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Jan. 8-14, 2014 Jan. 8-14, 20141

Woodstock

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

I NDEPENDENT The

Published every Wednesday

Est. 1987

Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill.

www.thewoodstockindependent.com

$1.00

EDUCATION

ENTERTAINMENT

MARKETPLACE

Crystal Squires teaches American Sign Language to Woodstock kids

Stew Cohen publishes WYEN book

Longtime Woodstock real estate business sold

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WEATHER WATCH

TAKING FLIGHT Local business helps Challenger’s flight simulator off the ground

‘A-salt’ on Woodstock Nearly 4 million pounds of salt used to battle icy roads By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

College students Josh Thibaudeau, left, and Eric Becnel visit friends at the Challenger Learning Center and test out the Boeing 737 simulator. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

New aviation programs nearly ready for takeoff at Challenger By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent From the cockpit of the Boeing

737, aspiring aviators will soon be able to soar through clouds and over cities, looking down at tiny cars and squares of land all from a stationary simulator at the Challenger Learning Center for Science & Technology, 222 E. Church St. With the help of WavTek, a local information technology business at 113 Van Buren St., Challenger Center Executive Director Chantel Madson said she hopes to eventually incorporate the airplane simulator to provide a new merit badge experience for Boy Scouts and an aviation education program to the public.

Last first baby born in Woodstock? By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

INDEX

In the culminating minutes of the first

day of the new year, Jacob Michael was born at 11:57 p.m. at Centegra HospitalWoodstock to Catherine Bigsby and Jeremy Anderson – the hospital’s last

OBITUARIES

4

COMMUNITY

15

OBITUARIES

OPINION

5

CALENDAR

18

EDUCATION

7

CLASSIFIEDS

19

8

PUBLIC NOTICES

21

SPORTS

24

Michael A. Hansen, Greenwood Barbara A. Salins, Wonder Lake Jesse S. Pilcher, Woodstock Dorothy Jean Alejandro, Woodstock Tom A. Joorfetz, Woodstock

A&E MARKETPLACE

10

“We have the opportunity for future programs for the community because of the help of a local business,” Madson said. “ey believe in our mission and they understand how many children we see every day and every year.” Madson said the Challenger averages about 8,500 children each year, and has served more than 100,000 children since its opening in May 2001. She said when she joined the crew in 2008, it had been her goal to get the simulator – which had been Please see Flight simulator, Page 2

First baby of 2014 could be city’s last New Year’s birth as hospital plans to close maternity ward planned, first-of-the-year delivery. Centegra’s Public Relations Manager Please see Baby, Page 2

END QUOTE “No one is joining clubs anymore.” — Henry Connor, Page 15

With 20 winter storm events this past December alone, Woodstock Public Works has battled constant low temperatures, snow and sleet – causing icy roads – with 1,900 tons of salt. Public Works Director Paul Ruscko said $190,000 was budgeted this year for purchasing salt, which is used to cover about 250 lane miles of roadway throughout the city. Currently, the contract Public Works has with its salt vendor allows the department to purchase 3,000 tons of salt for $54.67 per ton, but the department can purchase an additional 600 tons at the same guaranteed rate if needed. Ruscko said the city has 700 tons of salt left at this point and has its final 1,000 tons of 3,000 on order. Last December, Public Works responded to only two winter storm events and used a total of 300 tons of salt. “e way we are going, I would not be surprised that we would buy all 3,600 tons of salt, which will then put us just under $7,000 over our budget, Ruscko said. “We’re going to conserve and try not to get to that point.” Public Works handles snow removal only within city limits but not including major highways. Highway 14 and routes 47 and 120 are plowed and maintained by the Illinois Department of Transportation. Other Woodstock roads are maintained by the townships. Ruscko said several winter storm events use a significantly greater amount of salt than a few large storm events. For snow removal and salting, Public Works has 11 fully outfitted snowplow salt dump trucks, six snowplow pickup trucks and up to an eight-person crew for downtown salting and shoveling. Please see Snow, Page 2

The Woodstock Independent 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 www.thewoodstockindependent.com


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Jan. 8-14, 2014

We know how you feel! Next week’s Independent will be 1 day late. Eight times a year we send The Woodstock Independent to every household in Woodstock, Bull Valley and the west side of Wonder Lake ... over 16,000 homes. Because of this large volume, the post office delays our delivery by one day. We thank you for your patience while we grow your newspaper. That should make everyone smile!

Woodstock

The 1/15/14 issue of The Woodstock Independent will be delivered 1/16/14.

I NDEPENDENT The

Dennis AAnderson, d CFP® Jenny Murray, M AAMS® Branch Manager Assistant Branch Manager Senior Vice President Senior Registered – Investments Financial Associate

The Reilly Team

BBrian RReilly ll Senior Vice President – Investments

NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

David D id RReilly ill Financial Consultant

The Wormley Team

James Wormley, W l CFP® Senior Vice President – Investments

Matt Wormley M W l Financial Consultant

Ryan Wormley, W l AAMS® Senior Vice President – Investments

SSandy d PPeterson Senior Registered Financial Associate

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Proudly serving all investors in the McHenry County area. Stop by or give us a call.

Benjamin F. Edwards & Co. 11621 Catalpa Lane, Woodstock, Illinois 60098 Phone: 815-337-4485 Toll Free: 855-337-4485

benjaminfedwards.com 2013-1473 Exp. 9/30/2015 Member SIPC

Flight simulator

Continued from Page 1

broken since 2006 – up and running data, real-time audio and data from again. the airfields and real-time traffic Madson said once all the bugs from the control towers where the are worked out, Challenger staff simulator is flying. e craft will will be trained to operate the flight read altitude, speed, navigation simulator with volunteer Pete Helms, and several other factors like a real a Woodstock resident and American aircraft would. Airlines pilot. She said she is working “You can actually fly over your own with WavTek to develop certain house,” Gariepy said. “You can fly missions the through the new program skyscrapers will offer, in Chicago. which might … It’s all 3-D incorporate a rendered, so flight from the if you’re up International in the clouds, Space Station you see clouds. back to Earth, You can see combining cars on the C h a l l e n g e r ’s ground. It’s space theme pretty cool.” — Paul Gariepy, WavTek systems engineer with aviation. G a r i e p y Madson said said WavTek the donated simulator is not actually brought in some pilots to look at the a 737 but a combination of various system. ey determined the controls airplane control systems. WavTek mostly resembled those of an Airbus systems engineer Paul Gariepy said A321, and the overhead console was he thinks the simulator was used as from a Boeing 737. He said the system a demo instrument to showcase a is set for alarms and buzzers to go off variety of airplane control surfaces. when the aircraft is over speed and Gariepy said WavTek determined such, but it won’t break the airplane the simulator could be restored, but and it will continue to fly. it needed to be gutted. e software “I’m excited that the community was from 1998 and needed major is willing to help us out, and I look updating. He said the simulator has forward to when we can make the big been updated to Flight Simulator X, announcement that it’s ready to go a 2010 version with 3-D capabilities, with programs for the public to enjoy real-world terrain from Google Map and learn about aviation,” Madson said.

´<RXFDQDFWXDOO\Á\ over your own house. <RXFDQÁ\WKURXJK the skyscrapers in &KLFDJRµ

Snow

Continued from Page 1

“ese events take a whole lot of manpower to clean up after and during,” Ruskco said. Ruscko said streets division superintendent Dale Behm has worked at Public Works for 35 years and has seen the plowing procedures change radically. Behm said initially cinders were used instead of salt. After cinders, sand and then a mixture of sand and salt was spread on the roads. Now, salt with a liquid chemical blend of de-icing agents is sprinkled on the streets. Plow blades also have become more effective with hydraulic power and various materials like plastic and rubber to protect the bricks in the Square. Ruscko said Behm recalled a large, mechanically operated salt spreader that inconveniently stuck out of the

Baby

side of the truck. Ruscko said Behm told him “You definitely didn’t want to get too close to cars or anything because you had a big, metal arm sticking out.” Now, the spreaders are compact and hydraulic. As superintendent, Behm is in charge of scheduling the snow plan, routes and managing the drivers and hours. Ruscko said the hours can be very long and they are often unpredictable, but the staff is prepared, efficient and hardworking. He said almost every car in the parking lot at Public Works is some sort of truck or sport utility vehicle because of the nature of most of the jobs at the department. e plow personnel and mechanics need to be able to drive to Public Works to get through the snow and icy roads to man the plows and garage.

Continued from Page 1

Kim Kubiak said the birthing center at the Woodstock hospital would be moved to the McHenry location by summer. In a hospital that delivers about 80 babies each month, Jacob was the first baby born in the county and the only born New Year’s Day at the Woodstock hospital. After passing the Dec. 31 due date, Bigsby wasn’t expecting to head to the hospital the following morning after a snowstorm … or slide into a ditch. “When I went over, I figured it would be another week before I had him,” Bigsby said. But when contractions began at 8 a.m. Jan. 1, and she and Anderson headed from McHenry to the hospital, their car slid into a ditch. “We ended up getting stuck in a ditch for a half hour,” Anderson said. “We almost hit a telephone pole,” Bigsby said. “We had to get towed out and everything. And I’m sitting there contracting. … I thought, maybe I was going to have him in the tow truck.”

Jacob Michael But Jacob held out almost all day, arriving just before midnight at 7 pounds, 14 ounces, and measuring 19 inches long. “It’s exciting,” Bigsby said. “I mean, honestly. Come in with a bang, right? End up in a ditch and be the first one of the year.”


NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Jan. 8-14, 2014

3

WE PASSED ‘COLD’ ABOUT 20 DEGREES AGO

Left: A row of mailboxes is packed with snow and ice the morning of Jan. 6, when temperatures in Woodstock dropped to about 20 degrees below zero and wind chills made it feel closer to 40 or 50 below zero, creating conditions the National Weather Service called “dangerously cold and potentially life-threatening.” Schools in Woodstock and the Woodstock Public Library were closed, and garbage pickup was even delayed as a result of the brutally cold weather. Above: Collins Road is closed due to dangerous driving conditions Jan. 6. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Police arrest man accused of October robbery attempt in WL A 25-year-old Wisconsin man was arrested in late December in connection with an attempted robbery in October at Sunrise Food and Liquor, 5313 E. Wonder Lake Road. Prosecutors charged Jeremy E. Caccamo, 25, 138 Sharon St., Darien, Wis., with attempted aggravated robbery, a class 2 felony, following an investigation into a robbery attempt that occurred Oct. 4. During the October incident at Sunrise Food and Liquor, police allege Caccamo entered the store and demanded money from an employee before eventually leaving on foot without any money or goods. Following the incident, police released a description of the suspect as well as surveillance footage. Officials said several people contacted the police with information pertaining to the attempted robbery. Caccamo’s bond was set at $50,000. His court date was set for Jan. 3. — Katelyn Stanek, The Independent

STREET SMARTS With high wind speeds, be cautious of snow drifting. Snow drifts and snow drifting can be more dangerous to drivers than snowfall because irregular buildups on the shoulders of roads can cause cars to swerve unexpectedly and drifting snow can make it difficult for drivers to follow lane lines. Drive slowly.

Average gas price

$3.42

/GAL.

0.02

Reflects average price of regular unleaded gasoline at Woodstock gas stations the morning of Jan. 6.

Pedestrian hit, killed by Metra train A 34-year-old Woodstock man was struck and killed by an eastbound commuter train Dec. 30 while crossing the railroad tracks on foot. eodis R. Williams was at a railroad crossing at Short Street when

he was hit by a Metra train traveling on the inbound tracks. According to a statement from the Woodstock Police Department, Williams was walking northbound across the tracks when he was killed. Police said the train

engineer sounded the train’s horn and applied the emergency brake before the collision. Members of the Woodstock Police Department and the Woodstock Fire/ Rescue District responded to the scene. A Metra spokeswoman said all equipment was working as intended at the time of the incident. — Katelyn Stanek, The Independent


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Jan. 8-14, 2014

NEWS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

OBITUARIES

Michael A. Hansen

Michael A. Hansen, 64, died Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013, at his home in Greenwood. He was born March 14, 1949, in Woodstock to Clarence and Marjorie (Hutson) Hansen. A lifelong resident of Woodstock, he graduated from Woodstock High School in 1968. Immediately after graduation he joined the Army and proudly served his country during the Vietnam war. He worked for Unions 681 and 150 for 30 years, retiring in 2011. In his spare time he enjoyed fishing, hunting and the loyal companionship of his beloved Brittany spaniel, Scrappy. His greatest joy was spending time with his family and babysitting his grandchildren. Survivors include a son, Christopher (Jessie) Hansen; a daughter, Vonnie Hansen; five grandchildren, Mollie Hansen, Mariah Hansen, Connor Hansen, Kylee Hansen and Nicholas Hansen; his mother; a sister, Linda Hansen Goad; three nieces, Amy (Bill) O’Brien, Katie Krause and Carrie (Jamison) MacDonald; several aunts and cousins. He was preceded in death by his father and a brother, Dean Hansen. All arrangements were private.

Barbara A. Salins

Barbara A. Salins, 70, Wonder Lake, died Monday, Dec. 30, 2013, at Centegra Hospital - McHenry. She was born Aug. 1, 1943, in Chicago to Sam and Florence (Hobe) Sciortino. On Nov. 14, 1964, she married Jerome E. Salins in Melrose Park. Previously of Addison, she was a resident of Wonder Lake for the past 13 years. In her lifetime, she took great pride in caring for her husband, raising her children and making a comfortable home for her

family and friends. She was a wonderful cook and had the philosophy that no one left her table hungry. After celebrations, guests often were sent home with a meal to enjoy the next day. She was also well known for her beautiful Christmas cookies. The baking marathons began the weekend after Thanksgiving, and she made at least 15 different varieties of cookies. She began the tradition of a cookie bake day with her daughters and niece and continued the tradition each year to include her granddaughter and great-niece. When her husband retired, he became her sous-chef. Many family and friends were the recipients of her talents. She also was an accomplished secretary. When her children were in the later grade school years, she began working as a legal secretary in Addison where she was able to put her dictation and typing skills to use. During their retirement years, she and her husband enjoyed collecting antique American brilliant cut glass. They would travel to destinations near and far to seek out a new bell, cruet or something unusual. When traveling became more difficult, she enjoyed finding her next treasure on eBay. Over the years, beauty was gathered and displayed and a story for each was shared. Survivors include her husband; three children, Christine (Matthew) Klein, Burlington, Leslie (Richard) Wegner, Carol Stream, and Michael Salins, Hanover Park; seven grandchildren; a brother, John (Patricia) Sciortino; a niece, Angela; and a nephew, John. She was preceded in death by her parents. Visitation and service were private for the family. Memorials can be made to the American Heart Association or to the National Kidney Foundation.

