call (815) 338-9370 www.rlcw.com

TECHNOLOGY

WINDOW CLEANING

INSURANCE

Mark Mitchell Insurance Agency 5RXWH‡:RRGVWRFN

815-334-1000 www.markismyagent.com

PAINTING Professional interior and exterior painting. Fully insured. 35+ yrs exp. Free estimates. Local references. Senior discounts.Winter Rates

J.B. Decorating 847-658-8512


22

Oct. 16-22, 2013

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PUBLIC NOTICES and which said Mortgage was made by: James C. Mass Jeanine C. Mass the Mortgagor(s), to Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Mortgagee, and recorded LQ WKH 2IÃ&#x20AC;FH RI WKH 5HFRUGHU RI 'HHGV RI 0F+HQU\&RXQW\,OOLQRLVDV'RFXPHQW1R 5 DQG IRU RWKHU UHOLHI WKDW summons was duly issued out of said Court against you as provided by law and that the said suit is now pending. 12:7+(5()25(81/(66<28Ã&#x20AC;OH\RXU DQVZHURURWKHUZLVHÃ&#x20AC;OH\RXUDSSHDUDQFHLQ WKLV FDVH LQ WKH 2IÃ&#x20AC;FH RI WKH &OHUN RI WKLV Court, Katherine M. Keefe Clerk of the Circuit Court 16HPLQDU\ :RRGVWRFN,/ RQ RU EHIRUH 1RYHPEHU   $ '()$8/7 0$< %( (17(5(' $*$,167 <28 $7 $1< 7,0( $)7(5 7+$7 '$< $1'$-8'*0(170$<%((17(5(',1 $&&25'$1&( :,7+ 7+( 35$<(5 2) 6$,'&203/$,17 &2',/,6 $662&,$7(63& $WWRUQH\VIRU3ODLQWLII :1RUWK)URQWDJH5RDG6XLWH %XUU5LGJH,/   'X3DJH :LQQHEDJR 2XU)LOH1R 127(7KLVODZÃ&#x20AC;UPLVGHHPHGWREHDGHEW collector. , 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW 2FWREHU /

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PUBLIC NOTICE ,17+(&,5&8,7&2857)257+( 7:(17<6(&21'-8',&,$/&,5&8,7 0&+(15<&2817<,//,12,6 -3025*$1 &+$6( %$1. 1$7,21$/ $662&,$7,21 3ODLQWLII Y .$7+</08//(1HWDO 'HIHQGDQW &+ 127,&( 2) 6$/( 38%/,& 127,&( ,6 +(5(%< *,9(1 WKDW SXUVXDQW WR D -XGJPHQWRI)RUHFORVXUHDQG6DOHHQWHUHG LQWKHDERYHFDXVHRQ-XO\DQDJHQW IRU 7KH -XGLFLDO 6DOHV &RUSRUDWLRQ ZLOO DW 30RQ1RYHPEHUDWWKH1/7 7LWOH //&  &RQJUHVV 3DUNZD\ 6XLWH ' &U\VWDO /DNH ,/  VHOO DW SXEOLF auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: /27  ,1 %/2&. $1' 7+( 6287+  )((72)7+(:(67)((72)/27 2)%/2&.,1635,1*&,7<$'',7,21 72 :22'672&. $ 68%',9,6,21 2) 3$57 2) 7+( :(67  2) /27  2) 7+( 1257+:(67  2) 6(&7,21  72:16+,3  1257+ 5$1*(  ($67 2) 7+( 7+,5' 35,1&,3$/ 0(5,',$1 $&&25',1* 72 7+( 3/$7 7+(5(2) 5(&25'(' 129(0%(5   $6 '2&80(17 180%(5  ,1 %22.  2) 3/$76 3$*(  ,1 0&+(15< &2817<,//,12,6 &RPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV  :+((/(5 675((7:22'672&.,/3URSHUW\ ,QGH[ 1R  7KH UHDO HVWDWH is improved with a single family residence. 6DOH WHUPV  GRZQ RI WKH KLJKHVW ELG E\ FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV DW WKH FORVH RI WKH VDOH SD\DEOH WR 7KH -XGLFLDO 6DOHV &RUSRUDWLRQ 1R WKLUG SDUW\ FKHFNV ZLOO EH DFFHSWHG 7KH EDODQFH LQFOXGLQJ WKH -XGLFLDO VDOH IHH IRU $EDQGRQHG 5HVLGHQWLDO 3URSHUW\ 0XQLFLSDOLW\5HOLHI)XQGZKLFKLVFDOFXODWHG RQ UHVLGHQWLDO UHDO HVWDWH DW WKH UDWH RI  IRU HDFK  RU IUDFWLRQ WKHUHRI RI WKH

