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Portfolio Project Title Retail Submission Title Organisation Date Organisation, etc Date etc Portfolio Statement


a leading global design practice

We are positioned across Australia and into Asia.

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Our capability is an attitude more than a set of skills. Our attitude is one of collaboration‌ always challenging and asking our clients the right questions. We are design focused, yet people centric.� 3


WOODHEAD COMPANY PROFILE 1 2 Victoria Avenue, Perth, WA 2 Southern Cross University, Building A, Gold Coast Campus, QLD 3 Community CPS, Adelaide, SA

Company Profile Architecture and design is a process, a journey of discovery with our clients. The constraints of space and time and commercial imperatives are a given, the difference at Woodhead is we see them as a catalyst to spur innovation. What We Do

Design and the Market

What we do is about exploring the future; asking the right questions, observing and listening to make sense of how to plan for the potential. We revel in complexity and understand that great results are a product of exhaustive rigor, research and proven processes and technologies.

We exist to design, however design excellence is an outcome of a commitment to rigor, research and innovation. Design does not exist in isolation; it requires an understanding of our clients and the markets they operate in. Research, processes and collaboration are fundamental to our success, as is our ability to deliver projects with technical accuracy and proficiency.

Our services are Architecture, Interior Design and Planning providing Property Advisory, Design and Project Delivery consultancy services.

Where We Operate Woodhead is an Australian company operating globally through a series of networked studios and partnerships; our practice draws depth from our geographic reach yet is locally infused with experience and character. We understand success will manifest itself through tangible projects that embody our values, evidenced by our client testimonials and our peer recognition.

Business Sustainability Whilst we exist to design, we only exist if we have a sustainable business platform that ensures practice and procedures are conducted within regulatory guidelines. The growth of business is predicated on achieving profit in order that we can reinvest in the organisation. A critical aspect of the structure is the management of risk and the continuous pursuit of quality. Business activity supports the Woodhead strategic business plan and goals, and contributes to a positive reputation and image by utilising high quality processes.

People and Culture How We Operate Our organisational structure is based on the interwoven activities of design, business and people. These spheres of practice coexist seamlessly to ensure the ‘Project’ sits at the centre of what we do and is the basis upon which success is measured.

Woodhead prides itself on the professional achievements of our people. We acknowledge individual contribution, and as a company we are committed to nurturing professional development through a range of activities including; study tours, corporate training, research projects, and providing an office culture based on continual improvement and learning. Woodhead supports policies and systems and processes that create equal opportunities for all and where people have the resources, assistance and support to achieve the highest personal and professional level.

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RETAIL

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INDUSTRIAL

TRANSPORT

HEALTH

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HEALTH

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EDUCATION

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TRANSPORT

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WOODHEAD KEY PROJECTS

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Woodhead works across several key portfolios, including; Commercial, Education, Industrial, Health, Hospitality, Residential, Retail, Transport, and Workplace.

COMMERCIAL

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WORKPLACE

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RESIDENTIAL

HOSPITALITY

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Adelaide Desalination Plant, Port Stanvac, South Australia

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Animation City, Guangzhou, China

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Flinders Centre for Innovation in Cancer, Adelaide, South Australia

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Sydney International Airport Terminal 1 Redevelopment, New South Wales

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Changi International Airport Terminal 1 Upgrade, Singapore

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2 Victoria Avenue, Perth, Western Australia

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Development Bank of Singapore (DBS), Singapore

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Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria

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Southern Cross University Building A, Gold Coast, Queensland

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Place on Brougham, North Adelaide, South Australia

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Gowings and State Theatre - QT Hotel Conversion, Sydney, New South Wales

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Retail design has to be customer driven and focused... As our customers and clients are more informed and evolving, retail architecture must keep ahead and align reactively to current market place demands.�

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WORKPLACE RETAIL PORTFOLIO STATEMENT

Retail Portfolio Woodhead recognise and acknowledge that the retail customer faces a myriad of choices within the shopping environment. Through our designs Woodhead seek to create a retail environment where the customer can feel comfortable making these choices. Retail architecture and design is not simply producing a well designed built form; the branding, merchandising, and the environmental ambience all work together to create a memorable retail experience. We believe that retail design has to be customer driven and focused. We endeavour to create retail spaces where the customer feels comfortable and subliminally relational. Retail spaces can reflect the customer’s social/cultural situation or create an aspirational concept where the customer perceives where they would like to be.

Mixed-use developments are gaining significance and popularity across Australia. Woodhead approach mixed-used developments where the retail components are of great importance, often the principal feature of the complex. The mixed-use development becomes a civic precinct including; supermarkets, discount department stores, boutiques and specialty shops, and malls with residential, commercial and public facilities in a podium structure. Residents and the community benefit from the conveniences of a full-scale retail shopping centre, together with civic spaces to meet and socialise.

Today, retail architecture is all about creating vibrant regional centres, reflecting the cultural demographic uniqueness of local customers. Ease of access, thermal comfort, sunshine and the transition between outside and inside is a sublime experience. We strive to tap into these senses with our retail solutions. As our customers and clients are more informed and evolving, retail architecture must keep ahead and align reactively to current market place demands.

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Rip Curl Retail Infill Store, Rundal Mall Adelaide, South Australia

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Stockland Merrylands Shopping Centre Redevelopment, Merrylands New South Wales

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Stockland Merrylands Shopping Centre Redevelopment, Merrylands New South Wales

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Animation City, Guangzhou, China

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Projecteld Smithfi Name, Retail Location, Centre, State, Cairns,Country Queensland


01 Shopping Centres Woodhead Project Experience


The debut performance of the redeveloped [Merrylands] centre augers well for the future of bricks and mortar retail, where centres are welldesigned to cater to the community they serve.� John Schroder Stockland CEO Commercial Property


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Stockland Merrylands Merrylands, New South Wales Woodhead has designed the $400 million redevelopment for Stockland’s Merryland Shopping Centre. The staged redevelopment integrates the existing shopping centre with the Merrylands town centre to create a major retail precinct. The 44,000m2 redevelopment provides customers with a wide range of quality shopping alternatives including; two additional levels comprising two discount department stores, two supermarkets, a new food court and a further 100 specialty shops.

Client

Stockland

Completion

2012

Project value

$400m

Project size

4 stage project 44,000m2

The design philosophy applies a contemporary language of clean, crisp lines with reference to a distinct modern Australian ambience. The retail environment features an emphasis on light and shade through the extensive use of glass, wide angular roof overhangs and louvered edges. Materials and finishes endorse the warm, contemporary ambience. Communal areas and dwell zones, such as ‘The Terrace’ foodcourt provide robust yet warm and inviting environments. The redevelopment improves the centre’s convenience and accessibility. The revised streetscape and external retail opportunities maintain and improved engagement with the local town centre and existing community facilities.

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Identifying elements, such as entry statements and façade banner treatments, bring the complex together in a unifying harmony.�


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Centro Bankstown Bankstown, New South Wales Centro Bankstown (formerly Bankstown Square) has served the local community for many years but required expansion and redevelopment to cater for the more diverse needs of today’s customers.

The existing 67,500m² retail centre is being expanded by 28,500m², with an additional 1,000 parking spaces.

Client

Centro Properties

Completion

Staged completion

Over a four year period, the centre has been invigorated and redefined with the addition of Woolworths and Franklins Supermarkets, a Big W discount department store and the fashion retailer Myer, with an additional 75 specialty shops to compliment the retail offer.

Project size

96,000m2

The design philosophy is contemporary, encompassing clean crisp lines with references to a distinctive modern Australian ambience.

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the owners sought out an international architectural practice who could think outside the box in retail refurbishment.�


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Stanley Plaza Hong Kong Island, PR China Woodhead has recently completed the refurbishment of the Stanley Plaza retail precinct on the South East peninsula of Hong Kong Island. Woodhead were invited by the owners “The Link” who were seeking an international architectural practice who thinks “outside the box” to provide the concept design for the repositioning of the centre which celebrates the iconic location and breathtaking vistas from the centre.

Client

The Link

Completion

2011

Our concept responded to the marine location adapting a nautical language of light weight panelised slatted facades reminiscent of a South Pacific almost tropical ambiance. The timber look slats express light and shade against the solid facade behind, creating a rich textured and layered result and contrasting markedly with the original heavy concrete fascias. The redevelopment seeks to update the ‘look and feel’ of the retail precinct, providing a high class shopping destination for visitors and a refresh of the facades to create a contemporary environment as unique to Hong Kong as it’s location. Located amidst the picturesque Stanley bay, the retail development provides a fresh food precinct, high quality boutique retail stores, and entertainment zones. “The Link” are delighted with the result saying that there is nothing anything like it in Hong Kong. This is exactly what we set out to achieve.