Arrangements were made by Justen Funeral Home & Crematory, McHenry.

Jesse S. Pilcher

Jesse S. Pilcher, 78, died Monday, Dec. 30, 2013, at his home in Woodstock. He was born Aug. 12, 1935, in Galesburg, to Jesse and Lillian (Long) Pilcher. On March 25, 1956, he married Janet Phillippi. He loved motorcycling, good food, going to garage sales on the weekends and making peanut brittle. He enjoyed old country music and movies, and he loved his children, grandchildren and the simple things in life. Survivors include two sons, Charles Pilcher and Roger Pilcher; a daughter, Beth Ann Ramey; a sister, Clara McVay; and eight grandchildren, Diana, Jeffrey, Christina, Benjamin, Cody, Jamie, Madelyn and Annalise. He was preceded in death by his wife, his parents and a son, Jeffrey, Dec. 1, 2012. The visitation and funeral were held Jan. 5 and 6 at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home. Memorials can be made to the Colon Cancer Society.

Dorothy Jean ‘Dottie’ Alejandro

Dorothy Jean “Dottie” Alejandro, 69, died Monday, Dec. 30, 2013, at her home in Woodstock, surrounded by her loving family. She was born Sept. 13, 1944, in Shawneetown to Herman and Isabelle (Ransom) Dortch. On Sept. 17, 1963, she married Juan Alejandro in Woodstock. She was a member of St. Mary Catholic Church. She worked for a time as a real estate agent, but she also had a de-

gree in early childhood education. She loved her kids and would do anything for them. She was active as a room mother, bringing in homemade cookies and cakes when her children were in school. She also took her children and their friends anywhere they needed or wanted to go. She was an excellent cook, making everything she cooked or baked from scratch. She celebrated every holiday, but Christmas was her favorite. She also loved all animals, being outdoors and bird-watching. Survivors include her loving husband; two children, Anthony Alejandro and Melanie Alejandro; and two sisters, Helen Maynard and Rita May Stipanov. She was preceded in death by her parents and three brothers, Frank Dortch, David Dortch and infant Jamie Dortch. Visitation and funeral were held Jan. 3 at Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home. Burial was at McHenry County Memorial Park Cemetery. Memorials can be made to the family for designation at a later date.

Tom A. Joorfetz

Tom A. Joorfetz, 59, Woodstock, died Monday, Dec. 30, 2013, at JourneyCare Hospice Inpatient Unit, Woodstock. He was born May 26, 1954, to Albert E. and Alice (Thompson) Joorfetz, in Woodstock. Survivors include his parents; a brother, Terry Joorfetz; two sisters, Beth (Terry) Jones and Peggy (Matt) Shimniok; a niece, Kelley (Todd) Dvorak; and three nephews, David Hoven, Cameron Shimniok and Spencer Shimniok. A memorial gathering will be held at a later date. Arrangements are being made by Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home.

POLICE BLOTTER Q Tabatha M. Crutcher, 17608 Altenburg Road, Harvard, was charged Dec. 22 with driving while license suspended at Highway 14 and Route 47. Crutcher posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Jan. 23. Q Janeth Ramirez-Paz, 24, 510 E. Jackson St., was charged with driving under the influence, driving under the influence over, and unlawful stopping, standing or parking in a roadway in the 300 block of North Madison Street. Ramirez-Paz posted $100 and her driver’s license as bond. Court date was set for Feb. 6. Q A Woodstock area juvenile, 16, was arrested Dec. 23 for driving without a driver’s license and improper backing at Amsterdam and Washington streets. The juvenile was released to the custody of his parents on a notice to appear. Court date was set for Feb 6. Q Aaron W. Anderson, 37, 207 Fremont St., Woodstock, was charged Dec. 25 with driving while license suspended and no seat belt at South Madison Street. Anderson posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Jan. 23. Q Teresa J. Pappas, 54, 1216 N. Madison St., Woodstock, was charged Dec. 28 with driving under the influence, driving while license suspended, uninsured motor

vehicle and improper lane usage at Clay and Bagley streets. Pappas posted $300 bond. Court date was set for Jan. 30. Q Rigoberto Bernal-Rojas, 20, 102-1/2 W. Washington St., Harvard, was charged Dec. 29 with driving without a driver’s license and speeding at Highway 14 and Kishwaukee Valley Road. Bernal-Rojas posted $150 bond. Court date was set for Jan. 23. Q Natalie A. Haslinger, 27, 778 Bayberry Drive, Cary, was charged Dec. 30 with driving under the influence and driving the wrong way down a one-way street at Benton and Judd streets. Haslinger posted $100 and her driver’s license for bond. Court date was set for Feb. 6. Q Jose L. Reyes, 23, 281 Nuthatch Drive, Woodstock, was arrested Dec. 30 for driving under the influence, driving under the influence over, and he also had an outstanding warrant from Cook County for violation of a suspension on a prior DUI charge. Reyes was turned over to McHenry County Sheriff’s office. Bond was set at $23,000. Court date was set for Jan. 30. Any charges are merely accusations, and defendants or suspects are presumed innocent unless proven guilty.


Opinion THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Jan. 8-14, 2014

5

Woodstock, IL Š 1987

CHERYL WORMLEY Publisher, Co-Owner

PAUL WORMLEY Co-Owner

JOHN C. TRIONE General Manager

THE EDITORIAL BOARD Cheryl Wormley John C. Trione Katelyn Stanek Jay Schulz Lisa Kucharski Sandy Kucharski

KATELYN STANEK Managing Editor

» OUR VIEW

So what’s next? Woodstock’s motto is a simple one: “True to its past ... Confident of its future.” It’s a motto that recalls the city’s rich history while looking toward its potential. It’s a motto we think fits. But lately, we’ve heard from many of you who are growing less confident in Woodstock’s future. e individual reasons may vary slightly, but the main concern remains the same — concern over Woodstock’s handling of the situation surrounding Woodstock Police Sgt. Charles “Chip” Amati. e Woodstock sergeant was accused of sending an inappropriate text message to a 12-year-old girl and illegally accessing a police database for personal use. Amati was never charged with a crime for either allegation, but the punishment handed down by the Board of Police and Fire Commissioners — a 30-day unpaid suspension to be taken in chunks over the course of a year — enraged many area residents and activists. In fact, many of the city’s elected officials have seemed equally uneasy with the punishment. At a City Council meeting in December, as speaker after speaker rose to ask the council to find a way to remove the sergeant from the force, many councilmembers nodded in agreement and even called an executive session for the purposes of discussing Amati’s future. But in the days and weeks that followed, city staff and councilmembers seemed to throw up their hands, citing the fact that the city already had recommended that the police commission institute a 30-day punishment as one of several complicating factors in removing the officer from his post. ey pointed to the concept of “double jeopardy” and said while they’re exploring other options to remove the sergeant, implementing any further action from the city of Woodstock will be very difficult. Exploring further options is good, and the council’s willingness to take to heart the concerns of this city’s residents is admirable. But this ongoing situation has left us — and many of you, too — with more questions than answers, more concerns than reassurances. One question towers over the others, though: If the city cannot, in fact, remove Amati from the force, what are city staff and councilmembers going to do to ensure Woodstock is never thrown into this kind of situation again? What is Woodstock going to do to repair its image and, much more importantly, to restore the trust between the city and its residents? In short, what is going to be done to make sure we can be as confident in our future as we are in our past?

weigh in Email letters to the editor to letters@thewoodstockindependent.com or mail them to 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098.

» YOUR VIEW

A letter of thanks to Woodstock Dear Woodstock Community, I am now safe and sound in the United States [after completing my internship in ailand]! I

returned home Dec. 15, so I was able to celebrate the holidays with my family. It was very hard to say goodbye to all of my friends and the children I worked with in ailand, but I know that I had done good work that has eternal value. Now that my internship is finished, I have returned to my college campus

in Minnesota to finish my degree in Intercultural Studies, and I will graduate this May. Thank you so much for letting me share this journey with all of you. I hope you all have a wonderful New Year! Rachel Trenkler, Woodstock

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

INDE THOUGHT

Minimum heat requirements for lessees Chapter 5 of Title 4 of the Woodstock City Code requires that temperatures in leased residential dwellings have certain minimum temperatures during the colder months of the year. Between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. Sept. 15 to June 1 rental dwellings must be heated to a minimum temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit in all habitable rooms. From 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. rental dwellings must be heated to a minimum of 60 degrees Fahrenheit. The City Manager’s Newsletter said even if the heating bill is paid for by the tenant, the owner of every dwelling or dwelling unit leased for residential purposes is responsible for making heat available to such premises. Failure to meet these minimum standards is considered a violation of the City Code, except where the lack of heat is due to an act of the tenant or to circumstances beyond the owner’s control, such as fuel shortage or loss of power.

Good Samaritans Thank you neighbors, friends and strangers for checking in on each other during the past few freezing days. It was nice to see people stopping to check on others in cars pulled over on the sides of roads, assisting each other through icy parking lots and helping each other shovel driveways and sidewalks. Though the worst of the cold spell has passed, freezing temperatures are always dangerous to people and animals. Continue helping each other out. That’s what this community does best!

Adopt a fire hydrant The city has more than 1,400 fire hydrants. Help out the Fire Department and Public Works by clearing the snow from around fire hydrants. Clearing a 2- to 3-foot radius around the fire hydrant will help both departments save a lot of time.

QUOTABLE

“It doesn’t matter if the water is cold or warm if you’re going to have to wade through it anyway.”

— Pierre Teilhard de Chardin


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Jan. 8-14, 2014

OPINION

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Âť COLUMN

So new, so cold, so fun So new Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a joy to announce the birth of our new grandchild. Mary Elizabeth Wormley was born Jan. 2 at Prentice Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital in Chicago. She is the daughter of Matt and Alexis, our youngest son and daughter-in-law, and the sister of John George, 5, and Charles, 3. She is a wee one, weighing 5 pounds 15 ounces and measuring 19 inches. Her birth surprised everyone, coming about a week before her scheduled delivery. I was blessed to witness her brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reactions to pictures of her texted to my cell phone. I saw their faces and heard their exclamations as they saw her in real time via the electronic wonder of FaceTime. And my husband, Jim, and I took in their anticipation as they waited for her to come home. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love for his baby sister shows in his face every time he holds her. Charles has been very accepting but seems to have a business-as-usual approach to her presence. She is beautiful.

So cold One of the roles of a newspaper is to provide a historical record. Since all of Northern Illinois is experiencing recordsetting snow and cold, it is appropriate Cheryl to make note of both. I am writing Wormley this Sunday night Declarations for our Wednesday publication. e Woodstock forecast for Monday and Tuesday includes actual temperatures dipping to nearly 20 degrees below zero with wind chills near 50 degrees below zero â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the coldest temperatures in 20 years. Snow fell on and off all last week, adding more than 10 inches and bringing the total accumulation to more than 24 inches, the heaviest tally this early in 13 years. e snow was unusually light and ďŹ&#x201A;uffy, which was great for sledding. Unfortunately, it also created drifts of more than 10 feet and made driving hazardous.

Schools in Woodstock School District 200, Marian Central Catholic High School and St. Mary School were closed due to the weather Monday and Tuesday, extending their winter breaks by at least two days.

in. e reality is something a bit more interesting. Regulation often is the product of a chummy relationship between elected ofďŹ cials and people in business who Scott want to cut down on Reeder their competition to maximize proďŹ ts. Reeder Report So every year, a parade of folks in various vocations come to the state capital asking for their ďŹ elds to be licensed and regulated. And it usually works like this: Q Have the state require extensive training for people wanting to enter the ďŹ eld. Q Exempt everyone already in the ďŹ eld from the new regulations by â&#x20AC;&#x153;grandfatheringâ&#x20AC;? them in. By doing this, folks in the profession can create an artiďŹ cial shortage of â&#x20AC;&#x153;licensedâ&#x20AC;? individuals. is reduces the supply of people who can do the job and enables those still in the ďŹ eld to be paid more.

at of course means that the rest of us pay more for their services. Yes, there are some life-or-death professions such as physicians or dentists for which it makes sense to require a license. But frankly, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care less if my barber has been OKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d by the state. If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not pleased with a haircut, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go to someone else the next time. atâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how the free market regulates things. Or how about interior designers? What would constitute a gross license violation? Improper use of the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;mauveâ&#x20AC;?? Shag carpeting in the basement rec room? Beaded doorway curtains? MacramĂŠ potholders? An interior decorator license beneďŹ ts the public about as much as a $2-word like â&#x20AC;&#x153;feng shui.â&#x20AC;? And such is the case for many of the vocations that government chooses to license and regulate. We should encourage entrepreneurship and selfreliance, not stiďŹ&#x201A;e it. For example, if a single mom on my street wanted to make a few extra bucks cutting neighbor kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hair in her basement, her initiative should be rewarded. She shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be punished. But too often, professional licensing

Now, something fun â&#x20AC;&#x201C; at least for me In 2012, I was introduced to the use of anchor dates to identify the day of the week for dates past and future. I have delighted in using the technique â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just ask my family and staff. ey undoubtedly have tired of hearing me say â&#x20AC;&#x153;that will be a Tuesday,â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Śa Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;? or whatever. Back in 2012, I shared in Declarations my fascination with anchor dates. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a brief refresher. Five of the anchor dates are easy to remember because the month and day are the same number: 4/4, 6/6, 8/8, 10/10 and 12/12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 4, June 6, Aug. 8, Oct. 10 and Dec. 12. Also easy to remember are 5/9, 9/5, 7/11 and 11/7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; May 9, Sept. 5, July 11 and Nov. 7. To remember them use the handy mnemonic â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I work from 9 to 5

at the 7-11. at leaves three. e last day of February is an anchor date. Now, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re down to two â&#x20AC;&#x201C; January and March â&#x20AC;&#x201C; both of which hinge on leap year. Jan. 3 is an anchor date any year that is not a leap year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; years that are divisible by four. e January anchor date in a leap year is Jan. 4. One source suggested this memory technique: for three years itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the 3rd, and for the fourth year itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the 4th. As for March, the last day of February is usually considered Marchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anchor date â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 0. Anchor dates in 2014 are Fridays â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so 4/4, 6/6, 8/8, 10/10, 12/12, 5/9, 9/5, 7/11, 11/7, Jan. 3, Feb. 28 and March 28 are Fridays. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how it works. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say you want to know what day of the week Christmas will be this year. Start with the date â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dec. 25. Remember anchor dates in 2014 are Fridays, and the anchor date in December is the 12th. e 25th is 13 days later â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so it will be on ursday. Now, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your turn.

