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President’s Corner: A message from Mr. Alley

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s we embark on another year, the staff and administration at Woodlawn Hospital continues our mission of bringing quality, comprehensive healthcare services to our entire region. Day after day, we strive to respond to our patients’ needs and make decisions that are guided by the pulse of the community. In keeping with this goal, we’ve welcomed our first-ever hospital gynecologist and internal medicine specialist, and added new physicians to the Woodlawn Hospital family. We’re also proud of our outpatient surgical suite, where patients can undergo procedures in a more intimate, less intimidating environment. And at the Woodlawn Hospital Cancer Center, we’re continuing to forge a successful partnership with Michiana Hematology Oncology. This collaboration, combined with the resources of the Cancer Center, gives area cancer patients access to expert treatment closer to home. Recently, many have asked, “How will healthcare reform affect our community?” Unfortunately, as healthcare continues to be tied to politics, some answers are still unknown. But no matter what the future holds, I want to personally reassure our patients that Woodlawn Hospital is prepared for whatever lies ahead. Over the last several months, we’ve closely monitored the changing atmosphere. We’re working with the Indiana Hospital Association and the American Hospital Association to stay informed of trends in both the political and clinical scenes. As healthcare changes continue to take effect, I am confident that we are well-positioned to continue to meet the needs of our patients. Today, tomorrow, and for many years to come, we look forward to providing the caring, quality, and expert services that our community expects.

John Alley President and CEO

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In Touch: A publication of Woodlawn Hospital


In Touch Contents

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President’s Corner: A message from Mr. Alley Committed to Comfort: Outpatient care that isn’t out of the way Woodlawn Hospital’s New Doctors: Michael Ryskin, MD, FACOG, Obstetrics, Gynecology J. Timothy Aldridge, DO, FACOI Internal & Critical Care Medicine Gaddiel Rios, MD, Family Medicine

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Rest Easy:

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Cancer Care, Close to Home:

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Woodlawn Hospital Sleep Center

Woodlawn Hospital Cancer Center Woodlawn Foundation: December 2012 Annual Appeal


Committed to Comfort: Outpatient care that isn’t out of the way

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ometimes surgery is an unavoidable necessity. But when facing a surgery, even a minor procedure can cause major stress, and selecting a facility deserves careful consideration. Since its renovation in 2010, the Woodlawn Hospital Outpatient Surgery Suite has offered an ideal environment for patients and their families, as well as for physicians and staff. Prior to the renovation of Woodlawn Hospital, the outpatient and surgery departments inhabited different floors of the hospital. As part of the building’s revitalization, the Outpatient Surgery Suite was expanded and relocated

to its current location, adjacent to the surgery department. The suite includes a centralized nursing station surrounded by 10 private rooms, where patients are prepped prior to their procedure. After leaving recovery, patients return to the same private room until they’re ready to go home. The new arrangement gives physicians and staff access to the resources and equipment of the inpatient surgery department and provides patients an easily accessible, comforting environment. The private rooms also let family members spend time with patients before and after their procedure.


Adding to the advantages of the department’s design, interconnected monitoring equipment contributes to a patient-focused approach before, during and after surgery. “We offer a continuity of care,” says Becky Kopka, Director of Surgical Services at Woodlawn Hospital. “Our recent renovation allows for smooth transitions for both the patients and the staff through the entire process.” Along with an improved layout, the Outpatient Surgery Suite boasts up-to-date technology and equipment. “We always try to stay at the forefront on modern technologies,” says Kopka. “Technology and techniques are always changing, and staff and surgeons do a great job staying current.” At the Outpatient Surgery Suite, physicians perform general, orthopedic, obstetric, gynecologic, urologic, podiatric, pulmonology, pain management and endoscopic procedures. According to Kopka, the facility’s focus fits perfectly with Woodlawn Hospital’s overall mission.

“It’s a local choice that gives patients throughout the region access to an excellent facility, caring staff, and a variety of expert surgeons and specialties, without the need to travel.”

