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TheWoodmereAnnual 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Woodmere extends sincere thanks and appreciation to the Drumcliff Foundation and Jeanne Ruddy and Victor Keen for their support of the exhibition and digital catalogue.


TheWoodmereAnnual 77 TH J UR IE D E X HIB ITIO N

CONTENTS Foreword by William R. Valerio 4 A Conversation with Syd Carpenter 6 Works in the Exhibition 24

June 2 – September 3, 2018

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FOREWORD Now in its seventy-seventh iteration, the Woodmere Annual is a different exhibition every year. Each juror, since the late 1940s, has been asked to take the reins of our mission to tell the stories of the arts in Philadelphia. The juror’s first task is to write a call to artists that can be specific or broad, encouraging artists who live within a fifty-mile radius of the Museum to submit up to five works for consideration. The juror makes selections (this year, seventy six artists chosen from over six hundred submissions) that collectively express something important: a statement about the “state of the

C-Venture Vesica, 2008, by William Daley (Courtesy of Thomas William Daley)

arts” in our city. It is no surprise that with different jurors, a different call, and different artists every year, the collective equilibrium is always distinct. But

in the movement of the body across time and

the resulting difference in messaging from year to

space, whether through deliberate movement

year also comes from artists developing ideas and

and migration or through passive flow or forced

making aesthetic choices in response to changing

displacement. As described in the pages of this

social and cultural exigencies.

catalogue, Carpenter understands that Philadelphia

We could not be more excited to work with Syd Carpenter as the juror of this year’s Annual. A professor of studio art at Swarthmore College,

artists are declaring an “alert,” demanding that we pay attention because there is a great deal at stake as we respond to the pressures of our time.

she is a sculptor of exquisite elegance, power, and

Carpenter, like every juror, has been asked to include

intellectual force. Coincidentally, we are honored to

her own work in the exhibition, and we are pleased

have welcomed her work into our collection, having

to be showing Storage 1 (2017). She has also been

acquired her Everelena Cannon (2009) this year.

asked to select works by Philadelphia artists from

Thank you, Syd, for organizing an exhibition that

Woodmere’s collection, thereby offering a historic

expresses your point of view on the vitality of the

perspective. Carpenter’s choices of Selma Burke’s

arts in our city.

bronze portrait bust of Mary McLeod Bethune (a

This year’s presentation resonates on three levels of engagement that are central to Carpenter’s own work: first, an investigation of the natural landscape that frames the experiences of life or the cityscaper; second, a consciousness of the physicality of the body that occupies space and is the vessel through which we feel and react; and third, aninterest 4

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recent gift from the renowned historian Charles M. Blockson), and Barbara Bullock’s Trayvon Martin, Most Precious Blood (2013–14) declare as much identification as reverence for two black women artists with penetrating political insight and brilliant virtuosity in their respective mediums.


Transition, 2017, by Joan Wadleigh Curran (Courtesy of the artist)

As always, Woodmere is grateful to the generous funders who make the Annual possible. For more than five years we have been honored by support from the Drumcliff Foundation and from Jeanne Ruddy and Victor Keen. I am grateful to Woodmere’s staff, especially Rachel McCay, Sally Larson, ElieAnne Chevrier Lewis, Chrissy Warhola, and Rick Ortwein, who were the organizing force that made the exhibition a reality. Thank you, everyone, for believing in the Annual as a statement of the creative vitality of our city. WILLIAM R. VALERIO, PHD

The Patricia Van Burgh Allison Director and CEO

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A CONVERSATION WITH SYD CARPENTER

On April 10, 2018, Syd Carpenter, juror of The Woodmere Annual: 77th Juried Exhibition, sat down with William Valerio, Woodmere’s Patricia Van Burgh Allison Director and CEO; Hildy Tow, the Robert L. McNeil, Jr. Curator of Education; Rick Ortwein, Deputy Director of Exhibitions; Rachel McCay, Assistant Curator; and Stephanie Marudas of Kouvenda Media, co-host and producer of Woodmere’s Podcast Diving Board, to discuss the show. WILLIAM VALERIO: Syd, thank you for organizing

the Woodmere Annual this year. We want our juried show to be a different exhibition every time, and you’ve selected a new universe relative to last year’s show. I thought we might start by talking about the specifics of your call to artists. You brought together three elements. SYD CARPENTER: First, I want to say how exciting

it was for me to be a part of this, to be invited to look at Philadelphia-area artists. I’m familiar with a lot of the work, but it’s nice to see who’s coming up, who’s doing what, and the level and the quality of work being made. I wanted to include work that reflected on intersections of body, land, and movement. VALERIO: I’m guessing that some works in the

exhibition address one of those elements more directly than the other two, while others really bring them all together in a way. Could you tell us about one work that explores all three elements? CARPENTER: We see all three elements in Kukuli

Velarde’s Saint Anna and the Virgin Mary as a Child (2013/16). We see portraiture; the horizontal head is a self-portrait. We see representation of natural forms. We see an artist who is an immigrant, and 6

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Saint Anna and the Virgin Mary as a Child, from the series Corpus, 2013/16, by Kukuli Velarde (Courtesy of the artist)


who established herself in the art world. Besides

able to integrate her own image and her child’s

that, the work is a tour de force of craftsmanship.

image into an object that is celebratory but also

VALERIO: It looks like it’s looking back to ancient

Peruvian moche pottery. CARPENTER: Exactly. She often references pre-

Columbian pottery and sculpture in her work. She comments extensively on the experience of

commemorative. VALERIO: What you’re saying, to me at least, is that

it’s moving through time and space. She refers back to pre-Columbian times and right up to the present in her reference to her own journey in life.

the immigrant, and the experience of colonialism.

CARPENTER: That’s an important theme for the

Her works are always powerful, besides being

show itself: work that makes connections that are

imaginative in terms of their use of iconography,

contemporary and timely through things that are

materials, and the juxtapositions of different forms

very poignant to the artists themselves, but also

from pottery to sculpture to self-portraiture. It’s

makes reference to a larger historical conversation.

a confluence of different languages, all in a very

Artists themselves are aware of the time in which

animated conversation.

they’re living. Pay attention is what I hear them

VALERIO: There’s a real tenderness in the mother’s

saying in their work.

gaze to the child and the touch of the hand on the

STEPHANIE MARUDAS: What do you know about

mother’s face. It gives a sensory dimension to the

her immigration story?

sculpture that you feel while looking at it. The mixing of different elements in different registers, from two dimensions to three dimensions, is also one of the fascinating features of pre-Columbian sculpture. In the bottommost register are flat patterns of verdant plants, with flowers and vines that are growing. Then it’s as if that floral element becomes three dimensional, coming from the earth and holding the pink cup and embracing the figurative part of the sculpture above. The blackware—a ceramic that’s fired and oxidized in certain ways to get that color—is in play with the earthen red-brown color in a way that is found in the treatments of pre-Columbian artists. CARPENTER: There’s a lushness to the subject.