Cheryl Wormley is publisher of The Woodstock Independent.

Âť COLUMN

When it comes to business, Illinois has a license to chill During the decades Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve covered government, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen a steady stream of people heading to SpringďŹ eld wanting to have their profession licensed. And beginning Jan. 1, the state began licensing yet another â&#x20AC;&#x201C; condominium managers. at vocation joins a litany of jobs such as hair braiders, interior decorators, barbers, auctioneers and others that are regulated by the state of Illinois. ere are some who would have you believe that government bureaucrats are like perched vultures waiting for some unsuspecting entrepreneur to come along before they swoop

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

is about protecting turf â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not the public. A 2012 report from the Institute for Justice noted that it costs $671 in fees to be an Illinois auctioneer, and 45 days of training also are required. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth noting that auctioneering wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even a licensed profession in Illinois until about 2000. But somehow, the state had plenty of successful auctions long before it began licensing auctioneers. Somebody must have done a lot of fast talking in SpringďŹ eld to get them licensed. Barriers such as these hurt lowerincome people by creating obstacles for them to enter certain ďŹ elds. It hurts the rest of us by reducing competition and increasing costs of the services those vocations offer. atâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the best regulator of professions is the consumer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not state bureaucrats. After all, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how the free market is supposed to work.

Scott Reeder is a veteran statehouse reporter and the journalist in residence at the Illinois Policy Institute. He can be reached at sreeder@illinoispolicy.org.

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&$BMIPVO4Ut8PPETUPDL *- 1IPOF 'BY XXXUIFXPPETUPDLJOEFQFOEFOUDPN

Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER c.wormley@thewoodstockindependent.com

The Woodstock Independent (USPS #001287) is published weekly at 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Periodicals postage paid at Woodstock, Illinois. POSTMASTERS: Forward address changes to The Woodstock Independent, 671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098-3213. Subscription rates/year: $35 in Woodstock and Wonder Lake, $37 in McHenry County, $42 for snowbirds and $50 outside McHenry County. Letters to the editor: We welcome letters of general interest to the community and reserve the right to edit for clarity or length. Letters should be fewer than 400 words, and writers are limited to one letter per month. Letters are due at noon Wednesday and must be signed and include the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s address and a telephone number for veriďŹ cation purposes only. Corrections: The Woodstock Independent strives for accuracy. To suggest corrections or clariďŹ cations, email news@ thewoodstockindependent.com.

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THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Jan. 8-14, 2014

7

Education For kids, some hands-on learning Local woman shares her passion for sign language through classes for children By SANDY KUCHARSKI The Independent Seated on the floor with her toddler on her lap, Crystal Squires’ face lit up with expression as she demonstrated the sign for “cat” while leading a sign language for children class at Mixin Mingle on the Square. She glanced around at the students, smiling and nodding in approval as they caught on. Like many first-time moms, Squires began reading everything she could about infant and child development as soon as she discovered she was pregnant. All the advice she came across said that teaching a child a second language was beneficial, especially for enhancing cognitive abilities. “I don’t know a second language,” Squires said. “I can’t teach my son Italian if I don’t know it, but I thought I could do signing with him.” And that’s what she did. When her son, Karter, was 3 months old, Squires started signing with him. At 9 months, he started signing back to her. Sold on sign language, she sought a class where she could take him to learn in a social setting with other children, but classes were not available in the Montana community she was living in. Undaunted, she took several online

classes and completed an interview to become a certified instructor. Starting out by leading volunteer classes at the local library, she soon began receiving requests from area preschools and kids clubs to conduct paid classes. “It was always so much fun, my son loved it; all the kids loved it,” Squires said. “It became a passion for me to teach sign language.” In October, Squires moved to Woodstock, bringing her son and her enthusiasm for sign language to town. In two months, she taught several introductory children’s classes, introducing her infant and toddler signing classes. She also coordinated an eight-week series of free classes to be held at 9:30 a.m. Fridays at the Woodstock Public Library. e classes are designed to teach the parents and children together, making signing a family experience. When children see their parents involved and having fun, it reinforces their comprehension. e social aspect of learning in a group also is important, and the interactive format of the class keeps the children interested. “e benefits [of sign language] are astronomical. ey’ve shown that kids that sign have a higher IQ,” Squires said. “It uses all the senses.” Her early impression of Woodstock

Cheyanne Bierman participates in a sign language class taught by Crystal Squires at Mixin Mingle. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

is that it is very similar to the Montana community where she last lived and taught. She said, “ey’re really focused on their children, parenting and giving their kids the best leg up, like the bilingual program [that D-200 offers.]” Currently offering classes for infants and toddlers, Squires teaches American

Sign Language, the universal language that is taught to the deaf. “I love watching the students learn it, watching their eyes light up, especially the young ones that aren’t verbal yet,” she said. “When they get it, it’s like they’ve unlocked a whole new possibility of being able to communicate what they want.”


8

Jan. 8-14, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

A&E Radio reminiscing By SANDY KUCHARSKI The Independent Known throughout the county as the voice of the news on Star 105.5 radio station, Stew Cohen has a history in radio that spans back to the mid ‘70s, but he always wanted to be an author. He recently combined his unfulfilled ambition with his lifelong career when he published “e WYEN Experience,” a compilation of stories about WYEN radio. “One day I was sitting in this studio, and a guy walks in and said ‘you know me,’” said Cohen. e guy was Kenn Heinlein, a former co-worker and an-

nouncer from WYEN. ey reminisced and shared stories from the time they spent at the station – the glory days of the mom and pop radio station from Des Plaines. “Why don’t we write a book?” Heinlein said, and the wheels were set in motion. Cohen searched the Internet and social media to find former employees, and he started to craft chapters. e resulting product is a collection of stories about the notable people who got their start there, such as Garry Meier of WGN, Bob Roberts of WBBM Newsradio and Greg Brown of WLS-FM, and the daily grind at the station. Cohen shares a variety of personal anecdotes

Veteran radio news anchor and reporter Stew Cohen publishes an insider’s story about WYEN

about experiences during his stint at the radio including memorable interviews and how it was to work with the technology of the ‘70s and early ‘80s. Heinlein, son-in-law of former WYEN owners Ed and Carol Walters, was an invaluable source, providing family background as well as photos from the Walters family’s archives. Cohen tells colorful stories about how his mother’s connections helped him get the job, his stressful interview and early broadcasts and his sister’s critique of his speaking voice – topics that everyone can relate to. In writing the book, Cohen got his chance to be the author that he always wanted to be, a welcome departure from his daily news writing. He said, “I love working with sentences. I loved to be able to craft a sentence and make it go somewhere. I never had writer’s block.” Cohen is marketing the self-published work on Amazon, Barnes and

Noble online, and iUniverse. Locally, the hardcover edition is available at Read Between the Lynes on the Woodstock Square, where he shared the work with an appearance and book signing last summer. He continues to make appearances at various venues. When long-time acquaintance Don Peasley heard that he was writing the book, Cohen said Peasley told him, “Stew, I want to be the first person to write your story.” e book was printed in early 2013, and Peasley was given a copy. ey were going to get together, but Don passed away. Saddened at the loss of his friend, Cohen said, “I missed the interview with him by less than a week.” Fueled by his enthusiasm to write and share stories, Cohen has more writing projects in the works including a story about the initial appearance of gold coins in e Salvation Army kettles, which can be traced back to Crystal Lake in 1982.

» COLUMN

A year in the life of the Opera House e Woodstock Opera House has had a tremendous year and has just concluded its holiday celebrations. I hope you took the opportunity to enjoy some of the treats provided by Ed Hall, the Woodstock Musical eatre Company and Judith Svalander Dance eatre. I Tony hope you also strolled through the Casalino Christmas forest in Now Playing the Opera House Community Room. Looking back over the year and my year’s contributions, you may remember columns I did about Opera House staff and people who have contributed to the presentations in the auditorium and in the Stage Left Café. is year I featured Mark Greenleaf, the WOH building manager (March) and Box Office Manager Daniel Campbell (August). ese two men are part of the unsung local heroes who work year-round to provide patrons with a safe and inviting environment and the ticketing and publicity information that we often take for granted. We also featured two of the founders of our community theater programs this year. In January I wrote about Frank Harrison, one of the founders of the Woodstock Musical eatre Company, and in February I featured Karen Wells, one of the original TownSquare Players; in fact the player that gave the Players its name. Karen along with Keith Johnson (featured in May) and Ed Hall (the October issue) have served for

years with me on the Opera House Advisory Commission. Ed, who just presented his Guitar Christmas program, brings well-known musical artists to the stage with William Tell Productions. Keith, when he is not running the Woodstock Farmers Market, is producing or organizing musical performances in the Stage Left Café. I also wrote about the Woodstock Children’s Summer eatre staff in June and the TSP/WMTC season offerings in my July column. In April I wrote about the late Helen Wright, one of the founders of the Woodstock Fine Arts Association and its Creative Living Series, which I also featured in September as they began their 50th anniversary season. Early in the year I mentioned Woodstock Celebrates, Inc. and the group’s efforts to name the stage at the Opera House for Orson Welles. ey will host celebrations to the great film and stage artist in May 2014 and again in May 2015. As I end this column, I need to call attention to the loss of two wonderful people who passed away recently. Long-time resident and member of the Woodstock Fine Arts Association Betty Leslie passed away several weeks ago. A few days after Betty’s passing, we also lost Michael O’Brien, a life-long teacher, colleague at Woodstock High School and a lover of Shakespeare and film. e holiday lights in Woodstock were a little bit dimmer with the loss of these two wonderful people. My heart is sad as I think of their contributions to the community and the pain that their families have to bear at this joyous time of year. Coming soon Q e WFAA will present Dr. James Phillips ursday, Jan. 16. Q e Opera House will present Lee Greenwood Saturday, Jan. 18. For information and to purchase tickets, call 815-338-5300 or visit www.woodstockoperahouse.com. Tony Casalino is chairman of the Woodstock Opera House Advisory Commission.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

playing at the Woodstock Theatre unless otherwise noted.

The Entertainer WOODSTOCK’S ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS

» MUSIC WEDNESDAY JAM GROUP Jan. 8, 1 to 4 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun Free 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org Acoustic musicians meet weekly to play music together. Everyone is welcome to attend to join in or to listen. STAGE LEFTOVERS Jan. 8, 29, 7:30 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 815-338-4212 Rich Prezioso, Joe Pesz, Brian Murphy, Laurel Palma, George Koester, Pete Johnson, Les Urban and Joe Wadz perform. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Jan. 10, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Expressly Leslie Vegetarian Specialties Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. Free expresslyleslie.com Guyz with Bad Eyez will perform. OPEN MIC NIGHT Jan. 10, 24, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org Open Mic is sponsored by Off Square Music. Various artists will perform in 15-minute slots. JAZZ JAM Jan. 17, Feb. 7, 8 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $5 815-338-4212 jazzonthesquare.com Jazz Jam is hosted by musicians Billy Denk and John Nelson. SONGWRITER SHOWCASE Jan. 17, 7:30 p.m. Mixin Mingle 124 Cass St. $7 mixinmingl.com An evening of music is hosted by A Place to Shine, with talented local songwriters sharing their music and the inspiration behind them. LEE GREENWOOD Jan. 18, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $65 815-338-5300 Grammy-winning American country music artist Lee Greenwood, best known for his single “God Bless the USA,” will perform. WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Feb. 1, 9 a.m. to noon McHenry County Farm Bureau 1102 McConnell Road Free woodstockfarmersmarket.org 11 a.m. - Mark Hobbs FIRST SATURDAY MUSIC Feb. 1, 7 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. $3 donation 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org Visitors can participate in the open-mic night or enjoy the show. Doors will open at 6:30.

SWITCHBACK Feb. 1, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $20 815-338-5300 The talented duo of Brian FitzGerald and Martin McCormack play a unique blend of American roots and Celtic soul, with harmonies that have been compared to the Everly Brothers and Simon and Garfunkel.

» LECTURE CREATIVE LIVING SERIES Jan. 16, 10 a.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $24 815-338-5300 Dr. James Phillips of the Chicago Field Museum will share stories from the museum and explain why continuing to collect artifacts is important.

» THEATER ‘FAIRY TALE COURTROOM’ Jan. 24, 25, Feb. 1, 7 p.m. Jan. 25, 2 p.m. Jan. 26, 3 p.m. Woodstock High School Auditorium 501 W. South St. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 The audience plays the jury in this comedy that shows the other side of several familiar fairy tales when the Big Bad Wolf and the Wicked Witch are brought to trial. ‘SYLVIA’ Jan. 31, Feb. 7, 8, 7 p.m. Feb. 1, 8, 2 p.m. Woodstock High School Black Box Theatre 501 W. South St. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 “Sylvia” is a modern, romantic comedy about a couple dealing with the unknowns of middle age, career changes and a stray dog.

» MOVIES Previews by Jay Schulz of films currently

‘SAVING MR. BANKS’ Tom Hanks (“Big”) and Emma Thompson (“Dead Again”) star in the story of how Walt Disney convinced author P.J. Travers to let him turn her novel “Mary Poppins” into a movie. “Saving Mr. Banks” is directed by John Lee Hancock (“The Blind Side”) and also stars Colin Farrell (“Tigerland”), Paul Giamatti (“Sideways”) and Jason Schwartzman (“Rushmore”). RATED PG-13, 125 MINUTES

‘FROZEN’ Anna (Kristen Bell) and Kristoff (Jonathan Groff) team up with a snowman Olaf (Josh Grad) to release their kingdom from an everlasting winter. “Frozen” is directed by Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee and also stars the voices of Idina Menzel (“Rent”) and Alan Tudyk (“Serenity”). RATED PG, 108 MINUTES ‘THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG’ Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), Gandolf (Ian McKellen) and the dwarves continue on their quest to reclaim Erebor from the dragon Smaug. “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” is directed by Peter Jackson (“King Kong”) and also stars Richard Armitage (“Robin Hood”), Orlando Bloom (“Troy”) and Cate Blanchett (“I’m Not There”).