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed  LQ FHUWLÃ&#x20AC;HG IXQGVRU ZLUH WUDQVIHU LV GXH ZLWKLQ WZHQW\IRXU   KRXUV 1R IHH shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose SULRU WR WKH VDOH 7KH VXEMHFW SURSHUW\ LV subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to 3ODLQWLIIDQGLQ´$6,6µFRQGLWLRQ7KHVDOHLV IXUWKHUVXEMHFWWRFRQÃ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW 8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOORIWKHDPRXQWELGWKH SXUFKDVHU ZLOO UHFHLYH D &HUWLÃ&#x20AC;FDWH RI 6DOH that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to WKHUHDOHVWDWHDIWHUFRQÃ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQRIWKHVDOH 7KHSURSHUW\ZLOO127EHRSHQIRULQVSHFWLRQ and plaintiff makes no representation as to WKH FRQGLWLRQ RI WKH SURSHUW\ 3URVSHFWLYH bidders are admonished to check the FRXUW Ã&#x20AC;OH WR YHULI\ DOO LQIRUPDWLRQ ,I WKLV property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required E\ 7KH &RQGRPLQLXP 3URSHUW\ $FW  ,/&6 J  DQG J  ,IWKLVSURSHUW\ is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments UHTXLUHG E\ 7KH &RQGRPLQLXP 3URSHUW\ $FW  ,/&6  J  ,) <28$5( 7+( 0257*$*25 +20(2:1(5  <28 +$9( 7+( 5,*+7 72 5(0$,1 ,1 3266(66,21 )25  '$<6 $)7(5 (175<2)$125'(52)3266(66,21 ,1 $&&25'$1&( :,7+ 6(&7,21   &  2) 7+( ,//,12,6 0257*$*( )25(&/2685( /$: )RU LQIRUPDWLRQ H[DPLQH WKH FRXUW Ã&#x20AC;OH RU FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII·V DWWRUQH\ &2',/,6  $662&,$7(6 3& : 1257+ )5217$*( 52$' 68,7(%8555,'*(,/    3OHDVH UHIHU WR Ã&#x20AC;OH QXPEHU  7+( -8',&,$/ 6$/(6 &25325$7,21 2QH 6RXWK :DFNHU 'ULYH WK )ORRU &KLFDJR ,/    6$/( <RX FDQ DOVR YLVLW 7KH -XGLFLDO 6DOHV &RUSRUDWLRQ DW ZZZWMVFFRP IRU D  GD\VWDWXVUHSRUWRISHQGLQJVDOHV&2',/,6  $662&,$7(6 3& : 1257+ )5217$*( 52$' 68,7(  %855 5,'*( ,/     $WWRUQH\ )LOH 1R  $WWRUQH\ $5'& 1R  &DVH 1XPEHU  &+  7-6&  127( 3XUVXDQW WR WKH )DLU 'HEW &ROOHFWLRQ 3UDFWLFHV$FW \RX DUH DGYLVHG WKDW 3ODLQWLII·V DWWRUQH\ LV GHHPHG to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. , 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW 2FWREHU /

2) 7+( 7+,5' 35,1&,3$/ 0(5,',$1 $&&25',1* 72 7+( 3/$7 7+(5(2) 5(&25'(' 129(0%(5   $6 '2&80(17 180%(5 5 '(6&5,%('$6)2//2:6 &200(1&,1*$76287+($67&251(5 2) 6$,' /27 7+(1&( 1257+  '(*5((6  0,187(6  6(&21'6 :(67$ ',67$1&( 2)  )((7 )25 7+( 32,17 2) %(*,11,1* 7+(1&( &217,18,1* 1257+  '(*5((6  0,187(6  6(&21'6 :(67 72 $ 32,17 21 $ &859( $ ',67$1&( 2)  )((7 7+(1&( $/21* $ &859( 1257+($67(5/< %(,1* &21&$9( ($67(5/<+$9,1*$5$',862) )((7$1'$&+25'%($5,1*2)1257+ '(*5((60,187(66(&21'6 ($67 72 $ 32,17 21 $ &859( $ ',67$1&( 2)  )((7 7+(1&( 6287+  '(*5((6  0,187(6  6(&21'6 ($67 $ ',67$1&( 2)  )((7 7+(1&( 6287+  '(*5((6  0,187(6  6(&21'6 :(67 $ ',67$1&(2))((7727+(32,17 2) %(*,11,1* ,1 0&+(15< &2817< ,//,12,6 &20021/<.12:1$6+DQGHO/DQH :RRGVWRFN,/ and which said Mortgage was made by: &KDUOHV ) (FNHO H[HFXWHG WKH PRUWJDJH however this individual is deceased and is not named as a defendant in this lawsuit WKH 0RUWJDJRU V  WR &RPPXQLW\ /LIH 0RUWJDJH//&DV0RUWJDJHHDQGUHFRUGHG LQ WKH 2IÃ&#x20AC;FH RI WKH 5HFRUGHU RI 'HHGV RI 0F+HQU\&RXQW\,OOLQRLVDV'RFXPHQW1R 5 DQG IRU RWKHU UHOLHI WKDW summons was duly issued out of said Court against you as provided by law and that the said suit is now pending. 12:7+(5()25(81/(66<28Ã&#x20AC;OH\RXU DQVZHURURWKHUZLVHÃ&#x20AC;OH\RXUDSSHDUDQFHLQ WKLV FDVH LQ WKH 2IÃ&#x20AC;FH RI WKH &OHUN RI WKLV Court, Katherine M. Keefe Clerk of the Circuit Court 16HPLQDU\ :RRGVWRFN,/ RQ RU EHIRUH 1RYHPEHU   $ '()$8/7 0$< %( (17(5(' $*$,167 <28 $7 $1< 7,0( $)7(5 7+$7 '$< $1'$-8'*0(170$<%((17(5(',1 $&&25'$1&( :,7+ 7+( 35$<(5 2) 6$,'&203/$,17 &2',/,6 $662&,$7(63& $WWRUQH\VIRU3ODLQWLII :1RUWK)URQWDJH5RDG6XLWH %XUU5LGJH,/   'X3DJH :LQQHEDJR 2XU)LOH1R 127(7KLVODZÃ&#x20AC;UPLVGHHPHGWREHDGHEW collector. , 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW 2FWREHU /

PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE

,QYLWDWLRQ WR &RPPHQW RQ D 3URSRVHG 7HOHFRPPXQLFDWLRQV)DFLOLW\ 7KLV QRWLFH LV WR VHUYH DV DQ RSSRUWXQLW\ for members of the public or the permitting agency to comment on a telecommunications tower with regards to HIIHFWVRQKLVWRULFSURSHUWLHVZLWKLQRQHKDOI of a mile of the proposed site. All interested persons are invited to comment on any potential effects that may be caused to historic properties, if any such properties are or may be located at or near the site, IURPDSURSRVHGFRQVWUXFWLRQRIDIRRW  IHHW RYHUDOO LQFOXGLQJ DSSXUWHQDQFHV  monopole telecommunications tower with associated equipment to be located at  :HVW /DNH 6KRUH 5RDG LQ WKH &LW\ of Woodstock, McHenry County, Illinois DSSUR[ 1 :  Comments regarding historic properties may be submitted to the following contact as IROORZV7UDF\/'UXQDVN\(GJH&RQVXOWLQJ (QJLQHHUV ,QF  :DWHU 6WUHHW 3UDLULH GX 6DF :,  3KRQH  (PDLOWGUXQDVN\#HGJHFRQVXOWFRP 7KLV QRWLFH LV SURYLGHG LQ DFFRUGDQFH with the regulations of the Federal &RPPXQLFDWLRQV &RPPLVVLRQ  &)5 3DUW$SSHQGLFHV%DQG& 3XEOLVKHG LQ 7KH :RRGVWRFN ,QGHSHQGHQW 2FWREHU /