Even if you’re unfamiliar with pre-Columbian pottery or sculpture, you’re going to immediately be aware of the lushness and the decorative quality. There’s also a loaded nature, as it references pre-Columbian history as well as her own personal history. She’s

CARPENTER: She is from a very well-known family

in Peru. She came to the United States, I think in the 1980s. She was in New York. She’s also a painter with enormous virtuosity; because of the skill of her painting her family expected her to be the greatest painter Peru ever produced. Instead, she stayed in the United States and gravitated towards clay. She did a residency at the Clay Studio here in Philadelphia, which is where she met another powerful artist, Doug Herren, who was doing a residency at the time. They’ve joined forces, and I say that very particularly—forces—because the two of them are a force in terms of what they’re doing as artists in the city. Herren has two pieces in the show. He makes these architecturally beautiful structures that reference the body as well as architecture. There’s this sense of transition from one form to another. There’s a certain gravitas to them, but at the same time THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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they’re playful. They engage you, but as you look

of course there’s the architectural reference. The

you see they really comment on environment, on

sculptures are constantly shifting. They’re in motion.

structure, on architecture, on place, while having

Their configuration is such that as you look, you can

a conversation with color and form. There’s

anticipate them changing, shifting, moving.

sophisticated thinking in these pieces. That’s why I think of the two artists as this force.

VALERIO: It’s very interesting as a complement

to Velarde’s work, because where hers seems to

VALERIO: These are anthropomorphic and

grow out of the earth, his seems to grow out of the

figurative.

city, which is the man-made thing. It’s constructive,

CARPENTER: Very much so. You can find the

figure; there are animals, there are human forms,

constructed. You feel how it’s made. CARPENTER: His sculptures have an association

with the built environment and things that are linked. These are assemblages. They have a structural integrity. They’re not going to fall apart. They’re autonomous. They’re strong. He’s sculpting with disjunctive forms.

Green Vase Cluster, 2012, by Douglas Herren (Courtesy of Peters Projects Gallery)

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Orange Chromatic Ewer, 2015, by Douglas Herren (Courtesy of Peters Projects Gallery)


At the same time, when you look at Velarde’s piece

of agitation. He’s certainly talking about a certain

there’s an orderly quality to it. There’s a strong

kind of potential for movement. These colors are

verticality to it in terms of the stacking, one thing

indicative of our own state of mind. In this era we’re

supporting another. There’s no sense of a form

deluged with information and this necessitates

possibly shifting or undermining another. There’s

intensity.

stability, which supports the mother-child theme that she seems to be describing in her piece in this show. Saint Anna and the Virgin Mary as a Child suggests being held and holding and supporting. In Herren’s pieces, you’re looking at this cacophony of angles and shifting parts, and imminent movement.

HILDY TOW: Under the chartreuse there is orange

that you see coming out in the edges. You get this sense of layering. He draws attention to the edge, which is important because of the disjunctive forms he’s using, which you talked about earlier.

His sculptures are about to change shape. There’s

CARPENTER: Yes, his work reveals that it’s

a Rube Goldberg feeling to it that this thing, if you

manmade. The bits of orange coming through imply

turn your back on it, is going to rearrange itself

that there’s surface beneath, there’s something

spontaneously.

supportive underneath. This thing has evolved to

VALERIO: The color is interesting too—loud colors.

You have to be confident as an artist to use these colors.

this state of green. In other words, if the orange were not there, we would read it completely differently. I think it would appear manufactured, whereas this thing exhibits a past. It exhibits youth,

CARPENTER: You can’t move through an urban

it exhibits experience, because there’s this other

environment without seeing colors that stand for

stuff underneath. Evolution is important in an object

caution or “watch out.” They also communicate

because it gives it a sense of time. The underlayer

“come buy me, come look at me.” It’s part of our

is one of those clues, one of those signals, that the

visual language. It’s part of our environmental signal.

viewer picks up on even if not immediately.

It has to do with association because we don’t associate those colors on certain kinds of forms. In terms of our aesthetics, we tend to appreciate the subdued, the organic. In terms of good taste we might think maybe that should be more bronze-like in tone. That palette would be more comfortable, more expected. In terms of what Herren is referencing, however, the brilliance, the intensity, the attention-grabbing quality is a required aspect of the object.

VALERIO: One of Woodmere’s requests of the

Annual’s juror is to include her or his work in the exhibition along with works from Woodmere’s own collection to create conversations across time in the art of our city. I was thrilled when you chose to include one of the newest additions to our collection, a very powerful and very meaningful gift from Charles Blockson. He recently came to the Museum and gave us this small bust of the educator Mary McLeod Bethune by Selma Burke, one of

To try to subdue it would imitate a bygone era

the great twentieth-century sculptors. I think it’s

when sculptors always moved toward the bronze

a beautiful arc through time to include Burke, and

surface, because it was associated with a certain

Barbara Bullock, whose work you also selected, and

kind of dignity. I don’t think Herren is trying to

your own work—three generations of black women

invoke dignity. He’s talking about a certain kind

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Trayvon Martin, Most Precious Blood, 2013–14, by Barbara Bullock (Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2014)

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it becomes a talisman to me, and the importance of it being touched and held is one of the most attractive aspects of this piece. You can make a physical connection with it. McLeod Bethune is an icon of culture and history, but now accessible in this size. The fact that you just handed it to me makes it more of a powerful, personal statement. I can hold this image in my hand and I feel a connection to her and to the history that she represents in this scale. This connection speaks once again to the communicative power of sculpture. Bullock’s piece represents trauma. We need to understand that Trayvon Martin represents a shudder, a bodily shudder, that our country needs to acknowledge, and she has represented it brilliantly in a piece that first engages you because of its exquisite visual qualities. It’s drawing in space with a magnetic materiality. She suggests a torso, but then Bust of Mary McLeod Bethune, date unknown, by Selma Hortense Burke (Woodmere Art Museum: Gift from the private collection of Charles L. Blockson, 2018)

there’s this explosive quality coming from the piece. It represents being pulled screaming and kicking to the truth. It’s important that artists use this opportunity right now. It’s so important for artists