Jan. 8-14, 2014

9

RATED PG-13, 161 MINUTES ‘PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES’ Directed by Christopher Landon (Burning Palms), Andrew Jacobs stars as Jesse who was “marked,” and he begins to be pursued by mysterious forces while his family and friends try to save him. Also starring is Molly Ephraim (“Last Man Standing”) as Ali and Crystal Santos (“Argo”) as the Coven Witch. RATED R, 84 MINUTES ‘AMERICAN HUSTLE’ A con man, played by Christian Bale (“The Dark Knight”) along with his seductive British partner, played by Amy Adams (“Man of Steel”) is forced to work for a wild FBI agent. The agent, played by Bradley Cooper (“Sex and the City”), pushes them into a world of Jersey powerbrokers and mafia. Directed by David O. Russell (“Silver Linings Playbook”). RATED R, 138 MINUTES

‘LONE SURVIVOR’ Directed by Peter Berg (“Hancock”), and starring Mark Wahlberg (“The Perfect Storm”), Taylor Kitsch (“Friday Night Lights”) and Emilie Hirsch (“Kindred: The Embraced”) “Lone Survivor” is a true story based on the failed June 28, 2005, mission “Operation Red Wings,” where four members of SEAL Team 10 were tasked with capturing or killing notorious Taliban leader Ahmad Shahd. RATED R, 121 MINUTES


10

Jan. 8-14, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Marketplace » COLUMN

Take a new year challenge Considering the No. 1 New Year’s resolution is to lose weight, and staying fit and healthy is in the top five, you may want to include challenging yourself at one of McHenry County’s sporting events. Tough Mudder is McHenry County’s newest obstacle course that will land Saturday and Sunday, May 10 and 11, and its sister event, “Mudderella,” will arrive Saturday, May 31 at the Richmond Hunt Club in Richmond. Unlike marathons and Laura triathlons that run Witlox on roads and trails, obstacle races Minding Your Business cover far shorter distances and ask participants to complete far crazier feats including wading through waistdeep mud, crawling under barbed wire, submerging in ice water and jumping through fire. Register at http://toughmudder. com/events/chicago-2014/. e Illinois Triathlon Championship will be held Sunday, June 22, at ree Oaks Recreation Area, Crystal Lake. Participants can choose their distance based upon personal experience and training, including Olympic Triathlon - 1500 meter swim, 26.5-mile bike, 10K run; Sprint Triathlon - 500M swim, 13mile bike, 5K run, Olympic Aquabike 1500M swim, 26.5-mile bike; or Sprint Aquabike - 500M swim, 20K bike. Register at http://www.3disciplines. com/Events/Illinois-Triathlon-Championship/ McHenry County will soon welcome Abraham Lincoln – well, a miniature form of him, that is. e Illinois Office of Tourism rolled out a new tourism spot this past fall starring “Mini Abe,” a tiny plastic version of the 16th president who is an adventurer that loves to travel and share his experiences as he journeys through the Land of Lincoln. Look for him throughout McHenry County Jan. 19 to 25 and follow him on our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/visitmchenrycounty or (hashtag) #MiniAbe. If your business serves the visitors industry, the 2014 Illinois Governor’s Conference on Tourism is a mustattend event. is year’s conference, “e Power of People and Travel,” will be held Monday to Wednesday, Feb. 3 to 5 at the Palmer House in Chicago. e tourism industry is a thriving source of Illinois’ economy and growing each year in McHenry County. Keynote speakers including Bridget Brennan, CEO of e Female Factor and author of “Why She Buys.” Visit www.illinoisgovconference.com. e McHenry County Convention & Visitors Bureau wishes you a very happy new year. Remember to experience McHenry County first. To learn more about the marketing and promotional efforts of the McHenry County CVB, email Laura Witlox Middaugh at laura@mchenrycountycvb.com or call 815-893-6280. Laura Witlox Middaugh is Manager of Group Sales at the McHenry County CVB.

Harding Real Estate sold By KATELYN STANEK The Independent After nearly five decades in business, a Woodstock real estate institution is changing hands. Harding Real Estate, 1710 S. Eastwood Drive, recently was purchased by Prudential Stark Realtors to become Prudential Harding and Starck Real Estate. “I think the world changes, and the real estate industry changes too,” said John Harding, former president of Harding Real Estate, who is now an employee at Prudential Harding and Starck. “It was a time to blend two unique, very good companies into one much better company. We thought rather than to be competing, we should be working as a team together.” e Prudential realty business, based in Palatine, now has 11 offices throughout the region and more than 400 employees, including Harding’s staff, which has stayed on through the transition. Prudential Harding and Starck

“I think the world changes, and the real estate industry changes too.”

President and CEO Andrew Starck said he’s enthusiastic about the staff joining his company. “ey have great people. It’s a great, great com— John Harding, pany,” Starck former Harding president said. “What they stand for are the same things we stand for.” Started in 1964, Harding Real Estate was one of the oldest businesses of its kind in the area. For years, its independence made it distinct in a market full of national and international brands. “Being an independent is kind of a unique thing,” Harding said. “We must work much harder to maintain our market share. We did that with personal attention to our people and our customers. We are a name that’s been

Realty office becomes part of Prudential

around a long time, and we’ve built a reputation on that.” Starck, too, started his business unaffiliated with other real estate companies, something he said proved to be difficult as international investors seeking names they recognized started to change the face of the industry. “For years, we said real estate is local,” Starck said. “And it is, but the reality is that real estate is also global.” Despite the change in name and ownership, Harding said much will stay the same at the Woodstock business. “Nothing has really changed,” Harding said. “e people are the same, our support staff is the same, and we’re blessed with some very wonderful, loyal employees.” e business will continue to sell undeveloped land under the Harding Real Estate name. Starck said the company will undergo another name change later in the year, when Prudential becomes Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices.

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Filed in the McHenry County Recorder’s Office Dec. 9 to 18: Q Residence at 724 N. Valley Hill Road, Bull Valley, was sold by the James and Mary Hill Trust, Woodstock, to Peter and Catherine Boll, Bull Valley, for $416,500. Q Residence at 1872 Yasgur Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Douglas and Caroline Hirsch, Carpentersville, to Guy Mouton, Woodstock, for $140,000. Q Residence at 726 Roosevelt Road, Woodstock, was sold by Greg and Christina Calhoun, Woodstock, to Corey and Courtney Hunt and Toby Parker Goad, Woodstock, for $122,500. Q Lot at 8920 Hickory Lane, Wonder Lake, was sold by Frank and Joanne Schoenborn, Winfield, to Jaime and Lisa Fernandez Jr., Woodstock, for $37,000. Q Residence at 14511 Highway 14, Woodstock, was sold by BBBD II LLC, Chicago, to Juan Alvarez, Woodstock, for $575,000. Q Residence at 1560 Wheeler St., Woodstock, was sold by Federal National Morgage Association, Dallas, to

Giuseppe Ferrioli and Leticia Medina, Belvidere, for $161,500. Q Residence at 9111 Memory Trail, Wonder Lake, was sold by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, 5000 Plano Parkway, Carrollton, Texas, to David Wasberg, Wonder Lake, for $57,000. Q Residence at 601 W. South St., Woodstock, was sold by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Carrollton, Texas, to Bertram Irslinger, for $100,000. Q Vacant lot 2, Maritime Lane, Woodstock, was sold by River Trails Inc., Union, to Peter School, Crystal Lake, for $115,000. Q Residence at 441 Dacy St., Woodstock, was sold by the Gregory Alfus Revocable Trust and Carol Alfus Revocable Trust, Woodstock, to Barbara Hiffman, Chicago, for $190,000. Q Residence at 131 E. Melody Lane, Woodstock, was sold by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, D.C., to Robert Woodhouse, Woodstock, for $63,000. Q Residence at 416 St. John’s Road, Apt. A, Woodstock, was sold by Federal

Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Carrollton, Texas, to Donald Metivier, Woodstock, for $42,500. Q Industrial building at 513-1/2 E. Judd St., Woodstock, was sold by Dolores Loomis, Woodstock, to Jay Keppen, Woodstock, for $91,000. Q Commercial building at 601 S. Eastwood Drive, Woodstock, was sold by Toms King RE (Illinois) LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Crystal Lake, to ARC BKMST41001 LLC, Jenkintown, Pa., for $1,324,482. Q Residence at 3506 Stieg Road, Woodstock, was sold by American Community Bank & Trust, Woodstock, to Deanne Kingston and Scott Fanning, Woodstock, for $95,000. Q Residence at 10616 Charles Road, Woodstock, was sold by Richard and Kimberly McCallister, Woodstock, to Christopher and Karen Cusick, Woodstock, for $310,000. Q Residence at 3305 Westwood, Wonder Lake, was sold by BMO Harris Bank N.A., Rolling Meadows, to Lawrence Flament, Richmond, for $45,900.

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Jan. 8-14, 2014

How to find time for fitness Finding time to exercise is no small feat for many people. Obligations at home and at the office can make it hard to fit in a workout, a familiar quandary for people with multiple commitments. e following are a few ways you can find time for fitness. Take a walking lunch. Many professionals have heard of a “working lunch,” but those strapped for time to exercise might want to take a walking lunch instead. Rather than sitting at your desk or in your favorite booth at a nearby restaurant on your lunch hour each day, consider squeezing in some time to walk during those 30 to 60 minutes you normally spend eating or catching up on office gossip with co-workers. Invite a few co-workers along, walking to and from your favorite restaurant or finding a nearby park and going for a quick walk. Exercise in the morning. Research has shown that people who exercise in the mornings exercise on a more consistent basis than those who exercise later in the day, including after leaving the office at the end of the workday. When exercising in the early morning hours, people are less likely to encounter scheduling conflicts, as co-workers, colleagues and even the kids will likely still be asleep. at means fewer interrupted or missed workouts. Prepare meals ahead of time. If working out in the morning simply won’t work for you, then consider planning meals in advance so you can free up time between the office and dinner each night. For example, slow cookers and crockpots make it possible to start making dinner in the early morning and require little or no effort once you arrive home in the evening. Plan to cook a few meals each week in a slow cooker, which will free up time for you to work out when you would otherwise be preparing dinner. Get off the couch. Many people prefer to unwind on the couch as they catch up on their favorite television shows and movies. But such unwinding should not come at the expense of working out. Much like catching up on work at the gym, you also can catch up on your favorite shows and movies while at the gym. Many smartphones and tablets now have apps that allow users to access subscription streaming services, so users who can’t find time to exercise should take advantage of such apps and watch their favorite shows and movies from the treadmill instead of the couch. Readers who can comfortably read while exercising can follow a similar route and read on the elliptical instead of sitting sedentary in a chair as they make their way through the latest bestseller. — Metro Creative Connection

This New Year, make a commitment to yourself If your scale is your worst enemy, it may be time to adopt a workable weight management strategy. A New Year is the perfect time to re-

commit oneself to health, wellness and shedding those extra pounds. Here are some tips for losing those crucial first ���ve pounds quickly, so you’ll be motivated to keep it up: Q Be mentally ready. Make a commitment to meet goals and eliminate temptations right from the start by getting rid of junk food in your pantry. Q Convenience counts. Life can get in the way of dieting if convenient options aren’t readily available. Have healthful ready-to-go

meals and snacks on hand, particularly during dangerous times of day when cravings kick in. Q Find a regular exercise routine with which you’ll stick. Stay motivated by teaming with friends. While one of the best, low-impact and low-cost forms of exercise is walking, short and intense workouts are beneficial too. Q Get support. Friends and family can be great cheerleaders, and an expert dieting coach can answer your questions. Q Drink more water. Some-

times when you feel hungry, you’re actually thirsty. Before eating, drink water to feel fuller. Replace sugary beverages with the good stuff — eight glasses daily is a good target. Q Track progress. Tracking your journey can help you keep focused on end goals. Make it convenient by downloading a free app you can use from your phone that features tools to plan meals and track weight, workouts and measurements. — StatePoint

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Jan. 8-14, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Advice for aging athletes Getting older doesn’t mean you have to put away the crosstrainers Retired professional athletes often speak about the difficult moment when they knew it was time to retire from professional competition. The transition can be easy for some but far more difficult for others. But aging amateur athletes know you need not be a professional to realize there comes a time when your body is telling you it’s time to ease up. Athletes are used to pushing themselves and stretching their limits, but some limits are best not pushed. Such is the case with the limits posed by aging. While athletes don’t have to completely fold up shop and hang up their cleats, tennis shoes or other athletic equipment as they approach senior citizen status, there are steps aging athletes can take to ensure they aren’t pushing their bodies too far as they grow older. First, it’s important to recognize your new recovery time. Veteran athletes tend to have a sixth sense about their bodies, knowing how long they need to recover from common ailments like ankle sprains, knee pain, back pain and shin splints. Despite the body’s remarkable ability for recovery, it’s not immune to aging, and that recovery time will increase as the body ages. Whereas a sprained

ankle might once have been as good as new after a few days or rest, aging athletes must recognize that the same ankle sprain now might require more recovery time. Returning too quickly from an injury can only make things worse for aging athletes, so don’t push yourself. Be sure, too, to take more time to warm up. As the body ages, its response time to exercise increases. This means the body needs more time to prepare itself for cardiovascular and strength-training exercises. Increase your warmup time as you age, gradually increasing the intensity of your warmup exercises until your body feels ready for more strenuous exercise. In addition, the more flexible you are, the more capable the body is of absorbing shock, including the shock that results from repetitive activities. But as the body ages, it becomes less flexible, which makes it less capable of successfully handling the repetitive movements common to exercise. Aging athletes should focus on their flexibility, stretching their muscles before and after a workout. In addition, activities such as yoga can work wonders on improving flexibility for young and aging athletes alike. Finally, don’t stop strength training. Some aging athletes mistakenly feel they should stop strength training as they get older. No longer concerned about building muscle, aging athletes might feel as if they have nothing to gain by lifting weights and continuing to perform other muscle strengthening exercises. But the body gradually loses muscle mass as

it ages, and that loss puts the joints under greater stress when aging athletes perform other exercises. That stress can put people at greater risk for arthritis, tendinitis and ligament sprains. While you no longer need to max out on the bench press or challenge yourself on the biceps curl, it is important to continue to make strength training a part of your fitness regimen as you age. Aging athletes need not associate aging with ceasing their athletic pursuits. But recognizing your limitations and the changes your body is going through is an important element of staying healthy as you approach older adulthood. — Metro Creative Connection