Oct. 16-22, 2013 2FWREHU /

PUBLIC NOTICE ,17+(&,5&8,7&28572)7+(1' -8',&,$/&,5&8,7 0&+(15<&2817<:22'672&. ,//,12,6 -30RUJDQ &KDVH %DQN 1DWLRQDO Association, successor in interest by purchase from the )',& DV 5HFHLYHU RI :DVKLQJWRQ 0XWXDO Bank F/K/A Washington Mutual Bank, FA 3ODLQWLII vs. /DZUHQFH7<RXQJV $SSOHZRRG 1HLJKERUKRRG $VVRFLDWLRQ 8QNQRZQ +HLUV DQG /HJDWHHV RI /DZUHQFH 7 <RXQJV DND /DZUHQFH 7KRPDV <RXQJV 0DU\ <RXQJV 8QNQRZQ 2ZQHUV DQG 1RQ 5HFRUG&ODLPDQWV 'HIHQGDQWV &+ 3URSHUW\$GGUHVV  6RXWK 6KDQQRQ 'ULYH :RRGVWRFN ,/  127,&()2538%/,&$7,21 7KH UHTXLVLWH DIÃ&#x20AC;GDYLW IRU SXEOLFDWLRQ KDYLQJ EHHQ Ã&#x20AC;OHG QRWLFH LV KHUHE\ JLYHQ \RX 8QNQRZQ +HLUV DQG /HJDWHHV RI /DZUHQFH7<RXQJVDND/DZUHQFH7KRPDV <RXQJVDQG 81.12:1 2:1(56 DQG 1215(&25' &/$,0$176 GHIHQGDQWV in the above entitled cause, that suit has been commenced against you and other defendants in the Circuit Court for the 22nd Judicial Circuit, McHenry County, by said plaintiff praying for the foreclosure of a certain mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: /27  ,1 %/2&.  ,1 6+$1121:22' 81,7 7:2 %(,1* $ 68%',9,6,21 2) 7+( :(67  2) *29(510(17 /276  $1'  2) 7+( 1257+:(67  2) 6(&7,21  72:16+,3  1257+ 5$1*(  ($67 2)7+(7+,5' 35,1&,3$/ 0(5,',$1 $&&25',1* 72 7+(3/$77+(5(2)5(&25'('0$< $6'2&80(17180%(5,1 0&+(15<&2817<,//,12,6 3,1 6DLG SURSHUW\ LV FRPPRQO\ NQRZQ DV  6RXWK 6KDQQRQ 'ULYH :RRGVWRFN ,/  DQG ZKLFK VDLG PRUWJDJH ZDV PDGHE\DQGUHFRUGHGLQWKH2IÃ&#x20AC;FHRIWKH 5HFRUGHU RI 'HHGV DV 'RFXPHQW 1XPEHU 5 DQG IRU RWKHU UHOLHI WKDW 6XPPRQVZDVGXO\LVVXHGRXWRIWKHDERYH Court against you as provided by law and that said suit is now pending. 12: 7+(5()25( XQOHVV \RX WKH VDLG DERYH QDPHG GHIHQGDQWV Ã&#x20AC;OH \RXU DQVZHU to the complaint in the said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the 2IÃ&#x20AC;FHRIWKH&OHUNRIWKH&RXUWDW0F+HQU\ &RXQW\ RQ RU EHIRUH 1RYHPEHU   a default may be taken against you at any time after that date and a Judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said complaint. Katherine M. Keefe Clerk of the Court 1RUWK6HPLQDU\ :RRGVWRFN,OOLQRLV 7KLVFRPPXQLFDWLRQLVDQDWWHPSWWRFROOHFW a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 6WHYHQ&/LQGEHUJ )5(('0$1$16(/02/,1'%(5*//& :'LHKO5G6WH 1DSHUYLOOH,/   ID[

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,17+(&,5&8,7&28572)7+(1' -8',&,$/&,5&8,7 0&+(15<&2817<:22'672&. ,//,12,6 &+ -30RUJDQ &KDVH %DQN 1DWLRQDO Association 3/$,17,)) 9V &KDUOHV)(FNHO'HFODUDWLRQRI7UXVWGDWHG  8QNQRZQ %HQHÃ&#x20AC;FLDULHV RI WKH &KDUOHV)(FNHO'HFODUDWLRQRI7UXVWGDWHG  8QNQRZQ 6XFFHVVRU 7UXVWHH RI WKH &KDUOHV ) (FNHO 'HFODUDWLRQ RI 7UXVW GDWHG  8QNQRZQ 2ZQHUV DQG 1RQUHFRUG &ODLPDQWV 5LFKDUG .XKQ DV 6SHFLDO 5HSUHVHQWDWLYH IRU &KDUOHV ) (FNHO GHFHDVHG  0DSOHV DW WKH 6RQDWDV +RPHRZQHUV$VVRFLDWLRQ//& '()(1'$176 127,&(%<38%/,&$7,21 127,&(,6*,9(172<28 &KDUOHV)(FNHO'HFODUDWLRQRI7UXVWGDWHG  8QNQRZQ %HQHÃ&#x20AC;FLDULHV RI WKH &KDUOHV ) (FNHO'HFODUDWLRQRI7UXVWGDWHG 8QNQRZQ 6XFFHVVRU 7UXVWHH RI WKH &KDUOHV)(FNHO'HFODUDWLRQRI7UXVWGDWHG  8QNQRZQ2ZQHUVDQG1RQUHFRUG&ODLPDQWV 7KDWWKLVFDVHKDVEHHQFRPPHQFHGLQWKLV Court against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described DVIROORZVWRZLW 7+$73$572)/27,17+(0$3/(6$7 7+(621$7$63/$11(''(9(/230(17 %(,1* $ 5(68%',9,6,21 2) /276        $1'  ,1 7+( 621$7$6 3/$11(' '(9(/230(17 %(,1* $ 68%',9,6,21 2)7+(:(67+$/)2)7+(6287+:(67 48$57(5 2) 6(&7,21  $1' 7+( 6287+($6748$57(52)6(&7,21 72:16+,3  1257+ 5$1*(  ($67