CARPENTER: Yes, I selected Barbara Bullock’s

Trayvon Martin, Most Precious Blood. This is about representation and self-representation. It’s about representing in art our own story, and I think that’s a key point to be made always. As African American artists who are women, and over time—and as you pointed out, the three generations—you can see the poignancy of the personal in each of these works. When I observed the Selma Burke piece of Mary McLeod Bethune, I looked at the animation. I look

to take this time to represent, and to talk about and acknowledge their experience. So much of the work in the show is doing that. Bullock epitomizes the things that I was trying to bring together in this exhibition, trying to find work that really zeroes in on the body as a site of expression, as a reflection of the traumatized state that our country is in and not acknowledged by a large portion of the citizens. RACHEL MCCAY: Which works of yours will be

included?

at the positive gesture in this, the optimism, but at the same time there is a knowing. The fact that it’s a small piece is also poignant. The scale of this piece suggests that it should be held. For that reason THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Storage 1, 2017, by Syd Carpenter (Courtesy of the artist)

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Life Forms II (Parent Material), April 2017, by Heather McMordie (Courtesy of the artist)

Life Forms III (Topography), April 2017, by Heather McMordie (Courtesy of the artist)

contains, who provides, who’s on the land. It also references history and talks about storage. I wanted to explore how an iconic figure, a mother, can be represented in a number of ways, including as a symbol of stability and persistence. That’s the key or the most tangible thing I want to express—this Life Forms IV (Climate), April 2017, by Heather McMordie (Courtesy of the artist)

sense of persistence, forward thinking, reaching back to the past, but also being very much aware of your present, and anticipating a future.

CARPENTER: I created a series that represents my

own mother and the land as a provider. It’s mixed media: clay and glass, and the glass contains lentils. It’s a presentation of her as an iconic figure who

MCCAY: I can’t wait to see it. RICK ORTWEIN: Can we look at two other artists

selected whose work relates to the piece by Barbara Bullock? One is Heather McMordie.

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CARPENTER: In selecting these pieces, I was first

TOW: It’s a collograph. To make a collograph you

drawn to how evocative they were of a microcosm

take some kind of surface, whether it’s paper, fabric,

and a macrocosm and at the same time, of earth.

cardboard, or you create a surface, and you make

I see decay, as well as birth, rebirth, and growth.

a print of that. She uses something from the world

Once again, there’s this sense of things changing.

and makes it into a print, which she then cuts up,

When you look at them in comparison to Barbara

shreds, and makes into something else. Her work is

Bullock’s piece, there seems to be a similar use of

such an interesting evolution of raw materials.

process, in terms of cut paper, splicing, assembling. Bullock references a visceral quality of body and flesh and McMordie’s references trees, branches, earth, soil, roots. When you’re looking at them, you realize there’s a connection between the two, from the visceral qualities represented in the exploded body of Trayvon Martin, and then those same kinds of gestures, those same kinds of marks, those

CARPENTER: She’s also taken something flat and

made it dimensional in an unexpected way. Also she combines the requirements of careful, systematic making that you associate with printmaking with chance, serendipity, and improvisation. That, to me, is what’s appealing about them, besides the fact that they evoke the land.

same kinds of pairings and intertwinings are also

MCCAY: One of the trends that resulted from your

representative of the evolving state of a natural site.

call to artists is a number of works that depict the

There’s a visual language in both that represents

human form floating or appearing or disappearing

how two artists can be powerfully expressive using

in indistinct spaces. Two years ago, our call to artists

similar means.

asked them to respond to Philadelphia as a place,

ORTWEIN: McMordie’s pieces begin with a print,

so she actually makes a work of art and then destroys it in order to make something else. This also demonstrates the decay and repurposing you mentioned. CARPENTER: Her use of prints is interesting. Prints

are printed, numbered, and then it’s done. She’s creating material for a work that will grow out of the print. The print is just the beginning of something that’s going to evolve into something else. I like that our perception of printmaking is one that can be expanded upon. In other words, it’s not finished— it’s only as finished as the person who looks at it and says, “Well, that’s the end in and of itself.” I like that extension, the possibility of it. She can take a print, which is typically numbered and succinct, and through stages of destruction and recreation and rebirth, a whole different object emerges. 14

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but you’ve made your call so much more broad and the submissions reflect that open-ended character. Works like Cynthia Porter’s Laying Figure, Todd Lauther’s Man in Water, and John Carlano’s Untitled (White Men), are a few examples. CARPENTER: A lot of that was showing up in

the photography. These photographers took a certain kind of license in their location of the body. This is also a result of what the technology itself can provide. The works you mentioned are very evocative and remove the body from the corporeal perception we have of it. Locating these figures in different environments that question our sense of stability and place by dissolving the figures, swathing the figures, immersing them in liquid, in water—all of these things deny the solidity and stability of our bodies. These works explore the body as a transitory element.


Untitled (White Men), from the series Folly, 2016, by John Carlano (Courtesy of the artist)

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Laying Figure, 2018, by Cynthia Porter (Courtesy of the artist)

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Man in Water, 2016, by Todd Lauther (Courtesy of the artist)

MCCAY: They are evolving as well. CARPENTER: Yes, they appear to evolve as they

emerge or disappear.

CARPENTER: A lot of these images reminded me

of fetuses in utero. I love that artists have depicted a fetus-like state in a mature or older body, or a body in different kinds of transitions. These

VALERIO: This conversation reminds me of the

images are characterized by transition, the mature

writings of Ta-Nehisi Coates. His conversation about

body encased, enveloped by liquid, by cloth. They

the body—specifically the black body—is in relation

question our sense of time and being and where

to politics and the violent, destroying inequality of

we are. What time is it? Where am I in this stage of

our institutional systems. He writes about the body

development? How far along am I? Are those early,

as a real thing and as a container of the soul, and

early sensory experiences still tangible? Am I still in

how the treatment of people in society manifests

touch with that?

itself in posture and in the visceral experiences of life itself.