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EAT MORE FIBER: Q Eat more bran, as bran has the highest fiber content of any food at about 25 to 45 percent. Q Consume whole fruit instead of juice. Whole fruits have more fiber in them and fewer calories than juices. Eating fruit can help you to feel fuller longer. Q Pass up on refined flours. Opt for whole grains whenever eating bread, cereal and baked goods. Try to aim for grains that have at least three grams of fiber per serving. Q Increase your consumption of beans. Beans are relatively inexpensive, filling and tasty. Plus, they pack a great deal of fiber, protein and other important nutrients. Q Take a fiber supplement if you feel you are not getting enough fiber in your daily diet. Gummy fiber chews can be tasty ways to get fiber. Q Opt for fresh fruit and vegetables for snacks over processed food

— Metro Creative Connection


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Cooler temperatures often bring along the seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s snifďŹ&#x201A;es and colds. With a few winter wellness tips, you can prepare for a happier and healthier season. Follow this checklist for seasonal health: Q Preventive care. A nutritious diet and plenty of rest can help you stay strong this winter, so consider keeping juices, vegetables and fruits in your fridge all winter long. Q Stock your medicine cabinet. When illness strikes, the last thing youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to do is rush to the store. A well-stocked medicine cabinet can save a trip when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re feeling your worst. Keep over-the-counter cold and ďŹ&#x201A;u relief medications onhand for both day and night, as well as cough suppressant and a general pain reliever. Parents should ensure they have medications suitable for children, too. Q Healthy skin. Skin is prone to dryness in winter, so apply moisturizer as soon as you get out of the shower. If possible, ditch the scalding hot showers for warm water, as heat can be very drying. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget that the sunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rays can be just as potent in winter as in summer, so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t neglect the sunscreen and lip balm just because of the cool temperatures. Q Germ-free. While germs exist year-round, your body may be more susceptible to cold and ďŹ&#x201A;u viruses in winter. Be sure to wash

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Jan. 8-14, 2014

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16 Magnum Circuit Weight Lifting Machines 17 Free Weight Stations Fitness Ropes & Kettle Bells Indoor Pool/Whirlpool/Sauna your hands thoroughly and use a hand sanitizer. Q Soupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on. Start all your winter meals with a warm bowl of soup full of protein, vegetables and liquids. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the time to make soup from scratch, healthful and delicious ready-made soup can be a great alternative. Q Stay active. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let your exercise routine fall by the wayside in winter. Exercise can improve your immunity and also help keep winter pounds at bay. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a gym membership, gear up with exercise apparel designed for cooler temperatures and pound the pavement or pop in an exercise video at home. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; StatePoint

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Did you know? Some fats can be beneficial to your health. Unsaturated fats, which include polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, can improve your cholesterol levels and promote a healthier heart. Polyunsaturated fats can be found in various foods, including fish and walnuts. Monounsaturated fats also can be used to make recipes healthier. For example, when a recipe calls for butter, consider substituting that butter with a monounsaturated fat such as olive oil or a polyunsaturated fat such as sunflower oil. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, both polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats help reduce â&#x20AC;&#x153;badâ&#x20AC;? cholesterol, also known as low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, while increasing high-density lipoprotein, or HDL, a protective cholesterol often referred to as â&#x20AC;&#x153;goodâ&#x20AC;? cholesterol. LDL can build up in the bloodstream and form plaque that lines the walls of the arteries, which can

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decrease blood flow to the heart and increase a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s risk of heart disease. Though saturated fats can be part of a healthy diet, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best to make sure consumption of saturated fats is minimal. Sources of saturated fat include meat, poultry with skin still attached and wholemilk dairy products. When eating meat, look for lean cuts with no visible fat. When preparing poultry, peel the skin off. And when enjoying dairy products, choose low-fat or nonfat products.

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Jan. 8-14, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

The basics of boosting metabolism People looking to shed a few pounds and keep those pounds off often look for ways to boost their metabolisms. Some may not know just what metabolism means, and though it is a complicated combination of processes, metabolism is perhaps best explained as the sum of those processes, each of which is instituted to convert food into energy. So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no surprise that so many people, especially men and women whose metabolisms have begun to slow down, want to boost their metabolism and turn

that food into energy more quickly. ough metabolism is a collection of complicated processes, boosting metabolism can be rather easy. e following are a handful of ways to do so, which can help men and women reach their ďŹ tness goals. Eat the right foods and eat more often. Many adults have been turned on to the concept of grazing, an approach to diet wherein adherents eat small portions of food every two to three hours instead of the more traditional three square meals

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per day. But grazing is only effective when people eat the right foods. Each small meal should still have nutritional value just as if it were a large meal. When eating smaller meals, include healthy sources of protein and ďŹ ber. Vegetables tend to be especially beneďŹ cial because they are high in ďŹ ber, a nondigestible carbohydrate that is hard for the body to break down. As the body works hard to break down ďŹ ber, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s burning energy and boosting its metabolism along the way.

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SPECIAL SECTION Add some lean muscle. Lean muscle can boost metabolism, so a workout dominated by cardiovascular exercise wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have as positive an impact on metabolism as one that includes a combination of weight training and aerobic exercise. When muscles are worked hard, the body needs to work hard to recover and rebuild those muscles, burning more calories and boosting metabolism as a result. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe everything you read or hear. Suggestions abound as to ways to signiďŹ cantly improve metabolism. Unfortunately, many of these suggestions boost metabolism but not enough to help people lose weight, which is the ultimate goal of many people looking to boost their metabolisms. For example, green tea has its proponents who feel it can have a signiďŹ cant impact on metabolism thanks to EGCG, a compound found in the tea that has been proven to elevate metabolism. However, the impact of EGCG on boosting metabolism is negligible, and therefore wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make much of an impact on a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weight. e same can be said about capsaicin, an active component found in chili peppers that some feel boosts metabolism enough to promote weight loss. ough capsaicin can boost metabolism slightly, studies have shown that inďŹ&#x201A;uence is not signiďŹ cant enough to affect a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weight. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Metro Creative Connection


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Jan. 8-14, 2014

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Community Are local clubs going out of style? By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent At 48, Henry Connor is the youngest member of the Woodstock Lions Club. With little growth in younger membership, Connor, a 10-year Lion, said he is concerned about the organization’s future and the hole in the community it would leave behind. “Our club is dying. We’re running out of members,” Connor said. “It’s pretty sad. It used to be a huge club.” Connor said aside from fundraising and creating service events to benefit the local community, the Lions have proudly provided the Santa Hut on the Square each year. “I’ve got kids, and I wonder what will happen if we stop doing this?” Connor said. “No one is joining clubs anymore.” Kim Larson, Woodstock Noon Rotary Club president, said she agrees that she’s seeing a lack of younger members, but she said it’s not so much the lack of volunteering as it is the lack of long-term commitment to a club or organization. “It’s generally true across the board. Gen X and Gen Y aren’t initially joining groups,” Larson said. e Rotary Club of Woodstock was chartered in 1968, starting with a membership of 31 individuals. Today, the club is split into morning and noon Rotaries with about 60 members total. Larson said the youngest member is 32 years old and the average age of members is around 50 years old. As the lead organization for Christmas

Clearing House, Larson said Rotary does have significant impact on the community but could capitalize more on the opportunity the event creates for developing membership. Aside from a website based on Rotary International’s site, the club does not have much of an online presence. “e social media piece of it is really lacking, and I think a part of that is because we don’t have the younger members involved,” Larson said. “I think if we had younger people that would do it, we would have younger people join.” Larson said the challenge in growing membership for older clubs like Rotary is overcoming the stigmas attached to them. “I think Rotary is looked at as more of a professional and older service club, and it’s really not,” she said. “You just have to live or work in the community.” Larson said losing the Rotary would mean Christmas without Christmas Clearing House and the loss of several community support efforts like sponsoring high school foreign exchange students, providing grants and scholarships and covering the cost of the Northern Illinois Food Bank. Jon Julius, co-chairman of membership at Woodstock Moose Lodge 1329, said it is a constant battle to maintain and increase membership at the Moose, especially when having to overcome people’s perceptions of clubs with membership dues. “e old TV shows where they wear the funny hats and do all that surely makes

a stereotype of what social organizations, fraternal organizations are all about,” he said. As a national and state organization, Julius said membership has been declining. But for the Woodstock Moose, Julius said it was one of six lodges in the United States that actually grew last year. He said the membership committee works aggressively to keep its numbers up and reach out to the community and help other service organizations with fun events, fish fries and fundraisers. He said the club tries its best to offer incentives to new and current members, providing discounted memberships in exchange for bringing in new members. While he said the Moose has a fairly older population, the club has evolved to attract younger members, especially those in their 30s and 40s. Currently, the Moose has members ages 21 to members in their 90s. “We’re in the process of really making some of those changes as a lodge,” Julius said. “It doesn’t mean our goals change.” Julius said the Moose is a purposedriven club, dedicated to providing support to Mooseheart Child City and School, Batavia, and Moose Haven retirement community. But he said the Moose’s success has come in supporting local efforts, education and fellow Woodstock clubs. “We want to be one of the driving forces in what makes Woodstock, Woodstock,” he said. “I honestly feel like the Moose is more relevant today than it ever has been. … It’s just getting the word out.”

IN BRIEF

Woodstock Chamber award nominations being accepted The Woodstock Chamber of Commerce & Industry is accepting nominations for the annual Harold Buschkopf Community Service Award. Named in honor of the late prominent Woodstock businessman Harold Buschkopf, the award is the chamber’s highest honor accorded to an individual for distinguished community service. Nominations must be on the official nomination form and must be received

HIGHLIGHTS

‘Enthusiasm’ from Scouts with special needs By JANET DOVIDIO The Independent Girl Scout Troop 334 serves girls from surrounding areas who have special needs. Most of the girls have autism or some other mental illness. Leader Angela Clemons is very creative in her troop’s activities. e girls, who range in age from 10 to 18, prefer outings and special field trips that allow them to fill requirements for many badges. ey just completed their First Aid badge, the Illinois interest patch and several fun patches. Clemons described a recent field trip and its challenges for the girls. ey went to the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, where the girls faced many serious fears and were very supportive of one another. Several were terrified of elevators yet they used them, including the glass-enclosed elevator. Others were afraid of dark spaces but went on the coal mine tour with the help of others. “I am so proud of them,” Clemons said. “ey never backed down from the challenges that day.” Clemons has several adult assistants, including her husband, Jerry Clemons, her sister, Amy Lee, and helper Daniela Steve. “I love the girls’ enthusiasm, their curiosity and mostly the challenge of finding new ways to do old things so each girl fully enjoys and learns from the activities,” Clemons said. ĐĐНĐĐН

in the chamber office by Friday, Jan. 31. The award will be presented at the chamber’s annual dinner Thursday, Feb. 20. The selection criteria for the award requires that the individual be known by many people or groups for having made a verifiable contribution to the quality of life in the greater Woodstock area; the individual should have provided inspiration that will have motivated other people to become involved in efforts to assist the community; and he or she should have been involved in positive community work for more than three years.

All nominations must be submitted on an official form, available from the Woodstock Chamber of Commerce & Industry, 136 Cass St., or downloaded from www. woodstockilchamber.com. The chamber also is accepting nominations for its other annual awards: Volunteer of the Year Award, Professional Service Provider of the Year Award, Industry of the Year Award and Retailer of the Year. For information, call 815-338-2436 or email chamber@woodstockilchamber. com.

Grace supports Bethel

Hayden Benedict, left, and Tyler Chaney sled at Emricson Park Jan. 4.

Bethel New Life, a nonprofit Chicagobased organization, is in the business of creating social impact and community change since its founding more than three decades ago. Grace Lutheran Church, Woodstock, has supported holiday programs at Bethel for many years. Bethel now has a new program for its West Side families called e Christmas Store, which allows the families to participate in giving and receiving. Churches like Grace and businesses donate thousands of gifts to e Christmas Store at Bethel. Hundreds of volunteers help over the three days of selling gifts to the families at affordable prices of $1, $5 or $10. Families spend cash and “Bethel Bucks” they have earned by participating in Bethel’s programs and classes. Since all items are donated, all proceeds are used to support Bethel’s education programs. Grace Lutheran sent 25 volunteers to e Christmas Store for a sales weekend in December. Prior to that, Grace congregation members donated toys, tools, kitchen items and many other gifts for the store. Grace member Mary Beth MartinBellavia oversaw the gift contributions, while Denise Hoover coordinated all the volunteers. “I am glad to do this,” Hoover said. “Lots of mothers and daughters participate, as well as many young people. e experience makes quite an impression on them.”

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

News of recognitions and milestones can be sent to Janet Dovidio at fetjetjd@aol.com.