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We are delighted to offer the eagerly awaited mall, Elante, to the people of the beautiful town of Chandigarh. The overall development plan of this project also includes a world class hotel and office spaces which should also be opening very shortly.� Shrikant Joshi, L&T Realty’s Chief Executive, Opening Ceremony 2013.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Elante Mall Chandigarh, India Described as the largest mall in Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir and Chandigarh the Elante Mall is part of a new mixed-use development designed by Woodhead’s Australian based retail team and developed by the Larsen & Toubro Group. The mall spans over 1.06million square metres or retail space and includes an assortment of department stores, international and domestic lifestyle brands, a hypermarket, multiplex, entertainment zone, food court and open spaces. Many famous international brands are present among the mix including; Mark’s & Spencer’s, Lifestyle, Shopper Stop, Westside and Pantaloons department, international fashion brands like Guess, Gant, GAS, Diesel, Zara, Swarovski, Bebe, Charles & Keith, and a Hamleys Toy Store. The 1,858m2 food court displays a multitude of food and beverage options a seating capacity of 750 seats with a children’s games area and is located close to the multiplex PVR Cinema for movie buffs.

Woodhead originally worked with Larson and Toubro on the design and construction of the new Indira Gandhi International Airport at New Delhi. This major fast tracked project saw the new airport delivered in time for the 2010 Delhi Commonwealth Games. The success of the Elante Mall project has further reinforced Woodhead’s expansion into the Asia marketplace. Client Completion

Larsen & Toubro Group 2013

Project value

$100m

Project size

1,060,000m2 Food court 1,858m2

Elenate was formally opened to the public in April 2013. Speaking at the ceremony L&T Realty’s Chief Executive, Shrikant Joshi said, “We are delighted to offer the eagerly awaited mall, Elante, to the people of the beautiful town of Chandigarh. The overall development plan of this project also includes a world class hotel and office spaces which should also be opening very shortly.”

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The innovative design has captured the market theme of the exciting animation industry and the spirit of youth in the 21st century.�


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Animation City Guangzhou, China The design team for the Animation City Retail Centre in Guangzhou combined a creative analysis of the market with the client brief, to produce a unique and successful design outcome. Woodhead’s innovative design has captured the market theme of the exciting animation industry and the spirit of youth in the 21st century. The new 25,000m2 retail centre spans three basement levels with entries at each level from the Front Park Metro station. The animation theme emerged as a set of new marketing concepts which were then transformed into a lively, vibrant and dynamic aesthetic.

Client

Guangzhou Tianyuan Investment Co. Ltd.

Project size

25,000m2

Floors

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Entry is gained to the retail centre from ground level above through two sunken stairs 60 metres apart at each end of the Plaza. The escalators and flat glass roofs are part of the original Metro design. The addition of organic steel mesh canopies sails and lighting over the top extend the vibrant theme and draw people down through the three level atrium spaces at each end of the centre. The sails stretching between the glass roof and the frame are designed to filter and shade direct sunlight, emulating leaves in the canopy of a tree. At night time, the sails and structure of the canopy are lit with changing colours to provide exciting and dynamic focal points in the plaza and with the urban context. The design layout encourages shoppers to congregate at the central core of the centre where the comic and animation culture is most prolific. The centre development is the focus for the rapidly growing digital industry and a boost to China’s world leadership in this field. 19


The challenge was to design a building that is eye catching and unashamedly contemporary to achieve the commercial objectives for both owner and tenant.�


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Rip Curl Adelaide, South Australia Sitting between the landmark State Heritage Listed Adelaide Arcade and Regent Arcade buildings, the former Regent Cinema laneway has been adaptively re-used to create a concept store for Rip Curl in Adelaide’s Rundle Mall. The Woodhead design makes a valid and respectful contemporary contribution to the ongoing heritage of the place. The new building’s transparency and volume allows the conserved and featured adjoining heritage walls to form an intrinsic part of the new building space with dramatic and elegant effect.

Client

Rip Curl

The challenge was to design a building that is eye catching and unashamedly contemporary to achieve the commercial objectives for both owner and tenant, whilst being considerate and in context with the significant neighbouring heritage buildings. Glass facades unify the competing ornate original façade elements with glass joints creating a subtle rhythm and continuity between old and new facades.The Rip Curl building design solution achieves an intense visual impact and presence in Adelaide’s main shopping mall, reinforcing the tenant’s unique brand and image.

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PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Smithfield Retail Centre Cairns, Queensland Woodhead has completed a $20 million refurbishment of The Smithfield Centre in Cairns, encompassing a comprehensive redesign of the existing 1980’s built shopping centre. The upgrade of the retail centre creates a contemporary ‘lifestyle’ shopping experience that reflects the tropical location and local community. The client’s vision was to rejuvenated Smithfield shopping centre offering a vibrant and dynamic retail environment and a meeting place for the local community. This included both revitalising the centre’s brand image as well as enhancing the current retail offer. The Fresh Food precinct features high outwardly pitching roof planes, promoting a modern, spacious, light and airy environment. Sealed concrete floor finishes in the public areas combine with timber panelled roof planes and large expanses of natural light to create a feeling of organic freshness.

Signage and Wayfinding In conjunction with the redevelopment of the shopping centre, Woodhead’s graphics team designed a signage program which reflects the aspirations of the trade area, creates a community focal point at the northern end of Cairns and contributes to increased market share and investment return for the owner. The revised signage and wayfinding solution rationalises traffic flows throughout and facilitates increased exposure to the smaller tenancies, as well as improving the customer’s overall experience. Client

Dexus

Project value

$20m

The centre wraps around an existing natural waterway on the site. Preserving the creek through the use of a raised deck over the waterway is a key feature which also solves the boundary and expansion issues in refurbishing the centre. The Village Green with its combination of tree canopies, shaded awnings and tropical breezes provide shoppers with a soothing haven to meet and relax. Muted earthy colours and materials encapsulate the spirit and style of the northern beaches. The designed response fits perfectly with the client’s brief to embrace the Centre’s natural surrounds while creating greater retail variety for customers and enhance social interaction and community engagement at the Centre. 23


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

David Jones Perth, Western Australia David Jones re-entered the Western Australian marketplace with the creation of a flagship Western Australian store. David Jones is one of Australia’s largest department stores and the oldest department store in the world still trading under its original name. Woodhead was commissioned in a joint venture with MacCormac Architects, to create 22,000m² of new refurbished space in the Perth central business district. The Perth department store features the latest innovative retail designs.

Client

David Jones

Project size

22,000m²

Staging was developed to allow the new extension and central escalator void to be completed first and to commence operation while the existing east section was refurbished.

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The addition of a Fresh Food Hall with gourmet specialty retailers is located around a sun-lit atrium, providing natural daylight and an alfresco feel for shoppers.�


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Floreat Forum Perth, Western Australia Woodhead provided architectural design for extensions to Floreat Forum, a food and convenience shopping centre in suburban Perth. The centre comprises two supermarkets and 60 specialty shops.

The design solution addressed the expansion of both Woolworths and Newmart Supermarkets to include full line merchandise. The addition of a Fresh Food Hall with gourmet specialty retailers is located around a sun-lit atrium, providing natural daylight and an alfresco feel for shoppers.

Client

Bovis Lend Lease

The outdoor experience is continued with an open plaza providing a Food and Beverage precinct comprising of four restaurants each with ‘alfresco’ dining and two ‘alfresco’ cafes. The retail precent includes a new 3,600m² gymnasium, 23 additional specialty shops, freestanding convenience retailing, a new petrol station, and parking for over 900 cars. The entire mall and public area is refurbished including new natural lighting systems. The design team have applied ESD principles of natural ventilation, with air-conditioning as backup for climatic extremes. The designed response fits perfectly with the client’s brief to embrace the Centre’s natural surrounds while creating greater retail variety for customers and enhance social interaction and community engagement at the Centre.

