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Woodstock

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June 13-19, 2018

Published every Wednesday | Est. 1987 | Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill. | www.thewoodstockindependent.com | $1.00

» CITY COUNCIL

MARKETPLACE

Will your street be resurfaced?

Sales tax increase boosts 2018 work By Larry Lough LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

Help is on the way for Woodstock streets in need of repair – $1.9 million

Pampered pooches chill out at local ‘Canine Clubhouse’

worth of help. at was the 2018 street resurfacing program approved last week by the City Council. And you can thank the increase in the local sales tax last fall for much of that money. e budget will take care of the city’s “priority” projects, Jeff Van Landuyt,

IT TURNED OUT WELLES

director of Public Works, said the day after the council approved the program June 5. “We have more need than we have funds available,” he conceded. “You spread the dollars out as best you can.” Geske & Sons of Crystal Lake was awarded a contract to do the work for

Please see Streets, Page 5

» CITY COUNCIL

City lowers impact fees

PAGES 16

NEWS State shows its Route 47 plan, which would close businesses PAGE 3

Council hopes cuts spur home building

COMMUNITY Marian grad A.J. Harrison ^P[OVSKLZ[SH^ÄYTPU<:

By Larry Lough

PAGE 17

LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

INDEX OBITUARIES OPINION SCHOOLS

9 10 12

A&E MARKETPLACE COMMUNITY CALENDAR CLASSIFIED PUBLIC NOTICES PUZZLES SPORTS

15 16 17 22 24 26 27 28

The Woodstock Independent

671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 Thewoodstock independent.com

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Sculptor Bobbie Joe Scribner (right), with the help of Mayor Brian Sager, unveils his statue of Orson Welles during a dedication ceremony at the Woodstock on Film and on the Stage Mural and Sculpture Garden next to Classic Cinemas Theatre. More than 75 people attended Friday’s event. Story on Page 15.

Events site permit altered Neighbors satisfied with hours, parking By Larry Lough LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

It’s official name is Cherry Tree Inn Bed & Breakfast. Most people know it as the place

where Bill Murray’s character woke up repeatedly in the movie “Groundhog Day.” Whatever you call it, just don’t call it a “party house” – even if 100 people show up. Woodstock City Council last week amended the special use permit it approved in November to limit the Please see Permit, Page 7

You could say that years of sluggish home sales – and population growth – in the Woodstock area finally made an impact on the City Council. Seven weeks after Mayor Brian Sager asked city staff to prepare a report within three months on lowering impact fees for newhome construction, the City Council voted to decrease those fees. At their April 17 meeting, council members had heard that other nearby communities had seen significant increases in home building after slashing impact fees by as much as 50 percent – or declaring a temporary moratorium altogether on such fees. Woodstock didn’t go quite that far, but the council voted unanimously last week to lower many fees by 10 percent or more. For example, fees for a three-bedroom detached home were cut to $15,750, a reduction of 13 percent. Please see Fees, Page 4


Care with a passion that never rests

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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NEWS

Just a short drive for exceptional hospital care When it comes to your health care, you deserve a hospital that puts you first. That’s what you’ll get at Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center–Harvard. Our primary and specialty care doctors strive to provide a compassionate patient experience. From a comprehensive emergency department to private inpatient care, your needs are put first. We’ve added doctors, specialties and services to give you high-quality hospital care, just a short drive from Woodstock. It’s our honor to care for the needs of McHenry County residents. We promise to continue to grow to meet your health care needs, now and for decades to come. At Mercyhealth Hospital-Harvard, you will receive: • Minimal wait time at our emergency department • Emergency medicine physicians • Trauma-trained nurses • 24/7 care for pediatrics • ICU and inpatient care • Full-service surgical suites offering: • Eye surgery • Foot surgery • Gastroenterology procedures • General surgery • Orthopedic surgery • Pediatric surgery • Vascular procedures

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Private hospital rooms with large, private baths Ambulatory outpatient care Heart and vascular care Interventional and non-interventional pain care Accredited sleep disorders center Mercyhealth Care Center • A home-like atmosphere for long-term care and short-term rrehabilitation

Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center-Harvard is Illinois’ first hospital to be certified as an Acute Stroke Ready Hospital by The Joint Commission. Our stroke specialists are here 24/7 to rapidly diagnose and treat stroke patients who are brought to our emergency department.

Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center–Harvard 901 Grant St., Harvard, IL 60033 (815) 943-5431 MercyHealthSystem.org


Businesses, homes would be relocated if proposed widening wins state approval By Sandy Kucharski SANDY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

To many, the most drastic change in the plan would be converting existing Route 47 intersections at U.S. 14, Lake Avenue, and McConnell Road from traffic signals to roundabouts. Roundabouts would also be built at Ware and Charles roads. A new traffic signal would be added at St. John’s Road. e concern of moving four lanes of traffic under the existing Union Pacific Railroad bridge has been addressed; findings show it is possible without affecting the current structure, which would avoid an expense of $30 million, according to

NEWS

Roundabouts planned

June 13-19, 2018

Local residents, business owners, and city officials had the opportunity to see the latest plan for the improvement of Route 47 through Woodstock last week when the Illinois Department of Transportation held a public hearing at the Challenger Learning Center. Some people attended out of curiosity, while others wanted to see how the proposed construction would directly affect their homes or businesses. Most were interested in seeing progress on the project. Attendees learned the details of IDOTs “preferred alternative” for the stretch of state highway from U.S. 14 to Ware Road, which includes two travel lanes in each direction, separated by a raised curb median/ left turn lane, paved shoulders, and drainage improvements. is section of roadway will also include a sidewalk and a shared-use path. Exhibit boards, roll plot maps, and a continuously running audiovisual explained and illustrated IDOTs plan and presented an environmental assessment of the work. Project team members were present to discuss the project and answer questions.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Visitors look at the proposed changes to Route 47 with representatives from the Illinois Department of Transportation available to answer questions at the Challenger Learning Center June 7.

Steve Schilke, head of IDOT’s Consultant Studies Unit. With roundabouts at Lake Avenue and McConnell Road, and the elimination of current pedestrian walkways on both sides under the bridge, the highway would accommodate four lanes of traffic. e proposed improvements include a pedestrian tunnel under the railroad tracks. Environmental impact findings indicate about a third of an acre of wetlands would be affected by the project. Outfalls, detention basins, and bio swales would be used to counter the environmental disruption. e human environmental impact

is slightly more significant – 33.1 acres of right-of-way and 17.9 acres of farmland would need to be acquired to complete the project. Seven commercial businesses and three residences would face relocation. Businesses currently earmarked for relocation in the proposed plan are Mambo Car Wash, Dwight’s Auto, Gas Cap Fuels, a vacant business building at Judd Street and Route 47, Sunderlage Insurance, Robert T. Evans Law, and X-Vaganza Hair Studio. Schilke said one-on-one meetings had been held with all business owners along the route. Gathering stakeholder input was an important component of the June 7 hearing. e public was invited to make

statements to a court reporter during a public forum, and written comments were accepted. Written comments also will be accepted through ursday, June 21, either mailed to IDOT, 201 W. Center Court, Schaumburg, IL 30196, or submitted online via the project website, IL47WoodsdtockStudy.com. All maps and materials shown at the June 7 hearing are also available at that website. e project is approaching the end of Phase 1: the preliminary environmental and engineering study. Phase 2 – contract plan preparation – is expected to take two to three years, followed by two to three years of construction engineering and construction.

house from 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 19, at the McHenry County Administration Building, 667 Ware Road. According to a news release, the meetPUN^PSSIL[OLÄYZ[VMVWLUOV\ZLZOLSK during a month-long public comment period from June 15 to Aug. 14. CMAP will also present for comment the draft 2019-2024 Transportation Improvement Program, as well as an air-quality conformity analysis of proposed transportation

projects. The draft plan will be posted starting June 15 at www.cmap.illinois.gov/ onto2050. Residents also may submit written comments online through Aug. 14. The plan, which will replace the existing GO TO 2040 plan, is expected to be approved in October. CMAP, which was created in 2005, is a regional planning organization for Cook, DuPage, Kane, Kendall, Lake, McHenry,

and Will counties. Its comprehensive plan helps the region and its local government units to address issues of transportation, housing, economic development, open spaces, the environment, and other quality-of-life matters, the news release said. To ask questions about the open house or make requests for accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act, call 312-386-8802 or send an email to onto2050@cmap.illinois.gov.

Businesses, homes affected

IN BRIEF Open house next week for regional development plan

Local residents may comment on an upcoming draft of a comprehensive regional development plan when the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning conducts a public hearing next week in Woodstock. The agency document, called “ON TO 2050,” will be discussed at a public open

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Route 47 project outlined at IDOT hearing

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NEWS

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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Campaign seeks support for services to homeless Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

Pioneer Center has launched an awareness and fundraising effort – “Homelessness Does Not Take a ‘Summer Break’” – to raise awareness about the unique, ongoing challenges faced during summer months by people who are homeless. e campaign is seeking monthly pledges of $15, $30 or $60 a month to help provide the program with steady, sustainable funding to keep its services open year-round. According to a news release, Pioneer Center for Human Services operates the county’s only day center and emergency overnight shelter, open 365 days a year at McHenry County PADS in Woodstock. More than 400 people seek refuge at PADS each year for its weekly health clinics, counseling, lockers, access to laundry, showers, computers, and kitchen. As summer approaches, PADS

Compassionate Care within a state of the art setting

church shelter sites throughout the county will close for the season. When the homeless don’t have access to clean drinking water, they can suffer from dehydration in addition to chronic health conditions such as asthma, depression, and migraines that are heightened by the heat. Limited resources lead to poor hygiene, the news release said, as well as infections and myriad illnesses when they don’t receive proper care.

Donations support services McHenry County PADS operates almost entirely on private contributions to keep its services open. e program remains the county’s only fixed site, year-round emergency shelter serving all populations – men, women and children. “For only a dollar a day, someone can truly make an impact on another person’s life,” said Sam Tenuto, coCEO of Pioneer Center. “ey can

give someone access to essential services that address the most basic of human needs.” A monthly pledge can help to provide the more than 10,000 trips that PADS buses make each year, as well as counseling and connections to resources and basic vital needs. To donate or to learn more, visit https:// www.pioneercenter.org/donate/. Pioneer Center’s roots began in 1954 with five Wonder Lake families who met weekly in each other’s homes to explore ideas and share accomplishments of ways to help their disabled children reach their full potential. As other families heard about them, they grew and now consist of about 300 employees who help more than 2,000 individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities. Pioneer has facilities in McHenry and Woodstock, homes and apartments and, in some cases, find employment for their clients. Go to www.pioneercenter.org for more information.

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FEES

Continued from Page 1

Why now? Impact fees are paid by builders to help local government units – such as schools, parks, police, and the library – to provide services immediately until developments begin to pay property taxes.

“We don’t have a need for new schools right now. We do have a need for new residents.” - City Council member Mike Turner With new home sales picking up lately, local resident Anne Maidment had a simple question: “Why?” Council member Mike Turner said that while sales of homes priced $250,000 and under are stronger, the market for more expensive homes is “soft.” Besides, he argued, Woodstock School District 200 enrollment is only about 55 percent of building capacity, the schools have no need for new construction – which is how schools use impact fees. “We don’t have a need for new schools right now,” Turner said. “We do have a need for new residents.” Councilman Mark Saladin said the city’s relatively high fees seemed to discourage home construction. “At this point developers are not willing to put a shovel in the ground to build a street,” he said. “at’s what we’re trying to accelerate.”

‘Update regularly’ A memo to the council from Joe Napolitano, the city’s director of Building and Zoning, had reported only 14 homes were built in 2016, and 40 in 2017 – after the city began to defer payment of some fees until a home was occupied. Kim Meier of KLM Builders appeared at the council’s April 17 meeting to complain about the high impact fees. Citizen Maidment asked the council last week whether residents could also ask that fees be adjusted if residential construction takes off. “We can increase these if we have a need in the future,” Councilman Turner assured her. City Attorney Ruth Schlossberg explained the city was also legally obligated to reduce impact fees in line with decreases in land values – something Woodstock hadn’t done since the local building boom from 15 and 20 years ago, when the fees were adopted. “e fee has to be related to fair market value,” she said. “It can’t be a fictional number. … is needs to be updated regularly.”


STREETS

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almost $1.5 million, the lowest of four bidders. e high bid was more than $1.8 million. Resurfacing is tentatively scheduled to begin July 17.

15 projects added

Queen Anne Road (North city limits to Berry Farm)

Island Court (Terry Court to end)

Moraine Drive (South Street to Westwood Trail)

Forest Avenue (Austin Avenue to Blakely Street)

Douglas Street (Judd to Calhoun streets)

Hayward Avenue (South Street to Herrington Place)

Blakely Street (Highland to Kimball avenues)

Gerry Street (Gerry Court to Hickory Lane)

Cherry Court (Clay to Tappan streets)

Highland Avenue (Dean to Muriel streets)

Quinlan Lane (Pleasant Street to Becking Avenue)

Tryon Street (South to Dean streets)

Queen Anne Road (Route 120 to Banford Road)

Meadow Avenue (Tappan to Wheeler streets)

Halma Lane (West Halma to East Halma)

Meadow Avenue (Wheeler to Queen Anne streets)

Lower parking lot in Emricson Park (south of Dream Field)

Clay Street (Walnut Drive to Terry Court)

Church Street parking lot

No price increase e city was fortunate resurfacing prices did not increase over last year, Van Landuyt said, which he attributed in part to the large amount of work that was put out for bids because of the extra income from the sales tax.

e council also adopted a resolution to appropriate $712,000 in 201819 from the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motor fuel tax. e council still has to approve individual expenditures from the money, which is proposed for trafďŹ c controls maintenance, street lighting, crack sealing, pavement marking, equipment rental to remove and haul snow from the downtown, and the purchase of ice

control materials. No one showed up at the City Council meeting to comment on the street program, and it was adopted without discussion as part of the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consent agenda. Van Landuyt said residents who wanted to report street repair needs should call the Public Works ofďŹ ce, 815-338-6118.

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The McHenry County Historical Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perkins Hall Players will return to Perkins Hall at 7 p.m. Wednesday June 20, for the historical drama, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Should We Give a Dam or Not?â&#x20AC;? Join in the debate surrounding the construction of a dam on the Fox River in the early 1900s. The often heated exchanged pitted recreational boaters and the tourism-related businessmen against farmers and riverfront property owners. Come and join in the civil melodrama, located on the southwest corner of Garden Valley and Franklinville roads near Woodstock. Period clothing encouraged. Don Peasley Photo Collection, McHenry County Historical Society Light refreshments. Free admission.

