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r i a F e B e r a w A t h g i r y p o C Be Copyright Awareness Pack

COPYRIGHT LAW IS THERE TO PROTECT YOU. SO LOOK AFTER YOUR OWN WORK AND RESPECT OTHER PEOPLE’S...

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 1


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T E A C H E R S | I N F O R M AT I O N

Teachers’ Information Sheet What you think and what you write belongs to you. You might want to earn a living from your thoughts and writing one day. You need to understand your rights and respect other people’s. Be aware, be fair. If you photocopy, scan or reproduce someone else’s written work without permission you are breaking the law. And we need to make all our students fully aware of that. When you buy a book, you own the paper and the ink and restricted access to the content. The content itself remains the property of the copyright holder - usually the writer. And it cuts both ways. If, as a teacher, you write something - a lesson plan or model essay perhaps - which someone then takes and reproduces without your permission then he or she is breaking the law. Such theft is serious, especially for professional authors, because it means that the writer of the words is getting no income from their use. If for example a copy of his or her book is bought, the author receives a percentage payment. There is also a small payment to the author if a book is borrowed from a library.

If, on the other hand, a single copy of a book is obtained and large sections of it scanned onto a computer for class use the writer gets nothing for the multiple use of his or her work. The teacher has stolen it. It is theft to take and use something which belongs to someone else. And that applies to writing as much as it does to a purse, car or jewellery. Copyright law is there to protect everybody. Most teachers are, to some extent, also writers. So look after your own work and respect other people’s - just as you would their home or material possessions. As teachers we need to role-model that respect for our students. It is part of good citizenship. We also need to make children - from a young age - aware of copyright law and how it works, just as we teach them that it is wrong and against the law to take someone else’s pencil case or sweets. As they progress through the education system, children and teenagers should learn what copyright means and how it can be protected - their own as well as that of the writers whose books and websites they are using.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 2

If their copyright is not respected there is no incentive for writers to write. Where would schools and pupils be without marvellous books like Philippa Pearce’s, Tom’s Midnight Garden, Richard Adams’s Watership Down and Philip Pullman’s Northern Lights - all of which have won the Carnegie medal in the past?


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T E A C H E R S | I N F O R M AT I O N

Frequently Asked Questions

Where can I find details of copyright law?

UK Copyright law is set out in the European Commission (EC) Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 which has been revised by a number of EC directives. You can download it from: www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts1988/Ukpga_19880048_en_1.htm

How do I get permission to reproduce an extract from a book to use in a lesson?

The school needs to buy a licence from the Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA). See www.cla.co.uk/licensing/schools. There are different levels of licence to cover different sorts of reproduction of material. But remember that no licence gives you total freedom to reproduce. There are always restrictions. This system works quite fairly because a proportion of the licence fee is paid to authors through Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS).

How long does copyright on books last?

Seventy years from the author’s death. Take Arthur Ransome’s Pigeon Post, which won the first Carnegie Medal in 1937. It goes out of copyright in 2037 because Arthur Ransome died in 1967. Rudyard Kipling’s work went out of copyright last year because he died in 1936. All the Carnegie medal winners since 1937 are still in copyright. This means that you may reproduce as much Shakespeare, Dickens or Wordsworth as you like because they have been dead for more than 70 years. But if you reproduce the works of living authors like Anne Fine, Marcus Sedgwick or Kevin Brooks - or recently dead ones like Jan Mark or Robert Westall - without permission you are breaking the law.

Is the writer of a book always the copyright holder?

Not necessarily. After an author dies someone else owns the copyright - often the writer’s family. And sometimes a writer sells or gives copyright to someone else. If you write your school’s prospectus, for example, you probably do it as part of your job as an employee. And there is an understanding between you and your school that it is the school which holds the copyright. Sometimes writers, for various reasons, concede copyright to their publishers, or give it to someone else such as a charity. But copyright is always held by someone during the writer’s life and for 70 years after his or her death.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 3


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T E A C H E R S | I N F O R M AT I O N

Frequently Asked Questions If I write, or one of my pupils writes, something we want to protect do we have to put a copyright sign ©?

Whether or not you use a sign, the copyright belongs to you (unless you’ve made an agreement to the contrary). The purpose of the sign is just to remind the reader or user that the work belongs to someone else.

Surely all this doesn’t apply to schools? We have low budgets and we reproduce material only to help our pupils learn.

There is no exemption for schools or students. Like all other organisations they must buy an appropriate licence from CLA to stay within the law.

Can I teach copyright law in citizenship lessons?

Yes, although there is no specific mention of it in the National Curriculum. Copyright education fits well into citizenship work on the media and into units of work and about rights, wrongs and respect. Many people and organisations, including ALCS, would like to see copyright education specified in the citizenship curriculum.