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A key feature of the design solution is an open air precinct surrounded by al fresco cafes, restaurants and lifestyle retailing.�


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Forestway Village Shopping Centre Frenches Forest, New South Wales Woodhead has designed the $6 million refurbishment of the 30-yearold Forestway Shopping Centre. The refurbishment has revitalised the suburban centre, with an emphasis on providing better customer amenity and a fresher, more contemporary retail environment. A key feature of the mall upgrade is the development of a ‘village’ experience. Timber battens applied to the bulkheads overhang the existing shopfronts and various feature walls throughout the centre. Tenants are encouraged to break through the bulkheads, enabling both sides of the mall to present dynamic variety of frontages unified by the timber banding, reminiscent of traditional streetscape awning lines.

Client

Lend Lease, Sydney

The redevelopment included increasing the capacity of existing and new major tenancies, introducing a significant restaurant and café precinct, expanding the floor space by 60% and increasing the parking provision by 90%. The new village shopping centre is an open air precinct surrounded by al fresco cafes, restaurants and lifestyle retailing. The ground-floor mall contains an expanded Woolworth’s supermarket, a gourmet supermarket and 70 specialty shops.

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Kmart Arana Hills, Queensland Woodhead have recently completed the second of the Kmart Plazas in Arana Hills. Having expertise with retail design and Kmart Plazas in particular, our client engaged us again to refurbish and extend on their centre in Arana Hills. The upgrade was to modernise the centre, creating a new contemporary, inviting and attractive centre for its patrons. New amenities were built for additional patrons’ usage which are well designed and to current health standards. New facades, modern finishes and new signage have brought the existing centre to present day high standards in the local area. Client

Built Pty Ltd

Completion

2011

Project Title Location

Kmart Toowoomba, Queensland Woodhead have been involved with Kmart Plaza located on Ruthuen Street Toowoomba over the last few years with planning the centres extensions to maximise the land potentials and retail offer in the local area.

In 2010 stage 1 extension works were completed collaborating with Incoll, Project Manager and Laing O’rouke, Contractors. The $3m extension and refurbishment included work to modernising the arcade and extensions to the speciality shops. New speciality shop fronts were added together with a new image for the outcomes and new building facades. Today the centre enjoys a vibrant new image offering more retail to the community, due to the planning and attention to detail by Woodhead retail. Client

ISPT

Completion

2010

Project value

$3m


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Commissioned to deliver a $1.5 billion national refurbishment rollout, Woodhead’s method in partnering with Coles is exceptional. Both organisations have continuously evolved new structures and processes to seamlessly integrate activities, achieving the most effective and efficient design and business outcomes. This required innovation by the consultant team to develop new methods and processes including; − New ‘scoping’ development processes − New documentation and QA interaction processes − Rigorous joint evaluation of client and consultation KPI’s

Coles ‘Project One’ National Rollout

These efforts have ensured continuous improvement collaborations as well as unique master programming. Over a 5 year program, 480 supermarkets were refurbished throughout Australia. Woodhead’s robust culture, structure and national communication capabilities were central to delivery and navigating the complex program. Client

Coles

Duration

2002-2005

Project value

$1.5b

Southlands Boulevard and Armadale Shopping Centres Perth, Western Australia Woodhead were commissioned to provide ambience upgrade to these two existing centres. This involved refurbished amenities, lighting upgrades, new way-finding graphics and exterior treatments. Client

Lend Lease

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Project Name, Kirrawee MixedLocation, Use Development State, Country (former Brick Pit site), Kirrawee, New South Wales


02 Mixed Use Developments Woodhead Project Experience


This development presents a unique opportunity by utilising the existing deep pit excavation to place the majority of car parking, loading and retail facilities below a ground floor Podium for a distinctive garden type residential development.


PORTFOLIO PORTFOLIO PROJECT PROJECT EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Kirrawee Brick Pit Kirrawee, New South Wales The Kirrawee Brick Pit mixed use development has recently received a Concept Plan Approval as a Part 3A from NSW Planning.

The vision is to create a contemporary mixed use development for Kirrawee which will enhance and contribute to the “village” ambience and character of the existing local centre. With the proposed development of the 9,000m2 open space could became the “Town Common” focal point for the community. This development presents a unique opportunity by utilising the existing deep pit excavation to place the majority of car parking, loading and retail facilities below a ground floor Podium for a distinctive garden type residential development. The concept’s design works with the topography of the site by adapting its unique features into a solution that gives emphasis to creating superior private and public spaces.

− The retail component of the development is “sleeved” under a landscaped podium and linked to the piazza which is surrounded by external retail and cafes. − The general form of the buildings comprise of placing predominantly lower height buildings along the main road frontages. This reinforces the urban edge of the development. − The 3 higher central blocks up to 14 storeys break this grid to “pivot” around the open spaces, the water features and piazza not just to present a dynamic vista from these areas but also to facilitate solar access during winter into these public spaces. Client

Kirrawee Centre Pty Ltd

Project value

$250m

The design utilises the existing brick pit in a number of ways that are a positive contribution to the urban fabric of the local area. Some of these are: − The placement of 99% of the car parking below ground with the majority within volume of the pit itself. − Respecting the existing pit edges by retaining the Sydney Turpentine and Ironbark Forest remnant along the rims. − The placement of the water features and open piazza are within the original pit area. − The placement of the 3 central residential towers in a radial formation reinforces these spaces as the focal point of the development. 35


Pacific Point Hornsby, New South Wales The Woodhead designed Pacific Point residential development in Hornsby has commenced advertising for pre-sale commitments, in association with LJ Hooker Dural and FAL Construction Group. The site is located on a prominent natural ridge, adjacent to a major highway and railway line, and features retained natural elements such as the fall across the frontages. As such it is a prominent site within the local context and highly visible. It is the intention of the architectural resolution to sculpt the massing of the site adjacent to those edges and roadways to a perimeter block format. Within the site composition the ridge location is recognised with higher character elements that identify the unique qualities of the site.

The combination of a curved and rectilinear façade planes sweeping along Pacific Highway culminating in a “pinnacleâ€? point at the Pound Road intersection sets this development as unique and apart from the surrounding rectilinear block type developments. The higher section of built form is identified by a unique iconic floating roof element. The tower will be visible from a distance and as such provide as positive contribution to the town centre fabric. The composition of these elements according to the varied functional configurations offers an architectural solution that is rigorous and logical whilst flexible and organic. We believe that this approach will provide an environment that highlights the unique qualities of the site and its history with a well designed living commodity. Client

FAL Developments Pty. Ltd.

Project value

$28m

Project Size

144 residential apartments 650m2 ground floor commercial and retail.

Floors

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Retail

650m2 ground floor retail


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

North Kellyville Mixed Use Retail and Residential North Kellyville, New South Wales North Kellyville Mixed Use will be the major retail and commercial town centre for the new North Kellyville land release. Client

Restifa and Partners

Project value

$180m

Apartments

273 residential apartments

Retail

8,750m2

Basement parking

930 cars

The development provides 4500 new dwellings for some 10,000+ people in the expanding Hills District this concept provides: − 8,750m2 of retail including a full line supermarket − 274 residential apartments within landscaped communal spaces − Segregated basement parking for 925 cars. A primary feature the ‘Retail Street’ is a semi-enclosed, naturally ventilated mall, with a pedestrian walkway flanked on both sides with retail shops and roofed with a translucent canopy above reminiscent of a ‘Glass House’ to afford customers protection from inclement weather. Woodhead has adapted the concept of ‘Glass house Village’, reminiscent of the Hills environment and the local history of Market Gardens. With these themes the intent is to create a town centre at a human scale fusing retail and commercial uses with residential components resulting in a homogeneous development.

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Project Name, Sydney International Location, Airport State, Terminal Country 1 Redevelopment, Mascot, New South Wales


03 Airport Retail Woodhead Project Experience


The refurbishment of Changi Terminal 1 continues the vision of updating an Asian icon, reinforcing Singapore’s position as the world’s No. 1 airport.”


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Changi International Airport Terminal 1 Singapore In 2003 Woodhead were commissioned as architects/interior designers by The Changi Airport Group of Singapore (CAG) for the S$500m upgrading of Changi Terminal 1.

The project looks to revitalise the Grand Dame of Changi Airport, a building held in the hearts and minds of the people of Singapore. The architectural and interior design is focused on the idea of the “tropical city”. Landscape, technology and movement play important roles in the “tropical city” and feature elements from elevated green walkways to kinetic rain sculptures have been used throughout the terminal to provide passengers with a truly unique “Changi Experience”. Central to the project brief was the necessity for the terminal to continue operations during the construction period. This involved the breaking down of the construction process into over 180 staged phases to be completed during a three and a half year construction period.

Client

Changi Airport Group of Singapore (CAG) - formerly CAAS.