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NEWS

budget for regular street maintenance.

June 13-19, 2018

A memo from Van Landuyt listed only four streets that would have been resurfaced if the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales tax had not been increased to 8 percent â&#x20AC;&#x201C; up one percentage point â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in September. at extra funding will pay to resurface an additional 13 streets and two city parking lots â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the lower lot in Emricson Park and a small lot off Church Street across from the Challenger Center. Work on streets and parking lots make up nearly $1.6 million of the program. e budget Van Landuyt presented also calls for $137,300 for engineering expenses; $80,000 for â&#x20AC;&#x153;skip patching,â&#x20AC;? which is â&#x20AC;&#x153;more than just pot-hole ďŹ llingâ&#x20AC;?; $30,000 for â&#x20AC;&#x153;pavement preservationâ&#x20AC;? to extend the life of streets; and $60,000 for a resurfacing contingency fund. Van Landuyt said ďŹ lling of pot holes, which he called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;year roundâ&#x20AC;? job, will come out of the street departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

2018 Street Resurfacing Program

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Continued from Page 1


NEWS

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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Summer-Fall Events calendar and Dining GUide Woodstock making magic happen again this summer Local diners get into having meals outside

ALSO: McHenry County Fair, Summer in the Park Woodstock Folk Festival... and a local dining guide

Woodstock

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Look for this Summer Fun guide in mailboxes Friday, June 15!


Continued from Page 1

number of events and guests allowed at 344 Fremont St. “What’s in here, everyone can go home happy,” neighbor Anne Maidment said at the end of the longest discussion of the 100-minute meeting. “We want to make sure what’s in here, we can feel comfortable with.” Starting with the original request by George and Lori Miarecki for a special use permit in a residential neighborhood, the neighbors have been concerned about traffic, parking, and noise that can come with a large gathering.

People limits, curfews

TIF advances quietly A sometimes-controversial subject received no discussion at all during the June 5 meeting of the council. A proposal to study a new tax increment financing district was lumped in with several other measures on the council’s consent agenda after no one asked that the matter be considered separately. e city’s current TIF district will expire in 2020, 23 years after it was established. Some properties in the 1997 district, such as the Old

Brewery license OK’d

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY LARRY LOUGH

Courthouse and train depot, would be moved to the new district. e new proposal leads the district out Judd Street to Route 47 – taking in the former Fresh Market property – then goes north before turning east along Lake Avenue and U.S. 14. e council approved a feasibility study of the proposed TIF district, which will be completed for $31,000 by Teska Associates, of Evanston, the same firm that advised the city on the 1997 TIF. A TIF diverts property tax money on new developments in the district,

In other business, the council: Approved a liquor license for Shadow View Brewing to establish a brew pub at 2400 Lake Shore Drive, off U.S. 14 on the city’s far east side. John and Mark Koziol plan to establish Woodstock’s first brew pub, but they insisted they had no interest in video gambling at their business, as many local bars and restaurants have. e council considered the license separately at the request of Councilman Dan Hart, who, as a liquor license holder, recused himself from the discussion and vote. Authorized replacement of video surveillance cameras at City Hall, the Recreation Center, and Woodstock Police Department. Honored Vietnam veteran Orville “Butch” Borchardt for his work in supporting the causes of military veterans in and around Woodstock.

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NEWS

e amended permit will allow up to 16 events a year: eight indoors with up to 60 people; six outdoors with up to 60 people; and two outdoors during daytime with a maximum of 100 people. e Miareckis said they expected to host mostly small events, many with as few as 10 guests. “We don’t want the neighbors to be worried we’re going to have a party every day,” Lori Miarecki told the council. e permit had limited events to 25

using that money for infrastructure and other projects to encourage development of “blighted” parcels. But that denies the new income to other taxing units, especially schools, whose budgets are largely dependent on property tax income. A tentative timeline for the proposal includes a public hearing in late October or early November.

June 13-19, 2018

people after neighbors got spooked by the Miareckis’ proposal for a limit of 160. e revised permit establishes curfews for music and people; limits parking in the immediate neighborhood and requires valet service for the outdoor events of more than 25 people; and requires administrative oversight from the city. “We’re very willing to work with the community … and the administrative process,” George Miarecki told the council. Councilman Mark Saladin said communication was the key to making the venture work in a residential area. “It’s a unique business in a unique neighborhood,” he said.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

PERMIT


WOOD WINDS CONCERT?

STREET OPEN(ISH)

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June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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NEWS

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY LARRY LOUGH

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

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Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

Two terms, 10 years

Alvera Jean Reed, 89, of Woodstock, died Saturday, June 9, 2018, surrounded by her family. She was born Oct. 9, 1928, in Woodstock to Edward and Mildred (Dibler) Nickels. She married John O. Reed on May 6, 1948, in McHenry. Jean was a member of St. Mary Alvera Jean Church in WoodReed stock. She was a charter member of the Genealogy Society of McHenry County and a member of the McHenry County Historical Society. She loved to travel and had been a member of the Woodstock Woodchucks and the Rainbow Chasers Camping Club. Jean had worked for the McHenry County 9LJVYKLYÂťZ6MĂ&#x201E;JLVU[OL>VVKZ[VJR:X\HYL before starting her family. She later returned to the new courthouse after the passing of her husband. She will also be remembered as a den mother with Cub Scout Pack 363. She is survived by her children, Robert (Rebecca) Reed and William Reed, both of Woodstock, David (Darla) Reed, of Colfax,

N.C., and Margaret â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peggieâ&#x20AC;? (John) Byard and Mary (Michael) Hoyt, both of Woodstock; a daughter-in-law, Teresa Reed; 18 grandchildren, Ashley Reed, Thomas (JanneĂŠ) Reed, Brian (Elizabeth) Reed, Monet 8\PUU 4\WO` 4VUPX\L 1PT 9`HU 9PJV (Shanell) Reed, Gregory (Jennifer) Byard, Daniel Reed, Grace Reed, Cameron (Emily) Cross, Courtney Cross, Catherine Cross, Christian Cross, Madison Fain, McKenzie Fain, Michael (Amanda) Witbrod, Anthony (Sarah) Witbrod, and Brian (Kristin) Witbrod; 27 great-grandchildren, Sean, Sophia, Natalie, Melanie, Mia, Conor, Reyna, Alana, Liam, Jared, Gabe, Ă&#x2030;ireann, Brendan, Patrick, Ian, Eve, Myles, Emma, Ethan, Lillian, Micah, Rita, Olive, Thomas, Stephanie, Alex, and Brandon; and a cousin, Marilyn Leigh. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, in 1986; a son, Michael Reed; a sister, Marie Nickels; and two daughters-inlaw, Rachael and Dorothy Reed. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 13, at Schneider Leucht Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, Woodstock. The visitation will continue from 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. Mass Thursday, June 14, at St. Mary Catholic Church, Woodstock. Interment will follow in Calvary Catholic Cemetery, Woodstock. Memorials may be made to Woodstock Fire/Rescue or St. Mary Church.

POLICE BLOTTER Woodstock Police Dept. Q Manuel A. Rios, 32, Woodstock, was arrested May 24 at St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Birch roads on charges of aggravated driving with license revoked, operating an uninsured motor vehicle, and no registration light. Held without bond. Court date June 22. Q Arthur W. Anderson, 65, Woodstock, was arrested at 101 Church St. on a charge of littering. Released after posting 10 percent of a $1,500 bond. Court date June 21. Q Robert C. Higgins, 67, transient, was arrested May 26 at 145 S. Eastwood Drive on a charge of criminal trespass to property. Held on $1,500 bond. Court date June 21. Q Janier A. Luna Victoria, 55, was arrested May 27 on charges of driving with license revoked, no seat belt, and a Kane County warrant charging no valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license. Released after posting $250 plus 10 percent of $1,500 bond. Court dates June 7 and June 28. Q Dawn L. Jorda, 40, Elgin, was arrested May 27 at 82 N. Eastwood Drive on two counts of domestic battery. Bond and court date to be set. Q Female juvenile, 14, Huntley, was arrested May 29 at 1200 Claussen Drive on a charge of disorderly conduct. Released to parent. Court date to be set. Q Philip D. Crimaldi, 46, transient, was

arrested May 15 at 315 N. Madison St. on a Cook County warrant for possession of a controlled substance. Held without bond. Court date to be set. Q Alise K. Rutherford, 31, transient, was arrested May 15 at 219 S. Madison St. on a charge of unlawful violation of an order of protection. Held without bond. Court date to be set. Q Hazel A. Flores, 28, Fox Lake, was arrested May 16 at 950 S. Eastwood Drive on charges of aggravated assault and criminal trespass to property. Held on $1,500 bond. Court date June 21. Q Ricardo J. Carreno, 35, Woodstock, was arrested May 17 at 629 Washington St. on a charge of unlawful violation of a protective order. Held without bond. Court date to be set. Q Jacob T. Gregory, 27, Spring Grove, was arrested May 18 at 326 Hutchins Court on a charge of unlawful violation of an order of protection. Held without bond. Court date to be set. Q Gloria P. Conley, 69, transient, was arrested May 19 at 100 N. Johnson St. on a McHenry County warrant for failure to appear. Held on $3,000 bond. Court date to be set. Q Miguel A. Guatemala-Bellow, 29, 1908 Julie St., was arrested May 20 at Madison and Calhoun streets on charges of driving while license revoked, two counts

domestic battery/bodily harm. Q Darius H. McCaskill, 24, Woodstock, was arrested May 19 on charges of domestic battery/bodily harm and domestic battery/physical contact. Q Shakiara S. Smith, 23, Woodstock, was arrested May 21 on a charge of domestic 4J/LUY`*V\U[`:OLYPMMÂťZ6MĂ&#x201E;JL battery/bodily harm. Q James W. Vanhoorn, 58, Woodstock, Q Brett A. Micek, 27, Wonder Lake, was was arrested May 15 on a charge of con- arrested May 22 on charges of expired tempt of court. YLNPZ[YH[PVU KYP]PUN \UKLY [OL PUĂ&#x2026;\LUJL Q Sonya M. Ivich-Bahl, 47, Woodstock, alcohol, DUI with 0.08 blood-alcohol. was arrested May 16 on a charge of pos- Q Thomas R. Gerstner, 27, Wonder Lake, session of a controlled substance. was arrested May 24 on charges of aggraQ Jonathan M. Franzen, 20, Woodstock, ]H[LK Ă&#x2026;LLPUN WVSPJL  HUK KYP]PUN VU H was arrested May 17 on charges of dis- revoked driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license. orderly conduct and criminal trespass to Q Daniel E. Demitropoulos, 36, Wonder land. Lake, was arrested May 25 on a charge of Q Christopher W. Stern, 44, Woodstock, disorderly conduct. was arrested May 18 on charges of driving Q Cassandra T. Voss, 41, Woodstock, was \UKLY [OL PUĂ&#x2026;\LUJL VM HSJVOVS ZWLLKPUN arrested May 31 on two charges of con11-14 mph above limit, illegal possession/ tempt of court. [YHUZWVY[ VM SPX\VY KYP]LY HUK PTWYVWLY Q 1LZZPJH 4 )VZX\La  >VVKZ[VJR [YHMĂ&#x201E;JSHUL\ZL was arrested June 2 on charges of drivQ Matthew K. Wiese, 20, Woodstock, was PUN\UKLY[OLPUĂ&#x2026;\LUJLVMHSJVOVSHUK+<0 arrested May 18 on a charge of domestic over 0.08 percent. battery/bodily harm. Q Jennifer L. Marzano, 34, Wonder Lake, Q Caelan A. Rivera, 24, Woodstock, was was arrested June 3 on a charge of domesarrested May 19 on a charge of speeding tic battery causing bodily harm. more than 35 mph over the limit. Q Rebecca D. Hoeft, 44, Wonder Lake, Any charges are merely accusations, and was arrested May 19 on charges of aggra- defendants or suspects are presumed ]H[LK IH[[LY` [V H WVSPJL VMĂ&#x201E;JLY HUK innocent unless proven guilty.

of operating an uninsured motor vehicle, leaving the scene of an accident, failure to give information, failure to reduce speed, and improper lane usage. Held on $1,500 bond. Court dates June 7 and June 28.

NEWS

Woodstock resident Bryan Estrada has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for a knife attack and robbery â&#x20AC;&#x201C; two separate crimes committed two months apart in 2016, the second while free on bond from his ďŹ rst arrest. Estrada, 19, last week was sentenced by Judge Bryan James Cowlin to a Estrada total of 10 years in connection to his guilty pleas to aggravated robbery and aggravated battery. OfďŹ cials said Estrada was charged in August 2016 with stabbing a man during a ďŹ ght, and then was arrested in October that year with attacking a man while trying to steal his cell phone. Estrada must serve at least half of the sentence before being eligible for release. Several other charges in the eight-count indictment were dismissed.

Alvera Jean Reed

9

June 13-19, 2018

No good-time credit, no eligibility for early release after treatment, no parole. Branden Napolitan must serve every day of a 28-year prison sentence he was handed last week after being found guilty in a bench trial of killing his roommate in their Woodstock apartment in October 2015. e 29-yearold Napolitan was convicted in March for the stabbing and s t r a n g u l a t i o n Branden murder of Daryl Napolitan Fox. Although he had ďŹ led an insanity defense, he was found guilty but mentally ill by Judge Sharon Prather. Police said that after the killing, Napolitan ďŹ&#x201A;ed to Wisconsin, where he was arrested in early December 2015 before being brought back to Woodstock to face charges. e original ďŹ vecount indictment against Napolitan included four murder charges and a count of possessing a stolen vehicle. Although he must serve all 28 years

of the sentence, Napolitan will receive credit for more than two years served in jail while awaiting trial.

