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Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Oct. 10-16, 2018

Published every Wednesday | Est. 1987 | Serving Woodstock, Wonder Lake and Bull Valley, Ill. | www.thewoodstockindependent.com | $1.00

» CITY COUNCIL

‘Hard to sleep with thump, thump, thump’ Council seeks ‘balance’ on sound from live music venues By Larry Lough LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

MARKETPLACE

Residents of Southview Drive on Woodstock’s south side have a noise problem. “It is thump, thump, thump,” Mary Richards said in describing the

Students tour local company for Manufacturers Day to get up-close looks at production PAGE 15

A&E

sound. “It’s really hard to sleep when it’s thump, thump, thump.” She, along with Roberta Ratliff and a few other neighbors, complained to the City Council last week about noise from outdoor music venues at two nearby bars that feature live bands during summer and fall.

What would you like for downtown?

PAGE 14

COMMUNITY

Local development study focuses on three likely sites

Busy Woodstock weekend recorded in staff photos PAGE 18

INDEX OPINION

8 11

A&E MARKETPLACE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

14 15 18 26

CLASSIFIED

28

PUBLIC NOTICES

30

PUZZLES

31

SPORTS

32

The Woodstock Independent

By Larry Lough

7

SCHOOLS

671 E. Calhoun St., Woodstock, IL 60098 Phone: 815-338-8040 Fax: 815-338-8177 Thewoodstock independent.com

Please see Noise, Page 5

» DOWNTOWN PLAN

SHINING A LIGHT

Bill Odenkirk, ‘Simpsons’ writer, will discuss its impact at Opera House Oct. 18

OBITUARIES

Every Friday and Saturday night, as well as Sunday afternoon, the music never stops during the goodweather months, they said. ey presented a petition signed by 50 people in the area who want the city to do something about the

LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

About 50 people attended a candlelight vigil Oct. 3 on the downtown Square to observe Domestic Violence Awareness Month. More information and photos on Page 2.

City takes roundabout way By Larry Lough LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

Local drivers who are nervous about the several roadway roundabouts planned for Route 47 through Woodstock should get a chance before long to get some practice. Although the remaking of 4.5 miles

of the state highway through the city is still six to eight years from reality, city officials have plans next year to build a roundabout at a busy intersection just blocks off the Square. e project became the subject of some discussion at the City Council meeting May 15, when three students

Please see Roundabout, Page 4

Woodstock City Council members have a vision for downtown development. A consultant has a little different idea. And developers – “the people who write the checks” for building projects – might have another plan for how the city’s central business district should grow. Council members juggled those interests in their meeting last week when they discussed a development study from Houseal Lavigne Associates, a community-planning and urban-design consultant from Chicago. e various concepts the consultant suggested will be merged into a downtown development

Please see DOWNTOWN, Page 6


NEWS

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

2

‘LOVE SHOULD NOT HURT’

IN BRIEF

Jane Farmer, director of Turning Point, a domestic violence service in Woodstock, speaks during a candlelight vigil Oct. 3 at the Park in the Square. A survivor of domestic violence told her story, as did families of people, like Laura, who did not survive. The night before, the City Council had adopted a proclamation declaring October as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month in Woodstock. It urged all residents “to join in recognizing the devastating crime of domestic violence in our community and work towards ending domestic violence in McHenry County.� About 50 people attended the hourlong program, which ended with a soloist singing two Beatles tunes, “Here Comes the Sun� and “In My Life,� the latter which ends, “Though I know I’ll never lose affection/ For people and things that went before/ I know I’ll often stop and think about them/ In my life, I love you more. ...�

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NEWS

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

4

ROUNDABOUT

Continued from Page 1

INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY LARRY LOUGH

Motorists on eastbound South Street are warned that the railroad tunnel at Seminary Avenue and 3HRL:[YLL[OHUKSLZ[YHMĂ„JPUVUS` one direction at a time.

e students also suggested: Â?Ä? "ANNINGÄ? BICYCLESÄ? ANDÄ? PEDESTRIANSÄ? from the tunnel, with “motorized vehicles onlyâ€? signs posted on both sides; Â?Ä? ,OWERINGÄ? THEÄ? SPEEDÄ? LIMITÄ? FORÄ? TUNnel trafďŹ c to 10 mph “because younger drivers and sedans like to speed as fast as possible through the tunnelâ€?; Â?Ä? 7IDENINGÄ? THEÄ? ROADÄ? WHEREÄ? 3OUTHÄ? Street turns onto Lake Avenue; and Â?Ä? (IRINGÄ? AÄ? SURVEYÄ? ENGINEERÄ? TOÄ? ˜CONduct a detailed survey of the structural integrity and the contents of the soil underneath the bridge,â€? which carries Metra and freight trains over the road. e students said they had safety in mind as they studied the project, though their research showed the tunnel had been the scene of only six accidents since 2012 – but no collisions. All wrecks involved cars hitting tunnel walls. But the students reported witness-

from the other side. ose stop signs for westbound trafďŹ c would be replaced by red-andgreen lights to control trafďŹ c entering the tunnel from all three streets. Because South has the shortest approach to the tunnel, the signal would give its trafďŹ c priority to enter. Although westbound Lake Street brings the most trafďŹ c to the tunnel, the students proposed it be the lowest priority “because it is the longest and can handle cars getting backed up.â€? Asked by Mayor Sager how the roundabout was likely to affect trafďŹ c, the students said they expected the efďŹ ciency of the intersection would increase vehicle counts. ey thanked the cooperation their study received from Jeff Van Landuyt, Woodstock’s director of Public Works, and Andrew Celentano, chairman of the city’s Transportation Commission.

from Woodstock High School presented their study on how best to control trafďŹ c entering the railroad tunnel from the east and west off South and Lake streets and Seminary Avenue. at one-lane tunnel is just a few hundred feet from where the roundabout is planned – at the ďŹ ve-way intersection of South with Lake Avenue and Madison Street. e $1.6-million project is scheduled for 2019, Mayor Brian Sager conďŹ rmed at that May meeting. According to the city’s website, ofďŹ cials suggest the roundabout will: Â?Ä? )MPROVEÄ? THEÄ? APPEARANCEÄ? OFÄ? THEÄ? intersection, which is a gateway street leading to the downtown; Â?Ä?!LLOWÄ?FORÄ?THEÄ?OPPORTUNITYÄ?TOÄ?INSTALLÄ? signage to deďŹ ne an access route to the downtown; and Â?Ä? )MPROVEÄ? TRAF­CÄ? ÂŽOW Ä? REDUCEÄ? CONgestion, and reduce vehicle wait time resulting from the existing ďŹ ve-way Drawing of the roundabout planned at Lake Avenue’s intersection with intersection. South and Madison streets.

Trying to avoid backups At the council meeting in May, students Andrew Ahmeti, Jackson Nielsen, and Alec VandeWalker presented a seven-page report from their study. “at’s a college-level engineering problem,â€? Councilman Gordie Tebo said of the work done by the students of Steve ompson, industrial technology teacher at WHS. eir recommendation was that the city spend $762,000 for a sensor-triggered trafďŹ c light that would give the right of way to eastbound trafďŹ c on South Street. at would avoid backups from trafďŹ c coming off the roundabout, they explained. TrafďŹ c would be continuous through the roundabout and into the tunnel, while vehicles on Seminary and Lake Street – on the other side of the tunnel – would yield.

ing many near-miss collisions. “While doing several trafďŹ c counts we were able to see a total of 12 contentions,â€? their report said. “Contentions are incidents where cars almost collided with one another or where cars are unable to move because they get stuck trying to enter the tunnel while another car tries to enter.â€? Although the number of accidents doesn’t warrant a trafďŹ c light, the students reported, they estimated about 11 contentions an hour “that justiďŹ ed creating a new solution.â€?

)NFORMATIONÄ?ABOUTÄ?THEÄ?CITY–SÄ?PROJECTÄ? is available at woodstockil.gov. Go to the Public Works page, and under Latest Updates you will ďŹ nd South/Lake/ -ADISONÄ?2OUNDABOUTÄ?)NFORMATION

Priority streets ey suggested eastbound trafďŹ c on South Street be given priority as cars APPROACHÄ?THEÄ?TUNNEL Ä?BECAUSEÄ?THATÄ?ÂŽOWÄ? has no stop sign until vehicles come out of the tunnel at Seminary and Lake. But cars normally alternate use of the tunnel – if they can see trafďŹ c coming

Signs on both sides of the railroad runnel on South Street give drivers the dimensions, but since 2012, six cars have hit the walls of the tunnel.

Sex offender charged with entering school Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

A Woodstock man who is a registered sex offender was being held on $10,000 bond after being arrested last week for reportedly entered Woodstock High School illegally. *AMESÄ?#ORNELIUSÄ?)6 Ä? Ä?WASÄ?ARRESTEDÄ? on a charge of presence within a school zone by a child sex offender. According to a news release from Woodstock Police, faculty members told the school’s resource ofďŹ cer Oct. 2 that a man they believed to be Cornelius had entered the school building toward the end of the previous school day. Police and school ofďŹ cials James reviewed the Cornelius school’s surveillance videos and identiďŹ ed Cornelius as the man who was inside the building for about 10 minutes around 4 p.m. Oct. 1, according to the news release. After receiving the information, the McHenry County State’s Attorney’s OfďŹ ce obtained an arrest warrant for Cornelius, whose address was listed in the 300 block of West Calhoun Street. Police reported they found Cornelius about 8:15 a.m. Oct. 3 in the 1200 block of Walden Oaks Drive, where he was arrested on the warrant. Police said they found cannabis on Cornelius when he was arrested, so he was also charged with one count of possession of cannabis. He was taken to the McHenry County Adult Correctional Facility,. Cornelius had been barred from entering the school after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor of criminal sexual abuse in 2014. A statement from District 200 Associate Superintendent Brian McAdow said school employees believed Cornelius might have been trying to speak with staff members or former staff. “Mr. Cornelius either knew or should have known that it was illegal for him to be on school property,â€? McAdow’s statement said. “We appreciate our strong partnership with Woodstock Police. ... We will continue to work with them to investigate anyone who unlawfully enters school property.â€? Cornelius is scheduled to appear in court Oct. 16.


Continued from Page 1

Balancing act

IN BRIEF Housing Authority offers help with heating costs The McHenry County Housing Authority has begun accepting applications for winter heating assistance for seniors 60 and older and people with disabilities. Help with utility bills is available for lowincome families through the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program. Effective Nov. 1, disconnected households and families with children ages 5 and younger can apply for assistance. Other eligible households may apply Dec. 1. Residents must provide proof of income to be eligible: up to $1,518 a month for a single person, and up to $3,138 for four people. (WWSPJHU[Z^PSSILZLY]LKÄYZ[JVTLÄYZ[ served until May 31 or the funds are gone. For more information, call the Housing Authority, 815-338-7752.

Grant designed to change substance abuse behavior The McHenry County Substance Abuse *VHSP[PVU HUK [OL 9LNPVUHS 6MÄJL VM ,K\cation were awarded a Drug Free Communities grant of $125,000 a year for 5 years to change alcohol, marijuana and prescription drug-use norms among youths, parents and community members through education about the risk/harm to youth. DFC grants are awarded through the 6MÄJL VM 5H[PVUHS +Y\N *VU[YVS 7VSPJ` HUK monitored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration. For program information, email Laura Crain, Drug Free Program coordinator at [OL9LNPVUHS6MÄJLVM,K\JH[PVU33*YHPU' McHenryCountyIL.gov

- Deputy Mayor Mike Turner concerns. “He was very cooperative,” Turner said. “He is willing to consider sound barriers. ...” Ratliff said the sound was disruptive in her home, which is more than one-half mile from the bar. She figured the closest any council member lived to the bar was 1.4 miles. “We’re not here to make enemies

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‘Turn it down’ Police Chief John Lieb said in April that he hoped to have a noise ordinance, with specific decibel limits, in force by summer, but acknowledged last week, “I did not get as far on that as I had hoped.” At an annual meeting to review liquor control and video gaming, Lieb told bar owners then that police would react to neighbors who called about noise. “If complaints start coming in, you need to turn it down,” he said. But that involved reports from people who live near the Benton Street bars in the downtown. Lieb said establishing acceptable sound limits was not an easy process. “Sound is a fluid thing,” he said. “It’s

about like tacking Jello to the wall.” But he said patrol sergeants were now in charge of “gathering as much sound meter data as possible” through October. e chief said the readings would provide “a little more definition” to sounds so that an ordinance can be crafted “to be fair to everyone involved.” Asked whether he would have a recommendation to the council by January, he said, “at’s probably a good estimate.” What kind – if any – ordinance the city establishes will be a decision made by the council, Lieb noted. At last week’s council meeting, neighbors off Route 47 reported that live music sometimes would go on until 3 or 4 a.m. Turner said that violated terms of the bars’ liquor licenses that require a midnight curfew. “Your voices are heard,” Turner assured the neighbors. “We’ll look for a balance.”

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NEWS

Richards also suggested the city look into sound barriers to muffle the noise, an idea that Deputy Mayor Mike Turner liked. Turner, who said the council would try to “balance” the neighbors’ concerns with the businesses’ interests, explained two steps the city was

“...one man’s loud noise isn’t another person’s loud noise.”

of the establishments, ...” she said. “We just want them to tone it down.” Councilman Gordie Tebo was sympathetic. “I don’t know how you guys take it,” he said.

Oct. 10-16, 2018

noise. “We need the City Council to take some action,” Richards said. “e petition asks you to set quiet hours. ... We need some type of noise ordinance to control this.” Richards said the city ought to limit the noise as it does in construction zones. “And yet the city doesn’t have anything to regulate outdoor music venues,” she complained. “We need the City Council to take a proactive stance.”

taking. First, police are measuring sound in the area to get “an objective measure” of the noise involved, which could lead to an ordinance similar to those in other communities. “But one man’s loud noise isn’t another person’s loud noise,” he said. Second, city officials have met with one bar owner to discuss the

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

NOISE


Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

6

DOWNTOWN

Continued from Page 1

plan that has been in the works for months. A ďŹ nal version is expected to be presented to the council at its Oct. 16 meeting. As council members discussed their wish lists for downtown projects, council member Maureen Larson asked City Manager Roscoe Stelford whether giving developers speciďŹ c details of projects was helpful. “I think it’s less helpful,â€? Stelford said. “e more we get down to details, the harder it is to ďŹ nd a developer [to adopt them].â€?