Completion

2012

Project value

S$500m

Project size

Refurbish existing and additional 21,700m2

Awards

Short listed Transport - World Architecture Festival 2012

The refurbishment introduces a “piazza” like public space with un-obstructed 9m high glazing looking directly onto the apron. It is envisioned that this space will become the heart of the airport and provide a perfect base for passengers to relax and enjoy their “unique” Changi experience. Also, an 11,150m2 extension of the airside, providing Changi T1 with a mixture of high quality public and retail spaces.

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PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Changi International Airport Terminal 3 Singapore Singapore’s Changi International Airport is regarded as one of the world’s most popular airports. Woodhead, responsible for the new Terminal 3 interior architecture, has applied a project philosophy designed to create a memorable airport experience, capture the Singaporean sense of place and reinforce user friendliness and amenity. The interior design is calming and spacious, and based around a 21st century airport model, reflecting the airport’s economic importance together with a civic focus for the city and region. The terminal adopts an intuitive layout concept promoting ease of orientation.

Client

Changi Airport Group of Singapore (CAG) - formerly CAAS

Completion

2008

Project value

S$1.75b

Four guiding design principles lead the design process; clarity, natural lighting, external views and maintainability. The design approach encompassed two distinct zones: landside – accessible to the public, and airside – accessible only to travelling passengers.

Project size

380,000m²

Awards

2008 Winner Mixed Use Buildings, MIPIM Asia Awards

The project accommodates over 130 retail and food and beverage outlets, both landside and airside, and facilitates over 22 million passengers each year. Terminal 3 features a unique five-storey vertical garden, the ‘Green Wall’, spanning 300m across the main building and viewable from both the Departure and Arrival halls. Together with the rest of the terminal the detailed interior design provides a rich tactile experience that sees passenger flow integrated with retailing, airport facilities and themed landscaping.

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The main piazza ‘The Forum’ creates an integrated and dynamic passenger experience. The Forum defines the travel experience as a civic place of dwelling, where travellers can pause and reflect on their journey.”


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Sydney International Airport Terminal 1 Sydney, New South Wales The Sydney Airport Terminal 1 Redevelopment celebrates the joy of travel and articulates the importance of public spaces.

Designed by Woodhead, the expansion of the departures level of the International Terminal encompasses a diverse range of activities within a main piazza ‘The Forum’ creating an integrated and dynamic passenger experience.

Client

Sydney Airport Corporation Limited

Completion

2010

Project value

$450m

The Forum defines the travel experience as a civic place of dwelling, where travellers can pause and reflect on their journey. The creation of this space evolved into the heart of the terminal, producing a signature place of international quality which captures and embodies the light and spaciousness of Sydney.

Project size

Additional 7,300m2 to the departures level.

Awards

Shortlisted 2012 Inside Awards at this years World Architecture Festival in Barcelona.

The project incorporated; − − − − −

upgrading and provision for more streamlined check-in facilities, single focused landside food-court and retailing environment, single point of outbound immigration and security control, provision of premium check-in and processing facilities, single focused airside retailing environment featuring a naturally conditioned market-style “Forum” for passengers dwell time, and − increased airline lounge facilities, all designed in line with the parallel programs allowing A380 aircraft provisions. Environmental initiatives in the International Terminal include the use of recycled water for toilet flushing and in cooling towers and energy efficient displacement air-conditioning in the Forum.

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The retail street concept is supported by stylised ‘lanterns’ which reflect the famous views along Nathan Road Kowloon and offer a similar function by creating a backdrop for integrated advertising and retail signage.”


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

East Hall Retail Chek Lap Kok Airport, Hong Kong The reconfiguration and expansion of the new East Hall Terminal at Chek Lap Kok Airport Hong Kong is designed to revolutionise the existing shell by adding retail value and an improved passenger experience.

Woodhead has transformed the terminal’s East Hall precinct into an integrated environment supporting a diversity of passenger services and amenities. An additional 9,000m2 of commercial space is introduced via two identical split-level extensions to the East Hall’s diagonal facades.

Client

Airport Authority Hong Kong / Meinhardt (HK)

Completion

2003

Project size

9,000m2

The design concept creates a Hong Kong ‘sense of place’ inspired by the vibrant and energetic Hong Kong cityscape, while respecting the integrity of the terminal’s existing architecture. The retail street concept is supported by stylised ‘lanterns’ which reflect the famous views along Nathan Road Kowloon and offer a similar function by creating a backdrop for integrated advertising and retail signage.

Awards

World’s Best Airport Award – Gold Award, Skytrax 2005

The design ensures that the retail spaces are conducive to generating revenue. The masterplan curbs the primary passenger flows increasing dwell time within the retail environment. Centred on an internal communal ‘Piazza’ space, the masterplan is serviced by restaurants, retail and passenger amenities over two levels. The primary vertical circulation, post security, places passengers into the newly engineered central space. The expansion and retail works harmonise with the airport’s dynamic overarching structure, invigorating the unique space.

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Woodhead has collaborated across three studios to complete its first project in Istanbul. Woodhead Sydney has worked together with Woodhead’s Italian studio and local architects Toner to create the new duty free retail precinct at the Sabiha Gökçen International Airport.


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Setur Duty Free Sabiha Gökçen International Airport, Istanbul, Turkey Woodhead has collaborated across three studios to complete its first project in Istanbul. Woodhead Sydney has worked together with Woodhead’s Italian studio and local architects Toner to create the new duty free retail precinct at the Sabiha Gökçen International Airport. Commissioned by retailer Setur, the dutyfree fitout is designed to interact, integrate and take part in the overall airport environment. The “open” model approach to retail planning draws the passenger into the retail space in a less invasive way. The retail zones blend seamlessly with the architectural form of the airport terminal, creating a continuous environment for the passenger. The design concept is modelled on the dynamic curvatures found externally and internally on aircraft as a metaphor for an extended travel experience. Designing a project across the globe provided our team with a valuable professional and cultural experience. Woodhead plan to use this knowledge to continue to develop project opportunities worldwide.”

Signage and Wayfinding In an additional commission, Woodhead’s graphic design team was commissioned to develop an expandable dual language (Turkish / English) wayfinding system for the new Sabiha Gökçen International Airport terminal. The signage form was influenced by one of the terminal’s feature architectural elements a striking wave-like curved roof. A complete signage suite was developed to respond to the various surrounds. The end result is a world class integrated signage and wayfinding system that will service the annual 25 million passengers, and beyond. Client

Setur Duty Free

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Woodhead’s retail masterplan realigns the vertical circulation points and passenger flows to improve integration with and enhance the retail, food and beverage offer.�


PORTFOLIO PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Sydney Airport Terminal 2 Sydney, New South Wales Woodhead has combined aviation and retail planning expertise in to achieve a successful design outcome for the $20 million upgrade of Sydney Airport’s Terminal 2. The project team worked with the client to develop the design philosophy. The design incorporates the principals of ‘light’ and ‘height’, giving the space an open and welcoming feeling. The main entrance to the departures concourse level does not favour any one airline tenant, but navigates departing passengers into a central retail zone, maximising retail sightlines. The design is vibrant, dynamic and energetic to correspond to the airlines that are utilising the terminal for their operations. Relocated escalators encourage passengers to move through the retail precinct en-route to lounges and concourse areas, strategically increasing footfall and leading to superior revenue potential by the retail offer. The retail precinct comprises a combination of shops, food and beverage and seating, encouraging travellers to extend their dwell time in the retail zone. The project incorporates an airside expansion of the building envelop, in the form of a curved façade, to provide new passenger public spaces and cater to expected increased passenger demand. The security zone and processing is also reinforced as a result of the retail reconfiguration.

Terminal 2, one of Sydney Airport’s busiest terminals, handles over 10 million passengers a year. The redevelopment has provided passengers with improved facilities, additional retail outlets, new floor surfaces, more effective signage and an abundance of natural light, ensuring the whole journey is a memorable and pleasurable one. Client

Sydney Airport Corporation Limited

Completion

2007

Project value

$20m

Project size

4,500m2

Awards

− Winner 2008 Property Council of Australia Innovation and Excellence Awards - Award for Emerging Assets − Winner 2008 Property Council of Australia Innovation and Excellence Awards - Award for Tourism & Leisure Development

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Project Rip CurlName, Retail,Location, Rundle Mall, State, South Country Australia


04 Our Commitment Woodhead Process


Environmental Sustainability and Innovation Woodhead Thought Leadership Our responsibility as architects and designers extends beyond the completion of construction as we focus upon the lifecycle of a building. This is reflected in our commitment to environmental, social and economic sustainability.