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,17+(&,5&8,7&2857)257+( 7:(17<6(&21'-8',&,$/&,5&8,7 0&+(15<&2817<,//,12,6 86%$1.1$$675867(()25:$08 6 3ODLQWLII Y 6$1'<.$//,&.6+(55,,.$//,&. :(//6)$5*2),1$1&,$/,//,12,6,1& 'HIHQGDQW &+ 127,&( 2) 6$/( 38%/,& 127,&( ,6 +(5(%< *,9(1 WKDW SXUVXDQW WR D -XGJPHQWRI)RUHFORVXUHDQG6DOHHQWHUHG LQWKHDERYHFDXVHRQ$XJXVWDQ DJHQW IRU 7KH -XGLFLDO 6DOHV &RUSRUDWLRQ ZLOO DW  30 RQ 1RYHPEHU   DW WKH1/77LWOH//&&RQJUHVV3DUNZD\ 6XLWH ' &U\VWDO /DNH ,/  VHOO DW public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: /RW  LQ 3LQH 5LGJH 6XEGLYLVLRQ 8QLW 1R  EHLQJ D SDUW RI WKH 1RUWKHDVW 4XDUWHU RI 6HFWLRQ  7RZQVKLS  1RUWK 5DQJH  (DVW RI WKH 7KLUG 3ULQFLSDO 0HULGLDQ DQG SDUW RI WKH 1RUWKZHVW 4XDUWHU RI 6HFWLRQ 7RZQVKLS1RUWK5DQJH(DVWRIWKH 7KLUG 3ULQFLSDO 0HULGLDQ DFFRUGLQJ WR WKH

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24

Oct. 16-22, 2013

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, WOODSTOCK, ILLINOIS DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE RESIDENTIAL ASSET SECURITIZATION TRUST 2005-A8CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-H UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2005, Plaintiff, vs. LAURETTE DELLINGER, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE LAURETTE M. DELLINGER DECLARATION OF TRUST DATED DECEMBER 4, 1995 AND KNOWN AS TRUST AGREEMENT NO. 250, NATIONAL CITY BANK, Defendants, 11 CH 1739 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on January 9, 2013 Intercounty Judicial Sales Corporation will on Thursday, November 14, DWWKHKRXURIDPLQWKHRIĂ&#x20AC;FHVRI Botto Gilbert Gehris Lancaster, 970 McHenry Avenue, Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described mortgaged real estate: P.I.N. 13-07-177-057. Commonly known as 780 Tara Drive, Woodstock, IL 60098. The mortgaged real estate is improved with a single family residence. If the subject mortgaged real estate is a unit of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Condominium Property $FW   6DOH WHUPV  GRZQ E\ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV EDODQFH E\ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV ZLWKLQ  hours. No refunds. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are DGPRQLVKHGWRFKHFNWKHFRXUWĂ&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOO information. )RULQIRUPDWLRQFDOO6DOHV&OHUNDW/DZ2IĂ&#x20AC;FHV of Ira T. Nevel, 175 North Franklin Street, Chicago, Illinois 60606. (312) 357-1125. INTERCOUNTY JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION 6HOOLQJ2IĂ&#x20AC;FHU   I565230 (Published in The Woodstock Independent October 9, 2013, October 16, 2013) L8838 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, -v.GARY J. RITTER, et al Defendant 12 CH 2564 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment

PUBLIC NOTICES

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on November 14, 2013, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 518 BURBANK AVENUE, Woodstock, IL 60098 Property Index No. 13-08-329-019. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $69,848.34. Sale terms: GRZQRIWKHKLJKHVWELGE\FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HGIXQGV at the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by WKHSXUFKDVHUQRWWRH[FHHGLQFHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG funds/or wire transfer, is due within twentyfour (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to FRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOO of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHRI6DOHWKDWZLOOHQWLWOHWKHSXUFKDVHU WRDGHHGWRWKHUHDOHVWDWHDIWHUFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQ of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court Ă&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOOLQIRUPDWLRQ,IWKLVSURSHUW\LVD condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For LQIRUPDWLRQ FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII¡V DWWRUQH\ HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD., 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105, CHICAGO, IL 60603, (312) 372-2020. Please UHIHU WR Ă&#x20AC;OH QXPEHU  7+( JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also

visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HAUSELMAN, RAPPIN & OLSWANG, LTD. 39 South LaSalle Street - Suite 1105 CHICAGO, IL 60603 (312) 372-2020 Attorney File No. 12-2222-20977 Case Number: 12 CH 2564 TJSC#: 33-20889 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are DGYLVHGWKDW3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\LVGHHPHGWREH a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I565999 (Published in The Woodstock Independent October 16, 2013) L8843 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, -v.KATHY L. MULLEN, et al Defendant 13 CH 00621 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on July 2, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on November 13, 2013, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 927 WHEELER STREET, WOODSTOCK, IL 60098 Property Index No. 13-05-111-010. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: 25% GRZQ RI WKH KLJKHVW ELG E\ FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG IXQGV DW the close of the sale payable to The Judicial Sales Corporation. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by WKHSXUFKDVHUQRWWRH[FHHGLQFHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HG funds/or wire transfer, is due within twentyfour (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to FRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOO of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHRI6DOHWKDWZLOOHQWLWOHWKHSXUFKDVHU WRDGHHGWRWKHUHDOHVWDWHDIWHUFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQ of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court