OBITUARIES

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Murder brings 28-year prison term


OPINION

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

10

Opinion

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER, CO-OWNER

Paul Wormley CO-OWNER

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THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Cheryl Wormley Larry Lough Sandy Kucharski Ken Farver

No charges, but need changes You might not like it, and it can even have the appearance of impropriety – “bad optics,” as they say these days. Possibly, it’s ethically or morally wrong. And maybe it generates a “nonstop barrage of negative headlines.” But that doesn’t mean it’s criminal. at’s the bottom line of a 52-page report issued by McHenry County State’s Attorney Patrick Kenneally after a seven-month investigation by his office into the conduct of Robert Miller, a former highway commissioner for Algonquin Township Road District. Kenneally declined to prosecute Miller after the exhaustive examination of allegations of public corruption and misuse of public funds. His investigation, it should be noted, followed the refusal of state and county police agencies, as well as the Illinois attorney general, to investigate what Kenneally described as “a convulsion of indiscriminate allegations that, regrettably, first surfaced in the press.” at leads us to make two observations about our challenged version of democracy. First, we live in an era when the explosion of social media gives everyone a megaphone, and the notion persists that the person who speaks loudest and longest wins the argument. But we would do well to remember that the much-abused rule of law requires us to insist on reasonably objective and conclusive evidence to justify prosecution. Second, criminal investigations are

» YOUR VIEW

Get something straight about First Amendment Crooked Joe Tirio, just another crooked politician, is slammed in a political mailer because he spent taxpayer funds to go to New Mexico and hire additional full-time employees in the recorder’s office. President

– and should always be – subject to public discussion and media monitoring. Investigation and prosecution must succeed despite scrutiny by the press and public, not in the absence of it. Kenneally must be commended for conducting the investigation despite the limited resources of his office to do so. “[W]e issued dozens of subpoenas, reviewed over 10,000 emails, analyzed thousands of pages of financial and Township documents, and conducted dozens of interviews.,” he reported. “After devoting nearly seven months and hundreds of man-hours, we regard our investigation as complete and thorough.” What did we learn? at it’s easier to make allegations based on suspicions and political animosity, not evidence, than it is to build a criminal case that can be proved in court. Despite its outcome, the investigation has furthered the case for reform of antiquated township government in Illinois, especially the autonomous – and lucrative – office of township highway commissioner. Not much can be done about the former – the “convulsion of indiscriminate allegations.” at is part of the price we pay for free speech. As for the latter, we can hope the Legislature finds the political courage to tackle long-overdue reform as part of an effort to significantly reduce the state’s absurdly large number of political subdivisions. We won’t hold our breath. Trump uses the term “Crooked Hillary” in speeches, ads and yard signs because she used an unsecured email and server. e terms Crooked Joe Tirio and Crooked Hillary might be offensive, crude, or inaccurate, but they also are protected political speech by our constitution. Elected public officials have an almost impossible burden to prove defamation because their actions are subject to negative political ads that are exaggerated and designed to cast the candidate in the worst possible light. ese political opinions are legally protected in order to safeguard our civil liberties and to not allow the government to silence its critics. is

paper regularly prints letters to the editor and permits electronic comments in which citizens claim that various public officials lied, or committed misconduct or even crimes. ese opinions often are devoid of any facts, but are still constitutionally protected because they are opinions criticizing elected public officials. Now, Tirio is suing for more than $50,000 because he claims he was damaged, even though he won the election. One thing is obvious; Tirio’s attack on the First Amendment and his attempt at self-enrichment is crooked. Jeff Molinaro Woodstock

Let voters decide on future of townships I’m outraged that most of the McHenry County Board signed a letter opposing Rep. David McSweeney’s township consolidation bill. Whose side are you on? Are you watching what’s going on in Algonquin Township, where they’re suing each other into bankruptcy with Continued on next page


the garden. e planters, which are about 30 inches high, provide seats for people seeking solace or a place to chat with friends. is afternoon, I am the only person using a laptop. Of his design, Kiley said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My intent here was to create a drama: to substantiate the act of passing by a grove of trees within the city, to suddenly ďŹ nd oneself before a long vista over a pool, to have oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes arrested by a beautiful sculpture.â&#x20AC;? I say mission accomplished. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been blessed more than three decades with the opportunity to write Declarations every week. My goal each time is to share with you something of interest, an idea worthy of further thought, a call for action, an opportunity, or some humor. ank you.

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P.S. Really Woodstocks received this week: Q â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the people who gather Wednesday evenings for picnics on the Square and all who attend the City Band Concertsâ&#x20AC;?; Q â&#x20AC;&#x153;Woodstock High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20+ year tradition of Senior Service Day, a day for members of the graduating class to give back to the community of Woodstock through service projects and then leave their mark through colorful handprint murals within the schoolâ&#x20AC;?; and Q â&#x20AC;&#x153;e devotion of many people, mostly senior citizens, who volunteer at the food pantry and deliver Meals on Wheels.â&#x20AC;? Keep them coming by email at indepublisher@comcast.net or snail mail at 671 E. Calhoun St. Cheryl Wormley is publisher of e Woodstock Independent.

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our money? And this is after decades of former Highway Commissioner Bob Miller putting relatives on his payroll. Do you remember Grafton Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ cials suing themselves until they ran out of taxpayer money? I know board member Jim Kearns does; shame on you for signing that letter. Do you think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK that Nunda Township Highway Commissioner Mike Lespearance hired Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sonin-law, and then Miller himself, as a $40-an-hour â&#x20AC;&#x153;consultantâ&#x20AC;?? Or that the McHenry Township highway commissioner hired Lesperanceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son?

Township government is an unnecessary antique, good only for generating bad headlines. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a corrupt family business bankrolled by taxpayers, and for years it could do whatever it wanted. Now we ďŹ nally have McSweeney and other state lawmakers saying enough is enough, and our own county board wants to stand in the way of voters having the choice to get rid of these useless governments. Chairman Jack Franks supports consolidation; he has the taxpayersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; best interests at heart. Board members should stand aside and let the voters have their say. Donna Ocasek Crystal Lake

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OPINION

feet and higher, usually on my way back from a family trip or a conference of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors. I wrote about the importance of editorials after ISWNE conferences in England and Australia, and I vividly remember emailing a column about ďŹ&#x201A;oating upstream in an eddy after our family spent an afternoon canoeing in Colorado. is week, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m writing in the Art Institute of Chicago South Garden. My husband, Jim, and I are in Chicago for a semiannual appointment with my cardiologist and an evening at Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Symphony Hall. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a beautiful early summer day, so we sought out a spot that would offer a suitable environment for thinking, composing and writing. Jim had spotted the garden when jogging on previous visits to the city. Walking into the garden, designed by Dan Kiley and completed in 1967, was like stepping into a sunken living room â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it is 18 inches below street level. Hidden below the garden is a parking garage. A reďŹ&#x201A;ecting pool runs down the gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s center and ends at sculptor Loredo Taftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fountain of the Lakes.â&#x20AC;? e sound of the cascading water on the fountain and the jets of water in the pool dampen the sounds of the trafďŹ c on Michigan Avenue. I sit under one of 16 hawthorn trees on the south side of the pool. Each tree is planted 20 feet on center in its own raised square planter. A matching set of 16 trees in planters is on the north side of the pool. e meticulously pruned branches reach out to one another, creating a canopy that adds to the intimacy of

Woodstock

June 13-19, 2018

irty years ago, when I ďŹ rst wrote Declarations, I was almost always sitting at our familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dining room table. I was holding a pen and writing on a yellow legal pad. Once I had gathered my thoughts and written them down, I keyboarded them into an Apple IIe computer, saving the ďŹ le to a 3-inch ďŹ&#x201A;oppy disc before driving the disc to the ofďŹ ce. Cheryl I honestly donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Wormley remember how +LJSHYH[PVUZ the staff and I transferred what was on the disc to The Independentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early Macintosh system. e whole process was somewhat convoluted, but it was then state-of-the-art. I remembered vividly sending Declarations from a small hotel in Australia, asking for permission to use the ofďŹ ce computer and then faxing the ďŹ nished column to the TWI ofďŹ ce, then on Dean Street. With the advent of the internet and laptop computers, composing Declarations and forwarding the completed column to The Independent staff by deadline was greatly simpliďŹ ed. I composed in Word, saved to my laptopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard drive, attached the completed ďŹ le to an email, and hit send. Starbucks, an early provider of free internet, was the sending site for a number of columns I wrote while away from Woodstock. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve written Declarations in motel rooms, in the car while Jim drives, in homes of family and friends, and in libraries. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also written columns on airplanes at 30,000

The

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Where is Cheryl writing Declarations now?

I NDEPENDENT


SCHOOLS

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

12

Schools

Marian student winner of Notre Dame stipend

D-200 honors young authors

By Janet Dovidio THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

e Notre Dame Club of McHenry County has awarded its 2018 scholarship to incoming freshman Colin Stoll, who will be a member of the Notre Dame Class of ’22. Stoll is a Woodstock resident and a 2018 graduate Colin of Marian Cen- Stoll tral Catholic High School. e NDCMC Scholarship committee members are Jack Ryan, Bob Shea and Dan Wernham. “We wish Colin the best and look forward to his many successes at the University of Notre Dame,” Shea said. At Marian, Stoll was as an officer and member of Club Med, SMART, Student Government, Key Club, and Spanish Honor Society, and a four-year player on the school soccer team. He spent many hours volunteering at Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital, Family Health Partnership Clinic, Mime for Life, and St. Vincent de Paul. He was a St. Mary’s Youth group leader, co-chief for awards at the Care 4 Breast Cancer Run, and a Kairos Retreat leader. “Colin Stoll is a bright young man with an even brighter future,” Marian Principal Debra Novy said. “e dedication, compassion, and love of service he brings to everything he does here at Marian will most certainly translate well to whatever profession Colin chooses to pursue.” Stoll said he planned to study neuroscience or psychology with a supplementary major in pre-health. “My end goal is to go to medical school and become a physician,” he said. “My academic preparation at Marian has helped me to become not only diligent in my studies, but also to be intellectually curious. I hope to carry these attributes on to my studies at Notre Dame and throughout the rest of my life.”

COURTESY PHOTO

D D-200’s Young Authors winners were (front row, from left) Alexis Johnson, Emmett Loser, Paige Jarvis, and Phoenyx Muehler; (back row) Emily Reinhard, Blakely Bennett, Kaden Combs, Maren Filetti, Noah Folden, P and Susan Hansen. an By Janet Dovidio THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Ten author-illustrators were honored by Woodstock School ho District D 200 in the annual Young A Authors contest sponsored by the Illinois Il Language and Literacy Council C and the Illinois Reading C Council. e state conference on May 19, held he in Normal, was a celebration to honor exceptional writing by K-8 K students.

Variety of styles V Students wrote original stories ri and provided their own illustrations. ill “e children are encouraged to write in a genre that appeals to them,” th said Kristin Sauber, D-200 literacy lit tech coach. “We always see a nice variety of fiction and nonfiction, ti but students may also choose to write poetry, a biography, or a retelling re of a special event in their lives. liv Students completed projects on their own at home with their families. fa Students in some classrooms ro wrote them at school. ey

published their stories in handmade books, blank books in which they wrote their text or printed books created on the computer. “Some of our bilingual students also chose to write in Spanish,” Sauber said. All D-200 elementary and middle schools, as well as Clay Academy and Verda Dierzen Early Learning Center, participated. Each school selected winning representatives from each grade level. e District 200 Literacy Committee, comprising teachers from every school, selects winners from each school. Sauber said she was impressed with the students’ work and the level of participation. Some schools held assemblies to recognize the winners. Others were acknowledged at scheduled awards events. e school winners were recognized at a school board meeting. ey also read their work at Read Between the Lynes bookstore before reading them at the state conference. “It was so exciting to see each building celebrate their authors in their own unique way,” Sauber said.

The local winners are: Blakely Bennett, kindergarten, Verda Dierzen Early Learning Center Kaden Combs, sixth grade, Northwood Middle School Maren Filetti, third grade, Olson Elementary Noah Folden, second grade, Clay Academy Susan Hansen, eighth grade, Creekside Middle School Paige Jarvis, fourth grade, Prairiewood Elementary School Alexis Johnson, second grade, Mary Endres Elementary School Emmet Loser,ÄYZ[NYHKL>LZ[^VVK,SLmentary School Phoenyx Muehler, fourth grade, Dean Street Elementary School Emily Reinhard, second grade, Greenwood Elementary School


LIFE WINNERS

13

June 13-19, 2018

COURTESY PHOTO

By Janet Dovidio THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Clay Academy took third place in McHenry County in the Trex Plastic Film Recycling Challenge. Participating schools countywide competed to recycle the most pounds of plastic ďŹ lm from Nov. 15 through April 15. is program is sponsored by the

Trex Co. e Trex website indicates that â&#x20AC;&#x153;involving students in real problems facing the planet is motivating and lets students know that they can make a difference in their local community.â&#x20AC;? Clay Academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection was spearheaded by Catherine Cantwell, special education teacher for grades four and ďŹ ve. is was Clayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second year of participation. e plastic ďŹ lm collected was plastic wrap, plastic grocery bags, plastic food bags, and newspaper sleeves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of the plastic was brought in

by staff and students,â&#x20AC;? Cantwell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did reach out to e Backdrop of Woodstock and Steel Heart LTD in Harvard for collections at their businesses.â&#x20AC;? Clay students collected more than 212 pounds, or 3.21 pounds per student, which qualiďŹ ed for third place in McHenry County. e total for the county was 3,781.3 pounds. e county winner, Johnsburg Elementary, received a bench made from Trex materials. All other participants earned a smaller prize of a birdhouse made from the same material. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On Earth Day my students watched

a video about how plastic ends up in the ocean,â&#x20AC;? Cantwell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ey followed this up with a Scholastic News magazine called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Plastic Bag or JellyďŹ sh?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;e project went well overall,â&#x20AC;? she added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With such a small school population, it makes it fair for the contest to be judged by pound per student. Our students would bring in little bits at a time.â&#x20AC;? e McHenry County Schools Environmental Education Program was the communicator between Trex and the schools. e agency donated one day of educational classes.

LAST WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANSWER

Terra cotta decoration on the Woodstock Opera House in the Square

Congratulations to Bev Unglaube. Stop by The Independent to pick up your $5 prize.

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SCHOOLS

Clay Academy third in recycling program

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Right to Life McHenry County awarded scholarships to three graduating seniors from Marian Central Catholic School for demonstrating exceptional commitment to right-to-life issues. Pictured are (from left) George Jost, RLMC director; Kevin Niehaus, scholarship runner-up ($500); Colin Stoll, scholarship winner ($1,000); Lucca Kenyon, runnerup ($500); and Stephanie Hanlon, RLMC vice president.