Environmental Management System Woodhead’s Environmental Management System (EMS) aims to reduce the environmental impacts that may result from our operations and from the projects we design. Our EMS has been tailored around our existing ISO 9001 Quality Assurance system, and focuses primarily on actions needed to address our Climate Friendly commitment. We look forward to achieving final EMS ISO 14001:2004 certification shortly.

Green Building Codes As an inaugural and continuing member of the Green Building Council of Australia, Woodhead continue to be actively involved in the creation of Australia’s first Green Star rating tools. In fact we were using similar rating tools on projects even before the creation of the GBCA, and we now support the GBCA in all their endeavours. Woodhead is committed to maintaining Green Star Accredited Professionals within each studio and at leadership level across the group. In addition our team has the knowledge and skills to work with and apply NABERS energy rating requirements and relevant Government and Defence sustainability guidelines.

Greenhouse Impacts from Projects Our core service is in the delivery of world-class design. The built environment has a significant impact on global warming and water use, and we believe that we can drive positive change in our industry, ultimately to the point where sustainable development is part of the solution to global warming. Our Climate commitment objectives have been incorporated into our design process, whereby every project is assessed for sustainable benefits and outcomes. These outcomes are balanced between environmental, social and economic benefits.


WOODHEAD ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

Woodhead has developed a set of ‘ESD Performance Targets’ that are quantifiable measures relating to the assessment and design resolution of energy, water and materials in our projects. Example ESD Essential Requirements

Woodhead are increasingly raising the sustainability value in all of our projects – we believe that every client should benefit from improved building performance, improved user comfort, and reduced environmental risk.

Woodhead ‘ESD Performance Targets’ The ESD Performance Targets work together with a defined set of ‘ESD Essential Requirements’ to capture additional initiatives to lower the overall environmental impact of the building during design, construction and operation. Energy

Energy Appliances shall meet the following minimum energy efficient ratings; − − − − − −

Dishwasher: 3.5 stars Refrigerator: 4 stars Washing machine: 4 stars dryer: 2.5 stars Domestic air-conditioner: 4.5 stars for cooling Hot water systems shall have solar pre-boost with the system sized to provide a solar contribution of at least 50% of total annual hot water energy consumption. Where natural gas or LPG is available to the site the hot water system shall be gas boosted.

− Achieve a 20% improvement on the minimum energy efficient performance requirements using either one of the Verification Methods (Stated Values or Reference Building) described in Section J of the Building Code of Australia (BCA). Water − The 20% improvement target is generally consistent with the All taps, toilet, showers and appliances shall have a minimum AAA minimum 4.5 star NABERS rating for commercial office buildings. rating or equivalent star rating. − A building meeting the minimum BCA energy efficiency requirements should achieve an approximate 3 star NABERS Materials rating. − A 4.5 star NABERS rating represents an approximate 20% to 25% − All refrigerants and insulation shall have an Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) of zero. improvement compared to a 3 star building. − All timbers shall be sourced from either post consumer reused Water timber or from plantations complying with the Australian Forestry Standard. − Achieve a 30% reduction in potable water consumption compared − All internal paints shall be low Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) to a design reference building. (g/litre). − NSW: the residential planning scheme (BASIX) sets a water target − No PVC products shall be used in floor coverings (unless there is of 40% reduction compared to average water consumption. This no other alternative). is calculated using a complex web based database. − The simple method for calculating the water target is described in − A dedicated storage area shall be provided to allow segregation and collection of recyclable waste generated during occupancy of the Defence Water Target Calculation Methodology document. the building. Materials During demolition and construction works at least 70% of all waste by weight (except hazardous materials) should be either reused or recycled. Recorded by the contractor each month: − weight of all waste leaving the site; − weight of waste that was recycled/reused (i.e. not sent to landfill); and − destination and/or name of recycler/waste hauler. Soil stockpiled on site for reuse as fill shall not be counted in the calculation of waste. The definition and calculation of waste shall be in accordance with the current Green Star Technical Manual. 55


BIM Commitment Woodhead Thought Leadership Building: An information rich digital prototyped building.

Woodhead is committed to the continual improvement and upskilling of our team with the latest documentation and visualisation technology. Our teams are fluent in CAD and BIM authoring and coordination technology, specialist graphic design and publication packages and traditional administration processing tools.

Information: Addition and inclusion of valuable building information to the model.

The implementation of BIM (Building Information Modelling) tools and processes have made it possible to better streamline work flows throughout a building’s life-cycle, from concept /schematic design to model integration of design and construction models to facilitating the management of maintenance and decommissioning information of the built asset.

Modelling: Form and function with pre-planned intent.

BIM tools and processes enable our team to reduce risk, retain design intent and better ensure the client interest is maintained throughout the project. This also helps streamline quality control and provides a higher level of coordination between consultants. The processes adopted and the generation of coordinated models facilitates clear communication between all project stakeholders which in turn provides access to a wider range of analytic tools thereby better addressing our clients specific needs. At Woodhead, the adoption of BIM tools and processes is now our predominant and preferred method of workflow thereby ensuring quality solutions for our clients. Our BIM technology enables our teams to: − − − −

Reduce risk particularly in the bid phase of the project Retain design intent throughout the project Streamline quality control Provide design and construction certainty between consultant disciplines − Reduce conflicts on site through clash detection and comprehensive scheduling and data reporting during the design process.


WOODHEAD QUALITY AND TECHNICAL CAPABILITY

Woodhead has pioneered BIM as a key platform in the delivery of a range of large-scale facilities in Australia over the last five years. We believe that now is the time to make further advancements in the application of these tools to realise the next generation of benefits for our clients.” Jason Howden, Woodhead Group BIM Manager

BIM lessons we have learned − Technology... BIM is a process with efficiencies available through planning of clear workflow practices and procedures. − Modelling may incur more up front costs, yet; − The integrated model can provide a greater level of control all round. − There is value in working with Contractors as Consultants, however not all procurement processes will support this. − Getting the right team is an issue for all projects. With BIM implementation selecting the right team is essential. BIM is only as effective as the most ineffective link. − The level of service is superior to that of traditional service provision and therefore of greater value to the Client. Case Study: Greenskills, Perth, WA Woodhead is commissioned as lead consultant for the design and delivery of the Central Institute of Technology’s Greenskills project in Perth, WA. The new building will provide an innovative learning centre for the development of knowledge in the area of sustainable building design studies. Woodhead are collaborating with the Structural and Building Services Engineers to develop the integrated BIM model, capturing the work of all design team members, to establish and validate the building design, to enable construction documentation production, and to capture future ‘as constructed’ information, maintenance and manual requirements. The appointment includes the provision of full architectural and interior design services and coordination and integration of all sub consultants. The latest technological developments and processes were adopted to inform the move towards fully integrated project delivery.

Quality Certified by Australian Standards Woodhead operates a certified Quality Management System which complies with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008, across Woodhead Studios covered on the Certificate. Renewal: 23 February 2015. Woodhead takes the quality of its services and output seriously. Excellent outcomes for our clients are our goal, achieved by working with a Management System that provides checks and balances to our processes, ensuring consistent success. This mature Management System is certified in five Australian States and Territories, by SAI-Global, to AS/NZS ISO 9001:2008. This includes a Management Manual detailing the company’s approach to policies, objectives, management review, resources, sub-consultant appointment and improvement strategies. Core business processes from Project Initiation through to Completion are described. In addition, a range of system-specific procedures, forms and checklists provide a structure to ensure Woodhead staff work consistently and well. These relate to document and record control, required competencies, client feedback and continuous improvement action through a sophisticated internal audit program. Woodhead has a full-time Group Quality and Risk Systems Manager based in Adelaide, with a Project Delivery team in each Australian office checking the efficient management of quality – both in process and final product - throughout the company. All staff have equal access to quality-related resources over a company-wide Intranet.

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ProjectDuty Setur Name, Free, Location, Sabiha Gรถkรงen State, Country International Airport, Istanbul


05 Worldwide Retail Trends Woodhead Thought Leadership


Retail Innovation Trends 2013 Woodhead Thought Leadership First published in Shopping Centre News - January 2013 By Tony Quinn - Woodhead Director

Well another year has disappeared in a flash, so what’s going to be the new ‘black’ this year? I think the key word for 2013 is ‘Innovation’. Innovation of all kinds shows you are a leader and it stands you above your competition.