IT’S ALL DOWNHILL


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Jan. 8-14, 2014

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» COLUMN

Hungry for hummus Most vegetarians experience being asked at least once, “What do you do for protein?” Many new vegetarians, driven by this question, rely on dairy products and meat substitutes, including many soy-based commercial products. Experienced vegetarians know how easy it is to get protein from real food. A book that inspired my early ventures into vegetarianism is Frances Moore Lappe’s “Diet for a Small Planet.” It continues to inspire me for a variety of reasons, although she has modified her position on a key principle presented in her first edition. In 1971, Lappe presented a theory of protein complementarity, recommending that certain foods be eaten together to ensure getting sufficient complete protein: grains and legumes, grains and milk products, or seeds and legumes. In the 1981 edition, Lappe modified this position, writing: “With three important exceptions, there is little danger of protein deficiency in a plant food diet. e exceptions are diets very heavily dependent on [1] fruit or on [2] some tubers, such as sweet potatoes or cassava, or on [3]

junk food (refined flours, sugars and fat). Fortunately, relatively few people in the world try to survive on diets in which these foods are virtually the sole source of calories. In all other diets, if Leslie people are getting Cook enough calories, they Vegetating with are virtually certain Leslie of getting enough protein.” Well ... maybe. Sadly, there are not “relatively few people in the world” who try to survive on a diet of junk food since so much of what is on the market today is basically junk food. We are a culture that came of age on junk food, fat but undernourished. From the American Diabetes Association: 25.8 million Americans have diabetes, 8.3 percent of the population; and 79 million Americans have prediabetes. As many as one in three American adults will have diabetes in 2050. We are learning how many other diseases are fed by blood sugar disorders. If we haven’t figured out how to nourish ourselves correctly with a diet that includes meat, such an important part of nutrition that it has to be replaced in a vegetarian diet, are we likely to nourish ourselves well on a vegetar-

ian or vegan diet? We don’t have a long tradition of vegetarianism in this country with effective eating styles and combinations developed over centuries. Without intervention, we’re likely to transfer an unhealthy meat-based eating style to an unhealthy plantbased eating style. Replacing meat isn’t a sound approach to a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle. While protein complementarity may not be a necessary basis of a good vegetarian or vegan diet, it is still a great educational tool and can lead to a healthy and delicious eating style. It led me from my first attempt at vegetarianism more than 40 years ago, when I just added more cheese to foods I liked, to a Middle Easterninspired cuisine that is naturally full of protein complementarity and more delicious for it. Protein complementarity helped me identify traditional cuisines that I could love and build a healthy vegetarian, sometimes vegan, lifestyle. So how do we get protein healthfully on a vegetarian diet? ree cups of beans can satisfy the daily protein requirement for a small adult — but beans don’t necessarily have all nine essential amino acids required to make them a stand-alone protein source. Creating a diet based on almost any traditional culture (purged of recently added commercially processed foods), the chances are good you are eating foods that supply the other amino acids, maybe at the same meal ... maybe at another meal. One example is hummus, a complete protein package all by itself. Ubiquitous in the Middle East, it is part of many meals as a spread (like mayonnaise) or a stand-alone accompaniment to any meal of the day or a snack. e primary ingredients are chickpeas (or other beans) and ground sesame (tahina), a legume and a seed. Completed by lemon juice, seasonings and a good fat (olive oil), it is a superior real food item. In addition to being protein rich and

delicious, hummus is a great value. It costs about $1.50 to make enough hummus to supply adequate daily protein for a small adult. e same amount of protein from ground beef (5.5 ounces) costs almost $15. And hummus packs an added punch — it is not only protein rich but fiber and B-vitamin rich and contains other important nutrients. Fiber slows the absorption of sugar in the body, stabilizing blood sugar. Lemon also stabilizes blood sugar levels. Enjoy this basic hummus recipe by itself or as the start of many great meals and variations. My associate, Laura, used the same recipe to create the black bean hummus she uses on our southwest pizza. Classic hummus 1 pound dried chickpeas 1 cup tahina 1/2 cup olive oil 2 cloves garlic 2 teaspoons cumin 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon hot paprika 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/2 - 1 cup reserved bean liquid Rinse chickpeas and soak overnight. Drain water and place soaked chickpeas in a 3-quart pot. Add fresh water to 1 inch over the top of the chickpeas. Bring to a boil and reduce heat. Cook covered until very soft, checking water periodically. Drain and reserve liquid. Place seven cups cooked chickpeas in food processor along with remaining ingredients except reserved liquid. Start processor running and add liquid through funnel. Allow processor to run until hummus is smooth, adding liquid as needed for correct consistency. Hummus should be smooth and creamy and hold its shape but not be stiff. Happy, healthy eating! Leslie Cook is owner of Expressly Leslie Vegetarian Specialties, 110 S. Johnson St.


COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

FLASHBACKS 25 years ago Q Public parking at the corner of Throop and Judd streets became private when the city did not extend its contract with the lot owner, McHenry County Title Company. Q Woodstock School District 200 identiďŹ ed a 15-acre site in the proposed Kishwaukee Woods Subdivision at Highway 14 and Doty Road as a potential school site. Q A special census conducted by the city of Woodstock in December 1988 revealed a population increase of 1,400 to 13,123, which would net the city about $59,000 annually in taxes. Q The Marian Central Catholic High School boys basketball team defeated Wauconda 64-55 behind 22 points from Rick Draffkorn. 20 years ago Q â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Firm,â&#x20AC;? starring Tom Cruise, was the hot movie rental at Video Gallery, 92 Eastwood Drive. Q Ringwood resident Kenneth Swanson was installed as president of the McHenry County Retired Teachers Association. Q State Bank of Woodstock employees donated six bags and one box of food to

Jan. 8-14, 2014

17

RELIGION NOTES the Woodstock Food Pantry. Q McHenry County College broke ground on a new ďŹ eld for the MCC Fighting Scots soccer program. 15 years ago Q Residents of Woodstock struggled to dig out after a record 13.3-inch snowfall. Q The Woodstock Independent chronicled Civil War soldier Frank E. Hanaford, who escaped from a Confederate prison on Christmas Day. Q The Osborne Brothers, Sonny and Bobby, delighted their bluegrass fans at the Woodstock Opera House. Q The Marian Central girls basketball team defeated Prairie Ridge 32-30 behind 15 points from Monica Abramavicius. 10 years ago Q Alexis Rodriquez-Romero, daughter of Mario Rodriquez and Ziola Romero, was the ďŹ rst baby born in Woodstock in the new year. Q Ray Reynolds, chief ďŹ nancial ofďŹ cer for D-200, retired after 12 ½ years. Q The Independent proďŹ led the Family Health Partnership Clinic, which served more than 20,000 people in McHenry

County the past year. 5 years ago Q Construction on a third Woodstock ďŹ re station, located along Raffel Road near Woodstock North High School, was six weeks ahead of schedule, according to Fire Chief Ralph Webster. Q D-200 school ofďŹ cials imposed an immediate spending freeze due to a delay in funds issued from the state of Illinois and tax revenue decreases. Q The Adult & Child Rehab Center was awarded a $10,000 grant from the First Midwest Charitable Foundation. 1 year ago Q The Woodstock City Council voted to lower the tax levy by $900,000, but property tax owners were not expected to see their taxes lowered. Q WHS students, led by art teacher Herb Kruse, raised $1,000 from the Creative Soles art show held at the Starline Factory in Harvard. Q The WNHS girls basketball team defeated Lakes 37-35 behind 15 points from Aleecia Braun and 10 points from Sami Ahr.

CHRIST LIFE ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁ{Ă&#x160;7°Ă&#x160;>VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;{Â&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;{Ă&#x160; Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160;-iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;ÂŤ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E; EDEN BAPTIST ÂŁÂ&#x2122;äĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160;-iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;i°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;nÂŁ{Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;n{Ă&#x2021; Worship: 3 p.m. Sunday (Spanish) FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST ÂŁÂŁÂŁĂ&#x160;7°Ă&#x160;-Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Testimonal Service: 8 p.m. UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?]Ă&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;° FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Ă&#x201C;ä£nĂ&#x160; °Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;{Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â?Â?]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;° FIRST UNITED METHODIST Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x160;7°Ă&#x160;-Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;£äĂ&#x160; Worship: 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?]Ă&#x160;`Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Vi°Ă&#x160; FREE METHODIST Â&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;{Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160;-iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;i°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁnäĂ&#x160; Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;i`Ă&#x2022;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E; GRACE FELLOWSHIP CHURCH Ă&#x201C;ääĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;x£ä UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x160; Â?Ă&#x2022;LĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x201C;xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;n\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;°Â&#x201C;°]Ă&#x160;7i`Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E; GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday (casual); 8:30 a.m. (traditional), 10:45 a.m. (contemporary) Sunday UĂ&#x160; `Ă&#x2022;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{äĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E; HERITAGE BAPTIST CHURCH 4609 Greenwood Road *°"°Ă&#x160; "8Ă&#x160;{Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;xĂ&#x2021;xÂ&#x2021;ÂŁÂŁÂ&#x2122;ä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;° MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION 8617 RidgeďŹ eld Road, Crystal Lake 815-455-1810 Worship: 6:30 p.m. Friday, 9:30 a.m. Saturday REDEEMER LUTHERAN ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160; i>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;ä Worship: 8 and 10 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;i`Ă&#x2022;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E; UĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x17E;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192; RESURRECTION CATHOLIC 2918 S. Country Club Road 815-338-7330 Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;>Â?Ă&#x160; ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;ÂŤÂ&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; °Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160; ->Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160; Jan. 11 ST. ANNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EPISCOPAL xäĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;7°Ă&#x160;>VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;äÂ&#x2122;xäĂ&#x160; Worship: 8:30 and 10 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?]Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;° ST. JOHNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LUTHERAN {ä£Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;>`Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;xÂŁxÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x160; Worship: 6 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?]Ă&#x160;£ä\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;° ST. MARY CATHOLIC Ă&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; Worship: 7:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday; 5 and 6:30 p.m. (Spanish) Saturday; 7:30, 9 and 10:30 a.m., noon (Spanish), 5 p.m. Sunday THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`}iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;{Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;äx{n Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â?>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;>`Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;{Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;äĂ&#x17D; Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday THE VINE ÂŁÂŁĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160;>`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nä Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;xĂ&#x160;7°Ă&#x160; >Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;xĂ&#x17D;{ Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;vĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;°Â&#x201C;°]Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E; WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD ÂŁĂ&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x160; i>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6; Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday prayer service, 10 a.m. worship service WOODSTOCK BIBLE Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x160; °Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;L>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;i°Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ääĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x160; Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Sunday school: 9:30 a.m. (3 years through ďŹ fth grade) UĂ&#x160; °,° °° °Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;>°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;°Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160; Sunday


18

Jan. 8-14, 2014

COMMUNITY

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

CALENDAR Upcoming events in the Woodstock area U Events are free unless otherwise noted

PHOTO: MARTIN CATHRAE

8 | WEDNESDAY TLC CONSERVATION WORK DAY Westwood Conservation Area 1158 Hillside Drive 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservemc.org The Land Conservancy of McHenry County seeks volunteers for to help with the restoration project. Dress to work outside. Tools and refreshments will be provided. DAYTIME BOOK CLUB Read Between the Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 12:30 p.m. 815-206-5967 The group will discuss “The Edge of the Earth” by Christina Schwarz. STAGE LEFTOVERS Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 7:30 p.m. 815-338-4212 See The Entertainer, p.9.

9 | THURSDAY HATHA YOGA CLASS Unity Spiritual Center 225 W. Calhoun 6:30 p.m. 815-337-3534 Love offering unitywoodstock.org This class is designed for new or returning yoga students to learn the basic yoga poses, conscious breathing, meditation and relaxation techniques.

10 | FRIDAY EXTREME BATTLE BOTS Challenger Learning Center 222 Church St. 6 p.m. $12 per person 815-338-7722 challengerillinois.org Families will be divided into teams to build a robot and compete against other robots. Pizza dinner included. OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 9.

11 | SATURDAY HABITAT RESTORATION Dufield Pond 11750 Country Club Road 9 a.m. to noon 815-337-9315 Individuals, students, small groups and families with children older than 6 can participate in restoring native habitat at the conservation area. BRUCE MALONE, CREATION AUTHOR Grace Fellowship Church 200 Cairns Court 9 and 10:15 a.m. and 5 p.m.

815-337-6510 Author and speaker Bruce Malone will present three different talks in support of the biblical teaching of creation.

12 | SUNDAY

MURDER & MAYHEM Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. 815-338-0542 woodstockpubliclibrary.org The adult book club reads two to three mysteries per month.

TLC CONSERVATION WORK DAY Yonder Prairie 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservemc.org The Land Conservancy of McHenry County seeks volunteers to help with the restoration project. Dress to work outside. Tools and refreshments will be provided.

17 | FRIDAY

13 | MONDAY

SONGWRITER SHOWCASE Mixin Mingle 124 Cass St. 7:30 p.m. $7 mixinmingl.com See The Entertainer, page 9.

COFFEE WITH THE CHIEF Woodstock Police Department 656 Lake Ave. 7 to 8:30 p.m. 815-338-6787 A representative from Illinois Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka’s office will discuss the topic of identy theft. ZUMBA CLASS Mixin Mingle 124 Cass St. 7:15 p.m. Free mixinmingl.com Guests are invited to see what Zumba is all about during this free class.

14 | TUESDAY ALZHEIMER’S & DEMENTIA FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Valley Hi Nursing & Rehabilitation 2406 Hartland Road 6 p.m. 815-334-2817 Caregiving tips and strategies will be discussed. DISTRICT 200 BOARD OF EDUCATION Clay Professional Development Center 112 Grove St. 7 p.m. woodstockschools.org The meeting will be on the second floor. Use the parking lot behind Clay Academy and enter via Door 5.

16 | THURSDAY CREATIVE LIVING SERIES Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. 10 a.m. $24 815-338-5300 See The Entertainer, page 9. WOODSTOCK SENIOR CLUBS Hearthstone Communities 840 N. Seminary Ave. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A fee will be charged for lunch, $2 donation for bingo 815-344-3555 The activities will include a coffee klatch and bingo. Registration is required.

JAZZ JAM Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $5 815-338-4212 jazzonthesquare.com See The Entertainer, page 9.

18 | SATURDAY TASTE OF SWEAT Mixin Mingle 124 Cass St. 7:15 p.m. $6 per workshop mixinmingl.com Mini-workshops of fitness classes will be offered by local instructors. Participants can meet with local health and wellness business partners. WINTER TREE ID WALK Hennen Conservation Area 4622 Dean St. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. conservemc.org Members of The Land Conservancy will lead a workshop on how to identify trees based only on the twigs and bark. The first hour will be inside, and the rest of the time will be spent outside on the trails.

20 | MONDAY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.’S BIRTHDAY No school, District 200. EVENING BOOK CLUB Read Between the Lynes 129 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. 815-206-5967 The group will discuss “Longbourn” by Jo Baker. VILLAGE OF BULL VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION The Stickney House 1904 Cherry Valley Road 7 p.m.

21 | TUESDAY HELPING PAWS NEW VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION Helping Paws Shelter 2500 Harding Lane 7 p.m. 815-338-4400 helpingpaws.net Helping Paws will welcome new volunteers and offer a monthly ori-

entation. CITY COUNCIL MEETING Woodstock City Hall 121 W. Calhoun St. 7 p.m.