In Sophie Sanders’s Ophelia II the figure is submerged in liquid in a bathtub. We see only the THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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TOW: Sanders’s work is a photopolymer intaglio. It’s

a solar etching based on her photograph. Having made this kind of print myself, it is truly remarkable. The tones on her back are just extraordinary. It’s absolutely beautiful. CARPENTER: All of these artists also use the body

to represent a state of vulnerability and exposure. VALERIO: James Morton’s American Dream is

another very arresting image. It’s declarative and overtly political. Above the man’s head is the motto E pluribus unum from the US dollar, then there’s an American flag, a pile of skulls, and a symbolic goatheaded demonic creature. CARPENTER: You have two things in opposition:

on one side you have the American flag and it’s promise; on the other side, you have a black male looking down. The pile of skulls references a body count. The demonic symbols in the center are an interpretation of the conversation between the flag and the subject, which is the black male on the right. Ophelia II, 2017, by Sophie Sanders (Courtesy of the artist)

Morton includes emblems. When you look at the figure of this black male who is in the prime of his arc of her spine and body and hips. The photograph has a nebulous feeling to it, but at the same time there’s a feeling of comfort. Maybe these artists are thinking of a longing, a return to that protective space, a return to those origins. They’re all beautiful photographs. There isn’t a sense of revulsion. All of these figures are in a relaxed state. There’s a wonderful, poetic quality to these

life, the strength of his body is demonstrated, but at the same time he’s looking down. You can’t see where his hands are, but you’re looking at all these different emblems in contradiction to each other. The proportions of the image are almost like a banner. It’s almost as if it’s a flag. VALERIO: How do you read the emotions of the

figure?

older bodies in spaces that could possibly represent

CARPENTER: The words E pluribus unum are a

a return to the uterus.

promise, but at the same time they’ve turned out to

VALERIO: And returning to the earth.

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be a lie. Looking at the gesture of the young man who looks down and sees the evidence of the lie


American Dream, 2017, by James Morton (Courtesy of the artist)

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Shine, February 2017, by Cheryl Tracy (Courtesy of the artist)

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in the skulls, he expresses sorrow, bitterness, and

CARPENTER: The photograph is of a black

questioning.

male sitting in a pose that is associated with

Throughout history, the contradictions, the betrayals, are so evident between the flag and the black male body. Anyone looking at this photograph is going to be aware of the trauma, a sense of betrayal, a sense of all of these different contradictions.

the Buddha. There is a sense of enlightenment and otherworldliness. I was first attracted to the elegance of the photograph. I like the contradiction of thinking about the black male in terms of this level of ethereal peace. To me, this is a wonderful connection to the Morton photograph, to see this kind of ethereal beauty and glow and peace

It’s timely that this image shows up when they’ve

coming from a body that is generally associated

just opened the museum in Montgomery, Alabama,

with the opposite. She defies how we perceive

to commemorate and acknowledge lynchings in

the black male body and instead she has located

this country, primarily of black males, but also of

him in an elevated, beautiful, spiritual space. This

children and women. I think it’s important that

is in defiance of what would be imposed upon him

images like these are out there. As much discomfort

just living every day in a pressurized society that

and maybe resentment and outrage as they may

sees him as a victim, a perpetrator, a predator, but

cause, it’s time. Artists are acknowledging that the

refuses to see his humanity.

conversation can be with art making, that we can begin there as opposed to going to Facebook or going to a newspaper or watching Fox News. You come to a museum and have these kinds of truths presented to you in the form of art. VALERIO: I remember a landmark exhibition at

the Whitney Museum, Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art, organized by Thelma Golden in 1994. She posed the question of “the male body” as a subject. What’s happened in our society since that time, through the traumas and public knowing about Trayvon

VALERIO: One of the gorgeous things about the

photograph is the proximity of his fingers to that gnarly tree root. The tiny little space between his fingernails and the tree root gives a delicacy and buoyancy to the whole image. Something we have to talk about is the crossover in your selections between what we traditionally consider to be the craft arts and the fine arts. The blending and mixing of these spheres comes across very strongly in your own work, Syd, as in many of your selections.

Martin and so many others, is that the unequal

CARPENTER: What’s important is not so much

experience of black male life in the US has become

the media and the process, it’s the level of

part of our conversations in society, a reckoning.

expressiveness that’s achieved through their skills

Another image that caught my attention is Cheryl Tracy’s Shine. The figure is glowing from the lightness of his shirt.

as makers. Whether we’re looking at craft media, whether it be a Bill Daley piece, working in clay, or we’re looking at a Ken Vavrek or some other pieces that make reference to function, if those objects are not evoking a response, they’re not effective. Vavrek’s work references painting. He is certainly THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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having a conversation with early modernism, but at the same time these are plates. You could serve food or present them in that kind of functional way, but they are visual paintings done in media that we typically associate with craft. As tedious as it is, we’re still having that conversation. The object is only as good as the person making it, and if they choose to do it in the form of a plate, if they choose to do it in the form of a mug, it’s still the level of visual language that they bring to bear on it. To make distinctions about this being high art or low art—I think it wastes time. You have to look at the actual object and see what the artist has achieved in that object. What kind of language are they using? What attracts you to that object? What are they telling you? VALERIO: Bill Daley’s ceramics are amazing; they

feel like the body, like organs, like vessels. They have

Untitled pl217, 2017, by Ken Vavrek (Courtesy of the artist)

such a confidence to them as well. CARPENTER: He has advanced his expressive

abilities. They seem to be popping out of the seams

am I going to retrieve from seeing this body of work

of his creativity. His ceramics are so viscerally

together?

potent when I look at them. They’re fleshy but they’re architectural. They’re old but they’re new.

I think that the perceptive viewer will be able to pick

Two thousand years ago, if someone saw these

up on those connections, but at the same time, if

pieces, they would recognize them, but at the same

you’re someone who’s not accustomed to looking at

time, we see this completely contemporary and

objects in these groupings, you’ll be able to wander

modern interpretation of form and observation.

through and find conversations going on, find threads between one piece and another. When you

MARUDAS: What do you hope visitors walk away

look across the balcony down to the floor, you’ll be

with after having seen the show?

able to make a connection.