It’s what we’ve coined in the past as the ‘wow’ factor, the ‘differentiator’, and still remains relevant today. Below is some innovative stuff that’s been used in retail lately, and some innovative design solutions that caught my eye. The first is an amazingly simple product known as ‘Pavegen’, used around the new Westfield Stratford City and the London Olympic precinct. It’s a tile such that every time someone walks over it, renewable energy is harvested from the footstep. The technology converts kinetic energy to electricity which can be stored and used for a variety of applications. Pavegen powered over 2000 LED lights on a Christmas tree at Midsummer Place Shopping Centre in the UK by harvesting the energy from Christmas shoppers. British Pavegen founder, Laurence Kemball-Cook was nominated for the “Most Inspirational Young Person” at the Climate Week Awards in London in 2012 for his invention. Next is an interactive touch display screen system, similar to that shown in the movie ‘Minority Report’ with Tom Cruise. An eye catcher using multi touch technology, like a giant Ipad, for use in retail shopfronts.


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Thinking outside of the box is clearly the way to differentiate you from your competitors, and keep those tills ticking over ”

Talk about engage your customers! The Orange store in London has one and people are able to use it even when the store is closed. The company that makes them Vertigo systems from Germany also produce what they call ‘Living Surface’ which are interactive floors, walls and tables. Living Surface is a breathtaking interactive surface with lively contents that you can touch, experience and play around with. Digital creatures swim, hop, or fly across the floor, wall ceiling or table, responding to the movement of people. It turns the observer into a participant, with its magical interaction. Writing can’t do it justice, nor a still photograph. You need to visit their website www.vertigo-systems. com. And be blown away as I was by its use. Nike has introduced a new format store called NIKEiD, which unfortunately is not yet available in Australia. It’s a store where you’re able to individually customise colours, cushioning and more in shoes and clothing. It only takes them four weeks turnaround to produce a shoe or shirt that you’ve designed for yourself. They’ll also do limited offers, like the current one being an ‘elephant print’. You can also go online, or in store and design, say, a football boot, or any other shoe, choosing a plate colour, metal or plastic studs, cushioning options (3off) then an accent colour, base colour and finally a mesh colour. They’re not cheap but apparently people are rushing in to take up this latest innovation from one of the great innovators. Another bit of innovation, which like the above usually involves technology, was an installation in the Brussel’s main public square over the Christmas period. Instead of cutting down a huge pine tree, the city instead commissioned architects to create a more eco-friendly option. They created a 25 metre tall temporary tree like structure that presents visitors with video projections, changing light displays and sound effects. The artificial structure was made entirely of fabric wrapped scaffolding, with aerial views of the city square from its top.

The structure comes alive, covered in strobing, geometric projections, and music. It casts a soft glow and contrast against the historic buildings around the square. This installation is really a reinforcement of ‘placemaking’, something I’ve talked about in previous articles. Another interesting direction I’ve noticed lately is turning rooftops of shopping centres and other buildings into landscape spaces, much like the trend in hotels with rooftop bars and restaurants. In my last article I reviewed the new Interlomas department store in Mexico. I concentrated on its unique façade and interior, but atop this beautiful building I failed to mention is a ‘park in the sky’ with a restaurant offering customers both a day and night view of the surrounding cityscape. Another centre offering the same is the Tokyo Plaza Omotesando Project, known as “TPOP”. Located in the Harajuku shopping district it offers visitors both high end retail and a ‘rooftop forest’. Shoppers can access the upper levels via escalators through a kaleidoscopic entrance that acts as a magnet to draw passers by up into the roof top space. The walls surrounding this entrance are made entirely of triangular shaped mirrors that reflect light at many angles. The rooftop park offers customers quiet respite from the hustle and bustle of the busy street below. The recently opened Marina Bay Sands development in Singapore, with its spectacular sky park has become one of the city’s most visited attractions. People pay $20 each just to be able to visit the park and its expansive views over Singapore. The development includes a shopping centre, hotel, casino and convention facilities and one of the most spectacular swimming pools you’ll see anywhere in the world. So thinking outside of the box is clearly the way to differentiate you from your competitors, and keep those tills ticking over.

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Images: Liverpool Interlomas Store - Mexico

The interweaving of retail brands and their built expression. Woodhead Thought Leadership First published in Shopping Centre News October 2012 By Tony Quinn - Woodhead Director

Once again we’ve scoured the globe for interesting retail developments. A common theme flows from my previous articles on the inter-weaving of retail brands and their built expression. Some have won awards, while others are just plain good old attention grabbing, and isn’t that what whey should be, to draw us in.

I’ve examined from a small refurbishment to large, and new to show that is can be done on all levels. The first centre and appropriate for ‘Mini-Guns’ is in suburban Wykagyl in up state New York in the US. Originally constructed in 1957, the centre had lost its “mojo”, was not performing financially, nor was it part of its community life. Colloquially it was a “dud”! The owners wanted to reverse the decline and make it a landmark. It started with a façade upgrade, then with renovations and additions taking the centre from 2500 square metres to nearly 4000 square metres. It included lighting upgrades, landscaping, painting and a complete façade upgrade. The architects created a unified building using a limited palette of materials, careful massing and an innovative, undulating façade treatment of aluminium banding. The costs were approximately $2 million (US), rents were increased while maintaining occupancy and the community now has a landmark to be proud of, so mission accomplished. The increase in rent and sales offset the cost of the renovation, so a win-win all round.


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

No matter where retail projects are across the globe the themes remain the same, namely context, place, community, branding and technology. Next is a small store known as Design Collective with a total area of 2000 square metres per floor in Qingpu on the outskirts of Shanghai. It was an existing building with the brief being to redesign both the exterior and interior without demolishing the existing structure. The building was completely covered in an opaque wrap made from carbon fibre panels to create a dynamic looking object. The main entry features a striking steel tunnel drawing you into the building. The visitor then climbs through gallery levels, lit by openings in the roof allowing daylight into the central space. The main staircase wraps around this central void delivering visitors to each of the gallery levels where clothing and furniture is displayed. Also in Shanghai is the new IFC Mall, set in the heart of the Pudong financial district with direct links to the Pearl Tower and MRT underground. It includes a 4 level 85,400 square metres of retail and is part of a larger development that includes 3 towers and a public plaza. The projects ground plane is an urban park, extensively landscaped with fountains, gardens and open courts that integrate with the retail below, which includes cinemas. The iconic buildings were designed by architect Cesar Pelli, with the retail interiors by Benoy. Another project to catch my eye was the new Liverpool Interlomas Department store in Mexico City. The 30,000 square metre department store was designed as part of a new era in the company’s pursuit for re-branding itself with the understanding of the role shopping centres play in today’s society, in which they have become a magnet for social interaction. Fluidity and dynamism drove the design process, producing the doublelayered, sleek machine like exterior façade.

We move to Singapore, the Orchard Central on the famous retail strip, Orchard Road. It’s the first really vertical mall in Singapore and is a total turnaround of a typical centre capitalising on the constraints of a tight site, which forced multi-level retailing. By omitting a central atrium and using “borrowed space” from the adjoining Discovery Walk, abundant daylight filters through the various retail formats. These concepts of youth, fashion, wellness and sports are designed with overlapping, varied volumes and distinctive interiors. At night the protruding retail glass facades with the incorporated LED technology in the mullions act as the visual stimulus. The facades are transparent enough to offer glimpses of the internal activities and merchandise creating a magnet for customers. The day and night character of the mall is transformed by these LED’s creating a web like structure at various angles and is a giant canvas for digital artwork by local artist Matthew Ngui. It is a novel union between technology and light creating a festive mood in the urban streetscape. The final project is under construction in Qatar and caught my attention because of its tent like structures and place creation. The Lusail Marina Mall is inspired by natural forms created when land and water meet. Five interconnected retail islands link the mall with the landscape and the water. The 60,000 square metre centre includes three levels, with an additional 10,000 square metre hypermarket in the basement.I can’t wait to see the images of the final product. In summary, no matter where retail projects are across the globe the themes remain the same, namely context, place, community, branding and technology.

At night the hollow cavity between the layers of façade is bathed in light that subtly escapes, accentuating its’ fine relief forms. The building contains a roof terrace or “sky park” that can be enjoyed not only by the store customers, but also by the surrounding community. It is an innovative, beautiful and practical solution that brought interest to an otherwise bland urban context. The store is now considered a local architectural icon, achieving the clients’ brief.