22 | WEDNESDAY TLC CONSERVATION WORK DAY Concannon site 1913 Edgewood Drive 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conservemc.org The Land Conservancy of McHenry County seeks volunteers for to help with the restoration project. Dress to work outside. Tools and refreshments will be provided. SOCIAL SKILLS AND SELFESTEEM SUPPORT GROUP Recovery Outreach Center 101 Jefferson St. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. 815-338-3590 Monthly free group meetings will be ongoing and no reservations are needed. LITERARY BOOK CLUB Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. 815-338-0542 woodstockpubliclibrary.org A reading list is available at the circulation desk for this adult book club.

24 | FRIDAY ‘FAIRY TALE COURTROOM’ Woodstock High School Auditorium 501 W. South St. 7 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students 815-338-4370 See The Entertainer, page 9. OPEN MIC NIGHT Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 7 p.m. $3 donation 815-338-5164 offsquaremusic.org See The Entertainer, page 9.

ONGOING OPEN VOLLEYBALL Woodstock Recreation Center 820 Lake Ave. 6:45 to 9 p.m. Free for members, $4 non-members 815-338-4363 woodstockrecreationdepartment. com Teams are formed at random each week to play volleyball. COFFEE AT THE CAFÉ FOR SENIORS Tuesdays Stage Left Cafe’ 125 Van Buren St. 1 to 3 p.m. Senior citizens are invited to drop in for coffee. DIVORCECARE Tuesdays Woodstock Assembly of God

Jan. 8 to 24 1201 Dean St. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. 815-338-1316 divorcecare.org The weekly support group and seminar will be conducted by people who understand the pain of separation or divorce. MINDSHIFTERS GROUP Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun 6:30 p.m. $5 suggested love offering 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org A support group focused on the practical use of selfhelp tools for personal and spiritual growth will be presented weekly by Dr. Michael Ryce. WEDNESDAY JAM GROUP Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun 1 to 4 p.m. 815-337-3534 unitywoodstock.org Acoustic musicians meet weekly to play music together. Everyone is welcome to attend to join in or to listen. BINGO Wednesdays Woodstock Moose Lodge 406 Clay St. 7 to 9:30 pm. 815-338-0126 Games will include crossfire. Food will be available. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. SOBER MOMS AA MEETING Thursdays Blue Lotus Temple 221 Dean St. 10 a.m. 847-809-1104 Moms with a desire to stop drinking are invited to meet with the group. BRIDGE FUN FRIDAYS Fridays St. Ann’s Episcopal Church 503 W. Jackson 9:30 to noon 815-338-0950 stanns@stannswoodstock.org Players of every skill level are invited to play bridge. LIVE MUSIC AT EXPRESSLY LESLIE’S Fridays Woodstock Square Mall 110 S. Johnson St. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 815-338-2833 See The Entertainer, page 9. VFW FISH FRY Fridays VFW Post 5040 240 N. Throop St. 5 to 8 p.m. $8.50 815-338-5040 Fried fish plus additional menu choices will be served. This event is open to the public. BEST BET SELECTION To submit calendar items, e-mail pr@thewoodstockindependent.com or visit thewoodstockindependent.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Jan. 8-14, 2014

Service Directory AC/HEATING

19

Small blocks are $40 for 4 weeks. Call 815-701-9268 and ask for Jen for details.

CARPENTRY

ATTORNEY

CLEANING SERVICES

COLLISION REPAIR

Heating, Cooling, Plumbing and Water Heaters

Woodstock 815-337-4200

e on r servic 24 -hou & models es all mak

Boiler & h heating ot water speciali sts!

24-Hour Service ASPHALT SERVICES

MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF SERVICE CALL - Service upgrades Since - Repairs 1986 - Maintenance

FINANCIAL SERVICES

ENGINE REPAIR

ELCTRC. CONTRACTOR

B&J SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

Residential - Commercial

Authorized and stocked service center for Briggs & Stratton, Tecumseh & Kohler Engine Co., Honda, Subaru-Robin, Engs., Murray & M.T.D. products.

Chain saws serviced & sharpened.

Delaware Electric Co.

Call 815-648-2813

Fully Insured Fully Licensed

10302 Alden Rd., Alden, IL

815-338-3139

HEALTH INSURANCE

FOLK MUSIC LESSONS

HOME EXTERIORS

PAINTING Professional interior and exterior painting. Fully insured. 35+ yrs exp. Free estimates. Local references. Senior discounts.Winter Rates

J.B. Decorating 847-658-8512

INSURANCE

REMODELING

INSURANCE

Mark Mitchell Insurance Agency 5RXWHÂ&#x2021;:RRGVWRFN

815-334-1000 www.markismyagent.com SPACE FOR RENT Party? Anniversary? Baby Shower? Birthday? Retirement? Wedding Reception? Meeting? Woodstock Church Hall with full kitchen available daytime or evenings. Reasonable rates.

Redeemer Lutheran Church For details, call (815) 338-9370 www.rlcw.com

TECHNOLOGY

TUTOR

To Advertise, Call Jen at 815-338-8040 Crossword Answers


20

Jan. 8-14, 2014

SERVICE DIRECTORY/CLASSIFIEDS

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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ClassiďŹ ed Ads

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FOR SALE/RENT

MISC

Lake Front Lots - North of Elkhorn, WI. $20,000 & $30,000. 815-861-1604

Need Legal Help? FREE REFERRAL Call 877-270-3855 Courtesy of the Illinois State Bar Association at www.IllinoisLawyerFinder.com

YOUR TRULY LOCAL NEWS SOURCE

FOSTERS WANTED

today.

HELP WANTED OWNER OPERATORS Average $3K per week! Be out up to 14 days and enjoy guaranteed home time! Weekly settlements. Cardinal Greatwide pays loaded or unloaded. 100% fuel surcharge to driver. Class-A CDL & 1yr driving experience. Fleet Owners Welcome. Operate under your own authority or ours! Call Matt 866-904-8367. DriveForCardinal.com 40 cents ALL MILES! MACHINERY HAULERS. Flatbed, Stepdeck & RGN. Practical miles paid weekly! $1000 signon bonus. Paid health insurance + Much More! Class A CDL. Call Dawn at 309-946-3230 or apply at www.tennanttrucklines.com

Subscribe to

Call (815) 338-8040 to receive The Independent every week.

K9 Lifeline Rescue, Inc and Dalmatian Rescue of Wisconsin is a licensed, non SURÂżWF5HVFXHJURXS:H have several dogs and puppies available for adoption, however our biggest need right now is obtaining more foster homes.

Regular price: $35/year in 60098 & 60097 zip codes.

UĂ&#x160;/ Ă&#x160;7"" -/" Ă&#x160; * 671 E. Calhoun St. Woodstock, IL 60098 (815) 338-8040 thewoodstockindependent.com

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WANT TO BUY

WANTED TO BUY Old or new working or not outboard motors, chainsaws, motorcycles, mopeds, bicycles, ďŹ shing tackle, all sorts of stuff. CASH ON THE SPOT 815-322-6383

NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENT

Please visit our website for more information www.K9Lifeline.com

Sunnyside Apartments - Marengo (Section 8 Coupon Welcome) 1 BR $600-700/ month, 2 BR $700-800/month Free parking, coin laundry on premises, near town and school Security deposit special, mention this ad. 1060-2 Briden Drive and 610 E. Grant Hwy. Marengo, IL Habla espanol ->Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;xĂ&#x2C6;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C; ,Â&#x153;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;{

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Partners In Excellenceâ&#x20AC;? OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass passenger policy. 2012 & Newer equipment. 100% NO touch. Butler Transport 1-800528-7825 www.butlertransport. com Tanker & Flatbed Company Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business CALL TODAY 800-277-0212 or www. driveforprime.com

NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENT

Drivers - CDL-A DRIVERS NEEDED! Now hiring solos & teams in your area! Small ComSDQ\%,*%HQHÂżWV7RS3D\IRU Hazmat. CDL Grads Welcome! 888-928-6011 www.Drive4Total. com

Sunnyside Apartments - Woodstock (Section 8 Coupon Welcome) 1 BR $750/ month, 2 BR $800-820/month Free parking, coin laundry on premises, near town and school Security deposit special, mention this ad. 750-756 St. Johns Road, Woodstock, IL Habla espanol ->Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;xĂ&#x2C6;nÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x201C; ,Â&#x153;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;{

Start the New Year with a Great Career by Joining our Team. Class A Professional Drivers Call 877-294-2777 for more details or visit SuperServiceLLC. com Drivers IMMEDIATE OPENINGS REGIONAL and OTR deBoer Transportation Experienced Drivers and Owner Ops $1000 Sign On Bonus Mileage Bonus Avail. 800-825-8511 www.drivedeboer.com

MISC. Read the whole story in Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Celebration ads share your joy with everyone! 4â&#x20AC;? block with picture only

$25.00

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To Advertise, Call Jen at

815-338-8040 CLUES ACROSS 1. NOHOW 6. Record (abbr.) 9. Hair detangler 13. â&#x20AC;&#x153;l836 siegeâ&#x20AC;? of U.S. 14. Old name for Tokyo 15. Largest continent 16. Showed old movie 17. Clatter 18. Considered one by one 19. Chinese cinnamon spice tree 21. Frequently 22. 3 person 32 card game 23. Misaddressed mail (slang) 25. Expresses pleasure 26. Samba or basket rummy 31. Military leader (abbr.) 33. A citizen of Iran 34. Environmental Protection Agency 35. Carbon, radioactive or varve 36. Loss of electricity 41. Mass. Cape 43. Mediator 44. 1/1000 of a tala 45. Players at 1st, 2nd & 3rd 46. Covered Greek portico 49. Bring upon oneself 51. Leuciscus cephalus 52. Cold War foe U___ 53. Bumpkins or hayseeds 59. Fleshy seed cover 60. Golf ball prop 61. Antipathetic 62. Wait or tarry 63. Weather map line ___bar 64. Civilian dress 65. Relaxing resorts 66. Box (abbr.) 67. Burning crime

CLUES DOWN 1. Informant (slang) 2. Olive tree genus 3. Armed conďŹ&#x201A;icts 4. Am. Music Awards 5. Dance mix DJ Einhorn 6. Oxidation-reduction 7. Structure 8. Modern 9. Roman Conqueror 10. So. Honshu bay city 11. 8th C. BC minor Hebrew prophet 12. = to 100 satang 20. In active opposition 24. 007â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flemming 26. 12th century Spanish hero El ___ 27. Macaw genus 28. Slave rebellionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Turner 29. Cuckoo 30. From a time 32. Applies with quick strokes 37. Fasten with string 38. Teller replacement 39. Command right 40. Sea eagle 42. Most closely set 43. __ Dhabi, Arabian capital 44. Marten furs 46. Strike workers 47. Thysanopter 48. Louise de la Rameeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pen name 50. King of Thebes 54. __ mater, oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school 55. Time unit 56. Klutzes 57. __ Von Bismarck, Iron Chancellor 58. Front of the leg

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SPORTS

Meiners

GAMES OF THE WEEK

Continued from Page 24

mates are from Washington, Colorado and Arizona, and they come to Milwaukee, living away from their families with â&#x20AC;&#x153;billetâ&#x20AC;? families, or host families, for the opportunity to play hockey on this stage. As a high school junior, Sierra played the 20122013 season for CCM, a co-op program consisting of players from Crystal Lake Central High School, Dundee-Crown High School, McHenry High School, Woodstock High School and Woodstock North High School. Sierra was second in scoring on that team with 17 points on seven goals and 10 assists in 14 games, helping them to the Chicago Metro League Championship and earning all-state honors. e real story here isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that Sierra plans to continue playing hockey in college â&#x20AC;&#x201C; she does, of course. e Admirals have given her the opportunity to be recruited to play hockey by colleges throughout the Midwest. Sierra has been diligent about seeking out schools where she can play hockey and earn a degree in nursing, the ďŹ eld she plans to pursue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never make a penny off of it,â&#x20AC;? Sierra said of the sport she loves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I really wanted to play it in college because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve spent my whole life doing it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We scratched out all the schools that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have nursing, and we looked at the ones that had hockey and we circled them. And we went out and explored them in the summer.â&#x20AC;? Sierra has been accepted at several schools and is leaning toward attending Finlandia University, located in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. e real story here is a story of commitment â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from Sierra and her parents. Playing hockey at this level requires that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;e word is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;commitment,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; but maybe it should be â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;committed,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? joked Matt Meiners. In addition to completing her senior year in high school, Sierra has to be in Milwaukee for practice Tuesday and ursday of each week. On those days she comes home and works on homework until she has to leave for practice. e round-trip commute to practice is roughly three hours, where she spends her time continuing her studies or listening to music. After practice she gets back into the car, usually arriving home after midnight, in time for a few hours of sleep before getting up for school the next day. atâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the easy part. e tournament, or showcase, schedule is where the story becomes epic. e Admiralsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; road schedule includes weekend trips to New Hampshire, New York, Minnesota and Ontario, Canada. e road trips are made by way of plane, chartered bus or car chauffeured by Sierraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents, and usu-

ally consist of four or ďŹ ve games over the weekend. e Meiners have often been able to multi-task over the course of the trips, using them for college visits, sightseeing or family reunions to visit Mattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family in Minnesota. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Its ďŹ nancial commitment, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun,â&#x20AC;? said Matt Meiners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;is past summer (Sierra) had a week showcase up in Toronto, so we did a family vacation to the Toronto area and got to see the Hockey Hall of Fame. And we got to go to Niagara Falls, and we ďŹ t that in with the Rochester (New York) trip.â&#x20AC;? As if all of this wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough, Sierra is a threesport athlete. In addition to her hectic hockey schedule, Sierra also plays on the Woodstock North softball and tennis teams. Sierra plays catcher on the softball team and No. 1 singles on the tennis team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I deďŹ nitely would say that having the other two sports is very important also,â&#x20AC;? said Sierra. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting away from just that one thing. Spreading out and getting a chance to try out different sports, which I really love, and I love tennis and I love softball. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know a lot of people when they go out for these sports theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always so stressed out, and for me these are my â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;wind downâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and relaxing time.â&#x20AC;? While the schedule is taxing on Sierra and her parents, they all seem to be doing ďŹ ne. Matt Meiners said that while they keep watch over Sierra to make sure sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing OK, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve really never had anything to be worried about. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty self-regulated,â&#x20AC;? said Matt Meiners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had to make sacriďŹ ces. ere (are) things sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chosen not to do. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very social person, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever gone to a homecoming dance. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t direct, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had to. And her grades have always been very good.â&#x20AC;? Sierra was upset to have had to miss her senior homecoming dance this past fall but said she makes time to get together with her friends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You deďŹ nitely miss out on certain friend opportunities, but you can always make up for it,â&#x20AC;? said Sierra. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My friends understand it too, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;oh youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re home this weekend. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do something.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Sierra plans to take off hockey this spring to focus on playing softball and ďŹ nishing out her senior year of high school. Hockey will continue next summer and in the fall, wherever she ends up at college. Until then sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll continue her manic schedule, playing the game she loves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ere (have) only been a couple times in my life where I felt like I was overwhelmed,â&#x20AC;? said Sierra. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But my parents are a big support in what I do. And allowing me to do it, which is crazy.â&#x20AC;?

