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Table of Contents Southern California 02 Program Overview The Future of Practice 17 M.Arch 26 MS.Arch 38 MS.Arch RED 50 MIA 56 Work Student work 74 Resources WSOA 108 Faculty 112 Making Complex 124 WUHO/Wedge Galley 136 Career Services 150 IPAL 154 How to Apply 158


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Woodbury School of Architecture

PROGRAM OVERVIEW


Dean’s Statement

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Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter

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THE FUTURE OF PRACTICE This book provides a tantalizing glimpse into the Woodbury School of Architecture graduate architecture programs. Uniquely situated in a region where some of the most exciting design experimentation is occurring, Woodbury is at the nexus of pressing issues related to immigration, housing insecurity, climate change, and gender equality. Daunting?

Yes, but it’s also exciting to imagine how architects might engage such critical concerns. Our locations in Los Angeles, Hollywood and San Diego offer a complex context with messy, often oppositional tendencies for our students to explore. Our studios provide a sanctuary that inspire our students to experiment without fear and with ambition and ingenuity to construct not just buildings, but environments that enrich and effect change outside of the traditional


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confines of our spaces and of our discipline. Embedded in our curricula is the ethos that diverse points of view lead to innovative design solutions. Accessible education leads to accessible architecture. The work in this book – ranging in methodology, topic, scale, technique, formal investigations, tools, and concentrations – celebrates and amplifies the intrinsic diversity of our students which spans across spectrums

of gender, racial, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds. What unites us is an optimistic affirmation of the value of our profession. Woodbury School of Architecture is, above all, a school committed to the future of practice. What does this mean? Our paramount mission is not just to educate our students to succeed as architects, but to


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dynamically shape the future of practice. Not all our students end up working within these bounds, of course, but this is the beauty of the discipline: that the education of an architect opens doors to careers we cannot even begin to imagine. Design acumen is combined with a fundamental belief that good design is a human right.


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Investing in “The Future of Practice” suggests not only commitment to the profession, but to a method of applying knowledge. The word “practice,” is of course, both noun and verb. It is about action. It implies doing something, not just dreaming something. Speculation is underpinned by an ability to execute. Design acumen is arrived at by experience and exercise. Excitingly, many of our students now practice sooner through our Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure.


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Representational virtuosity is the most visible means through which our students are iteratively exploring and developing their personal language. Beautiful drawings that engage and invite are a powerful means of making architecture more accessible. Technology, used smartly, is another means of access. As technology shifts from being a top down brand-driven process, to an intellectual engagement with computing and light fabrication machines, we are there.


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What does it mean to practice as an architect? The work of our faculty exemplifies a breathtaking wealth of ways to practice. They are architects and educators but also public artists, real estate developers, creators of pre-engineered building systems, authors, fabricators, coders, curators, exhibition designers, landscape architects, furniture makers, filmmakers, interior designers, visual artists, façade consultants, delineators, and principals of their own architectural practices.


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Is it any wonder that our alumni are so successful, using design not just to galvanize communities but to craft unconventional career paths? “The Future of Practice” is our invitation to ask: “What next?” Understanding that good architecture has the potential to bring joy and beauty to others, we seek to reenergize the profession by stretching its limits and exploring its possibilities from within. Areas of


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concentration, led by faculty research engaged in a range of projects, allow students to craft customized degrees, uniquely blended to their skillsets and passions. In our student’s projects, you will find uncommon combinations: applied computer science and civic engagement; augmented reality and real estate development; immersive digital environments and curation; material research and representational virtuosity. We invite you to join our young graduate programs in exploring the future of practice.


Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter is an architect, educator, and design consultant specializing in the building envelope and the experimental architectural use of glass. Currently Dean of the School of Architecture at Woodbury University, she has taught at Yale, Cornell, the Bartlett, and SCI-Arc. She is also Director of WUHO, the Woodbury University Hollywood gallery, a venue for experimental installations, public lectures and workshops. She currently serves on the LA Forum Board of Advisors. The work of her collaborative office, WROAD, navigates transdisciplinary territory in the diverse type and scale of projects. She has collaborated

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on multiple award-winning projects including as façade consultant on Bloom with DoSu Architects, the Portland Aerial Tramway with AGPS, the Centre Pompidou exhibition, Continuities of the Incomplete, with Morphosis, and as project architect for the Corning Museum of Glass with Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects. Named AIA Fellow in 2018, Ingalill is recipient of AIA California Council 2016 Educator Award, was honored with the AIA|LA 2018 Presidential Educator of the Year Award, and recognized by DesignIntelligence as one of the nation’s Most Admired Educators in architecture and design.