“It’s a local choice that gives patients throughout the region access to an excellent facility, caring staff, and a variety of expert surgeons and specialties, without the need to travel,” she says. Kopka also attests that the department’s staff of over 20 nurses, techs and clerical assistants help to set it apart, noting that former patients regularly compliment the quality of care they received. “The staff are skilled and dedicated to their professions,” says Kopka. “They’re highly motivated patient advocates. They really try to make patients as comfortable as possible throughout what could be a stressful time in their lives.”

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Dr. Ryskin:

Caring for women with a comprehensive approach

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s the first gynecologist to join the Woodlawn Hospital family, Dr. Michael Ryskin brings nearly three decades of experience. His unique approach to patient care also combines the cultural perspectives of two continents.

In keeping with his patient-focused approach, he sees Woodlawn Hospital as an ideal partner. “Woodlawn [Hospital] is attached to the community at every level,” Dr. Ryskin says. “The philosophy and leadership is dedicated to the needs of the community. It’s all about the people who live in Fulton County, and that’s what I appreciate the most.”

Dr. Ryskin studied medicine at the Medical University of the State of Russia in Moscow. After medical school, he As a new member of the community, Dr. Ryskin enjoys moved to the United States and completed his residency the lakes, woods and natural features of the Rochester at Stamford Hospital in Connecticut and the Mount Sinai area. He devotes his free time to caring for his two School of Medicine in New York. It was during his residency Dobermans, and hopes to train them to hunt in the that he discovered his rural landscape. His passion for surgery. “It’s two children may also “Woodlawn is attached to the community join him in Rochester one of my favorite aspects of work,” says Dr. Ryskin. at every level... It’s all about the people soon. Fourteen-year“I like operating, and I like old Anastasia plans who live in Fulton County, and that’s seeing results when I do.” to apply to Culver what I appreciate the most.” Military Academy, and Specializing in Obstetrics his son Anton, 22, is and Gynecology allows him to perform surgeries while considering graduate schools in the Midwest. building relationships and interacting closely with patients.“I enjoy working with people and helping them in Dr. Ryskin plans to provide care to Fulton County patients their needs,” he says. “Plus, I’m helping women at a very for many years to come. “I probably won’t fully retire ever,” crucial moment in their lives, and I’m drawn to that.” he says. “But when I do, it will be from here. I look forward to staying in this community for good.” Dr. Ryskin came to Woodlawn Hospital in May 2011, after six years in a similar hospital-based practice in Colorado. Throughout his career, he has drawn inspiration from his diverse experiences as a healthcare provider. He attests that his personal philosophy comes from working in both Michael Ryskin, MD, FACOG Russia’s classical setting and the high-tech healthcare setting of the United States.“I appreciate the advantages of Woodlawn Medical Professionals technology,” says Dr. Ryskin. “But I also believe that natural Rochester Medical Center forces have to be allowed to work, and whatever we do as 1400 East Ninth Street, Rochester, IN 46975 physicians should add to that.” P: 574-223-2020


Dr. Aldridge:

Compassionate expertise for complex conditions

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t some point in life, almost everyone will hold a job. Many will even build professional careers. But only the luckiest and most dedicated will discover a livelihood they can be passionate about. Finding that perfect pursuit is something Dr. J. Timothy Aldridge knows all about. Dr. Aldridge’s success as a critical care, cardiology and internal medicine specialist had unlikely beginnings in a rural Arkansas community. For him, the decision to pursue a career as a physician was a natural choice. “I always thought this was what I was meant to do in my life,” he says. “I feel like I’ve never worked a day in my life, even though I work seven days a week.” He says his eagerness to practice medicine began at a young age, and his modest upbringing motivated his professional success. “My family were sharecroppers in southern Arkansas,” says Dr. Aldridge. “I’m the first one in the history of my family to go to college. I’m the first one from my high school to become a doctor, ever.” He continues, “I can’t remember a time that I didn’t want to do this. People called me ‘doctor’ when I was in grade school.” After completing a degree from Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Missouri, Dr. Aldridge fulfilled an internship at Michiana Community Hospital in South Bend, Indiana, a residency at Deaconess Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, and additional training in cardiology at the St. Louis University Hospital. These experiences marked the beginning of a career focused on critical care, cardiology and chronic diseases. He finds his role as a specialist to be especially rewarding. “I like helping people who have difficulty maintaining good health,” he says. “Just recently, I cared for a patient with a horrible disease, and I helped her get through that situation as best as I could. And seeing patients doing well is incredibly rewarding.” At Woodlawn Hospital, Dr. Aldridge performs specialty procedures, such as echocardiograms, colonoscopies and