In this pack are eight separate activity sheets prepared by ALCS. Four are at foundation level and four at core levels. We haven’t specified age or key stage. Instead teachers can build in differentiation by selecting which activities are best suited to their pupils. All the activities are designed to make pupils more aware of copyright and the issues surrounding it. They are also linked to wider reading and 70 years of the Carnegie Medal.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 4


s l i p u P r o F s t e e h S y t i v i t c A

Foundation Activities

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text Š Susan Elkin | Page 5


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F O U N D AT I O N | A C T I V I T I E S

Foundation Activity 1: WordSearch Find the words in the wordsearch below. Words can go in any direction.

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Author Award Carnegie Copyright Illegal Josh Junk Law Library Licence

Literature Medal Millions Novel Permission Photocopy Pratchett Protection Prize Pullman

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text Š Susan Elkin | Page 6

Ransome Reproduce Scan Skellig Tamar Tulku Westall Writer Wolf Words


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F O U N D AT I O N | A C T I V I T I E S

Foundation Activity 2 - True or False? Read this short passage then tick the true or false boxes for the ten statements which follow.

In 1937 Pigeon Post by Arthur Ransome won an important new prize for a children’s book. It was called The Carnegie Medal. The author of that first winning book died 30 years later in 1967. If you own a copy - old or new - of Pigeon Post, or borrow it from a library, it is against the law for you to photocopy pages from it, to scan it into a computer or to make copies of it in any other way. This is because the content of the book - the ideas and the story - still belongs to the estate of Arthur Ransome. This is a system known as copyright. It means that no one has the right to copy any part of the book without permission from the person who owns the copyright. There is a statement at the front of Pigeon Post and most other books to remind you of this. The law says that copyright in a novel lasts until 70 years after the death of the copyright holder - usually the author. So Pigeon Post is covered by copyright until 2037. Tom’s Midnight Garden, which won the Carnegie Medal in 1958, will remain in copyright until 2076 because its author Philippa Pearce died only last year. True

False The first Carnegie Medal winner was Alfred Ransome. Pigeon Post won a new prize in 1937. Philippa Pearce died in 1958. Copyright lasts for 70 years after an author’s book is published. Pigeon Post’s copyright runs out in 2037. If you buy a novel you are allowed to scan as much of it as you like. Philippa Pearce died 48 years after winning the Carnegie Medal. The Carnegie medal was awarded for the first time in 1927. Publishers usually print a statement about copyright on a book’s back cover. The estate of Arthur Ransome holds the Pigeon Post copyright.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 7


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F O U N D AT I O N | A C T I V I T I E S

Foundation Activity 3: Titles and Authors All these books have won the Carnegie Medal. All are still in copyright. Do you know who wrote which? Draw a line to link each title with its author - who is also the copyright holder unless he or she has died. Then the copyright will be held by whomever the author left it to. Look on the library shelves or at its index - or use a website like www.amazon.co.uk to help you with any you are not sure of.

Ivan Southall Gillian Cross Kathleen Peyton Eve Garnett Robert Swindells David Rees Rosemary Sutcliff Kevin Crossley Holland CS Lewis Penelope Lively

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text Š Susan Elkin | Page 8


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F O U N D AT I O N | A C T I V I T I E S

Foundation Activity 4: Spot the Word Can you sort out these six scrambled words? All are connected either with copyright or with the Carnegie Medal.

sprimiseon birrayl

ryter phectartt grindea

chootygoppin alm tepe USE THIS AREA TO WORK OUT YOUR ANSWERS

sprimiseon = birrayl =

ryter phectartt = grindea =

chootygoppin = alm tepe =

Can you find and underline relevant words inside these sentences? The first has been done for you. Siesta marks the beginning of the afternoon in hot countries. ‘I love to play the banjo’ she said. More spectators attended the match than expected. My old bike needs proper tyres. If it’s OK with Anne, fine with me. Don’t rest until leg allows.

HOW WOULD YOU LIKE IT IF SOMEONE TOOK YOUR WORK WITHOUT PERMISSION?

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 9


s l i p u P r o F s t e e h S y t i v i t c A

Core Activities

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text Š Susan Elkin | Page 10


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CORE | ACTIVITIES

Activity 1: Spot the Word Can you sort out these six scrambled words? All are connected either with copyright or with the Carnegie Medal.

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Y Percentage payments made to authors when their work is sold. The name of a company which collects fees for writers.

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Against the law. Obtain one to get formal permission. To make available to be widely read.

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To make a copy. A novel, biography of anthology for example.

CORY WAS SURFING THE NET...

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text Š Susan Elkin | Page 11

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CORE | ACTIVITIES

Activity 2: Who Does What? Link the organisations below with the work that they do by drawing a line...

Authors' Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS)

Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA)

Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP)

Public Lending Right (PLR)

Newspaper Licensing Agency (NLA)

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text Š Susan Elkin | Page 12

Licenses schools and other organisations which want to reproduce items from newspapers.