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M.ARCH PROGRAM


MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE


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THE M.ARCH IS A 3-YEAR PROGRAM.

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Students are eligible for advance standing (2-Years) if they have previous experience.


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The Master of Architecture program is a NAAB accredited professional degree. No prior architectural education is necessary to enroll. Students with a background in architecture are eligible to apply for advanced standing. Launched in 2008, the Master of Architecture program was conceived as a workspace for developing new models of architecture that emerge from cultural practices in Southern California.


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Dirty, hard, busy, good‌Architecture is work. The M. Arch program locates the work of architecture at the intersection of disciplinary principles and professional competency. Ideas become impactful when translated into material conditions. The messy process of translation often results in imperfect but meaningful design proposals that address challenges of contemporary life. Embracing the compromise between ideal and real underscores our commitment to the here and now.


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The three year program is organized in the following way: Ground Work 01 The first year of the M. Arch program provides an intellectual and technical foundation for the production of architecture. Students are introduced to conventions of representation and construction. Conventional understandings are then transformed into contemporary design


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proposals through the acquisition of advanced skill sets. Design problems are inward in orientation as they absorb and explore the tenets of the discipline. Field Work 02 The second year of the M. Arch program cracks the foundation to reveal the broad spectrum of architectural possibilities that emerge when foundational knowledge engages contemporary culture. Students are introduced to the technology

of building in relationship to environmental, structural, and material systems. Design problems are outward in orientation as they leverage disciplinary intelligence against a wide range of civic conditions. Frame Work 03 The third year of the M. Arch program narrows intellectual and technical expertise around individual interests. Students are introduced to research methods


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that aim to synchronize abstract concepts with modes of practice. Design problems are simultaneously inward and outward in orientation as they define a personal frame work for engaging a professional audience.

The four streams of M. Arch coursework are:

Criticism-Position The criticism track established disciplinary roots. Students survey a history of architectural production and are introduced to theories shaping contemporary discourse. Visualization-Speculate The visualization track introduces students to methods of architectural analysis, production, and representation using inventive techniques and emerging technology.


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Building-Assemble The building track introduces students to logics of fabrication and construction that address structural, environmental, and material concerns. Studio-Advocate The studio track integrates criticism, visualization, and building into design proposals that demonstrate the power of architecture.

Heather Flood is a designer and educator. Her professional work integrates the disciplines and techniques of cultural research, graphic art, and architectural design to create experientially dense environments. In 2008 she formed F-lab, a research based design practice committed to the production of architectural form in relationship to contemporary culture, both pop and sub. Located at the intersection of the graphic and the tectonic, Flood’s current research slips between two and three dimensions into the space of 2.5D where color, pattern, and texture synchronize with structure in an effort to push familiar architectural forms into new spatial realms that delight in affect and organization. Flood’s work has been published and exhibited internationally. In 2012 she received the prestigious C.O.L.A. Fellowship awarded to mid-career

professionals residing in Los Angeles. Prior to forming F-Lab, Flood worked in the offices of Murphy, Burnham, and Buttrick Architects in New York, HOLST Architecture in Portland, and Roto Architects in Los Angeles. In addition to her professional practice, Heather Flood teaches design studios and design communication courses at Woodbury University where she serves as Chair of Architecture on the Los Angeles campus. She has also taught design studios at SCI-Arc and UCLA and design workshops at the University of Kentucky. Flood has a Master of Architecture degree from the Southern California Institute of Architecture where she graduated with honors and received the Henry Adams Medal. Flood has a Bachelor of Art degree from Michigan State University.