J. Timothy Aldridge, DO, FACOI Woodlawn Internal & Critical Care Medicine 1400 East Ninth Street, Rochester, IN 46975 P: 574-224-2022

endoscopies. He has performed over 20,000 procedures in his career. He also helps other physicians resolve complex medical conditions. “I help the primary care doctors take care of their more complicated patients,” says Dr. Aldridge. “If you have a patient with hypertension caused by kidneys that are failing, you call me. I also help oncologists take care of their patients with special needs. For example, if a chemotherapy patient develops bleeding disorders as a side effect, I’m added to the treatment team.” Dr. Aldridge came to Woodlawn Hospital after working in a similar role in Plymouth, Indiana for over 16 years. He says he appreciates both the atmosphere and staff at Woodlawn. “I think the staff is incredible,” he says. “They’re welcoming, and they’re truly caring and compassionate people. They really go an extra mile for their patients.” He cites the friendliness of the community as the source. “I think that’s something you see in community hospitals that sometimes gets lost in bigger places,” he says. “It’s that personal touch. When you walk through the halls, people say ‘good morning’–not only to me, but to patients and their families.” Having grown up in a rural agricultural community, Dr. Aldridge feels right at home in the region. “I love the farming community; I like the farming life,” says Dr. Aldridge. “It’s what I’m comfortable with, and that’s the kind of hard-working patients I really love to care for.”

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in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Rios received additional medical training at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington D.C., and completed his residency at Darnall Army Community Hospital in Fort Hood, Texas. From there, Dr. Rios’ experiences took a globe-trotting turn. During his eight years on active duty as a physician, Dr. Rios served in Operation Iraqi Freedom, was stationed at Fort Polk, Louisiana, and fulfilled a NATO assignment in Belgium. Following military service, he also spent six years in a private practice in Texas and worked for the U.S. Army as a civilian doctor in Germany. In September 2012, Dr. Rios joined nurse practitioner Maureen Neeley at the Akron Medical Center, where he cares for patients of all ages. “My favorite aspect is meeting young families and helping them plan for a healthy future,” he says. “I especially love the adolescents – talking to them about their schooling, their sports, their education, and how they’re going to have a successful future.”

“My overall approach is to treat my patients as if they were my family. I think, ‘How would I want my brother, my sister, my children or my mom taken care of?”

Dr. Rios:

Supporting healthy futures, one family at a time

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fter several computer science internships in high school, Dr. Gaddiel Rios took an internship at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. When the internship was complete, he’d made a decision: Computers were too impersonal. Instead, he chose to pursue medicine. The decision was life changing, not just for Rios, but for the countless patients he has cared for since. From the start, he was drawn to the personal contact and patient interaction that family medicine provided. “The attraction was in the variety; to be able to see kids, adults and seniors,” Dr. Rios says. “I also enjoy the role of preventing disease; taking healthy people and helping them stay healthy.” After graduating from Tufts University School of Medicine

For Dr. Rios, family and faith are the foundation for patient care. “My overall approach is to treat my patients as if they were my family,” he says. “I think, ‘How would I want my brother, my sister, my children or my mom taken care of?” He continues, “I also find that religion is important in the balance of a marriage and a family, and is very important to me as a caregiver and a physician.” He and his wife Silvia have been married for 22 years and have two daughters. Twenty-year-old Nadine is in college in Michigan, while 15-year-old Victoria attends high school in Warsaw. The family is settling in and enjoying the community. “I think the small-town feel is nice,” says Dr. Rios, “I can be the town doc and get to know people.“ He is pleased that Woodlawn Hospital maintains that same close-knit, community approach. “There’s a sense that they want physicians to be able to really spend time with their patients, and it’s not just about putting patients through the door,” he says. “I really feel that it’s a family kind of environment.”