Richmond-Burton vs. Marian Central (Wrestling) 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10, at Marian Central Catholic High School Rockford Lutheran vs. Woodstock (Wrestling) 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 10, at

Whiting

Woodstock High School What to look for: Marian and WHS will be looking to win home matches while continuing to prepare for the IHSA regional tournament which will be held Saturday, Feb. 8.

Continued from Page 24

2012-2013 seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;her senior yearâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;when she led University of Dubuque to its most successful season in its programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 33-year history. In her team surpassing its highest number of recorded wins in a season, Whiting also found herself as the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alltime leading scorer with 1,737 points. She scored 667 points for the season, leading all NCAA D-III shooters. e Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basketball Coaches Association and D3hoops.com named her Honorable Mention AllAmerican, another ďŹ rst for a UD student-athlete. Her average of 23.8 points per game ranked sixth among all NCAA divisions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was one of the best single seasons Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen a player have,â&#x20AC;? said University of Dubuque head coach Mark Noll of her senior year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her lowest game was 21 points.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone we played knew she would take the big shot when we needed her to,â&#x20AC;? added Noll. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone built their defense around trying to stop her.â&#x20AC;? Noll also noted Whitingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contributions earning her Iowa Intercollegiate

Athletic Conference AllConference honors for four consecutive years. He said her intensity as a player and now a coach is one reason why heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happy she is still around to inďŹ&#x201A;uence the UD program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Half the team played with her and half saw her play,â&#x20AC;? said Noll. â&#x20AC;&#x153;e players respect and listen to her because she has â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;been there, done thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at a high level.â&#x20AC;? e way Whiting sees it, coaching is simply her way of helping younger players achieve their goals. While she and Noll agree transitioning from player to coach is difďŹ cult, the rewards are great. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a player, you never realize not to take it for granted,â&#x20AC;? said Whiting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You never think it will end, and, before you know it, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done.â&#x20AC;? And so helping the players have fun and enjoy the game is one of Whitingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new goals, along with guiding her players down the path to success. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To say to them, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Next time, try this,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and to see them go down the court and do it rightâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;there is no better feeling than that.â&#x20AC;?


THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

23

SCOREBOARD

» COLUMN

DeWane, Loras off to strong start Men’s swimming Matt DeWane helped the Loras College men’s swimming team to a 3-1 start in dual meets. Loras is 3-1 through their first four dual meets and split their dual meets between Augustana College and Simpson College, losing a 152-79 battle to Augustana but beatDan ing Simpson 15468. In the win over Chamness Simpson, DeWane, The College a Woodstock High Report School graduate, scored points in two individual events and helped Loras earn points in a relay. DeWane finished second in the 100-yard breaststroke (1 minute, 9.0 seconds) and third in the 100-yard butterfly (1:06.03). He also was a member of the Loras 200-yard medley relay, which finished second in 1:48.61. In the loss to Augustana, DeWane was part of the Loras 400-yard medley relay team, which finished third in 4:00.13. Haley Brasile, Woodstock, and the rest of the Western Illinois University swimming team competed in the House of Champions Meet, which was held at Indiana University-Purdue UniversityIndianapolis. Brasile competed in four events, two individual events and two relays. She was part of the Western Illinois 400-yard freestyle relay (3:42.15)

Horse

Jan. 8-14, 2014

and 800-yard freestyle relay (8:07.88). ey were 10th and 12th, respectively. Individually, she finished 35th in the 200-yard freestyle (2:06.48) and 100yard freestyle (:58.18). Western Illinois took seventh with 591.5 points. University of Wisconsin-Green Bay took first with 1,819 points. Women’s soccer Lewis University’s Susan Thomas, Marian Central Catholic, helped the Lady Flyers post an 8-7-2 mark this year. ey were 6-7-2 in the Great Lakes Valley Conference. omas finished with one goal and three assists. She had a total of five points. omas, a midfielder, played in all 17 games and made one start. e Illinois Wesleyan University women’s soccer team was 13-2-6 overall and 5-1-1 in the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin this year. Tess Bottorff, Marian Central Catholic, an IWU junior, did not have any stats this year. She played in three games and made two starts. Football Drew Walkington, Woodstock, played in nine games for the North Park University Vikings this year. Walkington, who had 64 carries for 262 yards, also caught six passes for 39 yards. Defensively, he had two tackles, one of which was a solo. North Park finished 3-7 overall and 3-4 in the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin. Volleyball North Park University’s Megan Tobias, Woodstock, played sparingly this year. e sophomore defensive specialist finished with 13 digs, six service aces and two assists. North Park finished 1123 overall and 1-6 in the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin. Dan Chamness follows the college athletic careers of Woodstock-area athletes.

Continued from Page 24

Caileigh practice with their horses and ponies several days a week, working on technique, form, fitness and relationship building. “It’s not just getting on a bike and going and doing X amount of miles and coming back in and putting the bike back down,” Amber Bauman said. “It’s working with a teammate that has their own mind and their own personality. But non-horse people don’t get that.” Caileigh said it’s challenging to explain to her friends that horseback riding is just as much a sport as any other. “Sometimes it’s kind of hard for my friends to understand because they’re like, ‘Oh, it’s not a sport.’ And I’m like, ‘Yes, it is because you basically use the same muscles that you use for sports,” Caileigh said. While they mostly compete in the summer from May through September, the girls spend a considerable amount of time training in the off-season, having to juggle school work like their fellow student-athletes. “It’s the commitment too,” said Erin Widmayer, Caileigh’s mother and softball coach at Marian Central Catholic High School. “ey’re out here just as much as their friends are at volleyball practice. I always say to the parents, it’s just like a club sport. ey’re out here literally three, four nights a week and then showing on the weekends. Friday, Saturday and Sunday are the shows, so it’s just like a volleyball tournament for a club sport.” With the practice and training, the girls said they have really learned a lot from their “teammates.” After being thrown from her ponies several times, Alexis said their actions have taught her “how

Alexis Bauman, 10, left, and Caileigh, 12, are year-round equestrian athletes. COURTESY PHOTO

to learn to sit up and ride,” and has made her a better rider. Alexis and Caileigh also practice on different horses to teach them to adjust to each individual equine. Caileigh said she enjoys the practical experience she gains from interacting with the horses at Valley View Acres for the past five years. ough she has to muck stalls and complete some chores, she said she likes being around the horses and the barn. She said she has even started thinking of becoming a veterinarian. “She’s learned so much out here,” Erin Widmayer said. “She’s seen birth, she’s seen the other extreme. … She learns a lot more than just to ride.” Amber Bauman said several high school riders at her barn are working toward their varsity letter through the Illinois High School Association equestrian program, which will help them obtain equestrian scholarships from colleges.

MARIAN CENTRAL Boys basketball Q Jan. 3: MC 78, Montini 67 For MC, Nick Waytula scored 18 points. Q Dec. 28: MC 74, Crystal Lake Central 54 For MC, Matt Ricchiuto scored 18 points. Q Dec. 27: MC 39, Barrington 65 For MC, Adam Pischke scored 9 points. Q Dec. 26: MC 58, Zion Benton 74 For MC, Adam Pischke scored 17 points. Q Dec. 23: MC 61, Crystal Lake South 75 For MC, Adam Pischke scored 21 points. WOODSTOCK Boys basketball Q Dec. 28: WHS 56, Marengo 58 Q Dec. 27: WHS 61, Round Lake 46 Q Dec. 23: WHS 52, Grant 47 Girls basketball Q Jan. 4: WHS 52, Indian Creek 41 Brecken Overly scored 14 points. Q Jan. 2: WHS 48, Johnsburg 52 Q Dec. 30: WHS 57, Harvest Christian 24 Hope Brainard scored 14 points.

Q Dec. 28: WHS 55, St. Benedict For WHS, Shea Carzoli scored points. Q Dec. 28: WHS 38, Hebron 42 For WHS, Grace Beattie scored points. Q Dec. 27: WHS 46, Durand 59 For WHS, Shea Carzoli scored points.

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WOODSTOCK NORTH Boys basketball Q Dec. 28: WNHS 43, Antioch 53 For WNHS, Nick Herscha scored 16 points. Q Dec. 27: WNHS 49, Stillman Valley 36 For WNHS, Nick Herscha scored 16 points. Q Dec. 23: WNHS 55, Westminster Christian 60 For WNHS, Josh Jandron scored 19 points. Wrestling Q Dec. 3: WNHS 18, Crystal Lake Central 54 For WNHS, Gerardo Ortiz and Jesse Cordoba won by pin.


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Jan. 8-14, 2014

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Sports “I’ll never make a penny off of it. But I really wanted to play it in college because I’ve spent my whole life doing it.” —Sierra Meiners, hockey player

» EQUESTRIAN SPORTS ILL. SHORT CIRCUIT AND ILL. HUNTER JUMPER ASSOCIATION

Woodstock girls claim victories in year-end horse series By LISA KUCHARSKI The Independent

who shaped her career, including those at Woodstock High School. “I got along great with my coaches, and they were my role models,” said Whiting. “ey were hard on me but honest and always helped me focus on what would make me better.” Whiting still never imagined what her future would hold when she left Woodstock for Dubuque, Iowa. Her mastery of the court progressed until during the

While their friends lug bats and gloves to travel softball games in the summer, Alexis Bauman and Caileigh Widmayer haul their horses around the area to compete at high-level hunter/jumper horse shows. is year, the girls earned several high-point and yearend titles competing in the Illinois Short Circuit and Illinois Hunter Jumper Association shows. Caileigh, 12, a Northwood Middle School student, claimed two championship titles as the 2013 IHJA-B Short Stirrup Hunter and Equitation high-point winner competing with Dexter, aka Macho Man. Prairiewood Elementary School student Alexis, 10, was one of the youngest competitors in her events, competing at age 9. With her ponies Dusty, aka White Knight, and Ella Enchanted, Alexis was named the 2013 IHJA-B Short Stirrup Hunter and Equitation reserve champion and placed sixth in Limit Equitation, a class of exhibitors 18 and under. In the Illinois Short Circuit, Alexis and Ella Enchanted won reserve horse of the year, reserve champion low hunter and low equitation, non-thoroughbred champion, pony champion and mini medal champion. Mini medal was a class with fences no higher than 2 feet 6 inches and no age restriction. “ese two girls really exemplify what horseback riding as a sport is,” said coach Amber Bauman, Alexis’ mother and owner of Valley View Acres, 5116 Mt. abor Road. “ey know what their job is to do, just like on any team. I’ve coached track, cross-country, basketball. I’ve participated in softball and volleyball. You know what your job is as an athlete on a team working with other people or, in this case, working with a 1,200-pound horse.” Along with other teammates at Valley View Acres, Alexis and

Please see Whiting, Page 23

Please see Horse, Page 23

Woodstock’s Sierra Meiners plays forward for the Milwaukee Admirals hockey team. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

» FEATURE HOCKEY

Working overtime By JASON LEARMAN The Independent Figure skating was never in the cards for Sierra Meiners. Growing up in Minnesota and a lifelong hockey player, Matt Meiners had all three of his children on skates at an early age. Son, Troy, played hockey, and daughter, Lark, was a figure skater. Matt Meiners’ youngest daughter, Sierra, knew she also wanted to be on skates and thought she wanted to follow in Lark’s footsteps as a figure skater. Meiner supported Sierra and let her give figure skating a shot but realized quickly it wasn’t right for her. “It became really apparent to us early on that [figure skating] wasn’t a good match for her,” said Matt Meiners. “When they were doing figure skating, she wanted to skate fast [and] throw herself around. So we en-

couraged her to try hockey.” Sierra “tried” hockey and hasn’t taken off her skates since. In spite of limited opportunities and programs for hockey in the area, Meiners and his wife, Vicki, have done their best to feed Sierra’s addiction to the sport. Sierra, 17, a senior at Woodstock North High School, also plays forward for the Milwaukee Admirals, a Tier 1 National Elite program, where she has three goals and three assists in 26 games so far in the 2013-2014 season. e real story here isn’t that Sierra is a very good hockey player – she is, of course. e Admirals’ program is, in essence, a showcase program where the best junior players from around the country come to play hockey and be seen by college recruiters. Some of Sierra’s Admirals teamPlease see Meiners, Page 22

WHS grad coaches college hoops as assistant By MEGAN IVERS The Independent

Mollie Whiting remembers every single open gym at McHenry County College during her freshman year of high school. e college basketball players were bigger, faster and stronger than her 14-yearold self. It was hard to keep up with them.

A Woodstock girl’s commitment to Tier 1 hockey means lots of sacrifice — and plenty of rewards

Yet in the back of her mind she knew why she was part of those scrimmages and found confidence in her coach’s belief that she could keep up. Today, with a wildly successful career as a student-athlete behind her and many years of coaching ahead of her, beginning with a stint as a grad assistant for her alma mater, University of Dubuque, Whiting has only appreciation for the coaches

Sierra Meiners hopes to play hockey in college. INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

GAMES OF THE WEEK

COLLEGE REPORT

SCOREBOARD

Gear up for a big week in preps wrestling

Dan Chamness reports on college swimming and more

Scores, stats and highlights from area high schools

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The Woodstock Independent January 8th, 2014