Heather Flood Ground Work_01 FALL SEMESTER Criticism 1: Introduction to contemporary architecture culture Building 1: Materials and construction methods Visualization 1: Introduction to techniques of representation Graduate Studio 1: Introduction to design SPRING SEMESTER Criticism 2: Architectural history and theory (ancient to modern) Building 2: Introduction to structures Visualization 2: Advanced techniques of representation Graduate Studio 2: Housing Field Work_02 FALL SEMESTER Building 3: Structural systems Visualization 3: Advanced techniques of representation Graduate Studio 3: Building in the city Elective

37 SPRING SEMESTER Criticism 3: Architectural history and theory (modern to contemporary) Building 4: Environmental systems integration Graduate Studio 4: Comprehensive building design Elective: (Visualization 4 recommended) SUMMER SEMESTER Graduate Studio: Fieldwork

Frame Work_03 FALL SEMESTER Criticism 4: Thesis preparation seminar Graduate Studio 5: Research topic studio Practice 1: The architectural profession Elective SPRING SEMESTER Graduate Thesis Studio Elective Elective


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MS.ARCH PROGRAM


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MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE


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More than ever, architecture needs to be understood as part of an ever-expanding set of aesthetic, social, and technical systems. Architecture today engages the world with a renewed agency prompted by changes to technology, society, and to its own disciplinary norms, while at the same time fields outside architecture continue to borrow its metaphors and techniques as a way of advancing their own agendas. The Master of Science in Architecture (MSArch) is a one-year/threesemester program that invites architects and


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non-architects to explore this expanded zone of interdisciplinary practice. Each student chooses an area of concentration that allows them to build expertise in a specific system of thought and technique. In so doing, students are prepared to productively contribute to today’s conversation about contemporary problems and practices in architecture, whether in new materials, artificial intelligence, homelessness, curatorship and photography,


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new forms of urbanism, new modes of interiority such as games and virtual reality, and new models of financial development and authorship. At the end of their oneyear course of study, students will have produced a personal project that will sustain and energize their future careers, whether as designers, artists, filmmakers, game designers, entrepreneurs, or scholars.

Students in the MS.Arch program have full access to the resources offered by Woodbury’s design, media, and business programs, such as our virtual reality facilities, gallery and exhibition spaces, game design courses, and digital fabrication labs. Further afield, students are encouraged to use the unique conditions of Southern California as an extended network and laboratory, including local archives and technical expertise from nearby industries.


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Areas of Concentration Materials & Fabrication Using the resources of our Making Complex, students in this area work closely with the Institute for Material Ecologies to develop an in-depth understanding of the behaviors and qualities of materials and the connections hold to environmental and political systems.


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Design of Design Computational Systems Students in this area focus on the design of computational design systems. They learn how to design and implement their own software tools and hardware prototypes using new generative design techniques, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.


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The City Using the environment of Los Angeles and Southern California, students in this area inquire into the present and future urban form. Students may choose to work with the Hinterlands Institute on the new productive landscapes beyond the city’s edge.

Management & Development Drawing upon the expertise native to Southern California and in close collaboration with our School of Business, students in this area engage the real-world practices of management and real estate development.


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Photography & Curatorship Taking advantage of Woodbury’s Julius Shulman Institute, our Hollywood exhibition space, and local archives, students in this area study the ways architecture is represented in media and in scholarship through architectural photography, exhibitions, and archives.


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New Interiors & Virtual Experience Students in this area engage the new interior spaces of gaming and virtual/augmented reality. They take advantage of resources such as our VR lab and the course offerings of our Interior Architecture, Game Design, and Applied Computer Science departments.


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Who we want Recent graduates of architecture programs who want to sharpen their focus prior to a professional career. Graduates of non-architecture programs who want to develop the architectural aspects of their work. Early- to mid-career professionals who want to develop a specific area of expertise.


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How it works During the application process, students identify an area of concentration and a primary advisor within that area. Once enrolled, each student works closely with the advisor in a small seminar/ studio format to define the project and conduct research. This work is supported by a series of elective courses. In their final semester, students produce a thesis project that gives concrete form to their investigation, whether as a publishable article, exhibition, or prototype.

Ewan Branda is an educator, architectural historian, software designer, and former architect. He received a PhD in Critical Studies in Architecture from UCLA and a Master of Science in Design and Computation from MIT. Currently, he is Associate Dean and Director of Postgraduate Programs at the Woodbury School of Architecture.

He is also the Multimedia Reviews Editor for the Journal for the Society of Architectural Historians. His research deals with architecture’s place in the information society of the late-postwar period and with the opportunities offered by artificial intelligence in the representation and production of architecture.


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MS.ARCH PROGRAM


RED


Director’s Statement The Master of Science in Architecture in Real Estate Development (MSArch RED) program seeks to build upon the unique perspective and ethos of the architect.

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While architects design the way a building looks and works, they are seldom involved in the decision of exactly what to build. In most developments, the architect is considered only one of numerous players and is often left to carry out a pre-established vision for the development.