NEWS

‘Key retail categories’ Houseal Lavigne’s study of “residential and commercial market potential� for the downtown focused on three sites: Woodstock Station,

whose development stalled when the recession hit a decade ago; the old lumber yard at Judd and Madison streets; and the current public works site along Washington Street. e consultants foresee construction of 550 housing units “in the next ďŹ ve years or so,â€? Deputy Mayor Mike Turner explained, involving a mix of single- and multifamily residences. But a key issue involved the kind of retail development the city could use to avoid losing business to other communities, which offer consumers some things Woodstock does not. e study listed “key primary retail categories which would be well-suited for the Downtown and have demonstrated market potential.â€? ey are: Â?Ä? 'ROCERYÄ? PARTICULARLYÄ? SMALLERÄ? specialty grocers); Â?Ä?,IQUORÄ?STORESÄ?PRIMARILYÄ?AÄ?HIGHER end national/regional chain);

Â?Ä?2ESTAURANTSÄ?FORMAL Ä?CASUAL Ä?AND Â?Ä? #LOTHING Ä? ACCESSORYÄ? ANDÄ? SPEcialty retailers – like shoes and SPORTSÄ?EQUIPMENT “ey could be spending here if we had the right mix of retail and restaurants,â€? Turner said.

parent. Court date to be set. Q David Vasquez-Sanchez, 18, Woodstock, was arrested Oct. 2 at U.S. 14 and Route 47 on charges of driving while license suspended and improper lane usage. Released after posting 10 percent of $1,500 bond. Court date Oct. 18. Q Devin M. Goss, 21, Woodstock, was arrested Oct. 4 on charges of burglary and theft. Bond and court date to be set. Q Jeffrey J. Soto, 43, West Dundee, was arrested Oct. 4 at Lake and Kimball avenues on charges of driving while license revoked, improper lane usage, possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond to be set. Court date Oct. 19. Q Bryan BB Jones, 23, transient, was arrested Oct. 4 on Church Street on a New York warrant charging possession of heroin. Held without bond. Court date to be set.

an order of protection. Q Antonio D. Caballero-Romero, 30, was arrested Sept. 29 on charges of driving with a revoked driver’s license, operating an uninsured motor vehicle, and speeding in a construction zone. Q Brandon R. Baker, 29, Wonder Lake, was arrested Sept. 29 on charges of driving with a suspended driver’s license and speeding 15-20 mph above speed limit. Q Cheri C. Irvine, 37, Woodstock, was arrest Sept. 30 on charges of driving under [OL PUÅ\LUJL VM HSJVOVS HUK ZWLLKPUN 11-14 mph above speed limit. Q Murjana R. Shah-Vonau, 36, Woodstock, was arrested Sept. 30 on a charge of domestic battery involving bodily harm. Q Jason R. Butenschoen, 39, Woodstock, was arrested Sept. 30 on charges of driving with electronic communications KL]PJLKYP]PUN\UKLY[OLPUÅ\LUJLVMHSJVhol, illegal transport of liquor/driver, and PTWYVWLY[YHMÄJSHUL\ZHNL

Developers interested Several aspects of the consultant’s vision – “A sense of what is possible,â€? Turner said – excited council members. ey included a trail path through the housing units, open spaces amid the densely planned construction, and especially underground parking proposed at one of the complexes. “is provides some deďŹ nition of the vision,â€? Turner said of the study’s suggestions. “It’s a starting point,â€? Larson added. But Councilman Mark Saladin was

concerned with some of the speciďŹ c details of the “consultant’s conceptâ€? being incorporated into the downtown plan. “is may or may not reect our own views,â€? he said. Whatever the vision is, downtown Woodstock is attracting interest from developers. e council already has approved two studies of housing developments that would be eligible for expense reimbursement if the city establishes a second tax increment ďŹ nancing district, an incentive to pay for early costs of planning and infrastructure. e process to create TIF2, to replace the current TIF that will expire in 2020, is underway and scheduled for a ďŹ nal vote in January. !NDÄ? 'ARRETTÄ? !NDERSON Ä? DIRECTORÄ? of Community Development, conďŹ rmed he would entertain two other developers this week, one of whom is coming for a return visit.

PUBLIC SAFETY LOG Woodstock Police Department

Q Alexander T. Rulford, 40, transient, was arrested Sept. 28 at Walden Oaks Apartments on a charge of criminal trespass to property. Released after posting 10 percent of $1,000 bond. Court date Oct. 25. Q Alfredo D. Jordan, 19, Woodstock, was arrested Sept. 29 in the 500 block of West South Street on a charge of driving while license suspended. Released after posting 10 percent of $1,500 bond. Court date Oct. 18. Q Peter J. Fallaw, 43, transient, was arrested Sept. 30 at Jefferson and Calhoun streets on charges of public indecency. Held on $1,500 bond. Court date Oct. 25. Q Luis E. Arreola, 24, Woodstock, was arrested Sept. 30 in the 200 block of North Benton Street on a charge of assault. Held on $1,200 bond. Court date Oct. 25. Q Mark Valdez, 33, Woodstock, was arrested Oct. 1 in the 800 block of Washington Street on a McHenry County warrant charging failure to appear. Released after posting 10 percent of $5,000 bond. Court date Oct. 19. Q James Cornelius IV, 22, Woodstock, was arrested Oct. 3 in the 500 block of West South Street on charges of presence within a school zone by a child sex offender and possession of cannabis. Held on $10,000 bond. Court dates Oct. 4 and Nov. 2. Q Taylor J. Witt, 24, Marengo, was arrested Oct. 2 in the 1100 block of North Seminary Avenue on charges of driving while license suspended and expired registration. Released after posting 10 percent of $1,500 bond. Court date Oct. 25. Q Male juvenile, 15, Woodstock, was arrested Oct. 2 in the 100 block of Grove Street on a charge of battery. Released to

4J/LUY`*V\U[`:OLYPMMZ6MÄJL Q Adam J. Taylor, 37, Wonder Lake, was arrested Sept. 25 on charges of hate crime and criminal defacement of property under $300. Q Dennis G. Mossuto, 51, Wonder Lake, was arrested Sept. 26 on charges of driving with suspended driver’s license and expired auto registration. Q Alex R. Ehrke, 22, Woodstock, was arrested Sept. 27 on charges of driving \UKLY[OLPUÅ\LUJLVMKY\NZHUKZWLLKPUN 11-14 mph above speed limit. Q Robert J. Ballarini, 58, Woodstock, was arrested Sept. 27 on six charges of predatory criminal sexual assault of a victim under 13. Q Paul S. Grzyb, 47, Woodstock, was arrested Sept. 27 on a charge of violating

Charges are only accusations of crimes, and defendants are presumed innocent unless proved guilty.

Woodstock Fire/Rescue District Fire Runs indicates units dispatched and what was found at the scene. Ambulance calls of Woodstock Fire/Rescue District are reported here in number only. EMS calls for Sept. 27-Oct. 3: 67 Fire Runs Sept. 27

10:02 p.m. – Queen Anne and Twin *YLLRZYVHKZWHZZLUNLY]LOPJSLÄYL"ZOPM[ commander, engine Sept. 29

6:42 a.m. – 1700 block of South Eastwood Drive, unintentional smoke detector HJ[P]H[PVUUVÄYL"LUNPUL 2:44 p.m. – 3500 Castle Road, authoYPaLKJVU[YVSSLKI\YUPUN"IY\ZO[Y\JRZOPM[ commander, engine 4:26 p.m. – 14500 block of Route 176, THSM\UJ[PVUPUNZTVRLKL[LJ[VYHJ[P]H[PVU" engine 7:38 p.m. – 600 block of South Eastwood Drive, unintentional smoke detector HJ[P]H[PVUUVÄYL"HTI\SHUJL[Y\JRZOPM[ commander Sept. 30

4:58 p.m. – 300 block of Railroad Street, carbon monoxide detector activation, no *6"[Y\JR Oct. 1

2:29 p.m. – 2600 block of Dean Street, WHZZLUNLY ]LOPJSL ÄYL" ZOPM[ JVTTHUKLY engine 7:17 p.m. – North Route 14, animal WYVISLT"LUNPUL 11:41 p.m. – 1100 block of Rose Farm Road, malfunctioning alarm system ZV\UKLK"[Y\JR 11:55 p.m. – 900 block of Lake Avenue, Z`Z[LTTHSM\UJ[PVU"LUNPUL Oct. 2

6:28 a.m. – 800 block of South Valley Hill Road, arcing, shorted electrical equipTLU["[Y\JR 4:50 p.m. – Seminary Avenue and Grove :[YLL[TV[VY]LOPJSLHJJPKLU[^P[OPUQ\YPLZ" two ambulances, shift commander, truck

12:28 a.m. – 1700 block of South Eastwood Drive, unintentional smoke detec[VYHJ[P]H[PVUUVÄYL"LUNPULHTI\SHUJL Oct. 3 2200 block of North Seminary Avenue, truck, shift commander Sept. 28 NHZSLHR"LUNPUL


OBITUARIES

7

Hervey James Warriner was born on May 29, 1952, to Rachel Jean McIntyre and William Wells Warriner in Freeport, Ill. He passed away at the age of 66 on Oct. 5, 2018. He is survived by his wife, Linda Hamer Warriner; his son, Elias William Warriner; and his niece, Rachel Benell Bednar Blanford of Minneapolis. He was preceded in death by his sister, Hallie Jean Warriner Bednar, and his parents. Hervey James Hervey grew up in Warriner Belvidere Ill., graduating from Belvidere High School in 1970. He then attended Millikin University-Decatur, where he majored in theater and music, performing with the university choir across the U.S. and Europe. Upon graduation, Hervey opened Copy Express print shop in Woodstock. After managing Copy Express for 25 years, Hervey traveled the country as a driver in the trucking business. Hervey and Linda were married on March 31, 1984. Their son, Elias, was born June 10, 1996. Hervey often brought Linda and Elias on his travels; together, they visited 48 states and made lasting friendships around the world. Hervey lived a life full of love, faith, music, and laughter. He loved theater, and is remembered for his inspired, crowd-pleasing interpretations of Harold Hill in “The Music Manâ€? and Benjamin Franklin in “1776.â€? A true Renaissance man, Hervey also had a lifelong love of literature and language. He enjoyed reading and was self-taught in French (très impressionnant!). Hervey devoted much of his life to service to others. A devout Christian, Hervey was a reader, leader, and lifelong member of the Christian Science Church, where he used his musical talents to sing moving solos every week. Hervey was also active in the Woodstock Rotary Club for many years; during this time, he sponsored many exchange stuKLU[ZHZ[OL9V[HY`@V\[O,_JOHUNL6MĂ„JLY He was known for his humor, which he used to great effect as the publisher of the weekly Rotary newsletter. Hervey will be deeply missed by his community and his family, including Barb, Renee, Rob, and Ryan Hamer; Rita Hamer; Mark, Sharon, Chloe, Sophie, and Annie Hamer;

Holiday lights to be wrapped, not draped for 2018 e Woodstock City Council agreed last week to buy and install new holiday lights downtown. e city will spend up to $12,800 on string lights for downtown trees from Holiday Radiance Lights of Broadview.

Bulldog Property Services of Gilberts was given a contract for about $31,700 to give trees a different look this year by wrapping lights around limbs on trees within the Park in the Square and a single tree in the McHenry Avenue

triangle. at work involves installing, maintaining and removing the lights. e city plans to return to draping lights in 2019 to minimize tree damage. at service last year cost the city about $29,700.

Dale Bednar and Sean Blanford; and longtime friends Barry and Emily Johnson. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, Oct. 13, at Schneider Leucht Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home, 1211 N Seminary Ave., Woodstock, Ill., 60098. A visitation will be held 9-11 a.m., with a service at 11 a.m.. A memorial can be made to First Church of Christ Scientist at 111 W. South St, Woodstock Ill. 60098, or the Woodstock Public Library at 414 W. Judd St., Woodstock Ill. 60098. For more information, contact the funeral home at 815-338-1710, or www.slmcfh.com

Judi Wett, 78 Judi Wett, 78, of Washington, Ill., formerly of Woodstock, Ill., passed away at 11:24 a.m. Monday, Sept. 24, 2018, surrounded by her loving family. She was born on Nov. 1, 1939, in Crystal Lake, Ill., the daughter of Charles and Dagmar (Dalby) Swanson. She married John K. Wett Sr. on Aug. 29, 1959, in Crystal Lake. Surviving are her husband, John; two sons, Michael (Robin) Wett of Aurora, Ill., and Stephen (Alana Mateling Flatley) Wett of Judi Lake Villa, Ill.; two Wett daughters, Andrea (Tim) Brooks of Columbia, Mo., and Jennifer (Brien) Friend of Washington, Ill. Also surviving are 16 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, one brother, Chester (Becky) Swanson of Random Lake, Wis., along with two sisters, Cheryl and Sylvia. Her parents and one son, John K. Wett Jr., preceded her in death. Judi managed the cafeteria of St. Mary Grade School in Woodstock for 25 years, retiring in 2000. She was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother. She loved nothing more than baking for her family and friends and will be missed by all who knew her. Cremation rites have been accorded. Graveside services will be 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018, at McHenry County Memorial Park cemetery in Woodstock, Ill. Memorials in Judi’s name may be given to a charity of the donor’s choice.To share a memory or send a condolence for her family, visit www.masonfuneralhomes.com.

Where to send obituaries Please email obituaries to The Woodstock Independent or bring them into [OLUL^ZWHWLYVMĂ„JLH[,*HSOV\U :[ (MLL^PSSILJOHYNLKMVYZ[HUKHYK VIP[\HYPLZ For more information about our WVSPJ`JHSS

NEWS

Peggy Stevens Hill, 91

Hervey James Warriner, 66

Oct. 10-16, 2018

cancer. Peggy was born on Oct. 11, 1926, to James (Jim) E. Baker, 55, of Woodstock, George E. Stevens and Virginia Ray Hook SteIll., passed away on Oct. 5 unexpectedly in vens (both deceased) in Salem, Mo. Peggy grew up in and around Rolla, Mo., which she his home. Jim was born on Aug. 16, 1963, to Harold called home. She attended Rolla High School. E. and Crystal A. (Scott) Baker in Woodstock, She married William Edward Hill (deceased) on July 4, 1946, divorced him in 1968, and Ill. He attended Woodstock High School. Shortly after Jim graduated high school, never remarried. Peggy had many careers in her lifetime. he started delivering pizzas for Napoli Pizza, where he later ended up buying the She worked as a newspaper reporter both in business from Dino in 1985. His love for the Salem, Ill., and in Rolla, Mo. She was also the community was inexpressible. From dona- church secretary for many years at the First tions to numerous organizations, always Presbyterian Church in Rolla, Mo. After retir[HRPUN JHYL VM [OL ÄYZ[ YLZWVUKLYZ HUK ing from the church, she worked for Century making sure that all of the schools had 21 Real Estate in Rolla. Peggy loved to travel and especially to food for every event. He touched so many lives, and was always there to feed fami- Scotland. She went many times, but problies in need or mourning. Jim took a little ably her most memorable trip was to the Isle pizza joint located in Woodstock to a place of Barra. Barra is the ancestral home of the where everyone would come and feel at Clan McNeill. Peggy traced her lineage back home. His smile and generosity were larger to the Clan McNeill and was a proud, current member of the clan. than life. Peggy was also an avid bird watcher He loved to spend time with his children, and was always involved with all their sports even into her later years. She was a curand academics. He enjoyed spending time rent member of the National Audubon with his family, but most of all spoiling his Society. Peggy had two children, Steven Wilgranddaughters. His love for the White Sox liam Hill (deceased in 2014), and is surwill always be remembered. Jim was preceded in death by his father, vived by her daughter, Donna Leslie (Hill) Emmons, of Woodstock, Ill.; her grandHarold E. Baker. He will be sadly missed by his mother, sons, Benjamin Emmons (Robin Ritter) Crystal; his son, Shaun (Brigitte), and their of Maple Grove, Minn.; Joseph Emmons two daughters, Gabriella and Ariella; and his (Elli) of Woodstock, Ill.; Lucas Hill (Ada daughter Samantha (Tyler) Westman. Along Torres) of Ormond Beach, Fla.; Woodwith his brother, Scott; sister Melinda (Mark); row Hill (Dove) of Englewood, Colo.; and nieces, Jessica and Renee; nephew, Ross; Justin Hill (Leslie) of Crestwood, Mo.; and 13 great-grandchildren (Hannah and Uncle Tony and Aunt Jerry Azarro. A visitation will be held on Wednes- Jacob Emmons, Madeleine and Jackson day, Oct. 10, 2018, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Emmons, Fernando, Angelina and Sarni Schneider-Leucht-Merwin & Cooney Funeral Torres, Laciana and Sabrina Hill, Elijah and Avila Hill, and Callie and Lily Hill) and one Home, 1211 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock. A service will be held in memory of Jim on additional great-grandchild on the way! Also surviving is Peggy’s brother Philip Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018, with visitation from 10 a.m. until the time of the service at 11 a.m. G. Stevens (Cozette) of Bailey, Colo., and at the funeral home. Interment will follow in OLY JSVZL ÄYZ[ JV\ZPU :\aHUUL /VVRL McHenry County Memorial Park cemetery in Schacher. In addition, she is survived by many nieces and nephews. Peggy’s Woodstock. Memorial donations can be made in mem- other brother, Jack Harlan Stevens, died ory of Jim Baker to: WHS Backers Club, in 2006. A memorial celebration of her life will be 501 W. South St., Woodstock, IL 60098, or WNHS Booster Club, 3000 Raffel Road, held in Rolla, Mo., this fall. 0U SPL\ VM ÅV^LYZ KVUH[PVUZ TH` IL Woodstock, IL 60098. For more information, contact the funeral made to the Juvenile Diabetes Research home at 815-338-1710, or www.slmcfh.com Foundation (JDRF), 26 Broadway, 14th Floor, New York, N.Y., 10004 or online at their website. For information, contact Schneider Peggy Stevens Hill, 91, died Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, at Valley Hi Nursing Home in Wood- Leucht Merwin & Cooney Funeral Home at stock, Ill., from complications of pancreatic 815-338-1710, or visit www.slmcfh.com.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

James (Jim) E. Baker, 55


OPINION

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

8

Opinion

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Cheryl Wormley PUBLISHER, CO-OWNER

Paul Wormley CO-OWNER

>VVKZ[VJR03࠮ 

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Cheryl Wormley Larry Lough Sandy Kucharski Ken Farver

It’s a ‘tax’ district, but it’s about the future Even if you don’t have an opinion on it, you at least should know details about the proposal for a new tax increment financing district in Woodstock. After all, it would be with us for the next 23 years. We suggested recently that the discussion about TIF2 (and there is enough disagreement to make it a debate) will be interesting in the months ahead. We suggest today that you be a part of it. Dates and times are listed below for when you can get involved. e development incentive would take in much more of Woodstock (see map) than the current downtown-centric TIF, which will expire in 2020. It will roughly follow Judd Street to Route 47, turn south to Lake Avenue, then east. A TIF diverts property tax revenue from new development within

its boundaries to finance incentives for developers, such as costs of planning and design, nuisance abatement, and infrastructure construction to encourage community growth – retail, industrial, and residential. Taxing units within the TIF that would be denied the extra income for 23 years – and there are six of them in addition to the city – can be expected to raise concerns, as officials of Woodstock School District 200 already have. All of those taxing bodies will have a say in the process as the Joint Review Board, which is scheduled to meet at 3 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29. Having a vote isn’t the same as having a veto, however; the City Council could approve a new TIF despite a vote of disapproval from the Joint Review Board. e next day, at 6 p.m. Oct. 30,

the city will have a public outreach meeting at City Hall, where the city staff will explain TIF2 and answer questions. Later that week, a final public outreach meeting is scheduled for a weekend – 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3 – to accommodate people for whom weekdays are not possible or convenient. At 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, as the first item on the City Council agenda, a public hearing will be conducted on the final redevelopment plan. A final vote on TIF2 would come at the council’s meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 15. You and your community could be – and probably will be – affected for the next two decades by the decisions that will be made in the next three months. You should be a part of the discussion.