CARPENTER: Coming into a museum and seeing

Roberto Lugo uses these ancient, traditional

this eclectic but connected group of works I hope

Chinese forms, but he imposes contemporary

raises questions about, why is this next to that? Is

images on them to make comments about

there a conversation between these objects? Are

important societal issues. A visitor might look at

they talking to each other? What kind of insights

his work and say, “That reminds me of this ginger

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jar my grandma has—but look at that person on

In curating this show, I’m looking for those clues,

it! That’s Whitney Houston!,” or some other iconic

those subtle murmurings and connections that

figure from history. We can use accepted forms of

someone may pick up on and want to return to the

interpretation and representational status, and also

show again and again to confirm that, and to see

have them be informative and maybe pull the rug

different threads that make stronger connections

out from under our perception of how those objects

the more they engage the exhibition.

should be seen or presented. The inexperienced looker is going to come in and see things that are appealing and maybe unsettling,

MCCAY: You picked a great show. VALERIO: Thank you, Syd.

and it will make them ask questions about the objects themselves. I’m always encouraging my students to provide clues without being obvious all the time. You can be overt, but at the same time you should include subtle murmurs that you discover over time.

Above left: Whitney Houston/Shirley Chisholm Urn, 2017, by Roberto Lugo (Courtesy of the artist and Wexler Gallery) Photograph by Kenek Photography; Above right: Ma Rainey and Blind Tom, 2017, by Roberto Lugo (Courtesy of the artist and Wexler Gallery) Photograph by Kenek Photography THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION WORKS IN THE EXHIBITION SYD CARPENTER, JUROR

American, born 1953 Storage 1, 2017 Clay, glass, steel, wood, 55 x 40 x 31 in. Courtesy of the artist

BERNADETTE ANDREWS

American, born 1944 Boathouse Row, 2016 Original picture stitched by hand, 8 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist

TABITHA ARNOLD

American, born 1995 Panopticon, 2018 Wool and cotton yarn on rug warp cloth, 24 x 36 in. Courtesy of the artist

Right: Church and State, 2018, by James Brantley (Courtesy of the artist)

Left: 10/365/2017 I Am, 2017, by Elena Bouvier (Courtesy of the artist) Right: 20/365/2017 In My Power, I Am Magic, 2017, by Elena Bouvier (Courtesy of the artist)

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Boathouse Row, 2016, by Bernadette Andrews (Courtesy of the artist)

Bound and Bounded, or Meiners’ Folly, 2017, by Jake Beckman (Courtesy of the Production Language Factory)

Shoreline, 2018, by Randall Exon (Courtesy of Hirschl and Adler Modern, New York)

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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What Was I?, 2015, by Cari Freno (Courtesy of the artist)

My Studio Interior with Fig Tree, 2018, by Daniel Dallmann (Courtesy of the artist)

Valley Broom, 2018, by Eva Wylie (Courtesy of the artist)

Hollow, 2018, by Jason Starin (Courtesy of the artist)

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Above Far Left: Rally Together, from the series Come Together, 2018, by Kathleen Spicer (Courtesy of the artist). Above: That Which Requires No Battle, 2018, by Terri Saulin (Courtesy of the artist)

My Luck’s Gonna Change (Philadelphia 802), from the series Philadelphia Project, 2013, by Michael Penn (Courtesy of the artist)

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Faith and Fate, December 2016, by Barbara Bix (Courtesy of the artist)

JAKE BECKMAN

HENRY BERMUDEZ

ELENA BOUVIER

Bound and Bounded, or Meiners’ Folly, 2017 Found objects, 19 x 8 x 6 in.

Eve, 2016 Acrylic paint, glitter, canvas, 84 x 54 in.

10/365/2017 I Am, 2017 Dye-infused aluminum, 16 x 16 in.

Courtesy of the Production Language Factory

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1982

Venezuelan, born 1951

American, born 1962

Courtesy of the artist

ELENA BOUVIER MARIE BENDER

American, born 1955 Sticks and Stones, 2013 Oil on panel, 20 x 32 in. Courtesy of the artist

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM

BARBARA BIX

American, born 1960 Faith and Fate, December 2016 Glass smalti, tempered glass with paper underlay and handcrafted Milagros grouted to a two sided metal base, 42 x 16 x 60 in. Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1962 20/365/2017 In My Power, I Am Magic, 2017 Dye-infused aluminum, 16 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist


Formed to Fit, 2015, by Jennifer Rubin Garey (Courtesy of the artist) Half-Full, 2017, by Anthony Bowers (Courtesy of the artist)

ANTHONY BOWERS

American, born 1984

Half-Full, 2017 Organza, dyed wool, wood, paint, zipper, 28 x 34 x 8 in. Courtesy of the artist

JAMES BRANTLEY

American, born 1945 Church and State, 2018 Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 48 in. Courtesy of the artist

GREGORY BRELLOCHS

American, born 1973 Organicist Mindscape II, 2016 Graphite on paper, 36 x 36 in. Panopticon, 2018, by Tabitha Arnold (Courtesy of the artist)

Courtesy of the artist THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Sphaera Oculus, 2017, by Jenna Hannum (Courtesy of the artist)

iPad, 2018, by Keith Sharp (Courtesy of the artist)

Reverie of the Puppets, February 2018, by Kathy Rose (Courtesy of the artist)

Belly Pile, February 15, 2018, by Chelsea Nader (Courtesy of the artist)

Divest, 2018, by Dganit Zauberman (Courtesy of the artist)

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Join My Swim Team, 2016, by Yixuan Pan (Courtesy of the artist)

Daydrawing 180310, 2018, by Christopher T. Wood (Courtesy of the artist)

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Mushroomcloudhead 3, 2017, by Berna Can Lustig (Courtesy of the artist)

EMILY BROWN

ANNE BUCKWALTER

Pickaxe, 2017 Vitreous enamel on hand-blown glass, 8 x 10 1/4 in.

Rattler, from the series The Groundskeepers, 2018 Gouache on paper, 22 x 30 in.

Untitled (Dark Cycle), from the series Folly, 2017 Archival inkjet print, 15 1/2 x 20 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

EMILY BROWN

ANNE BUCKWALTER

JIMMY CLARK

American, born 1943

American, born 1943

American, born 1987

American, born 1987

JOHN CARLANO

American, born 1956

American, born 1952

Holding, 2017 Vitreous enamel on hand-blown glass, 10 1/2 x 9 in.

Yawn in the Lawn, from the series The Groundskeepers, 2018 Gouache on paper, 22 x 18 3/4 in.