Gaddiel Rios, MD Woodlawn Medical Professionals Akron Medical Center 105 State Road 14 N, Akron, IN 46910 P: 574-598-2020


Rest Easy:

Sleep Center helps patients put a stop to sleeplessness

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et’s face it — between family responsibilities, hectic schedules, household demands and tons of always-on technology, a good night’s sleep is hard to get. But if you’re still sleepless after trying every trick, a physiological cause could be the culprit. In some cases, the key to drifting off to dreamland lies in expert diagnosis.

educational clinic allows the Sleep Center to give continuation of care throughout the process. Studies have shown that chronic sleep apnea is linked to cardiovascular problems, including heart attacks and strokes, and can increase a person’s chance of dying from cancer.1,2 More recently, research indicated that lack of sufficient sleep also causes hormonal imbalances that are linked to weight gain.3 With so much at risk, even a little snoring shouldn’t be ignored. If you think you might be suffering from a sleep disorder, talk to your doctor and take the quiz below.

To find out more about sleep disorders or sleep studies, call the Woodlawn Sleep Center at 574-224-1243, or visit www.woodlawnhospital.com/sleepcenter.

Above: At the Sleep Center, Dr. Rajagopal uses expert technology to identify sleep problems.

The Woodlawn Sleep Center focuses on diagnosis, treatment, and education for a wide range of sleep issues, including sleep apnea, narcolepsy, cardio respiratory problems, circadian rhythms, aging, pain, infant sleep and the effects of shift work. At the Sleep Center, board-certified sleep specialist Dr. Krishnan Rajagopal, MD, DABSM, works with patients to identify and treat sleep disorders.

Are you suffering from a sleep disorder? If you are over the age of 13, checking more than one box may indicate a sleep disorder. Do you feel sleepy during the day? Do you always nap when given the opportunity? Does sleepiness interfere with your work or social activities? Do you sometimes fall asleep at inappropriate times?

Following a physician referral and an initial consultation, patients take home a free home monitor that screens for disturbances during sleep. After the screening is reviewed, additional sleep studies and an array of diagnostic tests may also be used to identify sleep problems. Sleep Center specialists use the information gathered from sleep study testing to determine the best treatment, which may include medications or nighttime breathing aids.

Have you ever fallen asleep while driving?

The Sleep Center offers an educational clinic to explain what to expect during a sleep study and emphasize the seriousness of sleep disorders. While many people experience the effects of sleep deprivation, few realize how dramatically it can affect their overall health. The

Do you often wake up with a dry mouth?

Do your legs feel restless and bother you during sleep? Do you have frequent awakenings or disruptive/restless sleep? Do family members or friends complain about your snoring? Have you ever been told that you hold your breath or stop breathing while asleep? Do you often wake up with a headache? Are you overweight? Do you have a neck size of 17 inches or more? Do you have high blood pressure? Do you have congestive heart failure?

1 - http://www.sleepfoundation.org/article/ask-the-expert/sleep-apnea-and-heart-disease 2 - http://www.sleepfoundation.org/alert/sleep-apnea-associated-higher-mortality-cancer-0 3 - http://www.sleepfoundation.org/alert/even-your-fat-cells-need-sleep-according-new-research

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Cancer Care, Close to Home: Cancer Center connects the community to expert care

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diagnosis of cancer can be daunting. But after a diagnosis, finding the best care amongst an overwhelming array of treatment options can be an even bigger challenge. For cancer patients in our community, the Woodlawn Hospital Cancer Center is a unique resource that brings expert care closer to home. Through a partnership with Michiana Hematology Oncology PC, the Woodlawn Cancer Center offers a wide range of services, from prevention and detection, to diagnosis and treatment. Every week, a boardcertified oncologist visits the clinic to meet, treat and talk with patients. According to Sue Field, Director of the Woodlawn Hospital Cancer Center, the center’s one-onone approach sets it apart. “The oncologist spends a lot of time with the patient, mapping out the plan and talking about the diagnosis and the treatments,” she says. “Everybody gets an individualized treatment plan, tailored for their diagnosis.” Working directly with patients and their family doctors, the oncologists and Cancer Center staff members create a personalized treatment plan that takes patients through every phase of diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Between doctor’s visits, patients can also receive chemotherapy and biotherapy treatments at the center. For patients and their families, that means not having to travel long distances for check-ups and treatments. “It’s really important–especially when you’re not feeling well–that you don’t have to travel two hours to get your treatment,” says Field. She also notes that because cancer involves the entire family, it’s important that both patients and their loved ones understand and discuss treatment plans and potential side effects.