Boundaries of TIF2 would break out of the current downtown-centric TIF, running south along Route 47 and east along Lake Avenue.

What campaign info will you use before voting? As you start thinking about the Nov. 6 election, you should know that e Independent last week emailed questionnaires to all of the candidates for locally contested races on your ballot. at includes U.S. Congress, Illinois House and Senate, McHenry County Board, and county clerk. We asked only two questions, tailored to the particular office being sought, in an attempt to get information readers can use to make good choices about their elected officials. We will publish that information Wednesday, Oct. 31, in e Independent’s Voters Guide, editing only lightly so that you can read the candidates’ own words. at publication date might seem a little late – just six days before the election – given the early voting option people have. But we know from past elections that most people won’t vote until they go to the polls on Nov. 6. And we know from experience that many of them won’t really start to think about most of their votes until the week before the election. Human nature.

WHEN I FIRST moved to Illinois, I found I had gone to work at a daily newspaper that had a rule not to publish campaign information during the Larry week before an Lough election. e thinking Editorializing was, I’m told, that the editors feared a last-minute attack by a candidate would not give the newspaper time to allow the opponent a chance to respond. We changed that policy. I have always believed that rules were made by editors who were afraid to make decisions. It was easier, I assume, to say, “Sorry, we have a rule against that, ...” than to make a tough choice about whether to print and when. Editors make a lot of difficult decisions, especially as elections get close and candidates get desperate. at’s what editors should do.

COUPLE OF JOBS BACK, WHEN I was editor at a northwestern Illinois daily, I got a frantic Monday morning call the day before a city election. e caller, a former resident who had moved out of state, said he had important and scandalous information about the mayor that we just had to get into the paper the next day, before the scoundrel could be re-elected. Maybe the caller figured we would publish it without looking into its accuracy or asking the mayor for a response. No dice, I told him. Well then, could he buy an ad in the paper for election morning? Sorry, you missed the deadline. I never asked him what the scandal was. But I told him we would be happy to listen if he would call me the day after the election. It’ll still be scandalous then, I said. at follow-up call never came. MAKE NO MISTAKE ABOUT IT, with less than four weeks before Election Day, this is desperation time. You can tell by the increased frequency of disingenuous political advertising on TV.

Big money from mysterious sources gets poured into big elections like this. And when you consider the two candidates for governor of Illinois are multimillionaires who have dumped seven-figure donations into their own campaigns, well, the outrage of dishonest TV ads is multiplied many times over. So, be careful when you reach for the TV remote. Unless it’s to hit the mute button. YOU CAN DO MORE THAN VOTE. Write a letter to the editor of XHow else can you talk with thousands of your neighbors about matters important to you and this election? Give us your name and hometown, and add your phone number (for verification purposes only, not for publication). We’ll take it by email, U.S. Postal Service, or at our office. Make sure you vote. But first, be heard. Larry Lough is editor of e Woodstock Independent. His email is larry@ thewoodstockindependent.com


owner “dating back to the ’50s.� Her list included yet another jewelry store – Rourke’s Jewelry and Gifts. Seems Woodstock was the place to go for Cheryl jewelry. Some she Wormley grouped together: +LJSHYH[PVUZ cleaners and fur storage – Anderson, Beu’s, and Buckley; auto dealers – Holmes, Reichert, and Woodward; and service stations – Hunt’s, Wendt’s, and Limbaugh’s.

companies from the past – Harding, Gerald M. Smith and more. is could go on and on. As Don Peasley would have said, “It’s a trip down memory lane.�

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I’M A READER, TOO. I was in San Diego when last week’s paper was being produced, which means I wasn’t part of the process. I was a reader just like each of you, and I was looking forward to reading e Independent from cover to cover. It was a joy sitting in my favorite chair reading our community’s news, seeing the photos, and taking in the advertisements just as each of you does. Since I’m in a remembering-back mode, my Uncle Virgil Smith frequently complimented the staff and me by commenting that it was taking him longer and longer to read each week’s Independent. After reading last week’s Independent, I share his accolade. I applaud and thank the staff for interesting, well-written articles, columns, and editorial; quality photos; and well-designed ads and pages. Like the businesses named for their owners, your names are on your work.

;OL>VVKZ[VJR0UKLWLUKLU[Z[YP]LZMVY HJJ\YHJ`;VZ\NNLZ[JVYYLJ[PVUZ VYJSHYPĂ„JH[PVUZLTHPSUL^Z' [OL^VVKZ[VJRPUKLWLUKLU[JVT

Cheryl Wormley is publisher of e Woodstock Independent. Her email is c.wormley@thewoodstockindependent.com.

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Corrections

Staff *OLY`S>VYTSL`

PUBLISHER

C.WORMLEY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

3HYY`3V\NO

EDITOR

LARRY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

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ASSOCIATE EDITOR

SANDY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

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PHOTOGRAPHER

KEN@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

5PJVSL2\Y[aTHU

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

NICOLE@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

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ADVERTISING MANAGER

JEN@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

ADVERTISING

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CONTACT INFO FOR PUBLIC OFFICIALS U.S. Sen. Richard Durbin Chicago ofďŹ ce 230 S. Dearborn St. Suite 3892 Chicago, IL 60604 312-353-4952

Gov. Bruce Rauner Chicago ofďŹ ce James R. ompson Center 100 W. Randolph St., 16-100 Chicago, IL 60601 312-814-2121

McHenry County Board Chairman Jack Franks 6903 S. Grant Hwy.w Marengo, IL 60152 815-334-4224 (work) jdfranks@co.mchenry.il.us

U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth Chicago ofďŹ ce 230 S. Dearborn St. Suite 3900 Chicago, IL 60604 (312) 886-3506

State Rep. Steve Reick District OfďŹ ce 1072 Lake Ave. Woodstock, IL 60098 815-880-5340

Woodstock Mayor Brian Sager 121 W. Calhoun St. Woodstock, IL 60098 815-338-4302 mayor@woodstockil.gov

State Sen. Pam Althoff District OfďŹ ce 5400 W. Elm St., Suite 103 McHenry, IL 60050 815-455-6330

Dorr Township Supervisor Susan Brokaw 1039 Lake Ave. Woodstock, IL 60098 815-338-0125 supervisor@dorrtownship.com

U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren McHenry District OfďŹ ce P.O. Box 1928 McHenry, IL 60051 815-679-6352

“I read about eight newspapers in a day. When I’m in a town with only one newspaper, I read it eight times.� - Will Rogers

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OPINION

A FEW OF THE OTHERS THAT drew my attention were Bowman Shoes, Hubert’s Pharmacy, and Sherman Bowling and Brettl’s Bowling. I was a little red-faced for having missed Dittman’s Plumbing and Heating, R.O. Andrew Feed Store, and Merwin Furniture and Martin’s HiWay Furniture. Susan’s list also included Stewart’s Locker Service, which reminded me of Jones Country Meats. Two more: 2 Bills Bike Shop and Belcher’s Yarns/ Gifts. If you’d like to see her complete list, let me know. While driving around town, I saw current businesses I hadn’t included three weeks ago: Zoia Monument Co., Peters Motors, and ompson’s Appliance. Just now, I thought of real estate

,*HSOV\U:[ŕ Ž>VVKZ[VJR03  Phone: 815-338-8040 ^^^[OL^VVKZ[VJRPUKLWLUKLU[JVT

9

Oct. 10-16, 2018

ree weeks ago, Declarations was about Bohn’s Ace Hardware closing after nearly 90 years of serving the people of Woodstock. Included in the column were the names of businesses that, like Bohn’s, carried the name of the owner. Knowing few lists are ever complete, I asked readers to “let me knowâ€? of businesses I missed. e response surprised and pleased me. Almost immediately, I had an email from Margaret Grell. She wrote, “My husband, Ed, has many happy childhood memories of playing in the empty lot behind his dad’s hardware store on the Square, Grell True Value. It was during the early ’50s and located where the yogurt shop now operates.â€? Within in days, Linda Taylor called, Nancy McCoy emailed, and Susan Friedel Obenauf sent a letter. Linda recalled Dacy Electric, Gluth Excavating, and Nolan’s Furniture. Businesses Nancy said “came to mindâ€? and “would be remembered by people in the ’60s and ’70sâ€? were Koblenz Women’s Clothing, Uncle Dan’s, Stone’s, Angelo’s, and Vierigg’s – though she was uncertain of the spelling of that last one. She also remembered a time when “there were four or ďŹ ve jewelry stores on the Square and Main Streetâ€? – Eby’s, Ray Wolf Jewelers, Conlin’s or Conlon’s, and Woodstock Jewelers. Susan sent a list of 26 businesses that each carried the name of its

The

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Ask ... and our readers respond

Woodstock

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Oct. 10-16, 2018

SCHOOLS

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11

Club hopes kindness message sticks School projects raise money for good causes

Marian school’s S.M.A.R.T. Club urges wise choices

THE INDEPENDENT

Hundreds of sticky notes began a September secret project by the Rotary Interact Club at Creekside Middle School. Members created and anonymously stuck positive notes on all the student lockers. “e idea behind the kindness notes began last year when the students were challenged to perform acts of kindness following another school shooting,” said Francesca Favero, Creekside assistant principal and Interact Club adviser. “e notes were met with great delight and surprise. e students loved the idea of starting the school year setting the tone for our building with kindness.” October will mark the club’s inaugural “sOCtoberfest,” which will be “sOCkrageous.” Members will collect socks for a local

By Janet Dovidio

Oct. 10-16, 2018

Activities encouraging healthy living decisions

By Janet Dovidio

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Schools

THE INDEPENDENT

Anne Perez (left) and Alyssa Peloquin react to the sticky notes of kindness students at Creekside Middle School found on their lockers, a project of the school’s Rotary Interact Club.

“The idea behind the kindness notes began last year when the students were challenged to perform acts of kindness following another school shooting.” - Francesca Favero, Creeksie assistant principal

children’s hospital in honor of Hope Fuller, a former student at Creekside who passed away after a battle with cancer. “We are hoping to collect a record number of socks to donate,” Favero said. Interact Club officers are Ingrid Gay and Vicki Ferrarini,

co-presidents; Melany Cervantes, vice president; Daniela Gomez, secretary; and Acelyn Guadarrama Popoca, treasurer. Future projects include participation in Tag Days on the Square and Christmas Clearing House. e club members are still considering the Polar Plunge for Special Olympics and the Purple Pinky Project to help eradicate polio. e Woodstock Rotary Club sponsors the Interact Club. District 200 Superintendent Mike Moan is a Rotary member. “Interact is a club for students who want to make a difference,” Favero said. “ese kids work hard to make a lasting effect to be proud of – one of kindness, courage and compassion.”

SCHOOLS

COURTESY PHOTOS

“Students of Marian Acting Responsibly Together” is the full title of Marian Central Catholic High School’s S.M.A.R.T. Club. Its purpose is to promote healthy living styles among teens. e members and their programs model the benefits of abstaining from negative behavior, as well as exposing the dangers and consequences of hazardous and unhealthy life styles. “Watching kids serve others is really an amazing experience,” said Benji Winkelman, physical education teacher, junior class adviser and S.M.A.R.T. adviser. is year’s president is junior Shaun Nayahagan. Members organize programs throughout the year, such as Red Ribbon Week, Prom Promise, Kick Butts Campaigns, Tobacco Free Kids, Operation Snowball, and Operation Click. ey give presentations to Marian’s health classes about the dangers of smoking, drugs, and alcohol. ey also visit fifth- and sixth-graders at Catholic middle schools in McHenry County with the same presentations. S.M.A.R.T. club members will soon distribute ribbons that they will make for every student to wear during Red Ribbon Week in October. ey have conducted blood drives in the past and will again in February. “We organized and successfully ran a blood drive through the Heartland Blood Center last February,” Winkelman said. “We had so many students that we had to turn people away; can you believe that! As adviser, I was extremely proud to see our past president Colin Stoll organize this blood drive. “It is very rewarding to see students plan, organize and execute goals that benefit our students at Marian. Many times people get so wrapped up in their own lives that they fail to see the needs of others. Watching these students put others’ needs first is what service is all about.”


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SCHOOLS

Oct. 10-16, 2018

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INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Mary Endres Elementary School had a Dr. Seuss-themed night Sept. 28 to collect food for the Woodstock Food Pantry. Principal Keri Pala dressed up as Cat in the Hat, and students who brought in a canned good could duct tape her to the wall while she read Dr. Seuss stories.

Full-size photos by our staff photographers available for purchase at: thewoodstockindependent.com (use the Photos tab on the upper right corner for downloads)

STUDENT OF THE

WEEK

AMY KEYZER

Amy Keyzer is a senior at Woodstock High School. “Amy is in AP music theory and band. She has done a wonderful job asking for extra help and getting whatever she needs outside of school,� said Mr. Styles, one of her teachers. In school, Amy is in National Honor Society and on high honor roll. She is also the captain of the varsity tennis team, and plays basketball and soccer as well. Outside of school, volunteering is very important to Amy as she volunteers at Christmas Clearing House, the Care4 Breast Cancer race, and at Feed My Starving Children. When asked who inspires her, Amy replied, “Serena Williams,� saying that “even though she has been injured a few times, that doesn’t stop her from playing the game she loves.� Amy says she is also inspired to, “power through and make myself better and stronger.� When asked why she feels successful, Amy replied that she always tries to push herself outside of her comfort zone, and surrounds herself with good people who inspire and lift her up.

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13 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT Oct. 10-16, 2018

SCHOOLS COURTESY PHOTOS

Students at St. John’s preschool shared their handprints to make Friendship Shirts for the class. Students are (front row, from left) Rylie Sullivan, Riley Gumprecht, Kaylee Buehler, Jordan Stoltz, Karsin Raju, Braulio Flores, and Joshua Ball; (back row) Sydney Vinson, Jackson Degrassi, Reed Stromquist, Adley Sheahan, Braxton Wakeley, Levi Brasile, Haylee Martin, Braxton Pena, and Mallori Hinderlider.