Cauldron, 2016 Sawdust-fired ceramic on stone and steel stand, 12 1/2 x 15 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist and Gravers Lane Gallery

INGA KIMBERLY BROWN

BERNA CAN LUSTIG

American, born 1970

Turkish, born 1975

Tea Time in the Henhouse of the Long Hairs, December 2016 Oil on canvas, wood, ceramic tile, twenty-four-karat gold leaf, human hair, down feathers, 60 x 70 in.

Mushroomcloudhead 3, 2017 Acrylic and painted paper collage on paper, 10 x 18 1/2 in.

Courtesy of the artist

JOHN CARLANO

Courtesy of the artist

Untitled (White Men), from the series Folly, 2016 Archival inkjet print, 22 1/2 x 30 in. WOODMERE ART MUSEUM

American, born 1952 Still Life, 2018 Sawdust-fired ceramic with found glass shards, 14 x 12 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist and Gravers Lane Gallery

American, born 1956

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JIMMY CLARK

Courtesy of the artist


Above left: Organicist Mindscape II, 2016, by Gregory Brellochs (Courtesy of the artist) Above right: Eve, 2016, by Henry Bermudez (Courtesy of the artist)

PATRICK CONNORS

JOAN WADLEIGH CURRAN

KEN DERENGOWSKI

Schuylkill River Viaduct, View from the East Bank, Clearing Fog, 2018 Oil on linen, 36 x 42 in.

Transition, 2017 Oil on canvas, 48 x 48 in.

Collection of Henry Bernstein and James Fennell

WILLIAM DALEY

The Greatest Generation: Bouncing Betty, 2010–16 Sterling silver and found object, 4 x 5 1/4 x 2 3/4 in. Courtesy of the artist

SCOTT COOPER

C-Venture Vesica, 2008 Unglazed ground stoneware with white grog, 15 x 29 x 24 in

American, born 1958

American, born 1988

American, born 1950

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1925

Rowdy Vessels, 2017 Earthenware, four vessels, approx. 6 x 9 x 5 in. each

Courtesy of Thomas William Daley

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1942

MATTHEW COURTNEY

American, born 1959

Rockets_House, 2017 Fired clay, four rockets, each 63 x 23 in. Courtesy of the artist

DANIEL DALLMANN

American, born 1974

KEN DERENGOWSKI

American, born 1974 The Greatest Generation: Radar, 2010–16 Sterling silver and found object, 3 1/2 x 7 x 5 in. Courtesy of the artist

Equatorial, 2017 Oil on linen, 28 x 28 in.

KEN DERENGOWSKI

American, born 1974

Courtesy of the artist

The Greatest Generation: Torpedo, 2010–16 Sterling silver and found object, 3 x 6 1/2 x 4 in.

DANIEL DALLMANN

American, born 1942 My Studio Interior with Fig Tree, 2018 Oil on linen, 16 x 16 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Top: Deep in the Valley, 2009, by Eric Goldberg (Courtesy of The Old Print Shop, New York) Bottom: Tic Tac Doe, 2016, by Patricia Moss-Vreeland (Courtesy of the artist)

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Left to right: Untitled_#17-09, 2017; Untitled_#17-06, 2017; Untitled_#17-04, 2017; Untitled_#15-08, 2015, by Janice Merendino (Courtesy of the artist)

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Above Left: Rattler from the series The Groundskeepers, 2018, by Anne Buckwalter (Courtesy of the artist). Left: Untitled (Dark Cycle) from the series Folly, 2017, by John Carlano (Courtesy of the artist). Above: Yawn in the Lawn from the series The Groundskeepers, 2018, by Anne Buckwalter (Courtesy of the artist)

PERKY EDGERTON

American, born 1953 American Girl, 2015 Oil, wax, paper collage on canvas, 41 1/4 x 61 in.

RANDALL EXON

JENNIFER RUBIN GAREY

Shoreline, 2018 Oil on canvas, 20 x 34 in.

Formed to Fit, 2015 Cast bronze and fabricated steel, 56 x 10 x 1 in.

American, born 1956

Courtesy of Gross McCleaf Gallery

Courtesy of Hirschl and Adler Modern, New York

EVAN EISNER

CARI FRENO

American, born 1955 Aftermath, March 2018 Steel, 48 x 32 x 6 in. Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1982 What Was I?, 2015 HD video, 00:03:24 excerpt from 00:16:59 total work Courtesy of the artist

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM

American, born 1985

Courtesy of the artist

ERIC GOLDBERG

American, born 1946 Deep in the Valley, 2009 Etching and aquatint, 7 3/4 x 21 in. Courtesy of The Old Print Shop, New York


MICHAEL GRIMALDI

JENNA HANNUM

PATRICIA INGERSOLL

Interior, 2018 Oil, chalk, wax, and charcoal on board on panel, 38 x 24 in.

Sphaera Oculus, 2017 Graphite on paper, 45 x 45 in.

Arrangement, 2017 Acrylic on paper, 15 x 15 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts

DOUGLAS HERREN

PATRICIA INGERSOLL

Back and Forth, 2016 Oil on linen, 28 x 24 in.

Green Vase Cluster, 2012 Ceramic and enamel paint, 23 x 12 x 10 in.

Tumbling, 2018 Acrylic on paper, 10 3/4 x 10 3/4 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of Peters Projects Gallery

MICHAEL GROTHUSEN

DOUGLAS HERREN

Twilight in the Forest, 2016 Oak and fir, 6 1/2 x 27 x 8 in.

Orange Chromatic Ewer, 2015 Ceramic and casein paint, 21 x 22 x 10 in.

Architecture of Remembering, 2017 Wood-fired white stoneware, four of nine parts, 1 x 4 x 9 in.

Courtesy of Peters Projects Gallery

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1971

American, born 1976

American, born 1948

Courtesy of the artist

DEBORAH GROSS-ZUCHMAN

American, born 1947

American, born 1966

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1962

American, born 1948

Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts

JENNIFER JOHNSON

American, born 1961

American, born 1962

American Girl, 2015, by Perky Edgerton (Courtesy of Gross McCleaf Gallery) THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Equatorial, 2017, by Daniel Dallmann (Courtesy of the artist)

Interior, 2018, by Michael Grimaldi (Courtesy of the artist)

The Greatest Generation: Bouncing Betty, 2010-16, by Ken Derengowski (Courtesy of the artist)

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Hollow, 2018, by Jason Starin (Courtesy of the artist)

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Right: Cauldron, 2016, by Jimmy Clark (Courtesy of the artist and Gravers Lane Gallery)

The Greatest Generation: Torpedo, 2010-16, by Ken Derengowski (Courtesy of the artist)

Tea Time in the Henhouse of the Long Hairs, December 2016, by Inga Kimberly Brown (Courtesy of the artist)

LEROY JOHNSON

American, born 1937 Market/Frankford El, 2016 Acrylic, photo collage, and mixed media on canvas, 48 x 72 in. Courtesy of the artist

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM

The Greatest Generation: Radar, 2010-16, by Ken Derengowski (Courtesy of the artist)

JOANNE KARPOWITZ

SARAH KAUFMAN

American, born 1940

American, born 1981

Upheaval, 2014 Fired clay, 14 x 18 in.