For more information, call the Woodlawn Hospital Cancer Center at 574-224-1259 or visit the Cancer Center web page at www.woodlawnhospital.com/cancercenter.

“We encourage patients to bring their family or a close friend with them during treatments,” says Field. She believes the close proximity of the Woodlawn Cancer Center encourages greater family support. The Cancer Center is a valuable asset for patients struggling with the concerns and uncertainties of cancer. The center’s five full-time, nationally certified oncology nurses are always ready to answer questions and discuss treatment options. “The environment is very patient-oriented,” Field says. “We don’t want patients to leave until they feel like they’ve had all their questions answered. And we want to make sure that they are presented with every possible treatment option.” In addition to personal attention and the expertise of Michiana Hematology Oncology, patients can take advantage of the Cancer Center’s hospital setting. Patients have the option of ordering meals and snacks from the room service menu, and can use the hospital’s laboratory and radiology resources to complete testing during their visit. With so many resources in one place, the Woodlawn Hospital Cancer Center is committed to treating the patient, not just the disease. It’s a unique destination that gives patients a comprehensive way to treat cancer without venturing far from home.


Every Community Member Matters The Woodlawn Foundation serves as an advocate for the hospital, patients and area residents. “The Foundation continually invests in improvements to the hospital’s facility and equipment,” says Foundation President Jim Straeter. “It also works to bring the resources of Woodlawn Hospital to the broader community, giving area residents access to better healthcare, education and wellness programs.” As with the hospital itself, the success of the Foundation initiatives depends entirely upon the support of the community. Each year, the Woodlawn Foundation seeks financial assistance for a specific need. This year, our goal is to help fund the Fulton County Transpo service.

Serving approximately 500 individuals each month, the Fulton County Transpo provides citizens free transportation to area medical facilities, including Woodlawn Hospital, the Woodlawn Specialty Clinic, Rochester Orthopedics, and the Rochester, Argos, and Akron Medical Professionals clinics. Following their appointments, Transpo passengers also receive transportation to pharmacies to fill their prescriptions. For many, this service offers a vital lifeline to necessary medical services. At the heart of this service are the touching stories of the people we serve:

• After experiencing life-changing abdominal issues, an independent family man wished to visit home periodically throughout his recovery. Thanks to the accessibility of the Transpo vehicles, he was able to stay in his wheelchair during the drives, avoiding painful transfers into and out of a car. Transpo made the journey more comfortable, which helped him benefit from the positive, healing experience of home visits during a long illness. • A young woman fell, injuring her ankle. Without the ability to drive herself and without anyone close by to call, she called Transpo for a ride to the hospital. • While en route to a doctor’s office with an elderly woman on board, a Transpo driver became aware of the woman’s critical condition, and drove her to the hospital instead. The quick decision to seek immediate emergency care was likely responsible for saving her life. To support the Woodlawn Foundation’s December 2012 Annual Appeal for Fulton County Transpo Services, please mail your donation with the completed form below. Make checks payable to Woodlawn Foundation. Your contribution is greatly appreciated! The Woodlawn Foundation looks forward to helping Woodlawn Hospital give the entire community greater healthcare resources for generations to come.

December 2012 Annual Appeal 1400 East Ninth Street Rochester, IN 46975 Please do not publish my/our name as a contributor:

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If donating by CHECK, please mail your check with this form to the address at the top of this form. If donating by CREDIT CARD, please provide us with the following information:

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Woodlawn Foundation Donors: We would like to thank the following donors for their generous 2011 and 2012 contributions.