St. John’s preschool celebrates anniversary Letter lessons have themes to learn by By Janet Dovidio THE INDEPENDENT

e preschool at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Woodstock, established in 1963, celebrates its 35th anniversary this year. “We currently have 32 students between the ages of 2 and 5 years old,” Director Jamie Czischki said, now in her 10th year at that position. Each month the teachers concentrate on different letters of the alphabet around a theme. September showcased the letters A, F, and M. e children learned about friends and families, then made friendship shirts where they placed their handprints on each other’s shirts. e month of October features the letter “L” to focus on leaf activities for fall. e letter “P” follows

COURTESY PHOTOS

St. John’s preschool students (from left) Reed Stromquist, Braxton Pena, and Levi Brasile get comfortable for a little reading time.

while learning the growth cycle of the pumpkin. Science and math skills will be developed during many pumpkin experiments. In addition to Czischki, the teachers are Zofia Czapla, Wendy Hooper and Tricia McCann. e children also participate in field trips and outreaches. ey recently visited the Woodstock Fire Safety Festival at Station No. 3. ey will soon visit Von Bergen’s Country Market to pick pumpkins. “We make fleece blankets, Blessing Bags and cards for our homebound church members,” Czischki said. “We had a Crandall’s AllYou-Can-Eat chicken dinner fundraiser on Oct. 8 from which we can donate meals to the veterans that live next door in transitional housing. “Our preschool isn’t just focused on learning, but building relationships with our families and our community with many outreach activities.”


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Oct. 10-16, 2018

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A&E

IN BRIEF

‘Day Without Water’ observance Oct. 10 Wednesday, Oct. 10, is “Imagine a Day Without Water,” a national day of action to raise awareness about the value of water, according to Scott Kuykendall, water resources specialist with the McHenry County Department of Planning and Development Water supplies around the country are vulnerable to a variety of threats, Kuykendall said in a news release, and the water infrastructure in many areas is aging or failing. “Here in McHenry County, all of our drinking water comes from groundwater aquifers,” he noted. “While these aquifers are wonderful sources for drinking water, they are susceptible to pollution, overuse, and drought.” For more information, visit the website imagineadaywithoutwater.org or contact Kuykendall at SHKuykendall@mchenrycountyil.gov

Forum on substance use Oct. 23 at Methodist Church A program on substance use, “JUULs, DABS, 40s and Goodfellas: What Parents Really Need to Know,” is planned for 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23, at First United Methodist Church, 201 W. South St. The community forum will feature Laura Crain, coordinator of the Drug Free Program of the McHenry County Substance Abuse Coalition, and William Gentes, project coordinator of the Underage Drinking and Drug Prevention Task Force at the Lake County Department of Health. The program will help parents to identify important cues in the use of alcohol and drugs and provide local resources for people facing substance use issues with family or friends. Advocate Aurora Health is sponsoring the program. For more information, call Sam Martinez at 847-565-9278.

Dinner Nov. 3 to support Collier House, McHenry A spaghetti dinner next month will supWVY[ *VSSPLY /V\ZL PU 4J/LUY` [V ILULÄ[ families who lose someone from the military in the line of duty. Tickets cost $15 for adults, $10 for children 4-9 for the meal from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, at McHenry Moose Lodge, Route 31 and Johnsburg Road. Tickets are available at the door or can be bought in advance. Call 815-385-4881 or visit collierhouse.org.

‘Simpsons’ writer to share experience C Creative Living Series will host Bill Odenkirk w By Nathan Willcockson THE INDEPENDENT

On April 29, 2018, Fox Broadcasting aired ai a historic moment in American TV history. In an animated sequence, Marshal M Matt Dillon (of 1955-1975’s “Gunsmoke”) “G faces off against a baby in a Wild West duel, and with mock drama, dr Dillon is finally fin gunned down. do e show, of course, co was “e Simpsons,” which Si claimed cl the title for fo most scripted episodes ep of an American Am primetime tim TV series w with No. 636, Bill Odenkirk “Forgive “F and Re Regret.” Next week, the Woodstock Opera H House will host the writer of that episo sode, Chicagoland native Bill Odenki kirk. During the Oct. 18 program, O Odenkirk will share his experience w with the monumental series, illumina some of the practices of TV writnate in and relate his own story of how ing, he went from co-inventing catalytic m molecules as a chemistry Ph.D. to au authoring primetime animated comed – a career move he considers the edy be in his life. best “It’s an odd business to get into, pe people take a lot of different roads, an certainly mine was a very strange and pa path,” Odenkirk said in a phone intervi view with e Independent. “I don’t ca back to my chemistry credencall tia really at all. … e whole point of tials ge getting into TV was to move on from th that. I have bad dreams about my ch chemistry career, but that’s as much as I think about it.”

TThe path there Starting in 1999, Odenkirk joined up with his brother Bob (famous today to as Saul Goodman in “Breaking Bad” Ba and “Better Call Saul”) to write for fo Kyle Gass and Jack Black’s “e Adventures A of Tenacious D,” then airing in on HBO. When that show was canceled,

The Making of ‘The Simpsons’ When: 10 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, coffee and conversation at 9 a..m. Where: Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. woodstockoperahouse.com $25 adults

Odenkirk found a place in the camp of Matt Groening, who was creating the first seasons of the now popular sci-fi comedy “Futurama.” Odenkirk wrote five episodes for the show’s 2000-2003 run, including “e Farnsworth Parabox,” ranked the sixth best in the series in a 2013 Comedy Central poll. e episode, which sees the main cast accidentally create and visit an alternate universe where every one of their coin flips gives an opposite outcome, is what Odenkirk considers to this day to be his best work. “I love that episode; I was very proud of it,” Odenkirk said. “It was a crazy science fiction concept, but it also was a personal story about what if you were to meet your alternate self, and realize what a jerk you are. It was a really fun, great episode. … Few things that you work on are that satisfying. at’s one of the things I’m most proud of, is that episode.”

Taking ‘bigger view’ When “Futurama” reached the end of its run (much to the dismay of fans, whose objections eventually brought it back for three more seasons), Odenkirk found his lasting gig with Groening’s other show, “e Simpsons.” His first episode for the series was its annual “Treehouse of Horror” Halloween anthology, which even then was on its 15th year. Since then, Odenkirk has written 12 other episodes for the show, and with its 30th season underway, he can finally say he’s been around for a full half of it. As jaw-dropping as the run is, though, Odenkirk doesn’t claim to be immune from criticism of what’s come to be called “Zombie Simpsons” – a side effect of the “counterculture” show of the 1990s turning into the solidly mainstream culture of the 2000s and 2010s. “I don’t blame people for criticizing us,” Odenkirk said. “Sometimes

our stuff lands pretty flat, but every season there’s a couple of really good episodes. … never mine, by the way. For a show that’s been on as long as it has, we still have some really good episodes every season, and I’m proud of that.” Part of what led to the show’s decline, Odenkirk said, was the shift comedy took after the ’90s from “cultural” commentary (George Carlin and Denis Leary) to “event” commentary (Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert). “[Talk shows] can give a sharp response to what’s happening right away,” Odenkirk said. But with the production challenges of even computer-assisted animation, “We’re on a long, long delay to getting into what’s happening in culture. So we take a bigger view of issues than those guys do. We have to be relevant to material that’s already passed, and we want to make the show to still be relevant 10 years from now.”

Getting personal In addition, Odenkirk said, the presence of story and characters in the show gives it an appeal that many find lacking in late-night. “We’re trying to find stories about personal issues in people’s lives and in society that aren’t necessarily politics, so it’s not much of a frustration that we can’t comment on Donald Trump every day,” he explained. “It’s the nature of the show, and that’s OK, because, people want something more than just political commentary.” But even with criticism of its later seasons, “e Simpsons” remains a living landmark of American culture. With nobody from the current production team ordering it, “Simpsons” memes have continued to grow as part of the internet landscape, ranging from animated gifs, to retro-themed “Simpsonwave” music, to endless remakes of the “Steamed Hams” scene from the 1996 episode “22 Short Films About Springfield.” Odenkirk said that he wholeheartedly approved. “Stuff is being clipped all the time, and we’re conscious of that, we love it,” he said. “It means people are still watching the show and it’s still resonating with them.”


R REAL ESTATE TTRANSACTIONS Tr Transactions ďŹ led in the McHenry County Recorder’s OfďŹ ce Aug. 22 to 27 : R

Manufacturing Day starts small BTM Industries hosts students from St. Mary By Janet Dovidio THE INDEPENDENT

BTM Industries Inc., of Woodstock, hosted the eighth-graders from St. Mary School for National Manufacturing Day Oct. 5. MFG Day started in 2012 by the National Association of Manufacturers. Its mission is to positively change the public perception of modern manufacturing. “Since this is our ďŹ rst year hosting an event for MFG Day,â€? said Kelly Allen, BTM’s executive ofďŹ ces manager, “only BTM Industries and St. Mary School are participating in our event. We hope to grow next year to more manufacturers and schools in

McHenry County.� e students met in the building’s break room, received safety glasses, and were given an introduction to the facility on Washington Street in Woodstock. ey walked through the machine shop, where they learned about the manufacturing done there and saw products being made. e tour ended with a question-andanswer session with shop foreman Steve Anderson and President Kyra Tillman. Tillman is the third-generation owner of BTM Industries. “By opening our doors to the students of St. Mary School,� she said, “we hope to help start changing the perception of manufacturing and introduce the students to the opportunities that exist in manufacturing. is is our chance to give the students a small glimpse into that manufacturing community.

“We’re hopeful that in the future we will be able to involve more businesses to showcase all of the amazing things that are manufactured right here in Woodstock.â€? BTM Industries manufactures products for other industries, including conveyance systems, recycling systems, automation systems, architectural components, modular furniture and car washes. at product diversity requires a skilled staff to seamlessly proceed from one job to another multiple times during the day. To recognize the importance of an industry that employs more than a half-million workers in the state, Gov. Bruce Rauner proclaimed October as Manufacturing Month in Illinois. Manufacturing Month events will take place around the state throughout the month. e events showcase some of the nearly 13,000 manufacturing ďŹ rms that call Illinois home.

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BTM Industries President Kyra Tillman explains the manufacturing process of her company to students from St. Mary School who toured the Woodstock business Oct. 5 for National Manufacturing Day. October has been declared Manufacturing Month in Illinois.

Oct. 10-16, 2018

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

Q Residence at 317 Lake Ave., Woodstock, was sold by Gary and Leanne Sahagun, wa Chino Valley, Ariz., to BC Taz Real Estate Ch LLC, Lake In The Hills, for $115,000. LL Q Residence at 663 Margaret Drive, Woodstock, was sold by The Lucille M. Propeck st Trust, Madison, Wis., to Rodney FredTr ricksen and Qiong Chen, Woodstock, for ric $220,500. $2 Q Residence at 840 Park Lane, Woodstock, was sold by Jeannette Cooper Srivastava, wa Chicago, to Daniel M. Walker, for $400,000. Ch Q Residence at 839 Queen Anne St., Woodstock, was sold by Teresa and John W Pappas, Chicago, to Nohemi Tapia Ayllon, Pa for $138,000. fo Q Residence at 3009 Walnut Drive, Wonder Lake, was sold by The Karen A. Koreba de Tr Trust, Northbrook, to Heath L. Goodlin, W Wonder Lake, for $43,900. Q Residence at 1501 Golden Oak, Woodst stock, was sold by B & R Homes, Inc., Bo Bolingbrook, to Donald A. Hay, Jr., Woodst stock, for $148,000. Q Residence at 11210 Halma Lane, Woodst stock, was sold by Neil S. Johnson, Wonde der Lake, to Tyler H. Beaty, Woodstock, for $3 $300,000. Q Residence at 1619 W. Halma Lane, W Woodstock, was sold by Jenifer E. Butensc schoen, Woodstock, to Eric M. Butensc schoen, Woodstock, for $71,806. Q Residence at 1878 Sebastian Drive, W Woodstock, was sold by Shari Hilliard F/ F/N/A Manke, Woodstock, to Shaina E. Pe Peck, Woodstock, for $154,000. Q Residence at 901 Oak Ridge Lane, W Woodstock, was sold by The Judicial Sales Co Corporation, Chicago, to Birch Homes LL LLN, Crystal Lake, for $87,601. Q Residence at 551 Leah Lane, Woodst stock, was sold by 247 Hoy Series of the Bu Bunzity LLC, Woodstock, to Alejandro Trujill jillo, Woodstock, for $67,500.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

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COURTESY PHOTO

Broc Ungaro, a McHenry County College alumnus and the college’s newest manufacturing technology instructor, stands next to a lathe in the MCC manufacturing lab. The Army veteran and former mold maker left a high-paying manufacturing career of nearly 20 years to inspire students to pursue careers in manufacturing.

Woodstock grad urges manufacturing careers MCC alum now back to teach manufacturing technology at college McHenry County College

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McHenry County College alumus Broc Ungaro loves the manufacturing ďŹ eld so much that he quit his highlypaid job as a tool-room manager to become a full-time manufacturing instructor at MCC this fall. Ungaro, who earned an associate degree in applied science in manufacturing technology from MCC in 2011, brings nearly 20 years of experience to the classroom to inspire students to pursue careers in manufacturing, where there is a shortage of highly skilled workers. “I want to pass on my knowledge and get students enthused about manufacturing careers because there is a scarcity of workers with these types of skills,â€? he said, referring to blueprint reading, running manual mills and lathes, and manufacturing processes. “e cool thing about manufacturing is working with steel or plastic and creating something useful,â€? Ungaro said. “Plus, you get a little pride seeing parts that you’ve worked on end up on store shelves,â€? at includes Nextel and Motorola cell phones, caps on medicine bottles and spray paint cans, and even pusher

trackers, the plastic devices on store shelves that push toothbrushes and cosmetics forward on shelves. “Manufacturing can be a career, not just a job,â€? he said. “Manufacturing facilities are not dark dungeons that you see in documentaries and in movies. ey’re [clean] and very safe trades to be in.â€? Ungaro said he had achieved his two goals in life – to cut steel and to join the Army. He ďŹ rst became interested in machine shop while a student at Woodstock High School in the early 1990s, and he worked part time as an apprentice for a local manufacturer before joining the Army in 1994. He served until 1998, when he went to work at a different company, where he enjoyed working with molds, making parts, and performing maintenance of the molds. Ungaro describes his new role as an instructor as rewarding. “It’s great to see students engaged in their assignments and asking questions,â€? he said. “e other day they wanted to discuss tariffs and how they affect manufacturing.â€? Not only does Ungaro prepare students to come away with solid skills in machining and fabrication, but he teaches soft business skills such as punctuality, good attendance, and communication to make them more marketable employee candidates. Ungaro resides in Wonder Lake with his wife and their three children.


‘Illinois Made’ honors presented at ceremony Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT

Silver Prairie Farm Natural Soap Co., 124 Cass St., sells soap made from milk of the goats on the Harvard farm of store co-owner Annette Gast. e soap was sold at fairs and crafts shows around the region until Gast and coowner Christy Huelsman opened their storefront in February 2017. ey also sell a variety of natural products for skin and hair. Husband-wife team Robert Blue and

Susan Blue Galloway opened their studio at 3607 Franklinville Road in 1984, and a gallery there two years later. ey use stoneware clay to produce a variety of pottery products they sell at their studio, which is among the stops on the Autumn Drive self-tour Oct. 19-21. Nick Potts turned his interest in the steel drum into Potts & Pans Steelband, 1039 Wanda Lane. Along with vice president Anthony Jay Houston, whose specialty is the jazz vibraphone, the band performs calypso and soca music you might hear in Trinidad, where Potts received training on the steel drum. e group performs at weddings, corporate events, and various other parties as the

largest professional steelband in the Midwest.

Local connections e honors continue a history of Woodstock enterprises being recognized for their unique contributions to the community. Visit McHenry County Convention & Visitors Bureau has identified 14 distinct artisan businesses as McHenry County Made makers, which includes five in Woodstock. In addition to the three honored last week, Ethereal Confections and Jackass Charm Corner Store were named earlier.