Devil’s Pool Bathers, 2016/2018 Archival pigment print, 40 x 40 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist


Schuylkill River Viaduct, View from the East Bank, Clearing Fog, 2018, by Patrick Connors (Collection of Henry Bernstein and James Fennell)

Still Life, 2018, by Jimmy Clark (Courtesy of the artist and Gravers Lane Gallery)

MICHAEL KOWBUZ

ROBERTO LUGO

HEATHER MCMORDIE

Blinds, 2017 Ink, watercolor, and gouache on Arches paper, 8 x 10 in.

Whitney Houston/Shirley Chisholm Urn, 2017 Porcelain, china paint, luster, 9 x 9 x 16 in.

Life Forms II (Parent Material), April 2017 Assemblage of hand-cut collograph proofs and collograph matrix, 13 x 12 x 4 in.

Canadian, born 1966

Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts

American, born 1981

American, born 1989

Courtesy of the artist and Wexler Gallery

Courtesy of the artist

MICHAEL KOWBUZ

Canadian, born 1966

Corner, 2017 Ink, watercolor, and gouache on Arches paper, 10 x 8 in. Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts

ROBERTO LUGO

American, born 1981

HEATHER MCMORDIE

Ma Rainey and Blind Tom, 2017 Porcelain, china paint, luster, 8 1/2 x 8 1/2 x 17 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist and Wexler Gallery

MICHAEL KOWBUZ

Canadian, born 1966

Side Window, 2017 Ink, watercolor, and gouache on Arches paper, 8 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts

American, born 1989

Life Forms III (Topography), April 2017 Assemblage of hand-cut collograph proofs and collograph matrix, 15 x 10 x 4 in. Courtesy of the artist

MICHELLE MARCUSE

South African and American, born 1957 The Other Side, 2018 Cardboard, water-based media, 25 x 27 x 29 in. Courtesy of the artist

TODD LAUTHER

American, born 1985 Man in Water, from the series Between the Devil and the City 2016 Archival inkjet print, 24 x 30 in. Courtesy of the artist THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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WeedRock, 2017, by Don Nakamura (Courtesy of the artist)

Back and Forth, 2016, by Deborah Gross-Zuchman (Courtesy of the artist)

Market/Frankford El, 2016, by Leroy Johnson (Courtesy of the artist)

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Architecture of Remembering, 2017, by Jennifer Johnson (Courtesy of the artist)

Penn Treaty Park, 2018, by Dave Walsh (Courtesy of the artist)

Forest Prayer, 2018, by Andrea Packard (Courtesy of the artist)

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Holding, 2017, by Emily Brown (Courtesy of the artist)

Pickaxe, 2017, by Emily Brown (Courtesy of the artist)

Twilight in the Forest, 2016, by Michael Grothusen (Courtesy of the artist)

HEATHER MCMORDIE

JANICE MERENDINO

JANICE MERENDINO

Life Forms IV (Climate), April 2017 Assemblage of hand-cut collograph proofs and collograph matrix, 17 x 22 x 7 in.

Untitled_#15-08, 2015 Pastel and ink on paper, 46 x 13 in.

Untitled_#17-06, 2017 Pastel and ink on paper, 42 x 11 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

JANICE MERENDINO

JANICE MERENDINO

Untitled_#17-04, 2017 Pastel and ink on paper, 47 x 12 1/2 in.

Untitled_#17-09, 2017 Pastel and ink on paper, 41 x 11 in.

American, born 1989

American, born 1952

American, born 1952

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1952

Courtesy of the artist

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM

American, born 1952

Courtesy of the artist


Idea of American Exceptionalism, 2016, by Jay Roth (Courtesy of the artist )

JAMES MORTON

American, born 1942 American Dream, 2017 Digital composite, 20 1/2 x 32 in. Courtesy of the artist

IFE NII OWOO

YIXUAN PAN

American, born 1952

Chinese, born 1991

Thanksgiving, 2013 Acrylic-painted papers and canvas on collaged canvas, 29 x 26 in.

Join My Swim Team, 2016 Video, projector, headphone, chair, 00:01:00 Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

PATRICIA MOSS-VREELAND

American, born 1951

Tic Tac Doe, 2016 Oil and acrylic on canvas, 40 x 48 in. Courtesy of the artist

CHELSEA NADER

American, born 1985 Belly Pile, February 15, 2018 Terra cotta clay, 10 feet x 10 feet overall Courtesy of the artist

DON NAKAMURA

American, born 1955

MICHAEL PENN

American, born 1969

YINKA ORAFIDIYA

American, born 1980 Freedom Cups (Group), 2018 Underground Railroad code printed on hand-built red stoneware, iron oxide, underglaze, slip, glaze, 4 1/2 x 3 x 2 in.

My Luck’s Gonna Change (Philadelphia 802), from the series Philadelphia Project. 2013 Digital inkjet print, 12 x 18 in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

CYNTHIA PORTER

American, born 1958 ANDREA PACKARD

American, born 1963

Forest Prayer, 2018 Mixed media on carved wood panels, 84 x 59 in.

Laying Figure, 2018 Archival inkjet print on silk, 77 x 42 in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

WeedRock, 2017 Stoneware with slip and underglaze decoration, 18 x 21 x 15 in.

PAUL RIDER

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1962 02, 2016 Archival pigment print, 36 x 36 in.

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Cry . . . Don’t Cry, 2014, by Doug Smock (Courtesy of the artist and Gravers Lane Gallery)

KATHY ROSE

SOPHIE SANDERS

CHARLES SCHMIDT

Reverie of the Puppets, February 2018 Video, 00:05:15

Ophelia II, 2017 Photopolymer intaglio print, 23 x 17 in.