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Image; Galleria Vittorio Emanuelle, Italy

The Importance of Place in Retail Woodhead Thought Leadership First presented at ‘The Mall the Merrier Conference’ Singapore , 19-20 April 2011 By Tony Quinn - Woodhead Director

Tony Quinn, Woodhead Principal and Group Retail Leader recently chaired “The Mall The Merrier” retail development in Singapore. While there, Tony presented on the importance of place making and how retail centres play a pivotal part in shaping communities.

Place making is about capitalizing on a local community’s history, culture, assets, inspiration and potential. Through this you ultimately can create spaces that enhance people’s well being. Creating a sense of place connects to community; it gives ownership, it becomes their place and just not any place. It’s important to differentiate from the proliferation of branded vanilla malls which are the same no matter what city or town they are in. They are corporate, not communal or local . You can’t create “connectedness” through this model. Ownership comes from a response to the local micro-climate, locality, materials, and demographic mix. A place is attractive to people because it has a unique identity, that is authentic to it’s location. The character and feeling of a place is the key to peoples participation in the life of the space. Space or place can be both internal and external. Creation of “outdoor rooms” for alfresco dining, community gatherings and social interaction form an important part in the connectedness of place.


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

How a well executed design can increase shopper traffic and ultimately spending.” Creating this unique identity has many historical references. Piazza San Marco in Venice is one of these. It along with its gondolas are the brand identity of Venice Now it may come as a surprise that none of this place making is especially new. As far back as 1573 the King of Spain decreed a set of rules for the building of towns and cities in the new colonies, the Americas, known as the “Law of the Indies”. This law decreed that all new towns must have a central plaza surrounded by important buildings with “portales” or arcades and from which the principal streets were laid out in a rectangular grid pattern. Smaller secondary plazas as well as narrow streets provided the next hierarchy or layering of the town. The narrow streets were called for in the hot climates to mitigate sun ingress and hence provide shade. The Grand Bazaar in Istanbul, Turkey dating back to 1461 is one of the oldest retail markets in the world. With more than 58 covered streets, courtyards and laneways and over 1200 shops it attracts up to 400,000 visitors each day. It has four main gates situated at the end of it’s two main streets, combining with two major mosques and a city square. Creating this hierarchy of spaces connected by streets and laneways gives a variety of experience which enhances opportunities for people to discover, still relevant today. Furthermore, connecting to the suburb, town or city fabric within which a retail centre might sit is important as it creates the feeling of belonging to rather than separate from; it becomes a seamless part of the whole. Equally important is enrichment created through the use of colour, texture, movement and sound all creating part of the experience of the place. The famous Galleria Vittorio Emmanuelle in Milano, Italy is another example or reference. Designed in 1861 and built in 1865 it is a classic model of many of today’s shopping malls. It is Milan’s number one shopping destination.

Image: Melbourne laneways

New York has adopted the idea by using old dumpsters surrounded by timber decking and filled with water to provide it’s city version of the Plage. Both these venues attracted thousands of locals and tourists because they connect with the community. Sydney recently hosted a temporary restaurant Joost at Circular Quay bringing life and vibrancy over the summer months to the harbours edge. Other good examples include Melbourne’s laneways which weave a maze of connections between the city’s main streets. They offer alfresco dining, cafes, bars, fashion boutiques, and bookshops uncovering many a hidden treasure. Sydney City Council has tried to emulate this successful retail place making by introducing a Business Redevelopment Program aimed at assisting small businesses locate and thrive in the fine-grain laneway precincts of the city. Grants of up to $30,000 dollars have been offered as incentive towards setup costs to locate in the city’s laneways. The Bullring in Birmingham UK, is one of the most successful retail place making examples, where the city was transformed by this world class redevelopment. The iconic Selfridges department store anchors the 110,000 square metre development which drew on Birmingham’s historic street patterns and comprises a series of traditional streets, both indoor and outdoor, squares and other open spaces. It is one of the most visited retail centres in Europe with 40 million visitors each year. Wouldn’t everyone love this sort of foot traffic! Your own Marina Bay Sands development here in Singapore has created a connectedness for Singaporeans and visitors alike. The Sky Park has become a major attraction where people pay to gain access to this major piece of ‘Place making’, and has attracted 11 million people since it’s opening in April last year. In conclusion, the design of “place” should respond to context, climate and people and only through this can we create a sense of community ownership. Creating this connectedness or community ownership, in fact makes the customer linger longer, hence increasing shopper traffic and ultimately spending.

Great Places need not always be permanent. Take the Paris Plage as an example which is a temporary place every European summer where tonnes of white sand is brought in along with potted palms, deck chairs, swimming pools and umbrellas all set along the edge of the River Seine.

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Image: Apple store, New York

Iconic Retail Design Woodhead Thought Leadership First published in Shopping Centre News February 2012 By Tony Quinn - Woodhead Director

While the battleground is seen as technology a lot of retailers are sticking to the fundamentals of creating an experience for the customer. You can’t create an experience online, and while multi channel selling is becoming the norm there’s no substitute for good old bricks and mortar.

A recent trip to the US has brought home to me the nexus between retail and iconic design. There is no better way to sell your brand and product than in a physical space that shouts “Look at me”. In this article I’ll take the story down to the shopfront or coal face and show how retailers are creating that point of difference and experience to keep ahead of the competition. While the battleground is seen as technology a lot of retailers are sticking to the fundamentals of creating an experience for the customer. You can’t create an experience online, and while multi channel selling is becoming the norm there’s no substitute for good old bricks and mortar. Take Hollister & Co, an American lifestyle brand by Abercrombie & Fitch for instance. In the middle of winter in New York they are selling basically t-shirts, hoodies, jeans and swimwear, wrapped in a store of dark timbers, white shutters and palm trees reminiscent of a Barbados beach house. While not quite my cup of tea it’s pitched at the “twenty somethings” and they had tanned guys and girls in swimwear opening the door on 5th Avenue. The place was teaming with kids, in a buying frenzy, over what I saw as simply t-shirts and jeans when infact they were selling a lifestyle.


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

How retailers are using iconic design to create that point of difference and experience to keep ahead of the competition.”

Image: Longchamp store, New York

A considerable number of the major brands have gone for the big design statement in their stores creating the good old ‘Wow factor’. The Apple store in New York on 5th Avenue, for instance with it’s now signature glass box façade and white apple symbol stands as a beacon reinforcing it’s brand with slick, modern clean lines and simplicity. It’s basically a whole in the ground leading to a basement store via a glass lift and glass stair beautifully simple in its detail. Also on 5th Avenue, the Armani mega flagship store, is a four floor retail space with an impressive glass façade and stunning internal staircase. Designed by Italian Architects Doriana and Massimilano Fuksas it is the third store after Hong Kong and Tokyo for the famous designer. Besides the basement the showroom develops on four different levels connected by the whirlwind of the staircase, with great dynamism, moving like a ribbon through the central void. The fluidity of the internal space is contrasted with the more linear exterior glass façade. The Prada store in Soho designed by eminent architect Rem Koolhaus attracts serious shoppers as well as the gawkers alike. It is part exhibition hall, part retail adventure, with the signature focal point being Koolhaus’s wave. A huge sloping timber wave that begins on the main floor, then dips down to the lower level acting as amphitheatre style seating for fashion shows and events. Complete with a circular glass elevator and translucent dressing rooms that turn opaque at the press of a button the store is heavy on design spectacle. Across road from Prada in Soho is the famous emporium Dean and Deluca with its wonderful display of deli foods, chocolates and fresh food. I defy anyone to go inside and not be enticed to buy something as its display is way too tempting.

Longchamp’s Soho store in New York also features a spectacular timber coloured staircase cascading and wrapping itself around several levels. The staircase is used as a means of drawing people up into the store from the street. As the stores signature design element it’s more of a terraced landscape, rather than a stair and is formed as a series of terraces, walkways and steps. Longchamp wanted something spectacular that would become a New York landmark, and I think it has achieved their goal. It’s certainly drawn people to its brand and says ‘innovation’ in a subtle way. Another iconic building for Prada is in Tokyo by Herzog and de Meuron set in the fashionable Aoyama district. It’s the company’s second radical approach following Rem Koolhaus’ flagship store in New York. The intent Prada says was to reshape the concept of function and shopping to encourage the meshing of consumption and culture. The store is a strikingly unconventional 6 storey glass crystal with diamond shaped structure with both flat concave and convex glass bubble like windows. It forms a transparent structural shell with floors appearing to float inside the building. The building is a reverse of typical Japanese emphasis of looking inward, instead offering views across the city and filling the spaces with light. So it’s not just the apparel, accessories or food that’s the brand, but the complete experience statement as to who they are and what they are about.