Free furnace program installs in Woodstock home Local home recipient in promotion by Lennox Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT

On North Seminary Avenue, residents of a particular home are starting to feel the heat. at because this past weekend, they felt the love. Germaine Smaidris and Michael Larson were chosen as recipients of the “Lennox Feel the Love” program, and a crew from Woodstock Heating & Cooling was at their home Saturday morning in the 600 block of North Seminary Avenue to install a new furnace – free of charge. e house has been in Michael Larson’s family for more than 100 years. Lennox launched the program in 2009 in Wisconsin as Heat U.P. It invites people and organizations to nominate deserving families or individuals in the community who would benefit from new heating equipment before winter. en Lennox partnering dealers, such as Woodstock Heating, choose a

home to receive a new, high-efficiency furnace to be installed the first Saturday of October. Dealers and their employees donate their labor and installation materials, and also help with chores around the property. “On this day, lives are changed through the goodwill of others,” Stephanie Bond, retail marketing director for Lennox Industries, said in a news release. “Feel the Love is all about creating connections with communities in which Lennox and its dealers live and work, to lend a helping hand by bringing comfort to deserving families.” Nominations describe the nominee’s situation and explain why that person or family deserves to receive new heating equipment. Recipients are chosen on a variety of criteria, including military service; community service; physical, mental, or social disabilities; financial challenges; and job loss. Once the winner is notified in mid-September, Lennox and the local dealer visit the home to review the installation site and to ensure they have the materials needed for installation. In 2017, the program received

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY KEN FARVER

The installation and clean-up crew from Woodstock Heating & Cooling poses for a photo outside the home that received a new furnace free of charge Saturday. Pictured on the front row with Woodstock Heating President Eric Iversen (far right) are (from left) son David Iverson; JenniMLY>PUKLYVMÄJLZLY]PJLTHUHNLYH[[OLZ[VYL".LYY`:THPKYPZYLJPWPent of the furnace in the Lennox 2018 “Feel the Love” campaign; son Lucas Iversen; and wife Dawn Iversen. In the back row are (from left) *OYPZ)LJRLY3LUUV_[LYYP[VY`THUHNLY"4PRL)L[ZHULZ3LUUV_ÄLSK technical consultant; Whit Dobbertin, lead installer at Woodstock Heating; and Elliott Blaszczyk, lead service technician for the local store. 40,000 nominations and completed 175 installation across eight states and four Canadian provinces, which are

served by 164 dealers. For more information, visit www. FeeleLove.com.

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Soap, drums and pots

CITY OF WOODSTOCK PHOTOS

Robert Blue (left) and Annette Gast received the Illinois Made award.

Oct. 10-16, 2018

Goat milk soap, stoneware clay pottery and Caribbean funk music brought special recognition to Woodstock last week. ree businesses associated with those locally unique offerings were honored as Illinois Made makers at a ceremony Oct. 5 in Crystal Lake. Silver Prairie Farm Natural Soap Co., Blue Eagle Pottery, and Potts & Pans

Steelband were among six McHenry County businesses recognized in the Illinois Made program of the Illinois Office of Tourism. Tourism Director Cory Jobe spoke at the ceremony. Illinois Made is a program of the Office of Tourism to recognize makers, creators, and artisans who help to craft Illinois by hand. Based on nominations submitted by the public, businesses are selected for their artistic skill and personal passion. Businesses earning this distinction receive extensive promotion from the Office of Tourism as part of the state’s economic development efforts. Chocolate-maker Ethereal Confection of Woodstock received that state designation earlier.

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Woodstock businesses earn state recognition

17


Community

COMMUNITY

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

18

IN REMEMBRANCE: Mike Hill, chief of the Woodstock Fire/Rescue District, presides over the Sunday mornPUNZLY]PJLVU[OL:X\HYL[VVIZLY]L5H[PVUHS-HSSLU-PYLÄNO[LYZ4LTVYPHS>LLRLUKHUH[PVU^PKLJLYLTVU` [OH[YHUNILSSZ[VOVUVY[OLÄYLÄNO[LYZ^OVSVZ[[OLPYSP]LZSHZ[`LHYPU[OLSPULVMK\[`(UUH2LTWRHZ[LWKH\NO[LYVM4PJOHLS>\Y[aHSVJHSÄYLÄNO[LYWHYHTLKPJ^OVKPLKMYVTJHUJLYPUYHUN[OLILSSPU[OL6WLYH /V\ZL[V^LY

Weekend in Woodstock Despite cloudy, cool days, lots of folks were outside for fall activities HOOSIER CADDY

INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY KEN FARVER

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WHAT ALES YOU

Judy and Al Degutis (left) of Woodstock ^VYL[OLPYKYPURPUNZOPY[Z:H[\YKH` MVY[OLÄM[OHUU\HS(SL-LZ[[VILULÄ[ (K\S[ *OPSK;OLYHW`:LY]PJLZ^OPJO YLJLU[S`TLYNLK^P[O-HTPS`(SSPHUJL[V MVYT0UKLWLUKLUJL/LHS[O ;OLYHW` Amy and Peter Schillinger, from ChiJHNV^LYLHWWYVWYPH[LS`V\[Ä[[LK^P[O pretzel necklaces to help cleanse the WHSH[LIL[^LLUZHTWSLZ


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COMMUNITY

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

20

COURTESY PHOTO

4LTILYZVM[OL>VVKZ[VJR.HYKLU*S\I^H[JOLKHZĂ…VYHSKLZPNULY)L[[`:[VYRJYLH[LKZL]LYHSILH\[PM\SHYYHUNLTLU[Z7PJ[\YLKHYL MYVU[YV^MYVTSLM[4HY`)L[O4PSSLY:[VYR4HYP[H:LUZPVUHUK1HUPJL.LUV]LZL"IHJRYV^2HYLU/H[[HU/LSLU1VURLY4HY`-YHU 4HKQHR:VUKYH4H[[LYULZZHUK)YLUKH+HOSMVYZ

FOR CHILDREN AGES 2–8

“This site is amazing! My children are excited to learn and they don’t want to stop. Thank you so much! � —Mother of 3- and 5-year-old girls

Get your $10 tickets to celebrate the 10th anniversary of The Land Conservancy of McHenry County's Art of the Land art show and fundraiser! Art of the Land Art Show and Fundraiser - 10th Anniversary! Nov. 9 & 10, 2018 | 6:30-10:00 p.m. The Starline Factory, 306 W. Front St., Harvard, IL

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After October 10, ticket prices go up to $20 per night or $30 for a two-day pass. GET READY FOR TWO NIGHTS OF:

Beautiful art and unique gifts for purchase, nature photography and People's Choice SKRWRFRQWHVWYRWLQJUDIĂ€HDSSHWL]HUVDQGFDVKEDUPXVLFDQGIXQ 3XUFKDVH\RXUWLFNHWVWRGD\DQG\RXZLOODOVRUHFHLYHDIUHHPRQWKPHPEHUVKLSWR 7KH/DQG&RQVHUYDQF\RI0F+HQU\&RXQW\ $UWRIWKH/DQGLV7/& VELJJHVWHYHQWRIWKH\HDUDQGDOOSURFHHGVVXSSRUWODQG preservation in McHenry County.

To purchase tickets, go to: www.ArtoftheLand.org or call 815-337-9502.


Heenan v. Heenan was celebrity divorce of 1860s

21

John Heenan claiming that Adah was an imposter and they were not, in fact, even married. Because of the accusation, the divorce case was postponed until the spring of 1862. At that time, Adah was able to prove they were, indeed, legally married, and she was granted a divorce by the McHenry County Court. Soon after, rather than commit to fighting in the Civil War, John Heenan fled to England and subsequently faded out of the limelight. Adah, on the other hand, went on to become a nationally famous and successful actress, one of the most glamorous celebrities of the 1860s. Some historians consider her America’s first true entertainment superstar. Soon after her initial visit to Woodstock in August 1861, Adah gained legendary fame by appearing in the equestrian melodrama “Mazeppa.” In the last scene of the production, Adah was stripped on stage to a flesh-colored body stocking, making her appear nude. She was then lashed to the back of a horse, which galloped down a ramp into the audience – a shocking and highly entertaining spectacle in the 1860s. In addition to her “Mazeppa” performance, Adah also had a penchant for posing in risqué photographs, becoming America’s first pin-up superstar, admired by Union and Confederate soldiers alike during the Civil War. Before Adah’s national fame, the Sentinel editors recognized her potential after her initial visit to Woodstock. They appeared to be quite charmed by her, noting in their reporting that in addition to being “a lady of considerable talent and notoriety” she was “not without considerable personal attractions.” This is a regular column of the Woodstock Public Library.

Book by Michael Stewar t and Mark Bramble, lyrics by Al Dubin and Johnny Mercer, and music by Harr y Warren. 1981 Tony Award for Best Musical

Produced through special arrangement with Tams Witmark Music Librar y

OCTOBER 5, 6, 7; 12, 13, 14; 19, 20, 21; 2018 FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS AT 8:00 PM SUNDAYS AT 2:00 PM INDIVIDUAL TICKET PRICE IS $24 INCLUDING $3.00 OPERA HOUSE SURCHARGE $21 FOR STUDENTS & SENIORS

WOODSTOCK OPERA HOUSE 121 VAN BUREN STREET • WOODSTOCK, IL 60098 VISIT WWW.WOODSTOCKOPERAHOUSE.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION

815-338-5300

The

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT

Look for the

VOTERSGUIDE

in the October 31 edition 671 E. Calhoun St. • Woodstock

815.338.8040

thewoodstockindependent.com

community

Shortly after the beginning of the Civil War, in August 1861, the Woodstock Sentinel reported on a “most interesting suit” that was on the docket at the recently built (1858) McHenry County Courthouse on the Woodstock Square: Heenan vs. Heenan. Two years prior, in April 1859, Adah Isaacs Menken, a regionally and marginally accomplished actress, married the bare-knuckle prize fighter John C. Heenan. Despite the fact that boxing was illegal in the United States at the time, Heenan, “the Benicia Boy,” was known as the boxing champion of America. Although by then a relatively obscure figure, John Heenan was quite famous throughout the country in the late 1850s and early 1860s. Many historians consider him America’s first sports superstar. Heenan is best remembered for his April 1860 prizefight in England versus British champion Tom Sayers. The bout, generally recognized as boxing’s first world championship, lasted 42 rounds, taking more than two hours to complete, ending in chaos after spectators broke into the ring and police intervened. The referee controversially called the fight a draw. Heenan was given a hero’s welcome when he returned to the U.S. Soon after, Adah sought a divorce. Living in Chicago at the time and wanting to avoid a media circus, Adah choose to file for the divorce in McHenry County, noting that Woodstock was “a place somewhat removed from the curious multitude of Chicago.” On August 5, 1861, Adah visited Woodstock with her lawyer to file for the divorce. Three weeks later, the Sentinel published a letter it had received from

Volumes of local history

Oct. 10-16, 2018

If you are in possession of Woodstock or McHenry County historical documents, images, items or have documented stories and are willing to share with the Woodstock Public Library’s Local History Archives, please contact the library at History@WoodstockIL.info

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Presents

By Kirk Dawdy


COMMUNITY

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

22

Woodstock native a Naval ‘information warrior’ Jamming enemy radar just part of his duties U.S. Navy OFFICE OF COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Seaman Kieland Ballard, a 2016 Woodstock High School graduate, is stationed with a command responsible for teaching future information warriors the skills required to defend America around the world. Ballard, as a cryptologic technician, operates out of the Information Warfare Training Command, Corry Station Pensacola, Fla. A cryptologic technician analyzes electronic communications, jamming enemy radar signals, deciphering information in foreign languages, and maintaining equipment and networks used to generate top secret intel. Ballard credits success in the Navy with lessons learned growing up in Woodstock. “I learned that making connections with people is a good thing, because you can always beneďŹ t from having multiple friends,â€? he said. IWTC Corry Station is just one component that makes up the Center for

Information Warfare Training domain, headquartered at Naval Air Station Pensacola Corry Station, Fla. Charged with developing the future technical cadre of the information warfare community, the CIWT domain leads, manages, and delivers Navy and joint-force training to 22,000 students each year. With 1,200 military, civilian and contracted staff members, CIWT oversees about 200 courses at four information warfare training commands, two detachments, and additional learning sites located throughout the United States and Japan. CIWT is responsible for training enlisted cryptologic technicians, information systems technicians, intelligence specialists, and electronics technicians. CIWT also provides training to cryptologic warfare, information professional, intelligence, and foreign area ofďŹ cers to prepare them to wage battle, and assure the nation’s success in this burgeoning warfare arena. Cmdr. Chad Smith, commanding ofďŹ cer of IWTC Corry Station, said the sailors and staff built trust, demonstrated teamwork, pursued growth, and instilled grit. “Each and every day, I’m extremely proud of how our sailors and staff

U.S. NAVY PHOTO

Cryptologic technician Kieland Ballard is “proud to be serving my country.� readily adapt to achieve and maintain the highest of standards.� he said. “ey truly represent the spirit and character of America, and they are why we are the strongest military force in the world.� Ballard has military ties with family

members who have previously served, and is honored to carry on the family tradition. “My grandfather was in the Army,â€? he said. As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied-upon assets, Ballard and other sailors and staff know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes, serving as a key part of the information warfare community in its mission to gain a deep understanding of the inner workings of adversaries and developing unmatched knowledge of the battle space during wartime. ese sailors and staff have a tremendous responsibility in creating war-ďŹ ghting options for eet commanders and advising decision-makers at all levels as they serve worldwide aboard ships, submarines and aircraft and from the National Security Agency to the Pentagon. “I’m proud to be serving my country and helping other people,â€? Ballard added. Written by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jerry Jimenez, Navy OfďŹ ce of Community Outreach Photo By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Amanda Rae Moreno

PICTURE THIS Mr. and Mrs. George Harding talk with Bishop Loras T. Lane at a Marian Central High School football game in the early 1960s. George Harding gave land to build Marian Central to the Rockford Diocese, ZLWKJURXQGEUHDNLQJWDNLQJSODFHLQ7KHIRRWEDOOĂ€HOGZDV named George Harding Field.

Don Peasley Photo Collection, McHenry County Historical Society

Join a variety of crafters, artisans, antique dealers and the McHenry County Historical Society from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 19, 20, and 21 in rural Woodstock/Marengo for the 31st Annual Autumn Drive. Visit the Historical Society at our 1885 original Seneca Township Hall. Volunteers will be selling UDIĂ€HWLFNHWVIRURXUTXLOWDQWLTXHDQG vintage gifts and books from our museum store. For many more details, maps, and stories, visit www.autumndrive.net

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corner – open to all of our communities.

“Happening: A Clean Energy Revolution”

Green Living Expo One of the best examples of

everyone.

Clean Energy At Liebman Science Center, from 6 to 8 p.m. ursday, Nov. 15, the Defenders and MCC, along with the Citizens Utility Board, will offer a Clean Energy Listening Session for all to discuss increasing our reliance on renewable energies over the coming decades. So, as it begins to turn cold outside and nature withdraws its green for winter months, and as our outdoor activities wane, we are bringing the green indoors. We hope you can join us! is was written by Kim Hankins, board member of Environmental Defenders of McHenry County, which has a monthly column in e Independent. ELECTRONICS RECYCLING will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, in the north parking lot of the McHenry County Administration Building, 667 Ware Road. For more information, call the county’s Division of Environmental Health, 815-334-4585.

NO TRICKS JUST A LOCAL TREAT

ADVERTISE IN OUR TOTAL MARKET EDITION OCT. 17

and take advantage of our print and online advertising opportunities reaching more than 17,000 local readers!