THEY ROCK

Scholarship honors late Marian student

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

14

By Janet Dovidio

SCHOOLS

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

COURTESY PHOTO

Westwood Elementary School teachers Deb Fuller and Katie Wagner (not pictured) received a 2017-18 grant from the D200 Education Foundation to beautify the school’s landscaping with inspiration from “Only One You” – a book about celebrating uniqueness and making a difference in the lives of others. Students KLJVYH[LKYVJRZ[OL`WSHJLKPU[VHNHYKLUVU4H`¶[OLÄUHSKH`VMZJOVVS

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Marian Central Catholic High School S Class of 2018 lost classmate Tyler Gardner to cancer in April T 2017. 2 Five students approached Marian i Superintendent Steve Baldwin in i March with the t idea of starting i a scholarship s in memory of o their friend and a classmate. ey  are Flannery n Harmon, Isaac I Kaufmann, Kevin K Santopadre, d Tyler Saxe elby, and Katie Tyler Gardner Wember. W e scholars ship was open to students currently i eighth- through 11th grades who in w would attend Marian next year. e m money would be applied to tuition a Marian for the 2018-19 school at y year. e five friends created a Mari ian Central wristband with Tyler’s i initials and the date he passed a away, along with “Forever a Hurricane” inscribed in it. e wristbands were sold during lunch periods. e entire student body could buy the wristbands., but only freshmen, sophomores and juniors could apply for the scholarship. “In the short time I knew Tyler, he showed amazing love, strength and perseverance,” Marian Principal Debra Novy said. “He remained positive, no matter what he was facing.” e students succeeded in their efforts. Tyler’s family, including his parents, Mark and Jennie Gardner, presented the scholarship to Sophie Burda, class of 2019, during Marian’s Honors Day assembly in May. Tyler’s doctors had asked him to try a new treatment that had been used only on adults at that time. “Tyler said he didn’t care if he ended up getting the side effects they thought he would get,” Novy said, “as long as it helps other kids after him. He only cared that the doctors learned from him and what he was going through so that it can one day help others. “Tyler’s legacy is one of great compassion for others and commitment to academics.”


15

Citizen Welles takes his place in Woodstock

June 13-19, 2018

Sculpture of noted actor, filmmaker unveiled at event By Larry Lough LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Woodstock finally gave adopted son Orson Welles a permanent seat. And it came as the latest addition to the Woodstock on Film and on the Stage Mural and Sculpture Garden, which pays homage to several entertainment icons of the community, including famed actor and filmmaker Welles. During a dedication ceremony Friday, a bronzed statue of a seated Welles – a cigar in his right hand – was unveiled by local sculptor Bobby Joe Scribner. e statue was installed toward the west end of a 118-foot wall mural, dedicated last October, that is a tribute to three of Woodstock’s claims to fame: Welles, who came here at age 11 in 1926 to attend boarding school; Woodstock artist Chester Gould, who created the “Dick Tracy” comic strip; and the 1993 film “Groundhog Day,” starring Bill Murray and Andie MacDowell, which was filmed mostly in Woodstock.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

People directly involved with the Woodstock on Film and on the Stage Mural and Sculpture Garden pose with the statue of Orson Welles after it was dedicated June 8. Pictured are (from left) RB Thompson, former city councilman who had the idea for the 118-foot mural of local entertainment icons; Michael Bihlmaler, a Marengo woodcarver who created a 600-pound wood sculpture of Woodstock Willie for the garden; Welles sculptor Bobby Joe Scribner; graphic designer Michael Stanard, who designed the mural; and mural painter Mark Adamany, of Rockford. e Welles sculpture sits near a 600-pound wood carving of Woodstock Willie, a local byproduct of the movie and the central character in the city’s annual Groundhog Days festival.

‘Capstone of our art’

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY LARRY LOUGH

On the side of the wood sculpture of Woodstock Willie is a love message for people familiar with the movie “Groundhog Day.”

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

A&E

Mayor Brian Sager said the mural garden, next to Classic Cinemas eatre at 209 Main St., was important to “the historical recognition and preservation” of art and culture in Woodstock. “is is the capstone to this corner of the community” he said, “the capstone of our art and history.” And the impressive display was every bit a community project. Graphic designer Michael Stanard of Woodstock was emcee of the dedication ceremony. He designed the mural that was the concept of former

city Councilman RB ompson and the work of Rockford muralist Mark Adamany. Stanard named nearly three dozen local people and organizations that had a hand in the project – from the concept to the fundraising to the promotion to the execution – and then noted it also involved “dozens and dozens and dozens of others.” Scribner, Adamany and wood carver Michael Bihlmaler of Marengo were among more than 75 people who attended the ceremony.

‘It turned out well’ Scribner, who teaches at the American Academy of Art in Chicago, recalled discussing Welles with Croatian actress Oja Kodar. She was Welles’ partner and collaborator during the last 24 years of his life, and she suggested a sculpture

when she visited Woodstock for the Orson Welles Centennial Festival that celebrated Welles’ 100th birthday in 2015. Scribner told her he would do it. “I said it, so I did it,” he told the crowd. “It was almost as if it was planned, but it wasn’t. I think it turned out well,” Scribner said. e statue is a three-fourths-size likeness of Welles as an older, bearded adult, not the clean-shaven young artist Woodstock knew when he directed his first play at age 19 at the Woodstock Opera House. at was just four years before he became globally famous for his broadcast of “War of the Worlds,” which launched his lengthy career, including the making of “Citizen Kane,” considered the finest movie of the 20th century. Welles died in 1985 at age 70.


MARKETPLACE

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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Marketplace

Dogs rule at their own daycare Canine Clubhouse creates dog world By Sandy Kucharski SANDY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

Dog owners in the Woodstock area have a new option for keeping their animals safe and entertained while the family is unable to. Recently opened, Woodstock Canine Clubhouse offers daycare, boarding, grooming, and fun for dogs of all shapes and sizes. e facility is a family-run business headed up by Woodstock residents Mike and Heidi Phipps and their children, Jess and Zach. Heidiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job as a CFO for a university is winding down, and she took the opportunity to make a career change. Equating her situation to a midlife crisis of sorts, Heidi Phipps said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is is a great chance to do something fun.â&#x20AC;? Woodstock Canine Clubhouse is located at 2215 Lake Shore Drive (directly across from Catalent Pharma Solutions). e layout of the building lends itself quite well to the cage-free facility, and brightly colored walls create a fun, inviting atmosphere.

Room to expand Two spacious open rooms are dog play areas, and well-placed gates allow the ďŹ&#x201A;exibility to further divide the space if needed. Several rooms that were previously ofďŹ ces around the building are set up as boarding suites with accommodations for dogs to room together or be separated. A utility room is set up with laundry facilities and a station for an in-house groomer, while another previous ofďŹ ce space is prepped as an efďŹ ciency apartment for overnight staff when boarding dogs are on the premises. A large entryway is earmarked for possible retail space in the future. e 10-week startup began in March, with the facility opening the doors for business by Memorial Day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten a lot of encouragement for the business,â&#x20AC;? Phipps said, adding that city ofďŹ cials have been supportive as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope it takes off,â&#x20AC;? said Jess Phipps, a college sophomore who is in charge of marketing for the business. Heidi Phipps estimates she can accommodate approximately 40 dogs a day for daycare and boarding.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY SANDY KUCHARSKI

Jess (left) and Heidi Phipps spend playtime with two dogs at Woodstock Canine Clubhouse, a new doggy daycare and boarding facility at 2215 Lake Shore Drive, Woodstock. She said people should consider taking their dogs to a daycare for a lot of reasons. Supervised care is beneďŹ cial for dogs who spend long periods of time alone, experience separation anxiety, demonstrate destructive behavior, or maybe are just plain bored. Dogs in a daycare setting receive positive stimulation and dogand-human socialization.

Cats welcome, too Owners need to register dogs in advance of dropping them off for daycare or boarding. Registration includes basic owner information, emergency contacts, proof of vaccination, and dog personality background. e dog can then be brought in for a temperament test, in which the staff will evaluate such things as

how the dog relates to other dogs and people. Approved dogs can be dropped off at any time for boarding or daycare. e visits can be prearranged, or walk-ins are welcome. A cat room is available for cat boarding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone might decide they want to take a day and go into the city,â&#x20AC;? Phipps said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and they can drop their dogs here for the day without worries.â&#x20AC;? Prices start at $15 for a half day (less than 5 hours) and $30 for a full day. Multiple day and multiple dog discounts are available. Hours are 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. For information call 815-3085815 or visit woodstockcanineclubhouse@gmail.com.

R REAL ESTATE TTRANSACTIONS Tr Transactions ďŹ led in the McHenry County R Recorderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OfďŹ ce May 11 to 18 : Q Residence at 8607 Coral Road, Wonde der Lake, was sold by Linda A. and Phillip J. Azzaline, McHenry, to Melanie Ra Rainault, Wonder Lake, for $172,000. Q Residence at 230 E. Donovan Ave., W Woodstock, was sold by Home State Ba Bank, N.A., Crystal Lake, to WLKP, LLC, M McHenry, for $185,000. Q Residence at 2629 Verdi St., Woodst stock was sold by Maples at the Sonatas, LL LLC, Burr Ridge, to Ronald G. and Linda S. Meyer, Woodstock, for $267,501. Q Residence at 404 St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Road, W Woodstock, was sold by Maryann Koon, O Oronoco, Minn., to Esteban Albarran, W Woodstock, for $69,900. Q Residence at 220 W. 3rd St., Woodst stock, was sold by Rosa Maria Caballero Za Zarate, Woodstock, to Regina Guerra, W Woodstock, for $121,400. Q Residence at 9209 Shadow Lane, Bull Va Valley, was sold by Linda and Robert Gilbe bert, Bull Valley, to Chicago Title Trust, as trustee, Trust # 8002377443, Chica cago, for $337,500. Q Residence at 10530 Bull Valley Drive, W Woodstock, was sold by Kim L. Olson, Pa Park Rapids, Minn., to John P. Eddy, W Woodstock, for $374,000. Q Vacant land, approximately 1 acre at Lo Lot 1 Lily Pond Road, Woodstock, was so sold by Dawn and Matthew Gilbert, Ba Bainbridge Township, Ohio, to Barbara W W. Cirigiliano, Palatine, for $5,333. Q Residence at 8617 Alden Road, Wonde der Lake, was sold by Wells Fargo Bank NA NA, Coraopolis, Pa., to Property Tree LL LLC, Wonder Lake, for $119,000. Q Residence at 1018 Queen Anne St., W Woodstock, was sold by Charlotte Re Reynolds, Woodstock, to Joris Harrison, W Woodstock, for $125,100. Q Residence at 380 Fieldstone Drive, W Woodstock, was sold by CalAtlantic G Group, Inc., East Dundee, to Nathan Ha Hartley, Woodstock, for $251,550.

DO

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Presented by: Kim

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REALTORÂŽ

Â&#x2021;815.790.4852 (call or text) Kim@TeamOpenDoors.com


17

St. Mary, Marian grad serves JAG Corps By Tricia Carzoli THE INDEPENDENT

“I was 95 percent certain going into the internship that I wanted to be in the JAG Corps, but I was 100 percent sure coming out.” - A.J. Harrison For Harrison, the path to the Army has been filled with twists and turns, but ultimately, “God’s plan,” he said. His many teachers over eight years at St. Mary, where he visited May 9, prepared him for high school, Harrison said. “ere are too many good teachers to list,” he said with a laugh.

4HU`PUÅ\LUJLZ At Marian, Harrison became involved in several activities run by Glenn Pinnau, a U.S. Army veteran himself, who was one of many influential people in Harrison’s life. Pinnau headed up several activities that piqued Harrison’s interest – Scholastic Bowl, JSA ,and Model United Nations. ose experiences

Internship convinced him Passing the LSAT with flying colors, he earned a full-ride scholarship at Penn State University’s Dickinson School of Law, where he found himself often in the company of several members of the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps. During the summer between his second and third years, Harrison interned at the 18th Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. “I was 95 percent certain going into the internship that I wanted to be in the JAG Corps,” he said, “but I was 100 percent sure coming out.” He applied to the JAG Corps in the fall of 2016, graduated from law school, was accepted to the Army JAG Corps, and passed the

COMMUNITY

“[Walking through those doors] always feels like home,” said Lt. Andrew “A.J.” Harrison of the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps after having visited St. Mary Catholic School. “I’ve literally sat in those seats,” he said, saying that he didn’t want to keep students from their lunch and recess. Harrison graduated in 2000 from St. Mary Catholic School and 2004 from Marian Central Catholic High School. He returned home on leave after graduating from e Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School in Charlottesville, Va. “[Serving as a judge advocate] is the union of my two passions – serving and practicing law,” he said. “I am able to use my talents in the way they are most useful to the nation.”

fueled his love of civics, politics and history. As a member of National Honor Society, Harrison embraced the motto: noblesse oblige, or nobility obligates. Service has been and continues to be a driving force in his life. ough both of Harrison’s grandfathers served in the U.S. Navy, and despite the fact that Pinnau’s military background directed the way he ran his courses and his extracurricular activities, Harrison did not immediately feel called to join the military. Instead, he attended George Washington University in Washington, D.C., to study political science. After graduation, he contemplated joining the military and began training in the hopes of joining the Marine Corps. On a training run, however, he rolled an ankle so badly that he was unable to complete his training. He returned to his hometown to recover from the injury and to find gainful employment, believing his military dreams would not come to fruition. After spending time in various jobs, including work in a felt factory, as a karate instructor, as a police officer, and as a physical education and religion teacher at St. Mary, Harrison decided to attend law school. He said he has found wisdom in the Yiddish proverb, “Man plans, God laughs.”

June 13-19, 2018

A.J. Harrison joins oldest U.S. law firm

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Community

INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY TRICIA CARZOLI

A.J. Harrison serves in JAG Corps at Fort Drum in New York.

bar exam. On Jan. 11, 2018, Harrison took the oath of office. “Once I was a real-life attorney, I began basic training in January,” Harrison said. “e JAG Corps motto is: soldier first, lawyer always.” In that order, Harrison began six weeks of basic training in soldier skills in the Direct Commission Course at Fort Benning in Georgia

1VPUZºVSK»SH^ÄYT After DCC, he attended the Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, where he studied military law for three months. His course of study included criminal law, administrative law, contract and fiscal law, and international and operational law. e U.S. Army JAG Corps is the oldest law firm in the nation, founded by George Washington July 29, 1775. On May 3, Harrison became a part of that firm. His mother, Kathleen, and

his sister, Megan, attended commencement. “He’s wanted to be a soldier [for] as long as I can remember,” his mother said. “He took a rather circuitous path, but I believe with all my heart that he’s where he’s meant to be.” e highly selective and competitive corps is responsible for offering legal support on military bases around the world. Beginning May 18, Harrison began an administrative law attorney for the Staff Judge Advocate in the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum in New York. He is eligible to be deployed at any time. He is ready to serve his nation as a soldier and a lawyer and will be stationed at Fort Drum for three to four years. “I couldn’t possibly be more proud of him,” his mother said. “He could have gone anywhere, but he chose to serve. My children make me proud.”