The MSArch RED program is unlike a traditional real estate development program where the curriculum is offered in a lecture setting. Instead, the entire curriculum of the 12-month, three semester MSArch Real Estate Development program is delivered through a studio based format. For their thesis, students develop and prepare finished presentation packages for their real estate development projects including market analysis,


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partnership agreements, funding proposals, architectural designs, and sales and leasing strategies. Many Woodbury Architecture students have gone on after graduation to successfully build their thesis projects. This course of study introduces more than the typical elements of development. In addition to learning from a broad array of building

industry professionals, MSArch RED students work with architects who have been successful as real estate developers through innovation and the invention of specific strategies to overcome financial shortcomings and policy roadblocks. These strategies are studied and shared in the studios.


Ted Smith Ted Smith and Kathleen McCormick Smith and Others Architects is an alternative architectural practice accomplishing buildings in partnerships with others. Principals Ted Smith and Kathleen McCormick have completed a wide range of unusual housing projects acting as architects, developers, contractors, and operators. The firm has built, many projects involving shared housing, early examples of California row houses, speculative single family houses with out interior partitioning, apartment

55 buildings with parking on the roof, and a housing demonstration block in collaboration with a team of architect developers. In 2005 Smith initiated a new graduate program to teach development strategies to architects at Woodbury University. In 2008, the work of the firm was exhibited in the Venice Biennale as a small part of the US Pavilion. Smith and Others is currently planning a micro unit tower in San Diego transferring the firm’s design exhibited recently at the Museum of the City of New York.


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MASTER OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE


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M.I.A. PROGRAM


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The Master of Interior Architecture (M.I.A.) program offers an education in critical spatial inquiry that elevates and reinvents the discipline of interior architecture by mining and imagining human conditions in our built environment. In doing so, the program adds criticality to the profession, cultivating scholars, academics and critics, while generating emerging and alternative professions.


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Students who possess baccalaureate degrees in any discipline can enter the M.I.A. threeyear track, while students who possess baccalaureate degrees in interior architecture, interior design, environmental arts or architecture are eligible to enter the M.I.A. two-year track.


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EMERGING IDEAS The MIA argues for Interior Architecture as a unique body of knowledge, with a distinct discourse, canon, and set of methodologies, filtered through the lens of art and architectural criticism and theory. As contemporary architectural practice continues to focus on issues of technology, technique, urbanism, and other aspects of exteriority, the MIA program looks to advance the role of the

human condition in the discourse, and to argue for the social, cultural, material, sensorial, and communicative realms of design. Woodbury University’s MIA program provides students with a curriculum that is critical and relevant. This agile program allows students to actively participate in the crafting of their education, to inflect each course with their own critical approach, and to specialize in


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their own professional pursuits. Student involvement fosters methodological diversity, and ensures that the program will evolve and adapt with each new cohort. Emerging Ideas The Emerging Ideas curriculum supports every area of learning within your interior architecture education: Criticism, Studio, Visualization, Figuring Space, and Practice.


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The Emerging Ideas seminars provide an active relationship between knowledge acquisition and knowledge content. Through faculty facilitated seminars students will develop a consensus of the scope of research their cohort will explore. Emerging Ideas 1: Navigation and Orienteering Contemporary trends and issues affecting and articulating the current body of knowledge in Interior Architecture

Emerging Ideas 2: Investigation and Steering Collaborative research builds toward a cohort driven area of investigation Emerging Ideas 3: Acquisition and Directing Unification of research transformed through negotiation and discourse


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Emerging Ideas 4: Methodological Slant Methodological approach declared and explored in preparation for Studio 4 Emerging Ideas 5: Aggregation and Realizing Forum for intentional and directed critique of research agenda Emerging Ideas 6: Conclusion and Assessing Organize and determine the outcome of research


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Criticism As the linchpin of the program, the criticism track is invested in the creation of disciplinary content, which reflects the historical and theoretical frameworks within, and outside of, the terrain of Interior Architecture, striving to develop a strong body of literature that reflects the specific theoretical concerns of the interior environment and human habitation.