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Image: Atrio in Villach, Austria

What makes award winning retail design? Woodhead Thought Leadership First published in Shopping Centre News May 2012 By Tony Quinn - Woodhead Director

In this article we review another series of centres from around the world that have won design awards, and that caught my eye for their innovation.

The first is the Atrio in the city of Villach in Austria. The recently built centre is a stand alone 100,000 m² partly raised building that is coloured red and silver by the Austrian SPAR Group. The brightly striking red entrance reads like a folded piece of origami. As the name Atrio, (Atrium in Italian) suggests the centre contains a large glazed internal central space, with a water column used as an integrating element. The centre draws on the colours of the three regions within which it sits namely Austria (red), Italy (green) and Slovenia (blue). One of the other features is a giant aerial photograph of the region at a scale of 1:6000 (a scale that shows buildings and cars) set into the ground floor. It’s in the form of a triangle with sides measuring 17 metres. The tri-level centre has a basement carpark and two retail levels anchored by an Interspar hypermarket of 8000m² and Cosmos of 3600m².


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Image: Ettlinger Tor Karlsruhe, Germany

The next centre is in neighbouring Germany in the city of Karlsruhe, an urban development with over 130 shops known as “Ettlinger Tor”. This centre was integrated into the historical precinct known as the Rondell Platz and presents to the street through preserved historical facades. It incorporates a 150 metre long day lit glazed cupola creating an internalised shopping street lined with brand name tenants like Zara, Tommy Hilfiger, Gant and Espirit. The centre also contains numerous cafes and restaurants catering to its inner city location. Spain is next with a centre known as Plenilunio close to Madrid airport which is a 66,000 square metre GLA development that offers a balanced mix of shopping and leisure. Major tenants include Bennetton, H&M, Massimo, Dutti and Zara along with a supermarket, cinema and bowling alley and karting circuit. The building has an elliptical shape and combines terraces, open facades and curved shapes. The interior has two circular nodes with the northern using contemporary language steel and aluminium finishes, while the southern uses more natural materials of timber and stone. The exterior façade was designed with two layers, two metres apart creating streams of air that ventilate the space reducing energy consumption and naturally cooling against the hot Spanish sun. Another centre in Madrid that bares mention is the Principe Pio which is set over an historic station, housing both regional and subway lines and includes one of the largest bus stations in Madrid. Being set at a major transport hub creates a regular stream of customers for this 10,000 m² centre with three levels of retail, dining and entertainment. Key fashion tenants are Zara and Massimo Dutti. While food tenancies range from cafes and restaurants to McDonalds and Burger King. A Warner cineplex is also located in the upper level of the development.

Image: Al Manshar in Fahaheel, Kuwait

The next centre is the Arkadia in Warsaw Poland on the 22 acre site that formerly contained state owned warehouse and railways infrastructure. Three levels house over 200 regional and international retailers, with an entertainment precinct with Cineplex, restaurants and food court. The design comprises four arcades that express the culture and history of Poland. Tenants include a Carrefour hypermarket of 20,000 m², Marks and Spencer, H & M and Zara stores amongst a total retail GLA of 120,000 m². The four arcades are named after the Wisla River, Poland’s longest, while the Pan Twardowski Passage references the work of Polish magician and alchemist; the Kopernik Passage expresses the achievements of renown astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, and finally the Camaletto Passage houses dining options. The next centre is in Kuwait and grabbed my attention because it was an existing 1970’s mall that was redeveloped into a retail and entertainment destination. Known as the Al Manshar in the city of Fahaheel is part of a larger complex which integrates more than 30 existing and new buildings into a state of the art mixed use development combining retail, entertainment, residential, hospitality and business. Design inspiration came from the old Kuwait markets with tented and latticed roof forms, providing protection from the hot sun. Laneways and internal streets were formed by building a line of new buildings opposite the existing and roofing over the spaces between creating the internal streets. The one common thread in all these developments is how the design response has been tied to each community and region to create connection with the community.

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Image: Westfield London

Who says Australian design can’t compete on the world stage. Woodhead Thought Leadership First published in Shopping Centre News September 2011 By Tony Quinn - Woodhead Director

Who says Australians design can’t compete on the world stage. All of the following International award winning centres involved Australian design firms.

The International Council of Shopping Centres US 2010/2011 awards, Gold medal winners included two centres designed by Westfield. One, Westfield Galleria at Roseville California where Westfield Design collaborated with local US firm Gensler enhanced and upgraded the existing Galleria at Roseville to create the preeminent shopping centre serving Sacramento and the surrounding Gold county. The expansion was carried out in two phases opening in 2008 and 2009. The project was designed to meet the needs of the growing community of Roseville, by unifying existing and new elements and creating spaces that support a variety of experiences and interest. At the heart of the centre is a newly renovated outdoor promenade offering activities for all members of the family. These include a gathering place for local culture, a community garden and a grand entrance. Inside is provided with a spectacular dining terrace featuring family amenities and lounges. A collection of new shops provides both elegant and value oriented retail, again for the broader family experience. The project was completed during the GFC, and yet has resulted in a 46% increase in visitation, has created 1600 new jobs and much needed tax revenue for the city of Roseville. Distinguished brands such as Tiffany’s, Burberry,


WOODHEAD THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

We have literally taken on the world and won, proving that we too can produce world class award winning retail development.”

Image: Westfield Southcenter

Louis Vuitton, Lacoste and Swarovski, along with Crate & Barrel, Pottery Barn, Nordstrom, Macy’s & JC Penney are part of this world class development. The second Westfield US award winning centre is Southcentre at Tukwila, Washington designed by Westfield Design and is now the largest centre in the Pacific North West at 170,000 square metres. It’s market is middle class professionals, with the aim of the expansion to grow the customer base by increasing the offering with new fashion & entertainment tenants. The $240 million expansion comprises 40,000 square metres that includes AMC cinemas, Borders, H&M, XX1 Forever, several fine dining restaurants, dining terrace and carparks. The expansion provided the opportunity to open up the traditional, inward focused centre to the exterior, creating a public face and activation to the outside as well as inside. The awards say Westfield’s design goal, aesthetically was to create a bold new expression for the centre that would address the strong regional character of the Pacific Northwest and be sympathetic to the existing structures that were to remain. Part of that expression is a huge and dramatic glass curtain wall entrance with sweeping roof and exposed structure. External elements also include the use of brick, stone, glass and metal, creating a strong and balanced visual presence. In the Asia Pacific awards, for Innovative Design and Development, Point Cook town Centre Quadrant 4 came away with an award. It was envisioned as a true lifestyle centre, bringing together the community and local environment. The design took it’s inspiration from Australia’s iconic landscape, with it’s wetlands, water, timber and stone all coming together in harmony. The $50 million project covers 13,000 square metres, with 5000 square metres attributed to commercial space. The brief was for a ‘High Street’ style centre and features both street side and

undercover laneways creating a village atmosphere to encourage the local community to meet, chat and do coffee. The new precinct also includes a town square with outdoor seating, public entertainment space, alfresco dining and a mix of on grade and undercover carparking. The project also won the Australian Urban Taskforce Development Excellence award for Retail. The next International Award was the 2011 ICSC European Shopping Centre award in the Extra Large Category. I refer to Westfield London, the iconic new Australian designed,172,760 square metre development with major tenants Marks and Spencer, House of Fraser, Debenhams, Next and Waitrose. The centre is London’s newest retail destination and Europe’s largest urban shopping centre. It comprises, of course retail, but also housing, leisure and civic facilities in a total mixed use development. The award commentary says it was designed to convey the intriguing interplay of water and light, with its striking feature glazed roof made up of thousands of clear panels. These have been carefully positioned to maximise natural light as the sun moves through the day. The central atrium is the size of a football field with 16 metre wide walls fashioned from marble, with decorative granite swirls. The atrium has an important purpose and that’s to act as a showcase for new brands as well as a world class venue for events and entertainment. Westfield London cost £1.7 billion to develop and took five years to build. Like taking coal to Newcastle we have literally taken on the world and won, proving that we too can produce world class award winning retail development. 71


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Woodhead Retail Portfolio Statement  
Woodhead Retail Portfolio Statement