Star Pool, 2017 Oil on linen, 24 x 48 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

JAY ROTH

TERRI SAULIN

Idea of American Exceptionalism, 2016 Archival pigment print, 15 x 20 in.

That Which Requires No Battle, 2018 Porcelain clay with celadon and luster glazes, 13 1/2 x 8 x 9 in.

American, born 1949

American, born 1975

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1970

American, born 1965

Courtesy of the artist

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM

American, born 1939

Courtesy of the artist

JOHN SEVCIK

American, born 1951 Under Betzwood Bridge, 2018 Oil on canvas, 12 x 24 in. Courtesy of the artist


Push Over, 2015, by Rita Siemienski Smith (Courtesy of the artist)

Beltway, 2018, by Kathleen Shaver (Courtesy of the artist and Reading Art Works, Reading, Pennsylvania)

Under Betzwood Bridge, 2018, by John Sevik (Courtesy of the artist)

KEITH SHARP

American, born 1968 iPad, 2018 Archival pigment print, 17 x 25 in. Courtesy of the artist

RITA SIEMIENSKI SMITH

KATHLEEN SPICER

Push Over, 2015 Acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48 in.

Rally Together, from the series Come Together, 2018 Oil on wood, 24 x 24 x 2 in.

American, born 1941

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1959

Courtesy of the artist

KATHLEEN SHAVER

American, born 1952

Beltway, 2018 Oil on canvas, 72 x 52 in. Courtesy of the artist and Reading Art Works, Reading, Pennsylvania

DOUG SMOCK

American, born 1956 Cry . . . Don’t Cry, 2014 Graphite on 8 ply rising museum board, 32 x 40 in. Courtesy of the artist and Gravers Lane Gallery

JASON STARIN

American, born 1976 Hollow, 2018 Glazed stoneware, 13 x 15 x 15 in. Courtesy of the artist

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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O2, 2016, by Paul Rider (Courtesy of the artist)

Rowdy Vessels, 2017, by Scott Cooper (Courtesy of the artist)

48

Thanksgiving, 2013, by Ife Nii Owoo (Courtesy of the artist) Photograph by Nathea Lee. WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Arrangement, 2017, by Patricia Ingersoll (Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts)

Tumbling, 2018, by Patricia Ingersoll (Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts)

Above: Freedom Cups (Group), 2018, by Yinka Orafidiya (Courtesy of the artist); Far Left: Devil’s Pool Bathers, 2016/2018, by Sarah Kaufman (Courtesy of the artist)

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Daydrawing 180226, 2018, by Christopher T. Wood (Courtesy of the artist)

Rockets_House, 2017, by Matthew Courtney (Courtesy of the artist)

Daydrawing 180305, 2018, by Christopher T. Wood (Courtesy of the artist)

JASON STARIN

KEN VAVREK

DAVE WALSH

Hollow, 2018 Glazed stoneware, 18 x 11 x 8 in.

Untitled pl217, 2017 Glazed stoneware, 26 ¼ x 21 x 3 in.

Penn Treaty Park, 2018 Oil on canvas, 60 x 69 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

CHERYL TRACY

KUKULI VELARDE

ROBERT WINOKUR

Shine, February 2017 Inkjet print on San Gabriel Baryta Fine Art paper, 11 x 14 in.

Saint Anna and the Virgin Mary as a Child, from the series Corpus, 2013/2016 Ceramic, 36x 19 x 13 in.

Little Orvieto, c. 1999 Salt-glazed stoneware with slips and engobes and blue wood ash glaze, 21 1/2 x 10 1/2 x 6 1/4 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1976

American, born 1965

Courtesy of the artist

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM

American, born 1939

American, born Peru 1962

American, born 1987

American, born 1933


Little Orvieto, c. 1999, by Robert Winokur (Courtesy of the artist)

CHRISTOPHER T. WOOD

EVA WYLIE

American, born 1979

SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION

Daydrawing 180226, 2018 Graphite on paper, 9 x 12 in.

Valley Broom, 2018 Screenprint on silk, acrylic on cut wood, and embroidery, 16 x 23 ½ in.

BARBARA BULLOCK

American, born 1979

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

CHRISTOPHER T. WOOD

American, born 1979

Daydrawing 180305, 2018 Graphite on paper, 9 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist

DGANIT ZAUBERMAN

Israeli and American, 1965 Divest, 2018 Oil on board, 8 x 10 in. Courtesy of the artist

American, born 1938

Trayvon Martin, Most Precious Blood, 2013-14 Acrylic, matte medium, and watercolor paper, 66 x 31 in. Woodmere Art Museum: Museum purchase, 2014

SELMA HORTENSE BURKE

CHRISTOPHER T. WOOD

American, 1900-1995

Daydrawing 180310, 2018 Graphite on paper, 9 x 12 in.

Bust of Mary McLeod Bethune, date unknown Cast metal, 8 x 5 x 4 ½ in.

American, born 1979

Courtesy of the artist

Woodmere Art Museum: Gift from the private collection of Charles L. Blockson, 2018

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Left: Corner, 2017, by Michael Kowbuz (Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts)

Side Window, 2017, by Michael Kowbuz (Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts)

Blinds, 2017, by Michael Kowbuz (Courtesy of the artist and Cerulean Arts)

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Upheaval, 2014, by Joanne Karpowitz (Courtesy of the artist)

The Other Side, 2018, by Michelle Marcuse (Courtesy of the artist)

Aftermath, March 2018, by Evan Eisner (Courtesy of the artist)

THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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Star Pool, 2017, by Charles Schmidt (Courtesy of the artist)

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WOODMERE ART MUSEUM


Woodmere Art Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

Support provided in part by The Philadelphia Cultural Fund.

Š 2018 Woodmere Art Museum. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission of the publisher. Photography by Rick Echelmeyer unless otherwise noted. Catalogue designed by Woodmere Art Museum and edited by Gretchen Dykstra. Front cover: Sticks and Stones (detail), 2013, by Marie Bender (Courtesy of the artist) THE WOODMERE ANNUAL: 77TH JURIED EXHIBITION

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WoodmereArtMuseum 9201 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19118

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The Woodmere Annual: 77th Juried Exhibition  

Woodmere’s annual juried exhibition highlights contemporary work in a wide variety of media by artists living within fifty miles of the Muse...

The Woodmere Annual: 77th Juried Exhibition  

Woodmere’s annual juried exhibition highlights contemporary work in a wide variety of media by artists living within fifty miles of the Muse...