Ă&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOOLQIRUPDWLRQ,IWKLVSURSHUW\LVD condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For LQIRUPDWLRQ H[DPLQH WKH FRXUW Ă&#x20AC;OH RU FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\&2',/,6 $662&,$7(6 P.C., 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100, BURR RIDGE, IL 60527, (630) 7943OHDVHUHIHUWRĂ&#x20AC;OHQXPEHU THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www. tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 15W030 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD, SUITE 100 BURR RIDGE, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 Attorney File No. 14-12-35712 Attorney ARDC No. 00468002 Case Number: 13 CH 00621 TJSC#: 33-15826 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised WKDW3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\LVGHHPHGWREHDGHEW collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I566654 (Published in The Woodstock Independent October 16, 2013) L8847 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY- SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT MC HENRY COUNTY, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU 2003-S4 Plaintiff, -v.SANDY KALLICK, SHERRI I. KALLICK, WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL ILLINOIS, INC. Defendant 09 CH 1574 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 12, 2013, an agent for The Judicial Sales Corporation, will at 1:00 PM on November 13, 2013, at the NLT Title L.L.C, 390 Congress Parkway, Suite D, Crystal Lake, IL, 60014, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 7920 Swarthmore, Woodstock, IL 60098 Property Index No. 1406-101-003. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $601,051.83. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned

Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not WRH[FHHGVKDOOEHSDLGLQFHUWLĂ&#x20AC;HGIXQGV immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;? condition. The sale is further subject to FRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQE\WKHFRXUW8SRQSD\PHQWLQIXOO of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a &HUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWHRI6DOHWKDWZLOOHQWLWOHWKHSXUFKDVHU WRDGHHGWRWKHUHDOHVWDWHDIWHUFRQĂ&#x20AC;UPDWLRQ of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court Ă&#x20AC;OHWRYHULI\DOOLQIRUPDWLRQ,IWKLVSURSHUW\LVD condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For LQIRUPDWLRQ FRQWDFW 3ODLQWLII¡V DWWRUQH\ HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC, 111 East Main Street, DECATUR, IL 62523, (217) 422-1719. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the 0RUWJDJHH¡V DWWRUQH\7+( -8',&,$/ 6$/(6 CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. HEAVNER, SCOTT, BEYERS & MIHLAR, LLC 111 East Main Street DECATUR, IL 62523 (217) 422-1719 Case Number: 09 CH 1574 TJSC#: 33-22503 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices $FW\RXDUHDGYLVHGWKDW3ODLQWLII¡VDWWRUQH\LV deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I567038 (Published in The Woodstock Independent October 16, 2013) L8852


SPORTS Âť GOLF

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Oct. 16-22, 2013

25

IHSA REGIONAL TOURNAMENTS

Local golfers head to regional tournaments By JAY SCHULZ The Independent Woodstock area high school golfers competed in IHSA regional tournaments starting Oct. 8 with varied levels of success. Marian Central e Marian Central Catholic High School boys golf team ďŹ nished second with 326 Oct. 8 in the Grayslake Central Class 2A regional tournament at Renwood Golf Course, Round Lake Beach. Senior Ben Schnepf shot 75, senior TJ Wancket shot 79, senior Owen Rost shot 85, senior Noah Radwanski shot 87, senior Matt VanHerzeele shot 88 and junior Kyler Hardie shot 89. Radwonski, who usually leads the team in scoring, had an off day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think Noah felt a lot of pressure because he had been our No. 1 scorer for most of our matches,â&#x20AC;? Marian head coach Erin Carver said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a senior. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a captain. Fortunately, the team carried him. atâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sign of a good team when you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to always rely on one person to lead the way. Ben and TJ really showed up.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play well at [the SCC conference tournament], so I was kind of worried,â&#x20AC;? Carver said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not surprised they qualiďŹ ed, but I am. After the way they played over the weekend, I was worried.â&#x20AC;? e Hurricanes played Oct. 14 at the sectional tournament at Park Hills Golf Course, Freeport. Radwanski said the competition at the sectional tournament will not be easy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be tough-especially with a couple of schools from 3A going down to 2A,â&#x20AC;? Radwanski said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have some tough competition this year, but I think, if we play well, we should be able to advance to state. If we have a couple of scores in the low 70s, I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be ďŹ ne.â&#x20AC;? Radwanski played the course his freshman year during the sectional

tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember it slightly,â&#x20AC;? Radwanski said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ere are a lot of blind shots that you have to make where you have to trust your instincts, but, other than that, it is pretty straight forward. Overall, you can score pretty well out there.â&#x20AC;? Schnepf said the team needs to play with the same mindset as at the regional tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just need to try and get in the same frame of mind as last week,â&#x20AC;? Schnepf said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go in, relax, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about too much and just play golf.â&#x20AC;? e Marian Central girls golf team ďŹ nished ďŹ fth with 405 Oct. 9 in the Crystal Lake Class 2A regional tournament at Prairie Isle Golf Course, Crystal Lake. Freshman Sophia Archos shot 89, junior Kenzie Macogni shot 101 and junior Emily Johnson shot 105 to qualify for the sectional tournament Oct. 14 at Ingersoll Golf Course, Rockford. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought it went quite well,â&#x20AC;? said Marian head coach Paula Watson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got three girls through, and I was very pleased with that. I thought the cutoff scores were a little high compared to other regional but it worked.â&#x20AC;? Watson praised her players coursemanagement abilities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each girl has her own strengths and weaknesses,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ey are all pretty intelligent golfers in terms of looking at a course and thinking through a hole, having a strategy and assessing the relative beneďŹ ts. ey are pretty good at thinking things through and applying course management.â&#x20AC;? e girls were able to get a practice round at the golf course, and Watson said her players need to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Observe what you learned from the practice round, relax, get sleep, catch up on their homework and be ready to go.â&#x20AC;? Woodstock co-op e Woodstock co-op golf team hosted the Class 3A regional tournament Oct. 8 at Plum Tree National Golf Club. e Woodstock team ďŹ nished seventh out of 10 teams with 372. Woodstock

High School senior Alex Ferguson shot 79 to qualify for the sectional tournament Oct. 14 at Blackstone Golf Club, Marengo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It went really well,â&#x20AC;? Wise said of the tournament at Plum Tree National Golf Club. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a lot of great volunteers, and it was really a positive experience.â&#x20AC;? Wise said Ferguson left some shots on the course but played well overall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He played well,â&#x20AC;? Wise said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ere were some opportunities missed, as there are with everyone, but it was a good round for him.â&#x20AC;? Woodstock North High School freshman Daniela Miranda shot 104 Oct. 9 in the Westminster Christian Class A region-

al tournament at the Golf Club of Illinois, Algonquin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Daniella played just a little bit better than her stroke average,â&#x20AC;? Wise said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we got there, we felt it was doable. â&#x20AC;Ś Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited for her. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big deal to move on in the state series.â&#x20AC;? Miranda shot 103 Oct. 12 in the sectional tournament at Park Hills Golf Course, Freeport, and failed to qualify for the state tournament. Kirstin Bell in 2003 was the last girls golfer from WHS to qualify for a sectional tournament. See the Oct. 23 issue of e Woodstock Independent for sectional results.