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Deadline for advertising: Thursday, Oct. 11

To advertise, call 815.338.8040 or email today! -HQ:LOVRQ‡MHQ#WKHZRRGVWRFNLQGHSHQGHQWFRP_.DW\2¶%ULHQ‡NDW\#WKHZRRGVWRFNLQGHSHQGHQWFRP -HQQLIHU0DUVK‡MHQQLIHU#WKHZRRGVWRFNLQGHSHQGHQWFRP

COMMUNITY

At 7 p.m. Environmental ursday, Oct. Defenders 18, at McHenry The Green Scene County College, MCC and the Defenders, as well as the Citizens Climate Lobby McHenry County chapter, will present a documentary movie, “Happening: A Clean Energy Revolution,” in Leucht Auditorium. Filmmaker James Redford embarks on a colorful, personal journey into the dawn of the clean-energy era as it creates jobs, turns profits, and makes communities stronger and healthier across the U.S. Immediately after the film, a panel discussion will follow on exciting things that are happening with solar in Illinois.

people coming together for “green” is northern Illinois’ biggest green event, the Green Living Expo, which will be on Saturday, Nov. 3. is free event, held at McHenry County College, will bring together environmental organizations, businesses, and artists. It is open to the public to come and enjoy the day. is year the event will feature a 2,500-gallon fish tank complete with fish from our Fox River (no fishing!). And new this year is our Clean Transportation Exhibit, with electric cars and bikes, charging stations, and area college/university solar and super-mileage team race cars and team members, including MCC students and their hybrid-engine truck. ere will also be alkaline battery recycling, solar installers, and energy-efficient ideas for your home and businesses. Tours of MCC’s new Liebman Science Center will also be available. Finally, back this year is our Sustainable Artists walk – a great time to support local crafters and shop for all the upcoming holidays. From nature photography to jewelry, there’s something for

Oct. 10-16, 2018

If you love autumn as I do, this is a good time of year to celebrate and enjoy our beautiful surroundings here in McHenry County. e trees are beginning their fall show of colors, sounds, and resiliency as they begin their transition into winter. Our communities, too, are celebrating the change of season with fall festivals and other events as we begin to think about the coming, quieter winter months. I have been a member and board member of Environmental Defenders of McHenry County for quite some time. Several years ago, when I started my job as sustainability director at McHenry County College, MCC joined as an Environmental Defenders business member. It was the continuation of an effective, long-standing partnership. e college can offer the Defenders space for events, speakers, and expertise, and Defenders can offer MCC students and staff unique volunteer, advocacy, and educational opportunities. So, please mark your calendars for some special things that are just around the

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Bring the green indoors for the season

23


Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

24

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21 REGISTER ONLINE AT: WWW.HPCLINIC.ORG RACE STARTS AT 8:30AM WOODSTOCK NORTH HIGH SCHOOL

COMMUNITY

3000 Raffel Road • Woodstock, IL

REGISTER ONLINE AT: WWW.HPCLINIC.ORG

Presented by:

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Baby Min Than, MD Board CertiďŹ ed Family Medicine


RELIGION

Q MCHENRY COUNTY JEWISH CONGREGATION 9PKNLĂ„LSK9VHK*Y`Z[HS3HRL 815-455-1810 >VYZOPW!WT-YPKH`Í„ !Í„HT:H[\YKH` Q NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN CENTER +LHU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q REDEEMER LUTHERAN +LHU:[ŕ Ž  >VYZOPW!WT:H[\YKH` HT:\UKH`

Q CHRIST LIFE >1HJRZVU:[ŕ Ž  Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday

Q RESURRECTION CATHOLIC  :*V\U[Y`*S\I9VHK 815-338-7330 Worship: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday; 5 p.m. Saturday; 8 a.m. weekdays

Q COVENANT REFORMED BAPTIST CHURCH  .YLLU^VVK9VHK 76)V_ŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday

Q ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL >1HJRZVU:[ŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday

Q DOXA FELLOWSHIP  5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž   Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Q EDEN BAPTIST  5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž >VYZOPW!WT:\UKH`:WHUPZO Q FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST >:V\[O:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 59V\[Lŕ Ž >VYZOPW! !HT:\UKH` Q FIRST UNITED METHODIST >:V\[O:[ŕ Ž >VYZOPW! !HT:\UKH` Q FREE METHODIST 5:LTPUHY`(]Lŕ Ž Worship: 10:30 a.m. Sunday Q GOOD NEWS CHURCH 4LL[PUNH[+VYY;V^UZOPW*VTT\UP[` 9VVT 3HRL(]L goodnewswoodstock.org Worship: 5 p.m. Sunday Q GRACE FELLOWSHIP *HPYUZ*V\Y[ŕ Ž Worship: 10:15 a.m. Sunday Q GRACE LUTHERAN 1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road 815-338-0554 >VYZOPW!WT:H[\YKH`JHZ\HS"!HT [YHKP[PVUHS!HTJVU[LTWVYHY`:\UKH` Q HOUSE OF BLESSING 59V\[L-PYZ[7YLZI`[LYPHU*O\YJO I\PSKPUN

Q ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN :[1VOUÂťZ9VHKŕ Ž  >VYZOPW!WT:H[\YKH`" HT:\UKH` Q ST. MARY CATHOLIC 5;Y`VU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 7:30 a.m. Monday - Saturday; 5 and !WT:WHUPZO:H[\YKH`"! HUK !HTUVVU:WHUPZOWT:\UKH` Q THE BRIDGE CHRISTIAN )YPKNL3HULŕ Ž  Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS /HY[SHUK9VHKŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q THE VINE 54HKPZVU:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER >*HSOV\U:[ŕ Ž Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday Q UPPER FOX VALLEY QUAKER MEETING 7PVULLY9VHK4J/LUY`ŕ Ž 815-385-8512 +PZJ\ZZPVUHUKZPUNPUN HT:\UKH` Worship, 10 a.m., fellowship, 11 a.m. Sunday Q WOODSTOCK ASSEMBLY OF GOD +LHU:[ŕ Ž >VYZOPW! HT:\UKH`WYH`LYZLY]PJL HT^VYZOPWZLY]PJL Q WOODSTOCK BIBLE CHURCH 118 Benton St. Worship: 10:30 a..m. Sunday Please send fall schedules to sandy@ thewoodstockindependent.com

Q Shirley and Willis Johnson, owners of Tivoli Enterprises, Downers Grove, had purchased and renovated the Woodstock eatre on Main Street. It reopened with the showing of “Who Framed Roger Rabbit� and “Young Guns.� Q Wein’s women’s wear store and Beard & Stovall men’s wear store held sales marking their anniversaries. Wein’s was celebrating 85 years and Beard & Stovall 103 years on the Woodstock Square.

1993 – 25 years ago Q Wonder Lake resident Rita Graff, named an Illinois Treasure by the Illinois Alliance for Aging, was honored at a dinner at the Drake Hotel in Chicago. Q Jenny Marcellis and Karl Dreyer were Woodstock High School homecoming queen and king. Lorrie Lynott and Matt Roark reigned over Marian Central Catholic High School’s homecoming.

1998 – 20 years ago Q Suzanne Hoban, founder and director of the McHenry County Family Health Partnership Clinic, received the 1998 Peace and Justice Award from the Interfaith Council for Social Justice. Q Kurt Carlson, Brennae Benda and Ashley Schwabe were winners in the NFL Gatorade Punt, Pass & Kick competition hosted by the Woodstock Recreation Department.

2003 – 15 years ago Q e Marian varsity football team ran its record to 6-0, including three shutouts, as it defeated St. Francis 31-0. Q e Chicago Cubs won their ďŹ rst playoff series in 95 years. Q e Woodstock Independent won 13 ďŹ rstplace awards in the Illinois Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest. For the fourth consecutive year and the eighth time since 1991, e Independent topped the small weekly newspaper division.

2008 – 10 years ago Q Sue Rose, community service director for the McHenry County Housing Authority, received the Peace and Justice Award during Woodstock’s annual Diversity Day. Q Public Works Director John Isbell attended a public information meeting about Phase 1 of a three phase Illinois Department of Transportation

project that would widen Route 47 through Woodstock. e goal for completing Phase 1, which began in November 2007, was October 2012. Q e Woodstock North High School varsity football team won its third straight game with its second shutout of the season, defeating Marengo 37-0. Sophomore Tyler Pichen led the offense, with freshmen Sam Schweder and Jon McFarlin and sophomore Billy Banville moving the ball.

2013 – 5 years ago Q Leaders of a Woodstock renters group addressed the City Council for the second time in a month, calling for a mediation process between aggrieved tenants and their landlords. Mayor Brian Sager said the city was working on an inquiry into the tenants’ concerns. Q Proud parents Neil and Stephanie Steiner, John and Jessica Hanlin, and Brian and Nicole Creighton announced the births of Logan Marshall Steiner, Jace Robert Hanlin, and Anabelle Creighton, respectively. Q e Marian varsity football team improved its record to 5-1, 2-1 in the SCC Blue Division in a hard-fought 34-28 win over St. Francis. Junior quarterback Billy Bahl, 15-24-277, completed four of his passes in the opening drive, punctuated by a 25-year touchdown pass to senior Tom Klinger.

2017 – 1 year ago Q e Oct. 3 City Council meeting was moved to the Woodstock High School auditorium to accommodate the more than 100 people who came to object to or support a proposed landlord registration program intended to help the city crack down on dilapidated rental properties while also gathering contact information on landlords. e council, led by Mayor Brian Sager, said it would not move the proposal forward. Q e “Woodstock on Film and on the Stageâ€? mural on the pedway on Main Street was ofďŹ cially unveiled during a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Among the participants were muralist Mark J. Adamany, former Councilman RB ompson, designer Michael Stanard, and Mayor Sager. Q Area high school golfers advanced to sectionals. Brothers James and Andrew Lydon qualiďŹ ed for Marian, and Evan Bridges qualiďŹ ed for the WHS-WNHS co-op team.

Your ad could sponsor this Flashbacks section! Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

Call 815-338-8040 today. thewoodstockindependent.com

COMMUNITY

Q CASA DE BENDICION 9PKNLĂ„LSK9VHK*Y`Z[HS3HRL *Y`Z[HS3HRL*OYPZ[PHU*O\YJO Worship: 1 p.m. Sunday, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday

1988 – 30 years ago

Oct. 10-16, 2018

Q BLUE LOTUS TEMPLE & MEDITATION CENTER +LHU:[ŕ Ž Meditation: 10 a.m. Tuesday, Saturday; 7 p.m. Monday, Wednesday

Worship: 1 p.m. Sunday JIOIĂ„SJVT

25 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Q BAHA’I COMMUNITY OF WOODSTOCK Gatherings are open to the public the second Saturday of each month. For information: 815-337-0126 woodstock.bahais@gmail.com

FLASHBACKS


COMMUNITY

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

26

Happenings

To submit calendar items, email pr@thewoodstockindependent.com

entertainment

Local talent working on comedy ‘The Foreigner’ Staff Report NEWS@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

“e Foreigner,” a Larry Shue comedy directed by Kathryn A. McCord, will be staged in nine performances this month at Black Box eatre of McHenry County College. e scene is a fishing lodge in rural Georgia often visited by “Froggy” LeSeuer, a British demolition expert who occasionally runs training sessions at a nearby Army base. is time “Froggy” has brought along a friend, a pathologically shy young man, Charlie, who is overcome with fear at the thought of making conversation with strangers. e play builds to a climax in which things go awry for the “bad guys,”

calendar 10 WEDNESDAY WOLF OAK WOODS WORK DAY Wolf Oak Woods 9100 Route 120 9 a.m. to noon conserveMC.org

and the “good guys” emerge triumphant, according to Dramatists Play Service. e cast of “e Foreigner” includes Jackson Nielsen of Woodstock. Lighting design is by Rick Amundsen and costume design by Kathy Brunke, both of Woodstock. “e Foreigner” will open ursday, Oct. 18, and run Oct. 19-20, 25-27 and Nov. 1-3. All performances will begin at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $10 for students, seniors, MCC Staff, MCC alumni, and veterans; and $15 for the public. For reservations, call 815-4558746 or email jgeller@mchenry.edu. Black Box eatre is at 8900 U.S. 14, Crystal Lake. Parking is available in Lot C and enter in Building E.

CHAIR YOGA Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 5:30 p.m. 815-338-0543 woodstockpubliclibrary.org

Charlie Baker (Liam Bell) shows Betty Meeks (Yvonne Alton) a new dance move in McHenry County College’s production of Larry Shue’s “The Foreigner,” which will open Oct. 18 and run Oct. 19-20, 25-27 and Nov. 1-3 in the college’s Black Box Theatre in Building E.

13 SATURDAY

8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET

WALK IN THE PARK

Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

INTERVIEWING SKILLS WORKSHOP

11 THURSDAY

COURTESY PHOTO

Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 10 a.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

16 TUESDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Woodstock Square

Emricson Park South Street entrance parking lot Noon Free, no registration 815-334-8850 Led by Molly Oakford, PT, DHS

COFFEE AT THE CAFÉ Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 1 p.m. For senior citizens

7 p.m.

17 WEDNESDAY WOLF OAK WOODS WORK DAY Wolf Oak Woods 9100 Route 120 9 a.m. to noon conserveMC.org

MEMORY MAKERS STORYTELLING GROUP

WOODSTOCK CITY COUNCIL MEETING

Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 9:30 a.m. 815-338-0542 woodstockpubliclibrary.org Led by Joy Aavang

City Hall 121 W. Calhoun St.

WORLD FILM NIGHT

Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6 p.m. 815-338-0542 “Hotel Salvation”

18 THURSDAY KIWANIS WOODSTOCK MEETING Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. Noon to 1 p.m. woodstockkiwanis@gmail.com

MURDER & MAYHEM BOOK CLUB Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. Continued on Next Page

Resurrection Catholic Church

2918 South Country Club Road, Woodstock, IL 60098

We welcome all to join us at our Mass times: Sat. 5pm & Sun. 8am & 10:30am

We, the members of the Resurrection Catholic Church, are a prayerful, loving community formed by the Holy Spirit, striving to be a sign of the Gospel values of Jesus Christ: justice, truth and love.


entertainment STAGE LEFTOVERS Oct. 10, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. operahouse@woodstockil.gov

OPEN MIC NIGHT

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET

calendar Continued from Previous Page 815-338-0542

19 FRIDAY AUTUMN DRIVE Rural Woodstock and Marengo 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For a map visit Autumndrive.net

CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP Family Alliance 2028 N. Seminary Ave. 1 to 2:30 p.m. 815-338-3590

20 SATURDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

ELECTRONICS RECYCLING McHenry County Administration Bldg.

SLC-ORIGINAL OPEN MIC Stage Left Café Oct. 18, 7:30 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $5 donation aplacetoshinemusic.com

THEATER ‘42ND STREET’ Oct. 12-14, 19-21 Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. Adults: A seating $25; B seating $22 adults, $18 C seating Students and senior citizens: A seating $23; B seating $20 adults, $16 C seating, 815-338-5300 667 Ware Road, north parking lot 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 815-334-4585

AUTUMN DRIVE Rural Woodstock and Marengo 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For a map visit Autumndrive.net

YONDER PRAIRIE WORK DAY Yonder Prairie 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 9 a.m. to noon conserveMC.org

VETERANS R&R WILD HORSE HOOTENANNY Beyond Stable Farm 11129 Rt. 176 6 p.m. to midnight $10

21 SUNDAY AUTUMN DRIVE Rural Woodstock and Marengo 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For a map visit Autumndrive.net

YONDER PRAIRIE WORK DAY

DRACULA WITH MEGAN WELLS Oct. 27, 8 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $25 adults, $18 students woodstockoperahouse.com

‘LITTLE WOMEN, THE MUSICAL’ Nov. 2-4, 9-10, 11, 16-18 Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. Adults: A seating $25; B seating $22 adults, $18 C seating Students and senior citizens: A seating $23; B seating $20 adults, $16 C seating, 815-338-5300 Sponsored by TownSquare Players woodstockoperahouse.com

MOVIES Yonder Prairie 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. conserveMC.org

23 TUESDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

WALK IN THE PARK Emricson Park South Street entrance parking lot Noon Free, no registration 815-334-8850 Led by Molly Oakford, PT, DHS

COFFEE AT THE CAFÉ Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. 1 p.m. For senior citizens

FRANKENSTEIN FILM FESTIVAL

SPOKEN WORD

Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 6 p.m. 815-338-0542 Oct. 15 “Bride of Frankenstein,” Oct. 22 “Abbot and Costello Meet Frankenstein,” Oct. 29 “Young Frankenstein”

Oct. 20, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St.