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Criticism 1: Fieldwork Los Angeles LA’s interior history and theory explored through observational research and analysis Criticism 2: Declaring the Canon Declaring the history and theory of Interior Architecture from pre-history through the present


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Criticism 3: Rewriting the Canon Contemporary theory and criticism used to reinterpret and expand the discipline Criticism 4: Thesis Preparation Self-directed study and research leveraged toward a thesis proposal

Studio Studio is the vital core of design study. It is a cohort, a culture, a place, and a practice; it epitomizes application and engagement in design learning and pedagogy. It both challenges and mirrors the profession, inculcating the student into disciplinary methodologies and operations. Within the semester, it is a node, drawing


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in and integrating all other realms of study, providing a dynamic platform for the collision, realization, and testing of ideas, knowledge, and technique. Studios 1, 2, and 3: Fundamental and comprehensive design studios include: Studio 1: The New Frontier of Space Studio 2: Synthesizing Complexity Studio 3: Pathways and Modalities


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Studio 4: Fieldwork / Study Away Methodological agenda declared in Emerging Ideas 4 is aligned with a destination for exploration Studio 5: Convergence Choose topic and develop thesis Studio 6: Thesis Declare and defend a claim within the discipline


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Visualization Design representation is not only a collection of techniques and skills that yield objects and artifacts, but a particular form of thinking through which design is brought into being. It is both a process and a thing. Design methodology is the means by which we move through the complex and nuanced world from thinking to making; from idea to artifact, communicating through the conventions of design representation, mapping, modeling, and analysis to synthesize and promote design agendas. Visualization 1: Making Technique Learn basic drawing and modeling skills Visualization 2: Analytic Constructions Use drawings and 3-dimensional representations to diagram, analyze and communicate

Visualization 3: Advanced Drawing and Modeling Drawing and modeling generates conceptual designs


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Figuring Space This area of concentration focuses on the making of space through material construction and invention, detailing, fabrication, and tectonics, as well as building understanding through the social content of codes, behavior, and planning practices. Students will be versed in the practical, functional, phenomenological, and performative aspects of transforming design work into physical form.

Figuring Space 1: Materiality and Making Material properties and assemblies Figuring Space 2: Code Analysis and Construction Materials and methods of detailing, fabrication, documentation, and specification Figuring Space 3: Impact and Implication Material logics through case study and performative modeling


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Practice The practice realm consists of two perspectives: teaching normative standards of the interior design profession, as well as encouraging students to explore emerging and alternative methods of practicing within a discipline that strongly reflects their area of research and practice agenda.

Practice 1: Ethics and the Profession Basic concepts, codes, procedures and policies in standard and alternative practices Practice 2: Commentary on Interior Architecture Forum for discussing the alternatives of practice and pursuit


Christoph Korner Christoph Korner, MArch, Dipl Ing Arch, NCIDQ, IIDA, IDEC Christoph Korner received his degree in Architecture and Urban Design from the Technical University in Braunschweig, Germany, followed by a MArch from UCLA with an emphasis on History and Theory. Since then he has been a part of GRAFT, an award winning design firm with offices in Los Angeles, Berlin and Beijing. Projects range from

73 Master Planning, Urban Design, Architecture, Interior Design, Exhibition Design, to Product Design. In addition his work has been exhibited and published on several occasions and he authored articles and books. In recent years his dedication gravitated increasingly towards teaching and academia, culminating in his current position as Chair of Interior Architecture at Woodbury University in Los Angeles.


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LOS ANGELES & SAN DIEGO

Woodbury School of Architecture is distinguished by its multiple locations at the heart of the Southern California creative industries: Los Angeles, Hollywood and San Diego. Together, these sites form a critical infrastructure for architectural investigations.


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We educate our students as entrepreneurs, citizen architects, and cultural builders equally committed to professional practice, theoretical discourse, social equity and to formal and technological inquiry. Our FACULTY is comprised of active and prolific architects, designers, and academics building and writing across Los Angeles and San Diego.


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Woodbury School of Architecture B Stan Bertheaud San Diego Barbara Bestor Los Angeles Berenika Boberska Los Angeles Matthew Boomhower San Diego Ewan Branda Los Angeles Nina Briggs Los Angeles C Jeanine Centuori Los Angeles Carmelia Chiang Los Angeles Steven Chodoriwsky Los Angeles Annie Chu Los Angeles

Courtney Coffman Los Angeles E Mark Ericson Los Angeles F Heather Flood Los Angeles Anthony Fontenot Los Angeles G Aaron Gensler Los Angeles Patrick Geske Los Angeles Anali Gharakhani Los Angeles Matthew Gillis Los Angeles April Greiman Los Angeles