BIRDWATCHER

Six-year-old Quinntin Hess from Woodstock shows off the backpack he received from Diane Brokow at a World Migratory Bird Days event Wednesday, April 29 at Volo Bog near Ingleside. A hundred backpacks, complete with binoculars, were handed out as a Backpacks for Birding promotion for children ages 6 to 14 who participated in activities. Diane raises funds to support the project in honor of her son, Zach, who died in a car accident in 2015.

COMMUNITY

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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COURTESY PHOTO

Our services At Mercyhealth Woodstock, passion drives everything we do to deliver medical excellence with a compassionate touch to everyone who walks through our doors. Passion inspires our doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff to do whatever it takes to make you feel better and keep you well. Nothing is ever too small or taken for granted. Everything matters. Every little thing.

Cardiology Dermatology Diabetes education Endocrinology Family medicine Gastroenterology General surgery Gynecology Hand surgery Imaging services Computerized tomography (CT) DEXA bone density Digital mammography Echocardiography

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, mobile) Nuclear medicine Ultrasound X-ray Internal medicine Laboratory services LASIK vision correction surgery Massage therapy Memory clinic Mercyhealth Eye Center Neurology Nutrition services Obstetrics

Occupational medicine Occupational therapy Ophthalmology Orthopedic surgery Orthotics/prosthetics Pediatrics Pharmacy Physical therapy Podiatry Pulmonology Rheumatology Urgent care Vascular surgery Weight management

Mercyhealth Woodstock 2000 Lake Ave., Woodstock, IL 60098 (815) 337-7100 â&#x20AC;˘ (888) 983-7100


FLOWER POWER

19 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT June 13-19, 2018 COURTESY PHOTO

BUTTERFLY STOP Eagle Scout candidate Solomon Anderson poses with a welcome sign built by BSA Troop 575 for the WVSSPUH[VYWHYRHSVUN3HRL(]LU\L near the Woodstock Police Station. The troop also built benches for the park made possible by a grant from ComEd/Openlands, submitted by city grant writer Terry WillcockZVU"NHYKLUKLZPNUPUZ[HSSH[PVUHUK maintenance by The Land Conser]HUJ`VM4J/LUY`*V\U[`"JVUZ[Y\Jtion assistance by Woodstock PubSPJ>VYRZ"HUKHULK\JH[PVUHSRPVZR by One Zero Charlie and Mapcraft Cartography.

COURTESY PHOTO

Land, sea parades at Patriotic Celebrations in Wonder Lake Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

One of McHenry Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest parades will be part of Wonder Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Patriotic Celebration starting at 1 p.m. June 30. Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; games and food booths along Hancock Drive between the Chamber of Commerce ofďŹ ce and Wonder Center Association Park will start about 30 minutes before the 1:30 p.m. parade. e procession will begin at Christ the King Catholic Church, go south on East Wonder Lake Road onto Hancock Drive, and end at East Lake Shore Drive.

eme for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parade and Venetian Boat Parade is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wonder Lake Pioneersâ&#x20AC;? in honor of the parade marshal, Pioneer Center. Other events planned for the celebration include:

SATURDAY, JUNE 30 3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Open house at the Wonder Lake East Fire Station on East Wonder Lake Road. 4:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wonder Lake Water Ski Show Team (2016 national champions) will perform at Wonder Center Property Owners Association Beach, at the end of Hancock Drive on East Lake Shore Drive.

Dusk â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A barge-launched ďŹ reworks show, where the barge will be located near the center of the lake, with land viewing from properties around the lake, including Wonder Center Property Owners Association Beach, as well as boater viewing from the water. For more info, contact the Chamber of Commerce at 815-728-0682 or go online to www.wonderlake.org.

SUNDAY, JULY 1 2-4 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wonder Lake Yacht Club will provide free pontoon boat rides to tour the lake.

TUESDAY, JULY 3

Dark â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Venetian Boat Parade. Visit www.wlyachtclub.org for information. ese Wonder Lake events are totally supported by donations and volunteers. Help is needed June 30 in the kids games area from any teens who would like community service credit. Adult volunteers are welcome, too. Call Celeste at the Wonder Lake Chamber, 815-728-0682 Donations may be mailed to â&#x20AC;&#x153;WL 4th of July Committee,â&#x20AC;? c/o Wonder Lake Chamber of Commerce (an IRS Code Section 501(c)(6) organization), 7602 Hancock Drive, Wonder Lake, IL 60097.

COMMUNITY

5HUJ`/PL[[LYJOHPY^VTHUVM[OL)\SS=HSSL`.HYKLU*S\IÂťZ/VZWPJL*VTTP[[LLOHZHUUV\UJLK[OLZJOLK\SLVMTVU[OS`Ă&#x2026;V^LYKLSP]LYPLZ[OH[ members will take to Journey Care Hospice in Woodstock. The Hospice Committee is the largest committee in the club with 20 members. Members pictured are (front row, from left) Mary Moltmann, Marge Thiessen, Tracy Kieras, Marie Randall, Hietter, Terry Aderhold, Dinah Hoppe, BarIHYH7HYYPZOHUK)L].HUZJOV^"IHJRYV^4HYNPL)YHK`)HYI:JO\S[a:OLSS`:[YHWVU-YHURPL4HUZVU)HYI)YLaPUZRP4HNNPL)HPSL`HUK :OHYVU:JV[[5V[WPJ[\YLK!:\ZHU=PJRLYZ+LIIPL:[HSL`:OPYSLL(TIYVaPHRHUK:HIPUH;HUKH


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FLASHBACKS

RELIGION

Q BLUE LOTUS TEMPLE & MEDITATION CENTER +LHU:[ŕ Ž Meditation: 10 a.m. Tuesday, Saturday; 7 p.m. Monday, Wednesday

Q COVENANT REFORMED BAPTIST CHURCH 4609 Greenwood Road 76)V_ŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday

Q NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN CENTER +LHU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q REDEEMER LUTHERAN +LHU:[ŕ Ž  Worship: 5 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. Sunday Q RESURRECTION CATHOLIC  :*V\U[Y`*S\I9VHK 815-338-7330 Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays Q ST. ANNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EPISCOPAL >1HJRZVU:[ŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday

Q DOXA FELLOWSHIP  5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž   Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday

Q ST. JOHNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LUTHERAN :[1VOUÂťZ9VHKŕ Ž  Worship: 6 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. Sunday

Q EDEN BAPTIST  5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž >VYZOPW!WT:\UKH`:WHUPZO

Q ST. MARY CATHOLIC 5;Y`VU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 7:30 a.m. Monday through Sat\YKH`"HUK!WT:WHUPZO:H[\YKH`" ! HUK!HTUVVU:WHUPZO p.m. Sunday

Q FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST >:V\[O:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 59V\[Lŕ Ž Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday

Q THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN )YPKNL3HULŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday

Q FIRST UNITED METHODIST >:V\[O:[ŕ Ž Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday

Q THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS /HY[SHUK9VHKŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday

Q FREE METHODIST 5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday

Q THE VINE 54HKPZVU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday

Q GOOD NEWS CHURCH 4LL[PUNH[+VYY;V^UZOPW*VTT\UP[` 9VVT 3HRL(]L goodnewswoodstock.org Worship: 5 p.m. Sunday

Q UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER >*HSOV\U:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday

Q GRACE FELLOWSHIP *HPYUZ*V\Y[ŕ Ž Worship: 10:15 a.m. Sunday Q GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 >VYZOPW!WT:H[\YKH`JHZ\HS"!HT [YHKP[PVUHSHTJVU[LTWVYHY`:\UKH` Q HOUSE OF BLESSING 59V\[L-PYZ[7YLZI`[LYPHU*O\YJO

Q UPPER FOX VALLEY QUAKER MEETING 7PVULLY9VHK4J/LUY`ŕ Ž 815-385-8512 Discussion and singing, 9 a.m. Worship, 10 a.m., fellowship, 11 a.m. Q WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD +LHU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday prayer service, 10 a.m. worship service Q WOODSTOCK BIBLE CHURCH 118 Benton St. Worship: 10:30 a..m. Sunday

Q Woodstock High School juniors John Frederick, Tim Ganschow, David Johnson and George Miarecki were selected to attend Premiere Boys State at Eastern Illinois University sponsored by the American Legion.

25 years ago Q Olson Middle School physical education teacher Bill Brown retired after 30 years. Brown also coached basketball and baseball. Q Six candidates vied for the title of Miss Woodstock: Tammi Kagel, Christine Lock, Megan Marshall, Missy Peck, Holly Schneider, and Heather Woznicki. Q e WHS girls softball team claimed an IHSA Class 2A regional championship by defeating Johnsburg, 4-3, thanks to a game-saving shoestring catch by Jenny Selzer.

20 years ago Q Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing store Beard & Stovall closed it doors on the Woodstock Square. e second-oldest business on the Square had been around since 1885. Owner Terry McNeese, his wife, Gretchen, and their 15-yearold daughter had decided to move to Arizona. Q e Marian Central Catholic High School baseball team lost, 2-0, to Greenville in the IHSA Class A baseball quarterďŹ nals.

15 years ago Q e city of Woodstock honored William Freund, who had served on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Building Construction Board from 1969 to 1993 and the Zoning Board of Appeals from â&#x20AC;&#x2122;97 to â&#x20AC;&#x2122;03. Freund also volunteered on the Woodstock Fire Department from â&#x20AC;&#x2122;56 to â&#x20AC;&#x2122;92. Q e Woodstock eatre was honored with a certiďŹ cate of merit for building renovation by the Woodstock Historic Preservation Commission. QOlson Middle School students, teachers and chaperones had returned from the 28th annual seventh-grade trip to Devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lake, Wis. e four-day, three-night camping trip included hiking, canoeing, rock-climbing, and side trips to Parfreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Glen, Cave of the Mounds, and the International Crane Foundation. Olson science teacher Rick Morozink had been on all 28 trips; reading and language arts teacher Lynn Grissom had been on 25.

10 years ago

Q Groundbreaking was held for the 5,500-square-foot Wonder Lake Municipal Center at ompson and Wonder Lake roads. Q Prairiewood Elementary School third-grader Felicity Rivera won the McHenry County Farm Bureauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual poster contest. Q For the second year in a row, the WHS choral program, directed by Paul Rausch, and the band program, directed by Rachel Clark, earned second place in the Illinois Class AA Music Sweepstakes Contest. e award was based on performances of students in the music solo and ensemble contest and the music organizational contest.

5 years ago Q Creekside Middle School students Micah Muhlenfeld and Ashley Peake were awarded Jeff Firak Memorial Scholarships for music and athletics, respectively, for their devotion, leadership, and willingness to help others. Q e Woodstock Independent named its Spring 2013 Top Ten in high school sports. Recognized in track and ďŹ eld from WHS were Maura Beattie, Tyler Parsons, Phil Krueger, Kyle Olesen, and Grace Beattie. Honored from Marian Central were Robin Wenzel, soccer; Aaron Waters, tennis; and Edgar Ross, baseball. Woodstock North High School top athletes were Sidney Smith, track and ďŹ eld, and Bria Romine, softball.

1 year ago Q Federal funding was helping pave 5.73 miles of roads in the village of Bull Valley â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bull Valley Road from Valley Hill Road to Country Club Road, and all of Crystal Springs Road. e village was awarded $2.9 million in surface transportation funds from the U.S. Department of Transportation. Bull Valley was required to match 20 percent of the grant, or about $570,000. Q Sherry Mesick, the longest-tenured â&#x20AC;&#x153;commanderâ&#x20AC;? at the Challenger Learning Center for Science & Technology, retired. e 80-year-old former teacher had worked at CLCST since September 2006. Q Woodstock Heating turned 100. Ernest W. Ebert started Woodstock Heating in 1917. He hired 17-year-old Robert Leanna in 1937. Leanna bought the business from Ebert in 1952. In 1977, Leannaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son Marvin took over the family business. When Marvin retired in 1998, Mike Gallagher became owner. He sold to current owners Eric and Dawn Iversen in 2016.

Your ad could sponsor this Flashbacks section! Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Call 815-338-8040 today. thewoodstockindependent.com

COMMUNITY

Q CHRIST LIFE >1HJRZVU:[ŕ Ž  Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday

Q MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION 9PKNLĂ&#x201E;LSK9VHK*Y`Z[HS3HRL 815-455-1810 >VYZOPW!WT-YPKH`Í&#x201E; !Í&#x201E;HT:H[\YKH`

30 years ago

June 13-19, 2018

Q CASA DE BENDICION 9PKNLĂ&#x201E;LSK9VHK*Y`Z[HS3HRL *Y`Z[HS3HRL*OYPZ[PHU*O\YJO Worship: 1 p.m. Sunday, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday

I\PSKPUN Worship: 1 p.m. Sunday JIOIĂ&#x201E;SJVT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Q BAHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;I COMMUNITY OF WOODSTOCK Gatherings are open to the public the second Saturday of each month. For information: 815-337-0126 woodstock.bahais@gmail.com

21


Happenings

To submit calendar items, email pr@thewoodstockindependent.com or visit thewoodstockindependent.com

entertainment

COMMUNITY

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

22

Too much to do, not nearly enough time.

calendar 13 WEDNESDAY WOLF OAK WOODS WORK DAY Wolf Oak Woods 9100 Route 120 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conserveMC.org

CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP Family Alliance 2028 N. Seminary Ave. 1 to 2:30 p.m. 815-338-3590

16 SATURDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET

14 THURSDAY LEGO NIGHT Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6:30 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

15 FRIDAY

Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

WOODSTOCK CHALLENGE RUN AND POOL PARTY 1313 Kishwaukee Valley Road 8 a.m. To register, go to www.signmeup. com/123474

5K adult, 5K youth, 1-mile and 1/2 mile kids,family run, followed by a pool party

YONDER PRAIRIE WEST WORK DAY Yonder Prairie 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 9 a.m. to noon conserveMC.org

17 SUNDAY YONDER PRAIRIE EAST WORK DAY Yonder Prairie 1100 S. Rose Farm Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conserveMC.org

19 TUESDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

WALK IN THE PARK Emricson Park South Street entrance parking lot noon Free, no registration 815-334-8850 Led by Molly Oakford, PT, DHS

INTERVIEW WORKSHOP McHenry County Workforce Center 500 Russel Court 1 to 3:30 p.m. 815-338-7100

workforcecenterRR@yahoo.com mchenrycountyworkforce.com Reservation required

PROTECT YOUR WORK Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6:30 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

WOODSTOCK CITY COUNCIL MEETING City Hall 121 W. Calhoun St. 7 p.m.