LECTURE CREATIVE LIVING SERIES “The Making of ‘The Simpsons’” Oct. 18, 10 a.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $25 woodstockoperahouse.com

THE CREATION OF ‘MY FAIR LADY’ Oct. 23, 1:30 and 7 p.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $10 matinee, $15 evening woodstockoperahouse.com

MCHENRY COUNTY’S TALES FOR THE INTERRED Woodstock Public Library 414 W. Judd St. 7 p.m. woodstockpubliclibrary.org

SUBSTANCE ABUSE COMMUNITY FORUM FOR PARENTS First United Methodist Church 201 W. South St. 7 p.m. 847-565-9278

24 WEDNESDAY YONDER PRAIRIE WORK DAY Yonder Prairie 1150 S. Rose Farm Road 9 a.m. to noon conserveMC.org

27 SATURDAY

DISTRICT 200 BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET

Woodstock High School Library 501 W. South St. 7 p.m. woodstockschools.org

Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

PIPPA WHITE - VOICES OF ELLIS ISLAND

NOT-TOO-SCARY GHOST STORIES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY Oct. 27, 10 a.m. Woodstock Opera House 121 Van Buren St. $10 all seats woodstockoperahouse.com

COMEDY STAGE LEFT COMEDY CAFE Oct. 27, 8 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. $10 woodstockoperahouse.com

WILD WOODSTOCK WALKS 9 a.m. Donato Conservation Area 700 block of Ridgland Ave. 10:30 a.m. Ryders Woods 750 Kimball Ave. Noon Hennen Conservation Area 4622 Dean St.

HABITAT RESTORATION Boger Bog 2399 S. Cherry Valley Road 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. mccdistrict.org 815-455-1537

30 TUESDAY WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET Woodstock Square 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. woodstockfarmersmarket.org

WALK IN THE PARK Emricson Park South Street entrance parking lot Noon Free, no registration 815-334-8850 Led by Molly Oakford, PT, DHS

COMMUNITY

Woodstock Square 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Performers will be: Oct. 13: 9 a.m. Al Fyfe and the Rocketeers, 11 a.m. Guyz with Bad Eyez; Oct. 16: 9 a.m. TBD, 10 a.m. Misha Gontar, 11 a.m. “Jazzman” Jeff Justman; Oct. 20: Bad Penny (weather permitting); Oct. 23: TBD Oct. 20: (weather permitting); Oct. 27: TBD (weather permitting)

Potts & Pans Steelband Oct. 14, 3 p.m. Culture, Arts and Music 1039 Wanda Lane $10, free children younger than 6 pottsandpans.com

Sponsored by TownSquare Players woodstockoperahouse.com

Oct. 10-16, 2018

Oct. 12, 7 p.m. Stage Left Café 125 Van Buren St. operahouse@woodstockil.gov

SECOND SUNDAY CONCERT

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

MUSIC

27


Service Directory

CLASSIFIED

Deadline: NOON Thurs. to get into next week’s issue

Small Blocks are $40 and Large Blocks are $80 for 4 weeks

Call 815.338.8040 for details. AC/HEATING

CARPENTRY

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

28

Your ad could be here! Call 815-338-8040

$80 for four weeks CONSTRUCTION

YOUR AD HERE

ANCHOR CONSTRUCTION SINCE 1977

FOUNDATIONS GARAGE SLABS/ DRIVEWAYS PATIOS/ WALKS/ STOOPS REPLACEMENTS

$80 for four weeks

FULLY INSURED

815-482-9542 (MCHENRY) FREE ESTIMATES ELECTRIC CONTRACTOR

YOUR AD HERE

YOUR AD HERE

$40 for four weeks

$40 for four weeks

MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF SERVICE CALL - Service upgrades Since - Repairs 1986 - Maintenance Residential - Commercial

Delaware Electric Co. Fully Licensed

815-338-3139 HEALTH INSURANCE

HANDYMAN

INSURANCE

TECHNOLOGY

YOUR AD HERE $80 for four weeks PRINTING

Print  Copy  Design  Promote    815.338.7161

www.copyexpressyes.com

                 

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Your ad could be here! Call 815-338-8040

$80 for four weeks


HELP WANTED DRIVERS

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED TO BUY

NEED LEGAL HELP? Get a FREE referral to an attorney! Call the Illinois State Bar Association Illinois Lawyer Finder The advice you need 877-270-3855 or https://www.isba.org/public/ illinoislawyerfinder

SAWMILLS from only $4397.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 800 567-0404 Ext.300N

FREON R12 WANTED: CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com

CLASSIFIED

Woodstock

I NDEPENDENT The

THIS WEEK’S PHOTO

Each week, The Independent prints a picture of something somewhere in Woodstock. If you can FRUUHFWO\LGHQWLI\WKHORFDWLRQDQGVXEMHFWRIWKHSKRWR\RX·OOEHHQWHUHGLQWRDGUDZLQJIRUDSUL]H Entries may be dropped off at The Independent RIÀFH(&DOKRXQ6W:RRGVWRFNRUHPDLOHG WRQLFROH#WKHZRRGVWRFNLQGHSHQGHQWFRPQRODWHUWKDQSP)ULGD\2QO\RQHSUL]HZLOOEH DZDUGHGSHUZHHN7KHZLQQHUZLOOEHDQQRXQFHGLQQH[WZHHN·VLVVXH*RRGOXFN First & Last Name: Phone: What is it? Where is it?

Oct. 10-16, 2018

GOT IT? Thank a Truck Driver! $1600 Sign-on Bonus! EXPERIENCED DRIVERS *Flatbed *Step Deck *Van *LTL Reefer. Pay is 26% Gross Flatbed/Step Deck & up to .53/mile Van/Reefer. Full benefits w/FREE Health & Life Insurance, 6 paid Holidays, + Industry leading Driver Bonus Program! Must have Class A CDL. Call Ruth or Mike at TTI Inc. 1-800-222-5732 Apply online ttitrucking.com

LEGAL SERVICES

29 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

&ODVVLÀHG$GV

Deadline: NOON Thursday to get into next week’s issue

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PUBLIC NOTICES

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

30

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on September 19, 2018 An Assumed 5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÄJH[L ^HZ ÄSLK PU [OL 6MÄJL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR PU 4J/LUY`*V\U[`03\UKLY[OLMVSSV^PUN business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses VM HSS WLYZVUZ V^UPUN JVUK\J[PUN HUK [YHUZHJ[PUN I\ZPULZZ RUV^U HZ! 9 * )96;/,9: >05+6>: *3,(505. SVJH[LKH[25633(=,4*/,59@ 03   6^ULY  5HTL  (KKYLZZ! *,:(9 6 367,A 906:  25633 (=,4*/,59@03 +H[LK!:,7;,4),9  Z4(9@,4**3,33(5*V\U[`*SLYR 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR Independent September 26, 2018, 6J[VILY   6J[VILY   L10617

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on September 19, 2018 An Assumed Name )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR PU 4J/LUY` *V\U[`03\UKLY[OLMVSSV^PUNI\ZPULZZ name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons V^UPUN JVUK\J[PUN HUK [YHUZHJ[PUN I\ZPULZZRUV^UHZ!.9(5+4(7(4»: SVJH[LK H[  */(7,3 /033 9+ 16/5:)<9. 03  6^ULY  5HTL  (KKYLZZ! */90:;05( :0**( (5+ >0330(4 3 :0**( 19  /,5A(+( (=,4*/,59@03 +H[LK!:,7;,4),9  Z 4(9@ , 4**3,33(5 *V\U[` *SLYR 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR Independent September 26, 2018, 6J[VILY   6J[VILY   L10618

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on September 17, 2018 An Assumed 5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK

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PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice of Self Storage Sale 7SLHZL[HRLUV[PJL9LK+V[:[VYHNL >VVKZ[VJRSVJH[LKH[>HZOPUN[VU 9K >VVKZ[VJR 03   PU[LUKZ [V hold an auction of the goods stored PU [OL MVSSV^PUN \UP[ PU KLMH\S[ MVY UVUWH`TLU[ VM YLU[ ;OL ZHSL ^PSS VJJ\Y HZ HU VUSPUL H\J[PVU ]PH ^^^ storageauctions.com on 10/23/2018 H[ !(4 <USLZZ Z[H[LK V[OLY^PZL the description of the contents are household goods and furnishings. *VYH 2UHWW <UP[  °  (SS WYVWLY[` PZ being stored at the above self-storage MHJPSP[` ;OPZ ZHSL TH` IL ^P[OKYH^U H[ HU` [PTL ^P[OV\[ UV[PJL *LY[HPU [LYTZ and conditions apply. See manager for details. 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR Independent October 3, 2018, October 3

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on :LW[LTILY(U(ZZ\TLK5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR PU 4J/LUY` *V\U[`03\UKLY[OLMVSSV^PUNI\ZPULZZ name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses of all persons

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PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on September 27, 2018 An Assumed 5HTL )\ZPULZZ *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L ^HZ Ã&#x201E;SLK PU [OL 6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR PU 4J/LUY`*V\U[`03\UKLY[OLMVSSV^PUN business name and address, and setting forth the names and addresses VM HSS WLYZVUZ V^UPUN JVUK\J[PUN HUK [YHUZHJ[PUN I\ZPULZZ RUV^U HZ! 4 1 463+05. SVJH[LK H[  4(73, (=,/,)965036^ULY5HTL (KKYLZZ!>0330(41:5@+,9 4(73,(=,/,)96503 +H[LK!:,7;,4),9 Z4(9@,4**3,33(5*V\U[`*SLYR 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL >VVKZ[VJR 0UKLWLUKLU[6J[VILY3

PUBLIC NOTICE

ASSUMED NAME Public Notice is hereby given that on October 2, 2018 An Assumed Name )\ZPULZZ*LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L^HZÃ&#x201E;SLKPU[OL6MÃ&#x201E;JL VM [OL *V\U[` *SLYR PU 4J/LUY` *V\U[` 03 \UKLY [OL MVSSV^PUN I\ZPULZZ UHTL and address, and setting forth the names HUK HKKYLZZLZ VM HSS WLYZVUZ V^UPUN conducting and transacting business RUV^U HZ! *9(0. )(*65 :;<+06 SVJH[LKH[-6?-09,+9*9@:;(3 3(2,036^ULY5HTL (KKYLZZ! *9(0. )(*65   -6?-09, +9 *9@:;(33(2,03 +H[LK!6*;6),9 Z4(9@,4**3,33(5*V\U[`*SLYR

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;OL:[VYHNL:WHJL +PLJRTHU:[7 6)V_>VVKZ[VJR03 T\Z[ receive the delinquent amount of $551.00 MVYYLU[HSVM\UP[ H[ +PLJRTHU:[ >VVKZ[VJR 03   UHTL *OHYSLZ )HUL6YJVU[LU[Z^PSSILZVSKUVH\J[PVU VYKPZWVZLKVMVUH[!HT H[  +PLJRTHU :[ >VVKZ[VJR 03    *VU[LU[Z! 3LH[OLY ZVMH JOHPY  LUK [HISLZ :THSS O\[JO +LZR )HZRL[ KYH^LYZ :UV^ ZOV]LSZ 4VUP[VY ;=  Z[HUK >OP[L [^PU ZPaL ILK ^P[O OLHK HUK MVV[ IVHYKZ ;^PU ZPaL TH[[YLZZ *Y\[JOLZ>HSRLY>VYSKIVVRZ:\P[JHZL Miscellaneous household items, and )HNZ  IV_LZ JVU[LU[Z \URUV^U HUK V[OLY NLULYHS OV\ZLOVSK 7\ISPZOLK PU ;OL>VVKZ[VJR0UKLWLUKLU[6J[VILY 3

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PUBLIC NOTICE

05=0;(;065;6)0+ ;OL )VHYK VM ,K\JH[PVU VM >VVKZ[VJR Community Unit School District No.

^PSS YLJLP]L ZLHSLK IPKZ \U[PS ! HT WYL]HPSPUN [PTL VU >LKULZKH` 6J[VILYMVYZUV^YLTV]HSHUK salting for the 2018-2019 school year. All bidders are required to execute a *LY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L VM ,SPNPIPSP[` [V )PK W\YZ\HU[ [V :LJ[PVU , , HUK , of the Illinois Criminal Code of 1961 HZ HTLUKLK )PK ZWLJPÃ&#x201E;JH[PVUZ HUK MVYTZJHUILVI[HPULKMYVT>VVKZ[VJR Community Unit School District No. 200, Business Services 6MÃ&#x201E;JL 9HMMLS9VHK>VVKZ[VJR03   ;OL )VHYK VM ,K\JH[PVU YLZLY]LZ [OL YPNO[ [V H^HYK [OL JVU[YHJ[ PU HJJVYKHUJL ^P[O P[Z ILZ[ PU[LYLZ[ HUK [V^HP]LHU`PUMVYTHSP[PLZPYYLN\SHYP[PLZ and errors in the bidding to the extent WLYTP[[LKI`SH^;OPZPUJS\KLZ[OLYPNO[ to extend the date and time for receipt VMIPKZ5VIPKKLYTH`^P[OKYH^OPZIPK ^P[OPU  KH`Z HM[LY [OL HJ[\HS KH[L VM the bid opening. )PKZ ^PSS IL VWLULK VU 6J[VILY   H[ ! HT WYL]HPSPUN [PTL HUK YLHK HSV\K PU [OL >VVKZ[VJR Community Unit School District No. 200 )\ZPULZZ:LY]PJLZ6MÃ&#x201E;JLH[ 9HMMLS 9VHK >VVKZ[VJR 0SSPUVPZ   I` 2LU 9VPSHUK +PYLJ[VY VM )\PSKPUNZ HUK .YV\UKZ7\ISPZOLKPU;OL>VVKZ[VJR 0UKLWLUKLU[6J[VILY3

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: e c i t o N c i Publ

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I NDEPENDENT The

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RUBES

By Leigh Rubin

HEATHCLIFF By Peter Gallagher CROSSWORD

31 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT Oct. 10-16, 2018

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I NDEPENDENT The

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Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

32

Sports 11SCOREBOARD 11 GIRLS SWIMMING Q Woodstock co-op fell to Huntley Oct. 3, 89-74. Woodstock freshman IreSHUK+\UUL[[[VVRĂ&#x201E;YZ[WSHJLPU[OLT breaststroke.

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Sophomore Sophia Ferru plays singles for the Thunder Oct. 4. BOYS SOCCER

)HZZĂ&#x201E;ZOPUNJH[JOPUNVUPU>VVKZ[VJR By Sandy Kucharski :(5+@';/,>66+:;6*205+,7,5+,5;*64

High school is all about giving students opportunities to ďŹ nd a niche where they ďŹ t in. About 30 students from Woodstock and Woodstock North High Schools have found a ďŹ t with bass ďŹ shing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fishing is a great outlet for kids who might not do anything else,â&#x20AC;? said bass ďŹ shing coach Jason Penuel. Penuel started teaching at WNHS four years ago. An avid ďŹ sherman, Penuel began testing the waters for the possibility of starting a bass-ďŹ shing team where he could share his passion with students. After 3-1/2 years in existence, the co-op team is starting to make waves. e Woodstock co-op hosted its ďŹ rst tournament on Wonder Lake Sept. 29. Seven teams were represented in the Wonder Lake tournament, and Woodstock had the No. 2 and No. 3 boats in the competition. e Woodstock co-op bass ďŹ shing team relies entirely on volunteers and borrowed equipment to compete in the IHSA-sanctioned activity. Partnering with the Wonder Lake Master Property Owners Association and Sportsmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club has been a key factor in growing the sport. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wonder Lake is private, but they are allowing the high schools to ďŹ sh

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Woodstock bass team members Jade Shouse (left) and Joey Fallaw ZOV^VMM[OLĂ&#x201E;ZO[OH[UL[[LK[OLT[OPYKWSHJL:LW[ H[>VUKLY3HRL in an effort to continue the growth of the ďŹ shing community,â&#x20AC;? Penuel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;is partnership is essential for creating amazing opportunities for students to gain critical knowledge of conservation as well as prepping them for potential bass-ďŹ shing opportunities and scholarships at the collegiate level.â&#x20AC;?

concept of competitive ďŹ shing was new to him. He has been active in getting the team started since he was a freshman and is excited to see it

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4VYL[OHUĂ&#x201E;ZOPUN WNHS senior Matthew Fallaw is president of the ďŹ shing team. While he grew up in a ďŹ shing family, the

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SCOREBOARD PRESENTED BY

815.338.7830

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Coach Jason Penuel (left) with team members Bartek Scheibe, Carter Miller, Tom Stygar, and Jacob Laha pose with their catch on the shores of Bangs Lake.