H Tyler Hanson San Diego Catherine Herbst San Diego Lara Hoad Los Angeles Amy Hoffman San Diego I Yasushi Ishida Los Angeles K Robert Kerr Los Angeles Jason King Los Angeles Kishani De Silva Los Angeles Timothy Kohut Los Angeles Christoph Korner Los Angeles

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115 L Alan A. Loomis Los Angeles M Casey Mahon San Diego Ryan Tyler Martinez Los Angeles Duane McLemore Los Angeles Cody Miner Los Angeles O Ed Ogosta Los Angeles Eric Olsen Los Angeles Branka Olson Los Angeles Mark Owen Los Angeles P Jose Parral San Diego

Mikaela Pearson San Diego

Daniel Segraves Los Angeles

David Pearson San Diego

Bailey Shugart Los Angeles

RenĂŠ Peralta San Diego

Paulette Singley Los Angeles

Hector M. Perez San Diego

Teddy Slowik Los Angeles

Heather Scott Peterson Los Angeles

Gerard Smulevich Los Angeles

Lilian Pfaff Los Angeles R Jason Rebillot Los Angeles Catherine Roussel Los Angeles S Marcel SanchezPrieto San Diego Jonathan Segal San Diego

Joshua G. Stein Los Angeles T Linda Taalman Los Angeles V Thomas Valle Stallman Los Angeles W Ingalill WahlroosRitter Los Angeles


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Joshua G. Stein, Radical Craft Annie Chu + Gooding Architects


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Marcel Sanchez-Prieto named 2018 Rome Prize Fellow

Woodbury’s First Year BArch Studio Wins a 2017 Studio Prize

Professor Marcel Sanchez-Prieto, co-founder of the San Diego/Tijuana based CRO Studio, has been named a 2018-2019 Rome Prize fellow. Considered one of the most prestigious awards given to artists and scholars, the Rome Prize is awarded by the American Academy in Rome and recognizes specialists in architecture, landscape architecture, design, historic preservation and conservation, literature, music composition, visual arts, and other disciplines.

The Woodbury School of Architecture first year BArch studio Natural Tendencies has been honored with a 2017 Studio Prize by Architect Magazine. Coordinated by the chair of undergraduate architecture Heather Flood, and co-taught by Nate Imai and YiHsiu Yeh, the prize acknowledges the most compelling studios in architectural education today.

Hinterlands Kiosk Built at Bombay Beach Biennale Woodbury faculty Berenika Boberska & Scrap Marshall took part in the Bombay Beach Biennale this year, constructing their installation – the Hinterlands Kiosk – on the receding shores of the Salton Sea.

Linda Taalman Restores Kristen Wiig’s Silver Lake Midcentury Home Architect and faculty member Linda Taalman recently completed the renovation and restoration of former Saturday Night Live star Kristen Wiig’s Midcentury house in Silver Lake. Built in 1952, the home was originally designed by Albert P. Martin as his own residence. Ed Ogosta Receives Residential Architecture Award Citation from AIA Los Angeles Faculty member Ed Ogosta, AIA, principal of Edward Ogosta Architecture, has received a Residential Architecture Award Citation from the AIA Los Angeles for the Rear Window House. The award ceremony gala was held on the evening of May 10th at MASS Beverly showroom in Los Angeles.

Ed Ogosta Receives Two AIA Design Awards for Corner Pocket House Faculty member Ed Ogosta, AIA, principal of Edward Ogosta Architecture, has received two AIA Design Awards in less than a week for his Corner Pocket House project in Manhattan Beach. Heather Scott Peterson Opens Exhibition at Texas State Galleries Associate Professor Heather Scott Peterson opens an exhibition of new sculpture at Texas State Galleries. The exhibition explores the syntax of matter, and the human impulse to measure as a hedge against the ineffable. Anali Gharakhani Exhibits Work at BoldPas Woodbury adjunct faculty member Anali Gharakhani will feature her work “Blister” as part of the BoldPas Art Takeover in Pasadena. The art takeover will include art installations throughout Old Pasadena’s historic alleyways, where visitors can interact with LA artists and join a walking tour to learn about public art. Work will be shown by artists like renowned painter and muralist Andrew Hem, and over three dozen decorated business and “Art Shops” will open their doors for visitors to connect with Pasadena’s creative community.