4th Street Studio A.A. Rochester Group Adlene I. Halterman Estate Alley, John and Linda Arnold’s Fine Jewelry and Gifts Ault, Rita Bair, Tom and Sue Baker, Dean and Suzanne Barker, Betty Barkman, Stephenia Barrett, Allen and Margaret Bathrick, Keith and Carolyn Belcher, Richard and Suzanne Beta Associate Chapter – Kappa Kappa Kappa Bitzell, Edna Blue Dragon Bobel, David Bode, Glen and Amy Bode, Wayne and Glenda Brovont, Tom and Rebecca Brown, Richard BSA LifeStructures, Inc. Burdge, Ross and Priscilla Burkhart Advertising, Inc. Burton, Linda Caitlin Morgan Insurance Cessna, Robert and Kathleen Charley Creek Inn Chesser, Allen and Mary City Of Rochester Clary, Annabelle Clay’s Flooring & Interiors, Inc. Comcast Conklin, Dennis Copeland, Janet CPSI Davis, Paul E. Day, Fred and Nancy

DeBruler Imaging Dilling Group, Inc. Elliott, Patricia Enid’s Cleaning Service, LLC First Federal Savings Bank Flirt Boutique Foley, Mary Jane Fulton County Massage Therapy Fulton County Wellness Center Gaerte Engines Inc. Gohn, Alan and Nancy Good Family Funeral Home Gottschalk, Evan and Emily Gray, Kenneth Green Oak Antiques Groenleer, Donald and Lynn Hall, Render, Killian, Heath & Lyman, P.C. Halterman, Ned and Jane Hardesty Printing of Rochester, Inc. Henderson, Paul and Juleen Heyde, David and Alison Hiatt, Catherine Hibner, Dan Hoffman Quality Graphics Holl, Sally Honeywell Center Hoover, Patricia Hope Hospice, Inc. Howell, Stacy Hubbard, Nina Johnson, Dan and Terri Julia’s On Main Kewanna Metal Specialties, Inc. Kroger Kuert Concrete, Inc. Lake City Bank Lee, Albert C. Lee, Christopher and Andi

Logue, Dax and Lauri Lutterbein, Barbara McCalla, Harold and Donna McCarter, Joe and Mandie McGee, Michael Mejean, Joanette A. Melton, Andy and Lizzz Mexico Church of the Brethren Mitchell, John Mollencupp, Jennifer Morton, Douglas and Lois Mulligan, James and Treva Musselman, Larry and Cheryl New Holland Rochester, Inc. Parish, David T. Paxton, Deborah Pemberton, Val and Shirley Perdue, Florence Perkins, Andrew and Teresa Peterson Waggoner & Perkins, LLP Pfeiffer, Donald and Donabelle Pike Lumber Company, Inc. Powell, Richard and Tami Purdue University Purkey, Daniel and Brenda Race, Tina Rathbun, Patricia Ravencroft, Thomas and Janet Reinholt, Dennis and Nancy Renaissance Indianapolis North Hotel Ricketts, Christopher and Laura Rochester Ford Lincoln Rochester Metal Products Rochester Telephone Company, Inc. Rogers, Bradley and Holly Rose, Thomas and Nancy Rude, Juanita Rude, Joshua and Rebecca Ryskin, Michael

Sarah’s Sweets Schouten, Andrew and Emily Schwenk, Liale Scott, Jim See, Shannon Seiwert, Violet Shepherd’s Chevrolet Buick Shirley, Michael and Patricia Shopping Guide News Showley Farms, Inc. Smith Sawyer & Smith Insurance South Bend Medical Foundation Sroufe, Mark and Joyce Stewart, Sherri L. Straeter, Jim and Melinda Strimbu, Lisa Summit Radiology, PC Tesler, Diane The Center for the Performing Arts The Wishbone Blues Band Thomas, Dawn Van De Putte, Ryan Waggoner, Ted and Nancy Wagon Wheel Theater Whitmore, Phyllis Whyte Horse Winery Williams, Stella Wilson Fertilizer and Grain, Inc. Wilson, W.S. and Sarah Wisely, Earl and Phyllis WNDU Woodburn, Kyle & Company Woodlawn Hospital Auxiliary Woodlawn Hospital Endowment Fund at Northern Indiana Community Foundation, Inc. WSBT, Inc.

NONPROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID ROCHESTER IN 1400 East Ninth Street, Rochester, IN 46975 | 574.223.3141 The People. The Technology. Right Here at Home.

PERMIT NO 172

Woodlawn Hospital Newsletter 2012  
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