        

IN BRIEF

WNHS to host tumbling clinic The Woodstock North High School cheerleading team and Layton Athletics will host a tumbling clinic from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, at the WNHS cafeteria, 3000 Raffel Road. The clinic is for students in ďŹ rst through eighth grades. Cost is $12 per person. Required attire is gym shorts, T-shirt and clean gym shoes. Payment and registration forms are due by Oct. 22. For information, email kďŹ rkus@ wcusd200.org.

Kremske Continued from Page 28 Kremske said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;e last ďŹ ve K was really tough, and I had to grit it out mentally to bring it home.â&#x20AC;? He said he is glad the race is over and he can rest up as he has no big races in the near future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Immediately after the race, my body was completed depleted of energy and nutrients,â&#x20AC;? Kremske said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today, I am a little sore obviously. â&#x20AC;Ś Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to try and relax these muscles. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad I can still walk.â&#x20AC;? Kremske said he plans to race in the USA half marathon Jan. 19 in Houston.

Saturday, October 19th

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26

Oct. 16-22, 2013

Âť FOOTBALL

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

*-, Ă&#x160;{nĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;7-Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;

Hampshire blows by Streaks By JAY SCHULZ The Independent e Woodstock High School football team was looking to play spoiler against the Whip-Purs from Hampshire High School Oct. 11. Hampshire, which entered the game 4-2 and is looking for its ďŹ rst playoff appearance in more than 15 years, made it obvious from its ďŹ rst offensive play it was not messing around. e Whip-Purs connected on a 63-yard touchdown pass from Nick Mohlman to Tim Jansen to take the lead they would never surrender as they defeated the Blue Streaks 48-7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes when you get in a game like this you want to say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hey, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and they executed that pass very well and that set the tone for the whole game,â&#x20AC;? said WHS head coach Steve Beard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hampshire came in tonight, and you could tell they want to go 6-3 on the season if not 7-2 if they can upset CaryGrove in week nine. ey came out and performed very well.â&#x20AC;? e Whip-Purs added a 3-yard touchdown run to extend the lead to 14-0. On the Streaksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; next possession, it looked as if they would make it a game. Junior quarterback Jace Pohlman completed a 45-yard

Blue Streak Preston Tio dives to tackle a Whip-Pur ball carrier Oct. 11. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY ALISA ELLEGOOD

pass to senior Jordan Sumner, giving the Streaks a ďŹ rst down on the Whip-Purs 15. On the next play, however, the Whip-Purs tipped Pohlmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pass and intercepted it. Hampshireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bruising senior running back Nick Kielbasa broke a 51-yard touchdown run to make the score 21-0. e Streaks ďŹ nally got a ground game

going and drove down the ďŹ eld behind junior Alex Shannon who scored the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only touchdown â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a 26-yard run with six minutes to go in the ďŹ rst half. However, Jansen struck again and returned the ensuing kickoff 84 yards for a touchdown making the score 28-7 at halftime. Kielbasa added two long touchdown

runs in the second half (35 and 20), and the Streaks were unable to generate any offense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play to our full potential,â&#x20AC;? Shannon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had some big mistakes early in the game. Personally, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think they are a much better team than us. ey just came to play, and we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.â&#x20AC;? e Streaks struggled without senior quarterback Alan Hafer who is out for the season after having surgery on his thumb. Pohlman, who was under constant pressure, ďŹ nished 16 for 37 for 131 yards and four interceptions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just him,â&#x20AC;? Beard said of Pohlman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got all day to throw back there. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a team game. We have to pass block a little better; we have to run block a little better to open up the running game; and, then, when we do complete a pass, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to break a tackle here or there.â&#x20AC;? e Streaks (1-6) play at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, at Crystal Lake Central (6-1). Shannon said he is hoping the team can end the season on a positive note. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to try and get a couple more wins,â&#x20AC;? Shannon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Crystal Lake Central] is a great team, but I think we can beat them if we come out and play hard and play to our full potential. We just need to practice to our full potential this week.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just said [Hampshire] looked like a team that hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been to the playoffs in a while and were really hungry tonight, and they came ready to play,â&#x20AC;? Beard said.

FOAT MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT RAISES MORE THAN $5,000 We have Indian Corn too!

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Team Nick Foat was one of seven teams that participated in the Chris Foat Memorial Flag Football Tournament Sept. 28. Joe Foat, pictured in the back row second from left, and Nick Foat, pictured in the back row fourth from leftâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;, are the younger brothers of the late Chris Foat. The event raised $5,500 for wrestling scholarships at Woodstock High School. COURTESY PHOTO

Marian

Continued from Page 28

like Montini,â&#x20AC;? said Marian head coach Ed Brucker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are hoping that we

get another chance at them in the playoffs. We like to think that we are good enough to beat anyone if we play our best. I was very proud of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort Friday night. If we play that hard the rest of the season, we will do well in the playoffs.â&#x20AC;? On offense, senior Chris Daniels added two carries for seven yards and one reception for two yards. Bahl also connected with seniors Brett Olson (6-80), Tanner Spoden (2-23) and Tom Klinger (2-13), and junior Matt Ricchiuto (1-6). The Hurricanes host St. Edward (5-2, 0-1) for their final SCC-Blue Division game at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18.