Faculty in the news WALK WATTS Launches in South LA WALK WATTS, an interactive walking tour in South LA, recently launched through a collaboration between Woodbury University, ACE and the Watts Labor Community Action Committee (WLCAC). Team members included Woodbury professors Jeanine Centuori, FAIA and Cate Roman, as well as Alex Kim and Briana Pong. Jason Rebillot Discusses Urban Displacements and the Third Italy Associate Professor Jason Rebillot recently presented research from his current book project at Parsons School of Design in New York, as part of the Design History Society‘s annual conference. The session he participated in, ‘Urban Displacements’, was moderated by Parsons’ Ioanna Theocharopoulou and included UK-based researchers Vivian Chan and Aikaterini Antonopoulou. Rebillot’s talk, “Designing the Posturban”, discussed the work of Italian iconoclast Andrea Branzi- framing his speculative project Agronica (1995) as a rejection of the traditional city and its associations in an act of voluntary, selfdisplacement. In particular, the presentation examined the project’s presumed location in the geo-economic region of the Third Italy, understanding the latter as a territorial system synonymous with the emergence of post-Fordist spatial arrangements. Héctor M. Pérez on Innovative Urban Design and Alternative Housing Woodbury SD Chair Héctor M. Pérez, Principal at The RED Office in San Diego, will be a panelist at the City of West Hollywood Innovative Urban Design Solutions Symposium. Perez will be one of 4 panelist in the morning session that will focus on creative alternatives for housing development and design.

123 Woodbury Agency for Civic Engagement Project is a Finalist in SXSW EDU Competition An outdoor classroom for a Burbank middle school, designed by Woodbury architecture students as a way to promote a unique connection to the natural environment, is a finalist in the SXSW EDU conference’s “Learn by Design” competition in Austin, TX this March. SXSW EDU is designed to foster innovation in education. The “Learn by Design” competition celebrates the collaboration of designers and educators in the pursuit of design-based solutions to challenges within education. Wedge Gallery Presents the Upside Down The Wedge Gallery presents the next show in its Spring 2018 series, The Upside Down, by Erick Carcamo & Bailey Shugart of All Black Form and Ignacio Rodriguez of IR Architects. Rear Window House Awarded 2018 AIA Small Project Award The Rear Window House, designed by faculty member Ed Ogosta, AIA, has been awarded a 2018 AIA National Small Project Award. The Small Project Awards recognize practitioners for their high quality work and promote excellence in small project design. The program strives to raise public awareness of the value and design excellence that architects bring to projects regardless of size and scope. The jury remarked that, “This project demonstrates how a thoughtful, strategic intervention can breathe new life into an older home and be good for the neighborhood, without sacrificing the needs of the contemporary family.”


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MAKING COMPLEX

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At Woodbury University you will find some of the most sophisticated fabrication technologies available in the architecture and interior architecture fields of study.

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Fundamental to its Fieldwork agenda, Woodbury School of Architecture is committed to nurturing an enterprising design practitioner. By facilitating firstperson exposure to and experience with making and thinking role models, it aims to convey to students the perspective and skill necessary to realize their own imaginings. The technologies of the Making Complexes on both campuses are integral contributors in this enabling education. Technology here is an inclusive term; one that reinforces inter-dependencies between analog craft and shop work, computing, and rapidprototyping processes.


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WUHO AND WEDGE GALLERY


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WUHO GALLERY Providing an alternative space for the exhibition of architecture and design in Southern California, WUHO has become a key force in broadening the way the public views architecture. WUHO’s trailblazing programming includes such seminal exhibitions as Deborah Sussman Loves L.A., Jennifer Bonner’s Watermarks, and Attending Limits: Constitution and Upkeep of the US-Mexico

Border. Most recently, the exhibition Now What?! Advocacy, Activism and Alliances in American Architecture, brought together, as never before, distinct voices of advocacy in the profession, with groups such as LALA (Los Angeles Landscape Architects), NOMA (National Organization of Minority Architects), FSA (Free School of Architecture), AWA+D (Association for Women in Architecture + Design), LA Forum, Cal Poly Pomona Department of Landscape


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Architecture, and MFLA (Mapping Feminist LA), uniting to organize events as part of a powerful collective. WUHO is committed to showing the work of designers exploring how issues such as gender inequity, climate change, cross-border politics, and political activism can be examined through the architectural lens. Associated activities in conjunction with exhibitions extend the influence of these explorations into the

classroom, where students actively participate in curatorial investigations and design of the use of architecture to advance issues of civic significance. WUHO allows the public access to architectural images and interventions in an effective and populous way and is like no other public institution in Los Angeles.