20 WEDNESDAY MEMORY MAKERS STORYTELLING GROUP Woodstock Public Library

Resurrection Catholic Church

2918 South Country Club Road, Woodstock, IL 60098

We welcome all to join us at our Mass times: Sat. 5pm & Sun. 8am & 10:30am

We, the members of the Resurrection Catholic Church, are a prayerful, loving community formed by the Holy Spirit, striving to be a sign of the Gospel values of Jesus Christ: justice, truth and love.


MUSIC WOODSTOCK CITY BAND CONCERT Woodstock Square 7:30 p.m. Themes will be: June 13: “Writing on the Wall”; June 20: “Planes, Trains and Automobiles”; June 27: “Horn Line”

Woodstock Square 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Performers will be: June 16: 9 a.m. Bad Penny; June 19: 9 a.m. Norm Siegel, 10 a.m. Amy Dixon Kolar,

Continued from Page 22

414 W. Judd St. 9:30 a.m. 815-338-0542 woodstockpubliclibrary.org Led by Joy Aavang

WOLF OAK WOODS WORK DAY Wolf Oak Woods 9100 Route 120 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conserveMC.org

WORLD FILM NIGHT Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6 p.m. 815-338-0542 “The Paris Opera”

21 THURSDAY KIWANIS WOODSTOCK MEETING Golden Eagle Bank 975 Country Club Road Noon to 1 p.m. woodstockkiwanis@gmail.com

TIPS FOR A WINNING INTERVIEW McHenry County Workforce Center 500 Russel Court 1 TO 3 P.m. 815-338-7100 mchenrycountyworkforce.com Reservation required

June 15, 8 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 815-337-1395

SONGWRITER OPEN MIC June 21, 7:30 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $5 donation Advance sign-up is required at aplacetoshinemusic@gmail.com.

80 YEARS OF SUPERMAN Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 4 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

MOVIES IN THE PARK Woodstock Square 8 p.m. The movie “Mamma Mia!-The Sing-a-Long” will be shown.

23 SATURDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

HABITAT RESTORATION Boger Bog 2399 S. Cherry Valley Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. mccdistrict.org 815-455-1537

24 SUNDAY LOCAL HISTORY WALKING TOUR: HISTORIC HOUSES Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. Meet at the bike rack 1 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

25 MONDAY JOB SEARCH WORKSHOP McHenry County Workforce Center 500 Russel Court

FIRST SATURDAY MUSIC July 7, 7 p.m. Unity Spiritual Center of Woodstock 225 W. Calhoun St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org

THEATER ‘VANYA AND SONIA AND MARSHA AND SPIKE’ 9 to 11 a.m. 815-338-7100 mchenrycountyworkforce.com

MUSICAL MONDAYS Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6:30 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org “Buffy (ep)”

26 TUESDAY

FILM ‘THE WANTING’ June 30, 7 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $18 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov

30 SATURDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION Wonder Lake

‘HANSEL & GRETEL’ July 8, 2 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $15 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov Presented by Woodstock Dance Academy

ALZHEIMER’S DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP

1 SUNDAY Wonder Lake Marina 4019 E. Lake Shore Drive 2 to 4 p.m. wonderlake.org

Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

DANCE

July

Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

ALL ABOUT VOLO BOG

July 6, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $48 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov

woodstockfarmersmarket.org

FREE PONTOON BOAT RIDES

Emricson Park South Street entrance parking lot noon Free, no registration 815-334-8850 Led by Molly Oakford, PT, DHS

THE CAPITOL STEPS

Parade: 1:30 p.m., from Christ the King Church to Wonder Center Beach Triangle Fire Station open house: 2:30 p.m. Ski show: 4:30 p.m., Center Beach Fireworks over Wonder Lake: Dusk wonderlake.org

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET

WALK IN THE PARK

COMEDY

2 MONDAY ATROCIOUS POETS Ethereal Confections 113 S. Benton St. 7 p.m. Atrociouspoets.com

FOX VALLEY ROCKETEERS MEETING Woodstock North High School 3000 Raffel Road, Room D187 7:30 p.m. 815-337-9068 foxvalleyrocketeers.org

3 TUESDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

WALK IN THE PARK Emricson Park South Street entrance parking lot noon Free, no registration 815-334-8850 Led by Molly Oakford, PT, DHS

Valley Hi Nursing Home 2406 Hartland Road 6 p.m. 815-334-2817

VENETIAN NIGHT Wonder Lake Dusk

4 WEDNESDAY WOODSTOCK FIREWORKS Emricson Park 1313 Kishwaukee Valley Road Dusk

5 THURSDAY WOODSTOCK JAYCEES GENERAL MEETING Mixin Mingle 124 Cass St. 7:30 p.m. 815-575-8065

LEGO NIGHT Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6:30 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

23

COMMUNITY

calendar

JAZZ JAM

June 15, 16, 22, 23, 8 p.m. June 17, 24, 2 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $23 A seating, $18 B seating, $13 C seating 815-338-5300 operahouse@woodstockil.gov TownSquare Players will present the 2013 Tony Award-winning comedy.

June 13-19, 2018

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET

11 a.m. Mark Hobbs; June 23: 9 a.m., Kishwaukee Ramblers; 11 a.m., Strum Brothers; June 26: 9 a.m. Judson and Judy Brown

June 22, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $3 donation offsquaremusic.org 815-338-5164

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

entertainment

OPEN MIC NIGHT


June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

24

Service Directory

Deadline: NOON Thurs. to get into next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue

Small Blocks are $40 and Large Blocks are $80 for 4 weeks

Call 815.338.8040 for details. AC/HEATING

Â&#x2021; Heating Â&#x2021; Cooling Â&#x2021; :DWHU+HDWHUV

RQ VHUYLFH  KRXU PRGHOV  V DOOPDNH

Woodstock 815-337-4200

CARPENTRY

INVESTMENTS

Are you earning enough on your savings?

%RLOHU K KHDWLQJ RWZDWHU VSHFLD OLVWV

CLASSIFIED

24-Hour Service ASPHALT SERVICES

CONSTRUCTION

LANDSCAPING

ANCHOR CONSTRUCTION

SANTOS OUR LANDSCAPING SERVICES:

SINCE 1977

FOUNDATIONS GARAGE SLABS/ DRIVEWAYS PATIOS/ WALKS/ STOOPS REPLACEMENTS FULLY INSURED

CLEANING

*6476:;Â&#x2039;;67:603Â&#x2039;;904405.;9,,:Â&#x2039;46=05. ;9,,:Â&#x2039;73(5;05.-36>,9:Â&#x2039;46>05. 4<3*/ :7905.-(33*3,(5<7:Â&#x2039;-9,,,:;04(;,:

815-482-9542 (MCHENRY) FREE ESTIMATES

10556 RT. 173 LOT 2 CAPRON, IL 61012 Â&#x2039;  

ELECTRIC CONTRACTOR

OPTOMETRIC CARE

MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF SERVICE CALL - Service upgrades Since - Repairs 1986 - Maintenance Residential - Commercial

Delaware Electric Co. Fully Licensed

815-338-3139 HEALTH INSURANCE

Medicare, VSP and EyeMed provider wolfoptometriccenter.com

HANDYMAN

PHYSICAL THERAPY

TECHNOLOGY

SERVICES

Medicare Supplements! TURNING 65? OVER 65? FIND THE PLAN THAT MEETS YOUR NEEDS Trudy L. Hayna Serving McHenry County for 30 Years We Offer All the Major Companies

>Ă&#x17E;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Â&#x2DC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;-iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;ä䣣 INSURANCE


HELP WANTED

LEGAL SERVICES

TRAINING/EDUCATION

Do you use a CPAP machine for sleep apnea? Get your FDA approved CPAP machine and supplies at little or no cost! Free sleep supplement and sleep guide included! Call 844-559-0707! (Mon-Fri)

THE STATE OF ILLINOIS IS SEEKING SKILLED AUTO MECHANICS STATEWIDE. FOR TESTING INFORMATION CONTACT CENTRAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES 217-558-3089 OR WWW.WORK.ILLINOIS.GOV. CLASS B CDL LICENSE REQUIRED.

NEED LEGAL HELP? Get a FREE referral to an attorney! Call the Illinois State Bar Association Illinois Lawyer Finder The advice you need 877-270-3855 or https://www.isba.org/public/ illinoislawyerfinder

AIRLINE CAREERS FOR NEW YEAR - BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED - JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312

FOR SALE Harvard Ranch-Style Home for Sale by Owner: 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 2-car garage, full basement, all appliances, corner lot $125K. Call 779-713-9591.

HELP WANTED DRIVERS BUCKLE UP WITH A NEW CAREER! $1600 Sign-on Bonus with pay up to.52 per mile! EXPERIENCED DRIVERS *Flatbed *Step Deck *Van *LTL Reefer. Full benefits w/Minimal health ins. premiums, FREE after 5 years! + Industry leading Driver Bonus Program! Must have Class A CDL & 2 yrs OTR Exp. Call Ruth or Mike at TTI Inc 1-800-222-5732 Apply online ttitrucking.com

SPORTING GOODS GUN SHOW - June 22-23-24, Winnebago County Fairgrounds, Pecatonica. Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday 9am-5pm, Sunday 9am-3pm. Large selection of rifles, shotguns, handguns & more! Info: 563-608-4401 www.marvkrauspromotions.net

FREON R12 WANTED: CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com

HELP WANTED Awesome Summer Job - Team Corn Detasseling is hiring workers for summer detasseling. Age 12 & up. Earn from $7.75 to $10.00 per hour depending on your ability. Attendance bonus of 50 cents & 25 cents per hour available. Season starts in early July and runs from 10 to 14 days. Transportation provided at several local pickup sites. For applications Call Toll Free 1-866-898-8326 or print an application at www.teamcorn.com.

HELP WANTED Service & installation tech wanted. Mechanical aptitude necessary â&#x20AC;&#x201C; plumbing experience desirable. Call Quality Water Conditioning 815-338-3344.

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

WANTED TO BUY

NEARLY 10,000 GUNS IN OUR 4-DAY REGIONAL FIREARMS AUCTION Thurs., June 21st - Sun., June 24th at Rock Island Auction Company in Rock Island, IL! Over 4800 lots, Nearly 10,000 Firearms, 6,700+ Items Classified as Antique or Curio & Relic, nearly 1,400 Winchesters, nearly 1000 Colts, nearly 2200 Sporting Arms, over 800 Military items. Manufacturers to include: Winchester, Smith & Wesson, Colt, Remington, Browning, Mauser, Savage, Ruger and more. Plus Edged Weapons, Ammunition and more! To inquire about this sale or selling at auction call 1-800-238-8022, email: info@ rockislandauction.com. View catalog and bid today at WWW.ROCKISLANDAUCTION.COM. Open to the public. Auction begins 9am Thurs., June 21st, Fri., June 22nd, Sat., June 23rd & Sun., June 24th at 7819 42nd Street W. Rock Island, IL 61201. Full day preview Wed., June 20th 9am to 6pm and Thurs. - Sun. June 21st - 24th from 7:30am to 9am. 18.5% buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premium for C/C, discount offered to 15% for pre-approved check or cash.

<285$' COULD BE HERE!

HANDYMAN Eliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Handyman Service Bathroom Remodeling Tiles, Painting, Plumbing, Electrical No job is too small Free estimates

224-716-3628 Please call or text 815-701-4716

LANDSCAPING

Expert Landscaping Â&#x2021;6SULQJ&OHDQXS Â&#x2021;/DZQ6HUYLFH Â&#x2021;7UHH6HUYLFH Â&#x2021;7ULPPLQJ(GJLQJ0XOFK Â&#x2021;)UHH(VWLPDWHV

815-905-5852 815-219-8755

CLASSIFIED

STRUGGLING WITH HEARING LOSS? Call now and claim your Free Caption Phone today! Your calls are captioned Free! Communicate easier with anyone with ClearCaption. Call Now: 844-839-5077

EVENT SPACE

June 13-19, 2018

HEALTH

25 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

&ODVVLÃ&#x20AC;HG$GV

Deadline: NOON Thursday to get into next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue


PUBLIC NOTICES

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

26

PUBLIC NOTICE

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PUBLIC NOTICE

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MVSSV^Z!*VTTLUJPUNH[HWVPU[ H[ [OL PU[LYZLJ[PVU VM 9V\[L  HUK (UKLYZVU 9VHK THYRPUN [OL ZV\[OLHZ[ JVYULY VM [OL :V\[OLHZ[ ë VM :LJ[PVU  ;V^UZOPW  5VY[O 9HUNL  ,HZ[ VM [OL 3rd Principal Meridian; running thence >LZ[LYS` HSVUN [OL :V\[OLYS` SPUL VM [OL ZHPK:V\[OLHZ[ëVM:LJ[PVUHKPZ[HUJL VM    MLL[ [V H WVPU[ THYRPUN [OL ZV\[OLHZ[ JVYULY VM [OL :V\[O^LZ[ ë VM [OL :V\[OLHZ[ ë VM ZHPK :LJ[PVU  MVY H WSHJL VM ILNPUUPUN" Y\UUPUN [OLUJL 5VY[OLYS` HSVUN [OL ,HZ[LYS` SPUL [OLYLVM H[ HU HUNSL VM Â&#x2021;»¹ TLHZ\YLK JSVJR^PZLMYVTHWYVSVUNH[PVUVM[OLSHZ[ KLZJYPILKJV\YZLHKPZ[HUJLVMMLL[ [VHWVPU["Y\UUPUN[OLUJL>LZ[LYS` WHYHSSLS ^P[O [OL :V\[O SPUL VM ZHPK :V\[O^LZ[ ë VM [OL :V\[OLHZ[ ë VM :LJ[PVU  H KPZ[HUJL VM  MLL[ [V H point; running thence Southerly parallel ^P[O[OLHMVYLZHPK,HZ[LYS`SPULHKPZ[HUJL VMMLL[[VHWVPU[VU[OLHMVYLZHPK :V\[OLYS`SPULVM[OL:V\[O^LZ[ëVM[OL :V\[OLHZ[ ë VM :LJ[PVU  ZHPK WVPU[ ILPUN  MLL[ >LZ[ VM [OL WSHJL VM beginning, running thence Easterly along ZHPK:V\[OSPULMLL[[V[OLWSHJLVM ILNPUUPUNPU;V^UZOPW5VY[O9HUNL ,HZ[VM[OLYK7YPUJPWHS4LYPKPHUPU 4J/LUY` *V\U[` 0SSPUVPZ  ,?*,7;05.! ;OL >LZ[  MLL[ VM [OL :V\[O  MLL[VM[OL,HZ[MLL[HZTLHZ\YLK HSVUN [OL :V\[O HUK ,HZ[ SPULZ VM [OL :V\[O^LZ[ ë VM [OL :V\[OLHZ[ ë VM :LJ[PVU  ;V^UZOPW  5VY[O 9HUNL  ,HZ[ VM [OL YK 7YPUJPWHS 4LYPKPHU 4J/LUY`*V\U[`0SSPUVPZ:P[\H[LKPU[OL *V\U[` VM 4J/LUY` HUK [OL :[H[L VM 0SSPUVPZ 7LYTHULU[0UKL_5V 6U(WYPS.\HYKPHU;H_0333* Ã&#x201E;SLK H 7L[P[PVU MVY 6YKLY VM ;H_ +LLK ;OL VIQLJ[ VM [OL WSHPU[PMM»Z WL[P[PVU PZ [V MVYLJSVZLVU[OL;H_:HSL*LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L5V  MVY [OL KLSPUX\LU[ [H_LZ VU YLHS LZ[H[L KLZJYPILK HIV]L ^OPJO ^HZ issued by the McHenry County Treasurer VU 6J[VILY    ;OL [H_LZ K\L \UKLY[OLJLY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[LHYLMVY[OL[H_ `LHY;OLWL[P[PVUHZRZ[OLJV\Y[[VKPYLJ[ [OLJV\U[`JSLYR[VPZZ\LH[H_KLLKPM[OL WYVWLY[` PZ UV[ YLKLLTLK MYVT [OL ZHSL VUVYILMVYL6J[VILYHUK[OH[ 7L[P[PVULYHZNYHU[LLVM[H_KLLKILW\[ PUWVZZLZZPVUVMZHPKWHYJLSVMYLHSLZ[H[L ;OL 7L[P[PVU MVY 6YKLY VM ;H_ +LLK ^PSS IL IYV\NO[ ILMVYL [OL 4J/LUY` *V\U[` Circuit Court on November 28,  H[ ! WT PU *V\Y[YVVT   0M `V\MHPS[VYLKLLT[OLJV\Y[TH`LU[LYH Q\KNTLU[ MVY [OL YLSPLM KLTHUKLK PU [OL WL[P[PVU .\HYKPHU;H_0333*7L[P[PVULY :[\HY[,4VYNLUZ[LYU  ([[VYUL`MVY7L[P[PVULY >3H\YLS:[YLL[ 7PUJRUL`]PSSL0SSPUVPZ  7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR Independent May 30, 2018, June 6, 2018, June 13, 2018) L10548