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

» FOOTBALL

Oct. 16-22, 2013

SCOREBOARD

Ê /,Ê{ÈÊUÊ7 -ÊÎÎ

CL Central outlasts Thunder By JASON LEARMAN The Independent Woodstock North High School football coach Jeff Schroeder has become resigned to the fact that the 2013 season will be a rebuilding one for his young team. What he had been looking for, amidst the under’s 1-5 start, are things he can build on. On Oct. 11, the under hosted Fox Valley Fox rival Crystal Lake Central High School and its 5-1 record. Despite losing to the Tigers 46-33 and falling to 1-6 (1-3 FVC Fox), Schroeder saw something in his young team he can work with. North stood toe-to-toe with a much bigger team, physically and in roster-size, took a solid punch on the chin and never once backed down. “We didn’t back off,” said Schroeder. “Our kids refused to be intimidated. When you’re not winning, you’ve got to be able to see the improvement.” Schroeder compared the Crystal Lake Central matchup to the under’s game earlier this season with Lakes High School, where they faced an equally physical opponent. In that game, a 45-14 loss, North appeared to back down when challenged by the physically dominant opponent. “Lakes: we were never in that game,” said Schroeder. “But we really battled

27

Crystal Lake Central.” North managed to stay with the Tigers early in the game, with junior fullback Jordan Plummer’s 47-yard touchdown run, bringing the under to within 13-10 with only 3:56 left in the first half. Central was able to strike quickly twice before the half though, taking a 27-10 lead into the intermission. Plummer was one of the stars of the night for the under, carrying the ball 14 times for 102 yards, and scoring twice. Since taking over the starting role three games into the season, Plummer has been a bright spot. Another important building block for North is junior quarterback Jimmy Krenger, who completed five of his 13 passes for 88 yards against Crystal Lake Central, including a 25-yard touchdown to senior Alex Mitchell. Krenger also completed a pass for a two-point conversion. “We threw the ball pretty well,” said Schroeder. “When he did hit, he hit it big.” Woodstock North will play next at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, at Grayslake Central High School. e Rams enter the contest with a 3-4 record (1-3 FVC Fox) and are equally motivated to win for a rebuilding program. “We’re obviously trying to win these last two games,” said Schroeder. “But we’re trying to, if we don’t win, play off positives.

The Thunder’s Andrew Wood picks up a blocked punt against Crystal Lake Central Oct. 11. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY MICHELLE KRENGER

“We’ve got a lot of young guys that are really developing. It reminds me a lot of 2010 when we had a lot of young guys playing. We didn’t have a great record but knew that we were developing a lot of experience and the opportunity to bring a strong team back next year.”

A HANDS-ON EFFORT

Woodstock North’s Rhetta Bates, foreground, performs in the Pink Glove performance with dance, cheer and other students during halftime of the Thunder’s game against Crystal Lake Central Oct. 11. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY MICHELLE KRENGER

RACE TO THE FINISH

GAME OF THE WEEK Woodstock High School vs. Woodstock North High School (volleyball) – 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, at WHS. Creekside Middle School student Adam Thomas runs in the middle school crosscountry conference meet Oct. 14 at Emricson Park. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY ALISA ELLEGOOD

What to look for: The Blue Streaks will host the Thunder on “Block Out Cancer!” night. The Streaks will be looking for revenge against the Thunder, who beat them earlier in the season.

MARIAN Boys soccer Q Oct. 12: MC 1, Wheaton Academy 2 Girls volleyball Q Oct. 12: Marian Central finished 3rd in the Huntley Invite. MC 2, Joliet Central 0 (25-13, 25-12); MC, 2, Glenbard North 0 (25-17, 26-24); MC 2, Westminster Christian (25-21, 25-15); MC 1, Huntley 2 (24-26, 25-19, 27-29); and MC 2, St. Ignatius 1 (24-16, 25-15, 25-18). Q Oct. 9: MC 0, Chicago Christian 2 (20-25, 22-25) For MC, Morgan Radcliffe had 5 kills and Alex Kaufmann had 14 assists and 3 aces. WOODSTOCK Boys soccer Q Oct. 10: WHS 1, WNHS 5 Q Oct. 8: WHS 2, Hampshire 1 For WHS, Enrique Leyva and Will Maidment each scored a goal. Girls tennis Q Oct. 12: WHS finished 9th in the FVC tournament. For WHS, Ana Fedmasu placed 3rd in singles. Girls volleyball Q Oct. 12: WHS finished 6th in the Grayslake North Tournament. WHS 0, Wauconda 2 (3-25, 2025); WHS 0, Mundelein (20-25, 14-25); WHS 0, Warren 2 (2025, 19-25); WHS 2, Waukegan 0 (25-18, 25-15); and WHS 1, Wauconda 2 (15-25, 25-14, 7-15). WOODSTOCK NORTH Boys cross-country Q Oct. 8: WNHS 25, Hampshire 31; WNHS 29, Grayslake North 26 Boys soccer Q Oct. 12: WNHS 8, Richmond Burton 0 For WNHS, Aaron Jones scored 3 goals, Chris Niese scored 2 goals, and Julio Campos, Luis Balleno and Victor Ortiz had one goal each. Girls cross-country Q Oct. 8: WNHS 34, Grayslake North 22; WNHS 38, Hampshire 23 Girls tennis Q Oct. 12: WNHS placed 12th in the FVC Tournament with 47 points. Q Oct. 7: WNHS 6, Round Lake 1 For WNHS, Sierra Meiners won No. 1 singles 6-3, 6-2; Cally Maire won No. 2 singles 6-3, 6-4, Sadie LeFever won No. 3 singles 6-4, 3-6, 10-7; Anna Gabrielson and Laura Nicks won No. 2 doubles 6-1, 6-0; Madison Wirfs and Kelsey Parlogean won No. 3 doubles 6-2, 6-0; and Alex Glod and Danielle Hurmis won No. 4 doubles 6-0, 6-0. Girls volleyball Q Oct. 10: WNHS 0, Johnsburg 2 (12-25, 26-28) For WNHS, Sam Abbate had 3 kills and 15 digs, and Sam Major had 14 assists and 1 ace. Q Oct. 8: WNHS 0, Grayslake Central 2 (8-25, 10-25) For WNHS, Casey Gavers had 8 digs. CO-OP Girls swimming Q Oct. 10: Co-op 59, Jacobs 99 For Woodstock, Tess Devinger took first place in the 200 yard IM with a time of 2:19.92.