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Alfie Koetter Exhibition

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Bryan Cantley Exhibition

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Joel Kerner Exhibition

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Andrew Kovacs Exhibition

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Career Services

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We Help You Start Your Career Our dedicated School of Architecture Career and Outreach Coordinator assists students with gaining work experience and beginning their professional careers in architecture, interior architecture and landscape architecture. We help students prepare a professional resume and portfolio. We organize annual career fairs and maintain an online job board. We help students with questions about licensure and certification for architectural professionals.


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Services Licensure and Certification

IPAL

We support students and alumni with the licensure and certification process for architectural professionals. Architecture students may begin the Architectural Experience Program (AXP) as soon as they start working in an office. Completion of AXP, administered by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), is a requirement for becoming a licensed architect in the State of California. Please see further information here. Interior graduates may become certified interior designers through the National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ). Students may begin fulfilling hours toward their certification after 96 semester hours of their education.

The School of Architecture at Woodbury University is among the first 14 accredited architectural programs to be accepted for participation in the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure (IPAL) initiative.

Woodbury University Job Board

Career Fairs

We have an active job board for students and alumni seeking employment. Likewise, we invite employers who are seeking interns as well as more experienced graduates to post job openings here.

We organize annual career fairs for students to meet with professionals and where firms meet new talent. Interested architecture firms can contact the Career and Outreach Office for further information and to register for our next career fair on campus.

The IPAL initiative is offered for both our undergraduate (BArch) and graduate (MArch) programs and on both campuses. The program allows for the integration of the three components of licensure: Architectural Experience Program (AXP), professional education (BArch or MArch) and Architect Registration Examination (ARE).


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IPAL: Architectural Licensure Upon Graduation


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Integrated Path to Licensure at Woodbury The School of Architecture at Woodbury University is among the first 14 accredited architectural programs to be accepted for participation in the National Council of Architectural Registration Board’s Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure (IPAL) initiative. The initiative has now expanded to include 26 programs in 21 colleges across the US. We are one of three schools in California to offer IPAL. The IPAL initiative is offered for both our undergraduate (BArch) and graduate (MArch) programs and on both campuses. The initiative allows for the integration of the three components of licensure: Architectural Experience Program (AXP), professional education (BArch or MArch) and Architect Registration Examination (ARE).


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How it works You can review the IPAL diagrams on our website to see how the Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure at Woodbury works. The diagram shows the IPAL Initiative in both the Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) program and the Master of Architecture (MArch) programs. In case of the BArch program, the educational path is designed to take students 6 years to complete. In the MArch program, the path is set up to take students 4 years to complete.

As students progress through their degree program and through AXP (formerly known as IDP) they become increasingly valuable to the firm. Whether they are in the BArch or MArch program, our students are highly motivated to gain experience and contribute to an office. The primary responsibility of the firm is to give students a range of experience, guiding them to completion of the AXP hours.


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Master of Architecture The Master of Architecture (MArch) at Woodbury University is a fully-accredited, professional degree program. The total duration of this 93-credit program is 3 years, including a summer studio prior to the final year. However, applicants who will earn or have already earned a Bachelor of Arts / Bachelor of Science (BA/BS) in Architecture or a Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) or its

equivalent abroad, are automatically considered for advanced placement into the 2nd year of the program (requiring only 63 credits to complete the program). The MArch program does not accept transfers from other graduate architecture programs, nor does it allow for mid-year (spring) entry or part-time enrollment.


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All applicants are required to submit a portfolio of creative work conveying a range of design accomplishments. The work can be both educational and professional, but individual contributions to group/team efforts should be clearly noted. Applicants who do not already hold a pre-professional degree in architecture (BS/BA) can include a range of creative work that may not always include architecture. For those with previous architectural education, it is recommended that you select a maximum of 3-5 examples of your best work. We prefer quality over quantity during the review stage. Please assemble your portfolio carefully, abiding by the specifications below. Portfolios that do not meet these requirements will not be reviewed.


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163 Specifications: Digital format: .pdf Color profile: RGB Number of files: 1 (a single multi-page .pdf, containing all work) Maximum file size: 20 MB Number of pages: no limit, but focus and brevity are preferred Provide 1 item. PDFs (up to 20MB each)


Learn more at architecture.woodbury.edu

Profile for Woodbury School of Architecture

2019 Woodbury School of Architecture Lookbook  

2019 Woodbury School of Architecture Lookbook  

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