PUBLIC NOTICE

05;/,*09*<0;*6<9;6-;/, ;>,5;@:,*65+1<+0*0(3*09*<0; 4*/,59@*6<5;@0330560: *HZL 5V ;? .\HYKPHU ;H_ 03 33* ;V!  /LPYZ HUK 3LNH[LLZ VM 9VZHSPH Bartolotta; Ben Bartolotta; Paul )HY[VSV[[H" 6JJ\WHU[ VM" ;*- 5H[PVUHS Bank; McHenry County Clerk; and all other WLYZVUZLU[P[PLZ <5256>5 OH]PUN VY claiming any right, interest or title in the MVSSV^PUNKLZJYPILKYLHSLZ[H[L! 3V[PU*VUJVYK/PSSZH[4LHKV^IYVVR <UP[ILPUNHZ\IKP]PZPVUVMWHY[VM[OL 5VY[O^LZ[ëVM:LJ[PVU;V^UZOPW 5VY[O9HUNL,HZ[ VM[OLYK7YPUJPWHS4LYPKPHU"HJJVYKPUN[V [OLWSH[[OLYLVMYLJVYKLK:LW[LTILY   HZ +VJ\TLU[ 5\TILY 9

HUK JLY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L VM JVYYLJ[PVU YLJVYKLK April 1, 1996 as Document Number 9  PU 4J/LUY` *V\U[` 0SSPUVPZ :P[\H[LK PU [OL *V\U[` VM 4J/LUY` HUK [OL:[H[LVM0SSPUVPZ 7LYTHULU[0UKL_5V 6U(WYPS.\HYKPHU;H_0333* Ã&#x201E;SLK H 7L[P[PVU MVY 6YKLY VM ;H_ +LLK ;OL VIQLJ[ VM [OL WSHPU[PMM»Z WL[P[PVU PZ [V MVYLJSVZLVU[OL;H_:HSL*LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L5V  MVY [OL KLSPUX\LU[ [H_LZ VU YLHS LZ[H[L KLZJYPILK HIV]L ^OPJO ^HZ issued by the McHenry County Treasurer VU 6J[VILY    ;OL [H_LZ K\L \UKLY[OLJLY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[LHYLMVY[OL[H_ `LHY;OLWL[P[PVUHZRZ[OLJV\Y[[VKPYLJ[ [OLJV\U[`JSLYR[VPZZ\LH[H_KLLKPM[OL WYVWLY[` PZ UV[ YLKLLTLK MYVT [OL ZHSL VUVYILMVYL6J[VILYHUK[OH[ 7L[P[PVULYHZNYHU[LLVM[H_KLLKILW\[ PUWVZZLZZPVUVMZHPKWHYJLSVMYLHSLZ[H[L ;OL 7L[P[PVU MVY 6YKLY VM ;H_ +LLK ^PSS IL IYV\NO[ ILMVYL [OL 4J/LUY` *V\U[` Circuit Court on November 28, 2018 at !WTPU*V\Y[YVVT0M`V\MHPS[V YLKLLT[OLJV\Y[TH`LU[LYHQ\KNTLU[ MVY[OLYLSPLMKLTHUKLKPU[OLWL[P[PVU .\HYKPHU;H_0333*7L[P[PVULY :[\HY[,4VYNLUZ[LYU  ([[VYUL`MVY7L[P[PVULY >3H\YLS:[YLL[ 7PUJRUL`]PSSL0SSPUVPZ  7\ISPZOLKPU;OL>VVKZ[VJR0UKLWLUKLU[ May 30, 2018, June 6, 2018, June 13, 2018) L10549

PUBLIC NOTICE

:;(;,6-0330560:05;/,*09*<0; *6<9;6-;/,;>,5;@:,*65+ 1<+0*0(3*09*<0;4*/,59@ *6<5;@05796)(;, *HZL5V79 0U [OL 4H[[LY VM [OL ,Z[H[L VM 16/5 ; >(34:3,@ Deceased *3(0456;0*, 5V[PJL PZ NP]LU VM [OL KLH[O VM! 16/5 ; >(34:3,@ 6M!(3.658<0503 3L[[LYZ VM VMÃ&#x201E;JL ^LYL PZZ\LK VU!  [V! 9LWYLZLU[H[P]L! 4(9.01:;964),*2 ;/(=, ;053,@7(9203 ^OVZLH[[VYUL`PZ! /,33@,9>0330(4(3;+ 596<;, STE 100 *9@:;(33(2,03 *SHPTZ HNHPUZ[ [OL LZ[H[L TH` IL Ã&#x201E;SLK ^P[OPU ZP_ TVU[OZ MYVT [OL KH[L VM Ã&#x201E;YZ[ W\ISPJH[PVU(U`JSHPTUV[Ã&#x201E;SLK^P[OPUZP_ TVU[OZMYVT[OLKH[LVMÃ&#x201E;YZ[W\ISPJH[PVUVY JSHPTZUV[Ã&#x201E;SLK^P[OPU[OYLLTVU[OZMYVT [OL KH[L VM THPSPUN VY KLSP]LY` VM 5V[PJL [V *YLKP[VY ^OPJOL]LY PZ SH[LY ZOHSS IL IHYYLK*SHPTZTH`ILÃ&#x201E;SLKPU[OLVMÃ&#x201E;JLVM [OL*SLYRVM*PYJ\P[*V\Y[H[[OL4J/LUY` *V\U[` .V]LYUTLU[ *LU[LY  5VY[O :LTPUHY` (]LU\L >VVKZ[VJR 0SSPUVPZ   VY ^P[O [OL YLWYLZLU[H[P]L VY IV[O *VWPLZ VM JSHPTZ Ã&#x201E;SLK ^P[O [OL Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the YLWYLZLU[H[P]L HUK [V OPZ H[[VYUL` ^P[OPU [LUKH`ZHM[LYP[OHZILLUÃ&#x201E;SLK Z2(;/,905, 4 2,,-, *SLYR VM [OL *PYJ\P[ *V\Y[ 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR0UKLWLUKLU[4H` June 6, 2018, June 13, 2018) L10550

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on May 22, 2018 An Assumed Name Business *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL County Clerk in McHenry County, IL \UKLY [OL MVSSV^PUN I\ZPULZZ UHTL HUK HKKYLZZ HUK ZL[[PUN MVY[O [OL UHTLZ HUK HKKYLZZLZ VM HSS WLYZVUZ V^UPUN conducting and transacting business

RUV^U HZ! *VYP 7H]SPZ 7YVMLZZPVUHS :LY]PJLZ SVJH[LK H[  > (ZOSHUK +Y 4J/LUY` 03  6^ULY 5HTL  (KKYLZZ!*VYLLUH7H]SPZ>(ZOSHUK +Y4J/LUY`03 +H[LK!4(@ Z4(9@,4**3,33(5*V\U[`*SLYR 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR Independent May 30, 2018, June 6, 2018, June 13, 2018) L10551

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on May 24, 2018 An Assumed Name )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JLVM[OL*V\U[`*SLYRPU4J/LUY` *V\U[` 03 \UKLY [OL MVSSV^PUN business name and address, and ZL[[PUNMVY[O[OLUHTLZHUKHKKYLZZLZ VMHSSWLYZVUZV^UPUNJVUK\J[PUNHUK [YHUZHJ[PUN I\ZPULZZ RUV^U HZ! ;/, ;/9,,:5(*2(;,,9:SVJH[LKH[  +(26;( +9 >66+:;6*2 03   6^ULY5HTL (KKYLZZ!40*2@9,,+  +(26;( +9 >66+:;6*2 03   +H[LK!4(@ Z 4(9@ , 4**3,33(5 *V\U[` *SLYR 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR Independent May 30, 2018, June 6, 2018, June 13, 2018) L10553

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on May 23, 2018 An Assumed Name Business *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL County Clerk in McHenry County, IL \UKLY [OL MVSSV^PUN I\ZPULZZ UHTL HUK HKKYLZZ HUK ZL[[PUN MVY[O [OL UHTLZ HUK HKKYLZZLZ VM HSS WLYZVUZ V^UPUN conducting and transacting business RUV^U HZ! ,70* .96<7 SVJH[LK H[  > 69*/(9+ +9 4**<3364 3(2,036^ULY5HTL (KKYLZZ! 1,::0*(367,A>69*/(9++9 4**<33643(2,03 +H[LK!4(@ Z4(9@,4**3,33(5*V\U[`*SLYR 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR Independent May 30, 2018, June 6, 2018, June 13, 2018) L10554

PUBLIC NOTICE

;6! *( 96+90.<,A 367,A 6**<7(5; 90*/(9+ 4(436<27(9;0,: 05 6**<7(5*@69(*;<(3 76::,::065 6- :(0+ 7967,9;@" <5256>56>5,9:69 7,9:65: 05;,9,:;,+ 05 :(0+ 3(5+ 6936; 4*/,59@*6<5;@*3,92 ;(?+,,+56;? -03,+! ;(2,56;0*, *V\U[`VM4J/LUY`:[H[LVM0SSPUVPZ +H[L7YLTPZLZ:VSK! *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L5V! :VSKMVY.LULYHS;H_LZVM!°°°°°°°°°°° :VSKMVY:WLJPHS(ZZLZZTLU[VM!5( HUK:WLJPHS(ZZLZZTLU[5\TILY!5( >HYYHU[5V!5( 0UZ[5V!5( ;/0:7967,9;@/(:),,5:63+-69 +,3058<,5;;(?,: 7YVWLY[`SVJH[LKH[4*/,59@(=, >66+:;6*203 3LNHS +LZJYPW[PVU VY 7YVWLY[` 0UKL_ 5V! 13-05-401-033 This notice is to advise you that the above WYVWLY[` OHZ ILLU ZVSK MVY KLSPUX\LU[ [H_LZ HUK [OH[ [OL WLYPVK VM YLKLTW[PVU MYVT[OLZHSL^PSSL_WPYLVU  ;OL HTV\U[ [V YLKLLT PZ Z\IQLJ[ [V PUJYLHZL H[  TVU[O PU[LY]HSZ MYVT [OL KH[LVMZHSL HUK TH` IL M\Y[OLY PUJYLHZLK PM [OL purchaser at the tax sale or his or her assignee pays any subsequently accruing taxes or special assessments to redeem

[OL WYVWLY[` MYVT Z\IZLX\LU[ MVYMLP[\YLZ VY[H_ZHSLZ*OLJR^P[O[OLJV\U[`JSLYR HZ [V [OL L_HJ[ HTV\U[ `V\ V^L ILMVYL YLKLLTPUN ;OPZ UV[PJL PZ HSZV [V HK]PZL `V\[OH[HWL[P[PVUOHZILLUÃ&#x201E;SLKMVYH[H_ KLLK^OPJO^PSS [YHUZMLY[P[SLHUK[OLYPNO[[VWVZZLZZPVUVM [OPZWYVWLY[`PMYLKLTW[PVUPZUV[THKLVU VYILMVYL  ;OPZTH[[LYPZZL[MVYOLHYPUNPU[OL*PYJ\P[ *V\Y[ VM [OPZ *V\U[` PU >66+:;6*2 Illinois, on 10/31/2018 in the McHenry *V\U[`*V\Y[OV\ZL5:,405(9@ (=, >66+:;6*2 03   *V\Y[YVVTH[!74 You may be present at this hearing but `V\Y YPNO[ [V YLKLLT ^PSS HSYLHK` OH]L L_WPYLKH[[OH[[PTL @6< (9, <9.,+ ;6 9,+,,4 044,+0(;,3@ ;6 79,=,5; 36:: 6- 7967,9;@ 9LKLTW[PVUJHUILTHKLH[HU`[PTLVU VY ILMVYL  I` HWWS`PUN [V [OL *V\U[`*SLYRVM 4J/LUY` *V\U[` 0SSPUVPZ H[ [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR PU >66+:;6*2 0SSPUVPZ -VYM\Y[OLYPUMVYTH[PVUJVU[HJ[[OL*V\U[` *SLYR McHenry County Clerk >(9,9+:<0;, >66+:;6*203   <5065;(?05=,:;69: 7<9*/(:,9VY(::0.5,, +H[LK! 7\ISPZOLKPU;OL>VVKZ[VJR0UKLWLUKLU[ June 6, 2018, June 13, 2018) L10555

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on May 29, 2018 An Assumed Name Business *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL County Clerk in McHenry County, IL \UKLY [OL MVSSV^PUN I\ZPULZZ UHTL HUK HKKYLZZ HUK ZL[[PUN MVY[O [OL UHTLZ HUK HKKYLZZLZ VM HSS WLYZVUZ V^UPUN conducting and transacting business RUV^UHZ!+/*65:;9<*;065SVJH[LK H[:039;,*9@:;(33(2,03  6^ULY 5HTL  (KKYLZZ! +,(5 /(9;05.:039;,*9@:;(3 3(2,03 +H[LK!4(@  Z4(9@,4**3,33(5*V\U[`*SLYR 7\ISPZOLKPU;OL>VVKZ[VJR0UKLWLUKLU[ June 6, 2018, June 13, 2018) L10556

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on June 1, 2018 An Assumed Name Business *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL County Clerk in McHenry County, IL \UKLY [OL MVSSV^PUN I\ZPULZZ UHTL HUK HKKYLZZ HUK ZL[[PUN MVY[O [OL UHTLZ HUK HKKYLZZLZ VM HSS WLYZVUZ V^UPUN conducting and transacting business RUV^U HZ! )6>,: >66+>69205. SVJH[LK H[  7,9205: 96(+ >66+:;6*2 03   6^ULY 5HTL  (KKYLZZ! 7,;,9 )6>,:  7,9205: 96(+ >66+:;6*2 03   +H[LK!1<5, Z4(9@,4**3,33(5*V\U[`*SLYR 7\ISPZOLKPU;OL>VVKZ[VJR0UKLWLUKLU[ 1\UL1\UL3

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Storage Space LLC, 945 Dieckman :[76)V_>VVKZ[VJR03  T\Z[ YLJLP]L [OL KLSPUX\LU[ HTV\U[ VM  MVY YLU[HS VM \UP[  H[  +PLJRTHU :[ >VVKZ[VJR 03   UHTL ,YPJRH 7\JRL[[  6Y JVU[LU[Z ^PSS IL ZVSK UV H\J[PVU VY KPZWVZLK VM VU   H[ ! HT H[  +PLJRTHU :[ >VVKZ[VJR 03    *VU[LU[Z!