28

Oct. 16-22, 2013

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Sports » FOOTBALL " / Ê{äÊUÊ, ÊÎx

Marian loses shootout to Montini By MEGAN IVERS The Independent

half marathon and finished second with a time of 1:05.39. He had been training for the marathon and had projected his time to be around 2:18. He was hoping to get under that time. Kremske said he felt good until he got to mile 20. “I got to mile 20 and my body started to change,”

The Marian Central Catholic High School Hurricanes lost 40-35 in a shootout to their conference rival the Montini Broncos Oct. 11. Marian (5-2 overall; 3-2 Suburban Christian Conference Blue Division) immediately scored on its first possession with a well-calculated drive that put senior running back Ephraim Lee (26-98 rushing; 7-44 receiving) in place for a 3-yard touchdown run. “We really wanted to come out hard and execute our plays,” said junior quarterback Billy Bahl. “Against a team like Montini, you can’t go three-and-out, and we did that a few times.” Needing more offense and defense put the Hurricanes in a tough position at the half with Montini (70, 3-0) already posting four touchdowns. The Hurricanes managed to keep the Broncos at bay, most notably with Tom Lesniewski’s block of a Bronco field goal, and a few minutes later his sack on Montini’s 13-yard line with 10 seconds left in the half. Lesniewski carried the defensive momentum into the second half. As the Broncos geared up for another offensive assault with 10:35 left in the third quarter, Lesniewski was able to recover a fumble that led to an 83-yard touchdown drive. After two incomplete passes to bring up fourth down, Bahl (2341-293-1) narrowly avoided a sack, runing up to the line of scrimmage and completing a 15-yard touchdown pass to Jordan Niemeyer (5125). Montini answered with two touchdowns to extend the lead to 40-21 early in fourth quarter. Bahl added a 63-yard touchdown pass to Niemeyer and a 10-yard run, but the Hurricanes simply ran out of time. The final score marked only the second time the Broncos hit the 40-point mark this season. The Broncos also have given up only an average of nine points per game, indicating the Hurricanes provided a true test of their ability to have another successful run in the postseason. “The offense played very well while the defense played hard but made some mistakes. You can’t make mistakes against a good team

Please see Kremske, Page 25

Please see Marian, Page 26

The Thunder’s Alejandro Miranda lunges for the ball Oct. 10. Blue Streaks Jose Gonzalez, left, and Andy Dominguez defend. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

» SOCCER

7 -ÊxÊUÊ7-Ê£

Thunder smash rival Streaks By JAY SCHULZ The Independent e under boys soccer team celebrated senior night in dominating fashion, defeating crosstown rivals 5-1 Oct. 10. “It was their senior night, and they had a lot of energy,” Woodstock High School head coach Mike Golda said of the under. “ey played very aggressively, and they played very well.” “I think they played really well,” said Woodstock North High School head coach Lauren Farley. “ey had been working on playing with intensity for the entire game because they had struggled with that in previous weeks. ey were able to pull it together and not let the rivalry get the best of them in the game. ey didn’t go crazy about it, which I had stressed. It was no more important than any other conference game.” e under were led by junior Josh Jandron, who scored two goals. ey also had goals from seniors Ryan Allori and Aaron Jones and junior Luis Balleno. Matt Shook scored the lone goal for the

Streaks. e game was close in the first half, with the Streaks almost able to seize momentum. “I think the turning point in that game they had a 2-1 lead, and we had a breakaway and a couple of close in opportunities and couldn’t finish,” Golda said. “ey came down and got a third. Julio Arias took a shot from 25 yards and hit the crossbar and [the ball] bounced around, and Matt Shook just missed it, and Ricky [Rodriguez, WNHS] made a great save. … At that point, North really grabbed the momentum and finished it off.” Farley said her team has made progress over the past week and said teamwork has been the key. “One hundred percent, they’ve realized they are more successful when they play as a team. And when they are not playing as if they are the only guy on the field anymore. And there were a few games earlier in the season that way,” Farley said. e past week, they are playing as a team and that makes a huge difference.” e under are now 10-10-1 with two

games remaining in the season. Farley said her players will continue to do what has made them successful. “Our focus is still going to be working and moving the ball together as a unit,” Farley said. e Blue Streaks are 6-11-1. Golda said his team is looking for a bit of revenge against its cross-town rival Wednesday, Oct. 23, at the IHSA Class 3A regional tournament at Marian Central. “We look forward to the rematch against North,” Golda said. “We know we can play better, compete better against them. I think we just let it get away from us, and I think boys are excited about the chance to show they can play better than that.” Golda noted that the Blue Streaks and the under have played each other three years in a row in the regional tournament, with the Streaks winning the first two games and the under winning last year. “North outplayed us,” Golda said. “We’ll see them again in regionals, and we have to be better prepared for that matchup.”

Kremske takes 25th at Chicago Marathon By JAY SCHULZ The Independent Woodstock North High School cross-country coach Dan Kremske, a 2007 graduate of Woodstock High School, competed Oct. 13 in the Chicago Marathon, his first full

marathon. Kremske finished 25th overall, 10th among American runners, with a time of 2 hours, 18.52 minutes. Kremske, who has had great success running half marathons the last few years, said the experience was great. “e whole experience was

a success going out and competing with some of the best guys in the world,” Kremske said. “To have family and friends and some of the kids from [the WNHS team] cheering me on was special.” Kremske last completed Sept. 22 in the Quad Cities

GOLF

FOOTBALL

SCOREBOARD

High school golfers take part in regional tourneys

Hampshire defeats WHS 48-7

Scores, stats and highlights from area teams

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The Woodstock Independent October 16th, 2013  
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