Tom Stygar holds the bass he JH\NO[:LW[ H[[OL[V\YUHTLU[ the Woodstock bass team hosted. Stygar won Big Bass for the tourUHTLU[^P[O[OPZĂ&#x201E;ZO


beginning to take off. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ecstatic,â&#x20AC;? Fallaw said about the formation of the team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once I started doing ďŹ shing tournaments, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opened a lot of doors to me.â&#x20AC;? He said tournament ďŹ shing had taught him a lot, including how to keep a cool head. Not everyone on the team has experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some know nothing, â&#x20AC;Ś some a lot,â&#x20AC;? Penuel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ey donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to compete. ey can do lessons.â&#x20AC;? Right now the team gets together every two weeks to practice and learn. e practices can be on dry land or on water. Bass ďŹ shing has a fall and spring season. In the off-season, Penuel encourages the kids to stay active in the sport â&#x20AC;&#x201C; such as ice ďŹ shing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and to spend time making connections with other ďŹ shing enthusiasts. On Oct. 20 the team will travel to Mundelein to compete in a tournament on Diamond Lake.

Dan Chamness write College Report for e Independent.

Northwood runs in XC sectional

Duenas earns a trip to state meet By Liz Stroh

THE INDEPENDENT

Area storms did not deter runners in the Illinois Elementary School Association sectional championship race at MicHenry Middle School Oct. 6. Northwood Middle School was one of 15 area teams to brave the wet, muddy course. Despite the weather, the sun shone on Northwood eighth-grader Mark Duenas, who crossed the ďŹ nish line with a time of 11 minutes, 55.83 second, enough for 10th place overall and a trip to the IESA state meet Oct. 13 in Bloomington. Head cross-country coach Steve Ryan, congratulated all of the athletes for their efforts at sectionals and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mark ran a great race to qualify for state. He works very hard in practice, and I wish him the best of luck on

Saturday.â&#x20AC;? e Northwood Warhawk boys team placed 11th at sectionals with 257 points and the girls team ďŹ nished in 12th with 320 points. Creekside Middle School did not participate in the sectional meet.

IINDEPENDENT PHOTO BY LIZ STROH

Northwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mark Duenas smiles after his state-qualifying run.

11SCOREBOARD 11 GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Q Marian Central hosted Benet Academy in ESCC play Oct. 2. Marian lost in two sets. Marian Central competed in the 16-team Huntley Invite Oct. 6, placing ninth overall. Q Woodstock hosted Johnsburg for a conference win Oct. 2. The Streaks won in two sets. Hanna Berry led with seven kills and two blocks. Emma Brand had four blocks, Sophie Wicker came away with 10 assists and two aces. Q Woodstock North beat Burlington Central 2-0 at home Oct. 2. The Thunder took down Johnsburg in two sets Oct. 5. Brooke Amann led the Thunder with 10 RPSSZĂ&#x201E;]LKPNZVULHJLHUKVULISVJR Woodstock North placed 13th at the Huntley Invite Oct. 6.

33

SPORTS

Continued from Previous page

in the Northern Athletics Collegiate Conference. Cody Kupsik (Woodstock North) kicked two ďŹ eld goals and two extra points for Rockford University, but it was not enough to power them beyond Wisconsin Lutheran University, which won a 26-20 overtime decision. He booted a 27-yard ďŹ eld goal and a 20-yard ďŹ eld goal. He also kicked off ďŹ ve times for 248 yards. Rockford is 1-3 overall and 0-1 in the NACC. Mason Sutter (Woodstock) caught three passes for 49 yards as his college team, Valparaiso University, lost a 40-35 decision to Davidson College. Valparaiso is 0-4 overall and 0-1 in the Pioneer Football League. omas Lesniewski (Marian Central Catholic) helped the Monmouth College Fighting Scots dump Lawrence University 49-0. It was the second consecutive shutout for Monmouth and third win in a row. Lesniewski had three tackles (one solo). He was in on a tackle for a one-yard loss. Monmouth is 3-1. Golf Lynsie Pietrzak (Woodstock) shot a 188 as Monmouth hosted the Fighting Scot Invitational, which was held at Gibson Woods Golf Course in Monmouth. e Knox College golfer shot a 188 for 36 holes. She had a 91 in the opening round. Knox did not have a team score. Augustana College won with a 659.

Oct. 10-16, 2018

Two and counting. Rachel Giustino and Alex Kaufmann, both Marian Central Catholic graduates, have helped the Murray State University Racer volleyball team win its past two contests, both Ohio Valley Conference matches. e pair of wins allowed Murray State to creep closer to the .500 mark, both overall and in the conference. e Racers are 8-9 overall and 2-3 in the OVC. Giustino posted doubleDan doubles in both Chamness contests. Both The College matches were Report decided by 3-0 scores. In a match with Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville, Giustino had 17 kills, 14 digs, two service aces and two assists. She hit .341 in the match. She also hit over .300 in the win over Eastern Kentucky University. She ďŹ nished the blowout victory with 18 kills and 11 digs. She had a .302 hitting percentage. While her high school and college teammate was doing the job in the front row, Kaufmann was contributing

in the back row. She had four digs against EKU and three against SIUE. Georgia Wicker (Woodstock), a Daemen College player, helped the Wildcat volleyball team win its last three matches. e three wins allowed Daemen to stay undefeated in the East Coast Conference. e Wildcats defeated Molloy College (3-0), Queens College (3-0) and the University of Bridgeport (3-1). Wicker ďŹ nished with 16 digs and two service aces in the triumph over Bridgeport. She had 11 digs and two service aces in the win over Molloy and six digs in the victory over Queens. Daemen is 12-8 overall and 6-0 in the ECC. Cross-Country Luke Beattie (Woodstock) ďŹ nished sixth at the Paul Short College Invitational, which was hosted by Lehigh University. e Utah State University junior ďŹ nished the 8,000-meter race in 24 minutes, 37 seconds. He was one of two USU runners in the top 10. Utah State won the highly competitive meet with 77 points. Virginia Tech took second with 80 points. Abigail Jones (Marian Central Catholic) ďŹ nished the 3-mile race at the Loyola University Lakefront Invitational in 18:48.78. e Loyola sophomore took 123rd. e Ramblers were eighth with 232 points. Princeton University took ďŹ rst with 65 points. Football Casey Dycus (Woodstock North), an Aurora University player, had six tackles, four of which were solos, in AUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 31-28 loss to Eureka College. Dycus had one tackle for four yards of loss. Aurora is 0-4 overall and 0-1

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

Marian grads contribute to Murray State wins

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY VICKY LONG

WNHS freshman Alyssa Wickersheim had a season-high seven kills Oct. 2 against Burlington. Please send scores and results for local teams to sports@thewoodstockindependent.com.

IN BRIEF Marian freshman volleyball team wins tournament Marian Centralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freshman volleyball team went 5-0 in a tournament at Burlington Central High School Oct. 6 to win Ă&#x201E;YZ[WSHJLPU[OLNVSKIYHJRL[ Setters Sammy Miderski and Grace Keeshan worked together to contribute an impressive 96 assists on the day. Outside hitter Jessa Passi led the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stats with 29 kills and 22 aces. Kate Rodden (24 kills, 10 aces), Bella Saxelby (19 kills, 4 blocks) Abby Todd (11 kills, 5 blocks) and libero Hailey Piwonka (45 digs) were led by their captain Jodie Winkelman (11 kills, 8 aces) to defeat KaneSHUKPU[OLĂ&#x201E;UHSZ Head freshman volleyball coach Robin Secrist said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am incredibly proud of these girls - they have grown so much as players and individuals and come together to make one amazing team.â&#x20AC;?


SPORTS

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

34

Marian losses tough 2-day game

This week in football...

By Meg Ivers SANDY@THEWOODSTOCKINDEPENDENT.COM

e Marian Central Catholic High School football team lost 31-13 to Carmel Catholic High School in week 7 of the regular season. e Hurricanes (3-4 overall; 1-4 East Suburban Catholic Conference) matched the Corsairs 7-7 in the first quarter, but a Corsair field goal with just seconds left in the first half was the beginning of a tough second half, which ended up being played the next day because of lightning. “Our guys battled,” Marian head coach Mike Maloney said. Seniors Jorge Enriquez, Bryce Radcliffe and Patrick Kelly were among the many players whose numbers were illegible by game’s end because of muddy conditions. “ey gave everything they could, total effort, and just couldn’t get the job done,” the coach said. “We’ve got to execute better.” e Corsairs (3-4 overall; 3-1 ESCC) returned the ball 88 yards on the opening kickoff to set up a two-yard rushing touchdown. e teams traded possessions before Marian’s third drive, when an encroachment penalty on the Corsairs and a 44-yard carry by junior Luke Rogers (15-134) brought

MARIAN CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 3-4 overall; 1-4 East Suburban Catholic Conference Oct. 5-6 at home INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY TRICIA CARZOLI

Luke Rogers runs with the ball for the Hurricanes in the Oct. 5 portion of the two-day game. the ’Canes to the 22-yard line. Junior quarterback Patsy Ricciardi (7-13-100-1) kept the ball on the next two downs for short gains before he completed a 19-yard touchdown pass to freshman Dante Ricciardi (3-36). Senior Andrew Menner’s kick tied the game. In the second quarter, both teams’ defenses kept points at bay. Junior Harrison Stanko put up a strong defensive effort, including a decisive tackle that forced the Corsairs into punting position. However, the Corsairs were

HANDS UP

able to get closer to the end zone on their next three drives: they failed on one field goal attempt, had a touchdown pass nearly intercepted by senior Mark Holian, and with only 2.7 seconds on the clock, kicked a field goal for a 10-7 lead at the half. Lightning postponed the game until the next day, but not before more than six inches of rain drenched the field. e conditions were challenging from the start of the third quarter, with Marian punting on its first possession. e Corsairs were able to score once in the

PONYTAIL FOLLOW-THRU

INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY KEN FARVER

Freshman varsity volleyball player Madelyn Moan (left) and junior Emma Brand go up to block a ball against Johnsburg. The Streaks defeated the Skyhawks in two games 25-16, 25-16.

INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY MARGIE PAFFRATH

Senior golfer Danielle Lattanzio drives the ball Oct. 1 when the Hurricanes faced Grant High School at Crystal Woods.

LOSS: 17-14 to Carmel Up next: The Hurricanes will play Marist High School at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12, at 4200 W. 115th St., Chicago

third quarter and twice in the fourth to increase their lead. e Hurricanes managed a fourthquarter touchdown after a fumble recovery with 1:51 to play. On that drive, senior quarterback A.J. Leidig (5-10-79-1) completed four of six passes, including a 43-yard pass to senior Bryce Radcliffe (6-132) and a final 18-yard touchdown toss to Radcliffe. Patsy Ricciardi added 47 yards rushing to the Hurricanes’ offense. Sophomore Bryce Shelton logged three receptions for 11 yards. “I’m proud of each and every one of our guys,” Enriquez said. “We made mistakes on both sides of the ball, but it’s nothing we can’t fix.” e game, Marian’s senior night, was bittersweet for the team’s seniors with the possibility that it could have been their last at George Harding Field. “To see us come out and play in conditions like this that we’ve always wanted to do – the score wasn’t what we wanted, but it was still just an honor to play here,” senior Radcliffe said. Marian has away games remaining against Marist (6-1 overall; 4-0 ESCC) and St. Viator (0-7 overall; 0-4 ESCC) to increase the odds of a playoff bid. e ’Canes are looking forward to the challenge. “We have to get it done,” Kelly said. “We can’t use excuses that we have players out or someone’s hurt or not feeling good. I believe we have the talent and the heart to win these next two, and I’m fairly confident that we will.” “On any given day, any team can win,” Radcliffe added. “We just have to be that team.”


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35 THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

This week in football... WOODSTOCK HIGH SCHOOL 2-5, 0-4 Kishwaukee River Conference

Oct. 10-16, 2018

Oct. 5 at home LOSS: 35-3 to Richmond-Burton Rockets Woodstock was behind 35-3 when the game was stopped two plays into the second half because of storms. ;OLVUS`ZJVYPUNJHTLVUHÄLSKNVHSRPJRLKI`*HSLI>HYTIPLY Up next: The Streaks will travel to the north side of town to face crosstown rival Woodstock North High School in the First National Bank Challenge at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12.

SPORTS INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY KEN FARVER

Quarterback Michael Purkey (left) throws while being pursued by a Rockets defender in the Oct. 5 loss to Richmond-Burton. Gavin White (above) carries the ball for Blue Streaks before the game was called because of storms.

INDEPENDENT PHOTOS BY VICKEY LONG

Fallon Ash, WNHS senior defensive specialist, serves in a 2-0 volleyball win over Burlington.

This week in football... WOODSTOCK NORTH HIGH SCHOOL 3-4, 1-3 Kishwaukee River Conference

Oct. 5 at Lincoln WIN: 41-6 over the Lincoln Railsplitters Running back Ed Flores had 112 rushing yards and scored 3 touchdowns to lead Woodstock North to a 41-6 win over Lincoln. Hans Goll (left), Andrew Pena and Matt Stevens contribute to the Thunder win with tough defense.

INDEPENDENT PHOTO BY VICKY LONG

Also contributing to the win were quarterback Ryan Zinnen, who rushed 12 times for 90 yards and one touchdown, and running back Austin Zieman, who rushed seven times for 51 yards. Up next: WNHS will host crosstown rival Woodstock High School in the First National Bank Challenge at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12.

KENNA MILES GOLF

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Woodstock High School senior Kenna Miles shot an 88 in IHSA regionals at Park Hills Golf Club, )UHHSRUW6KHTXDOLÀHGIRUWKH,+6$ golf sectional for a second consecutive year. An 88 score was quite an accomplishment considering the windy conditions (20-40 mph), having to play your shot at the back of your VWDQFHDQGÀQLVKLQJZLWKDORZIROORZ through. Kenna will be competing at sectionals with an opportunity to qualify for state.

Congratulations! Call to register

815-355-0661

815-334-1900 815-355-0661 More Info at SportsCityAcademy.com


Care with a passion that never rests

Oct. 10-16, 2018

THE WOODSTOCK INDEPENDENT

36

Just a short drive for exceptional hospital care When it comes to your health care, you deserve a hospital that puts you first. That’s what you’ll get at Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center–Harvard. Our primary and specialty care doctors strive to provide a compassionate patient experience. From a comprehensive emergency department to private inpatient care, your needs are put first. We’ve added doctors, specialties and services to give you high-quality hospital care, just a short drive from Woodstock. It’s our honor to care for the needs of McHenry County residents. We promise to continue to grow to meet your health care needs, now and for decades to come. At Mercyhealth Hospital-Harvard, you will receive: • Minimal wait time at our emergency department • Emergency medicine physicians • Trauma-trained nurses • 24/7 care for pediatrics • ICU and inpatient care • Full-service surgical suites offering: • Eye surgery • Foot surgery • Gastroenterology procedures • General surgery • Orthopedic surgery • Pediatric surgery • Vascular procedures

• Full-service radiology and laboratory • Complete rehabilitation services • Inpatient rehabilitation • Occupational therapy • Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation • Physical therapy • Speech therapy • • • • • •

Private hospital rooms with large, private baths Ambulatory outpatient care Heart and vascular care Interventional and non-interventional pain care Accredited sleep disorders center Mercyhealth Care Center • A home-like atmosphere for long-term care and short-term rrehabilitation

Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center-Harvard is Illinois’ first hospital to be certified as an Acute Stroke Ready Hospital by The Joint Commission. Our stroke specialists are here 24/7 to rapidly diagnose and treat stroke patients who are brought to our emergency department.

Mercyhealth Hospital and Medical Center–Harvard 901 Grant St., Harvard, IL 60033 (815) 943-5431 MercyHealthSystem.org

Woodstock Independent 10/10/18  
Woodstock Independent 10/10/18  
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