Continued on next page


Continued from previous page

PUBLIC NOTICE

:;(;,6-0330560: 05;/,*09*<0;*6<9;6-;/,UK JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 4*/,59@*6<5;@ 7<)30*(;06556;0*,6-*6<9;+(;, -699,8<,:;-695(4,*/(5., (ADULT) Request ofSuzanna Phyllis Reichart Case No. 18MR000398 There will be a court date on my Request to change my name from: Suzanna Phyllis Reichart to the new name of: Angela .YHJL4H`ÄLSK The court date will be held on Monday, August 6, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. at 2200 N. Seminary Ave. Woodstock, McHenry County in Courtroom # 204, Dated at Woodstock, IL, June 4, 2018 /s/Suzanna Phyllis Reichart (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 13, 2018) L10560

PUBLIC NOTICE

*0;@6->66+:;6*24*/,59@ *6<5;@0SSPUVPZ Notice of Interested Parties Registry (Woodstock TIF #2- Downtown & Route 47) Pursuant to Section 5/11-74.4-4.2 of the Tax Increment Allocation Redevelopment Act, 65 ILCS 5/11-74.4-1, et seq.(the “Act”), the City of Woodstock (the “City”) is establishing an interested parties registry (“Registry” or “Registries”) for a proposed redevelopment project area known as the Woodstock TIF #2- Downtown & Route 47

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on June 8, 2018 An Assumed Name )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÄJH[L ^HZ ÄSLK PU [OL 6MÄJL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR PU 4J/LUY` County, IL under the following business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting I\ZPULZZRUV^UHZ!) )/,(+:;65,:  465<4,5;: SVJH[LK H[  SUNDERLIN DR., HUNTLEY IL 60142. 6^ULY 5HTL  (KKYLZZ! 9(@465+ +64)96:20  :<5+,9305 +9 HUNTLEY IL 60142. Dated: JUNE 8, 2018 /s/ MARY E MCCLELLAN (County Clerk (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 13, 2018) L10562

HEATHCLIFF

By Peter Gallagher

27

SUDOKU

Rules: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as 9x9 grids, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve, the numbers 1 through T\Z[ÄSSLHJOYV^JVS\TUHUKIV_ :63<;065

PUZZLES & COMICS

PUBLIC NOTICE

By Leigh Rubin

June 13-19, 2018

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on June 4, 2018 An Assumed Name Business *LY[PÄJH[L ^HZ ÄSLK PU [OL 6MÄJL VM [OL County Clerk in McHenry County, IL under the following business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons owning, conducting and transacting business known as: LAVIN & PARISI, P.C. located at 850 S MCHENRY AVE, SUITE B, CRYSTAL LAKE, IL 60014. 6^ULY5HTL (KKYLZZ!2(9,543(=05 (5+ 2(9,5 4 3(=05  (::6*0(;,: P.C. 850 S MCHENRY AVE, SUITE B, CRYSTAL LAKE, IL 60014. Dated: JUNE 4, 2018 /s/ MARY E MCCLELLAN (County Clerk (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 13, 2018) L10559

RUBES

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Floor jacks, Hand truck, Safe, Cookware, Samsung CLP-620ND, Small table, 55 Gal oil drum, Clothes rack, Dresser, Gas cans, Miscellaneous household items, and Bags & boxes contents unknown and other general household. (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 13, 2018) L10558

Redevelopment Project Area (the “Area”). ( TVYL ZWLJPÄJ KLZJYPW[PVU VM [OL (YLH and the Registry will be available for W\ISPJPUZWLJ[PVUH[[OLVMÄJLVM[OL*P[` Manager during normal City business hours. Any resident of the City and organization active within the City are entitled to register in the Registry to become an “Interested 7HY[`¹ MVY [OL (YLH  6YNHUPaH[PVUZ include, but are not limited to, businesses, business organizations, civic groups, notMVYWYVÄ[ JVYWVYH[PVUZ HUK JVTT\UP[` organizations within the City or the proposed Area. The Registry will include the name, address, and telephone number of each Interested Person and, for organizations, the name and phone number of a designated contact person. Individuals and organizations wanting to register as an Interested Party with respect to the Area must complete and submit an Interested Parties Registration Form with the City Manager. The registrant must submit a copy of a current driver’s license, lease, voter registration card, utility IPSS ÄUHUJPHS Z[H[LTLU[ VY Z\JO V[OLY evidence that may be acceptable to the City Manager to establish the individual’s current residency. If the registration form and/or supporting documentation are incomplete, the City Manager will give written notice of a defective application to the registrant. The registrant will be entitled to correct any defects and resubmit a new registration form and supporting documentation. Registered residents and organizations will be entitled to receive notices of public meetings, public hearings, and the availability of redevelopment plans and eligibility reports. Registration forms must be picked up and ÄSLK^P[O[OLMVSSV^PUNVMÄJL! TIF Interested Parties Registry City of Woodstock c/o City Manager 121 W. Calhoun Street Woodstock, Illinois 60098 (Published in The Woodstock Independent June 13, 2018) L10561


SPORTS

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

28

Sports

Fighting Saint will be a healer

e past four years, Cody Brand has helped the University of St. Francis win basketball games. e Woodstock High School graduate will spend the rest of her life helping people medically. She will graduate with a bachelor of science degree in nursing in six months and be able to help people far beyond the basketball court. If her nursing career is the same as her basketball career, she will prevent many people from becoming sick. Meaning on the basketball court, the 6-foot-tall forward will probably be remembered more for her rebounding and shot blocking than Dan anything else. Chamness As a senior, The College Brand led the Report team in blocked shots with 21. While Brand started only three games, she played in a total of 28 games, averaging 10.4 minutes a game. Other than her blocked-shot total, she had 52 points and 65 rebounds (respective averages of 1.9 and 2.3 a game), 17 assists and 10 steals. She scored her points by hitting 20-of-51 from the field and 12-of-23 from the charity stripe. “My career just flew by,” Brand said. “When I graduated from high school, I thought, ‘I have four more years.’ “But playing over 30 games per year was really a whirlwind. I am going to miss being part of a team. Being competitive and working toward a common goal every day is an amazing feeling. When you win a close game or a game you were not supposed to win, celebrating with the team is really special.” Overall, she scored 253 points, pulled down 217 rebounds, doled out 67 assists, blocked 46 shots, and had 32 steals. She scored her career points by nailing 97-of-244 from the floor and 59-of-98 from the charity stripe. “When I entered the program as a freshman, we had not made it to Please see College, Page 31

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Annual event hosted 46 teams, nearly 4,000 fans By Meg Ivers THE INDEPENDENT

e Woodstock Avalanche baseball program celebrated the fifth annual Summer Slam June 8 to 10, welcoming 46 9-U to 14-U teams from the Midwest. e slam kicked off Friday evening with a home run derby at Emricson Park. Teams dodged rain Saturday for games played at Woodstock North, Merryman Fields, Bates Park and Emricson; but rain forced cancellation of Sunday games. “We run this tournament as a fundraiser for the program and an opportunity to give back to the city and the school districts,” said Tim Oman, Avalanche board president. “is is a huge team effort for the board of directors and volunteer coaches and is a great opportunity for us to do something for the community.” According to Oman, each team brings with it 80 to 100 people. Rosters generally range from 10 to 12 kids and a few coaches. When parents, fans and umpires are counted, the tournament this weekend welcomed about 3,000 to 4,000 people to enjoy Woodstock parks, lodging, eateries and entertainment.

Proceeds put to good use To enhance local park facilities to make the tournament more attractive and benefit local programs like Avalanche and Woodstock Little League, proceeds from the tournament have been used to install yellow bumpers along the tops of outfield fencing in addition to foul poles and windscreens on several fields. “We have such beautiful facilities, and Chris is instrumental in helping us manage them,” Oman said of Chris Lynk, head of maintenance for the city of Woodstock. “He’s done a phenomenal job with the city parks.” e end result is teams from all over the area, including Hamlin Park, Glen Ellyn, Marionette Park, Palatine and more, having a chance to compete in this annual Woodstock tourney.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Ben Sherman, Avalanche 10U, winds up for a pitch during Summer Slam tournament play at Merryman Field #3. Oman also noted a benefit of having tournaments like the Summer Slam in helping keep costs down for participants in the program itself, which has begun to see alums doing well in area high school programs. Avalanche alums playing in high

school have included Kyle Kanass and Aaron Montgomery at Woodstock North, Ben Strang at Marian Central, Jacob Waryck, Tyler Waterson and Calvin and JT Wormley at Woodstock High School, and Tyler Continued on Next page


29

Continued from Previous page

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT June 13-19, 2018

Oman at Alden-Hebron. “Our goal is to be a primary feeder program for the high schools,” Oman added. “We teach kids sportsmanship and how to be prepared to play good quality baseball so that when they get to high school, they’re team players who can play baseball in a highly productive manner.” Tournament highlights for the 2018 season will also include the 12U team competing in the annual tournament hosted in Cooperstown, N.Y., home to the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame.

2018 Woodstock Summer Slam home run derby winners from the Avalanche:

SPORTS

9U: Z[°¶)YPNO[VU)LOT UK°¶4H_)LHYK YK°¶/VSKLU/HHR 10U: Z[°¶*OHYSPL*YV^ZVU UK°¶3L]P7LYV[[H 11U: UK°¶7HYRLY5LMM

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Woodstock Avalanche 13U player Jay Zinnen bunts foul during the the Summer Slam tournament at Merryman Field.

DEFENDING TITLE Reese Connor, 11, Woodstock, performs in the May Ice Show at *Y`Z[HS0JL/V\ZLPU*Y`Z[HS3HRL 9LLZL[VVRÄYZ[WSHJLPU[OL-YLL Skate Preliminary Test Track event during the 18th Annual Wagon Wheels Figure Skating Club Compete USA Competition held Sunday at Crystal Ice House. Connor has been skating for four years and will compete to defend her position in Wisconsin at the Southport Summer Classic later this week.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY TRICIA CARZOLI


ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A BIRD, ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A PLANE, ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THE DARE DEVILS!

June 13-19, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY TRICIA CARZOLI

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christineâ&#x20AC;? 12-year-old female tabby DSH

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To see this pet or others or to volunteer to help walk dogs, call the shelter at

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31 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT June 13-19, 2018

PHOTO COURTESY OF GLORIA ALLEN

Cody Brand in action for the University of St. Francis.

COLLEGE

Continued from page 28

nationals,â&#x20AC;? Brand said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We made it three years in a row from my sophomore year on. It felt great to be part of a program that was able to turn it around.â&#x20AC;? During her four years on the team, St. Francis had never a losing season, either overall or in the conference. e past three years the Fighting Saints won 22 or more games in each season Cody and 16 or more in Brand each of the conference seasons. ere were 17-15 overall during Brandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freshman season. In Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference, St. Francis was 12-5. One year later, the Saints improved to 28-5 overall and 17-2 in the CCAC. St. Francis was undefeated in the regular season and in the league during her junior year, running the record to 34-2 overall and 21-0 in the CCAC.

SCOREBOARD

e Saints were 22-10 and 16-4, respectively, this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My best year personally was my sophomore year,â&#x20AC;? Brand said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, nothing can top my junior season. We were undefeated in the regular season, and we were in the NAIA Final Four. at would be tough to top.â&#x20AC;? As a sophomore, she scored 97 points and grabbed 61 rebounds. e daughter of Michelle and Roger Brand of Woodstock has six months until she completes a B.S. in nursing. She was twice named to the CCAC All-Academic team, earning the distinction as a sophomore and a junior. She currently holds a 3.07 GPA. â&#x20AC;&#x153;e sport gave me countless opportunities, and I am thankful for it,â&#x20AC;? the former Blue Streak said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My family was extremely supportive and would travel to my games regardless of how far. I would not have accomplished any of this without them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because of college basketball, I met my boyfriend, who is on the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team. I had two great coaches in Samantha Quigley and Steve Brooks, who taught me so much.â&#x20AC;? Dan Chamness covers the college careers of Woodstock-area athletes.

SCOREBOARD PRESENTED BY

Attention youth and adult summer sports leagues e Woodstock Independent would like to print your scores and results in our weekly scoreboard. Please send results to sports@ thewoodstockindependent.com.

Designed by Jasmin Vilchis, McHenry County College Sponsored by the McHenry County Department of Health. Funding provided by the Illinois Department of Public Health. Need Help Quitting? Visit www.quityes.org or Call the Illinois Tobacco Quitline at 1-866-QUIT-YES or TDD/TYY 1-800-501-1068.

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