Runs the annual Carnegie Medal and Kate Greenaway Awards.

Collects money for books which have been borrowed from libraries and pays it to authors.

Issues licences to schools and other organisations that want to reproduce parts of books.

Collects money for authors of books, plays, magazines articles and other writing which has been reproduced under licence.


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CORE | ACTIVITIES

Activity 3: You Ask The Questions Below are some answers. Write a suitable question above each... (1) Q: A: The Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society. (2) Q: A: Only if your school has bought a licence. (3) Q: A: Seventy years after the author’s death. (4) Q: A: Arthur Ransome in 1937. (5) Q: A: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. (6) Q: A: The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. (7) Q: A: To make sure that writers are motivated to go on writing. (8) Q: A: Rosemary Sutcliff for The Lantern Bearers.

AIDEN RECEIVES A PHONE CALL...

WRITING IS AN AUTHOR’S JOB. RESPECTING COPYRIGHT MEANS AUTHORS GET PAID AND THEY CAN GO ON WRITING... ...AND THAT MEANS MORE BOOKS FOR US ALL TO ENJOY.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 13


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CORE | ACTIVITIES

Activity 4: Copyright Carnegie Quiz 1.

Who won the Carnegie Medal in 1966?

a.

JRR Tolkein.

b.

Paul McCartney.

c.

No one because no book was considered suitable.

d.

Penelope Lively.

2.

Who holds the copyright on Peter Pan?

a.

No one because JM Barrie has been dead more than 70 years.

b.

Great Ormond Street Hospital.

c.

The family of JM Barrie.

d.

The British Government.

3.

Which organisation collects reproduction fees for authors of books?

a.

NLA.

b.

PLR.

c.

CLA.

d.

ALCS.

4.

If you want to quote someone else’s writing in an essay or piece of course work what to you have to do to remain with the law?

a.

Hope your school has a licence.

b.

Ring up the author and ask for permission.

c.

State clearly what you are quoting and who wrote it and keep the quotation fairly short.

d.

Don’t use quotations.

5.

Most British copyright law depends on an Act of Parliament passed in:

a.

2006.

b.

1890.

c.

1500.

d.

1988.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 14


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CORE | ACTIVITIES

Activity 4: Copyright Carnegie Quiz (continued) 6.

Five authors have won the Carnegie medal twice. Who were they?

a.

Berlie Doherty, Gillian Cross, David Rees, Kathleen Peyton, Melvyn Burgess.

b.

CS Lewis, Edward Osmond, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Beverley Naidoo, Kevin Crossley Holland.

c.

Anne Fine, Peter Dickinson, Jan Mark, Robert Westall, Margaret Mahy.

d.

Richard Adams, Philip Turner, Ivan Southall, Geraldine McCaughrean, Aidan Chambers.

7.

All Carnegie medal winning books are still in copyright because:

a.

The prize began 70 years ago in 1937 so none of the authors has been dead for more than 70 years.

b.

Special copyright arrangements are made for books which win prizes.

c.

Copyright lasts for 100 years.

d.

The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act was passed in 1937.

8.

In 1996 the Carnegie medal was, controversially, won by a book about heroin addiction. Was it:

a.

The Little Soldier by Bernard Ashley.

b.

Kensuke’s Kingdom by Michael Morpurgo.

c.

Girls out Late by Jacqueline Wilson.

d.

Junk by Melvyn Burgess.

9.

If you or your teacher wants to photocopy or scan from the page of a book so that everyone in the class has a copy you are breaking the law unless:

a.

You personally own the book you are copying from.

b.

You write the name of the author and the book clearly on each copy.

c.

The school has paid for an appropriate level of licence from the CLA.

d.

You tell the head teacher in advance.

10. Copyright matters because: a.

Without it writers don’t get paid for their work so they might stop writing.

b.

It stops people quoting each other.

c.

It shows that writers are important people.

d.

It provides jobs for staff in collecting organisations.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 15


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Answers to Activity Sheets

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text Š Susan Elkin | Page 16


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F O U N D AT I O N | A N S W E R S

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Foundation Activity 2 - True or False? True

False The first Carnegie Medal winner was Alfred Ransome. Pigeon Post won a new prize in 1937. Philippa Pearce died in 1958. Copyright lasts for 70 years after an author’s book is published. Pigeon Post’s copyright runs out in 2037. If you buy a novel you are allowed to scan as much of it as you like. Philippa Pearce died 48 years after winning the Carnegie Medal. The Carnegie medal was awarded for the first time in 1927. Publishers usually print a statement about copyright on a book’s back cover. The estate of Arthur Ransome holds the Pigeon Post copyright.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 17


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F O U N D AT I O N | A N S W E R S

Foundation Activity 3: Titles and Authors Wolf .......................................................... Gillian Cross Stone Cold ............................................... Robert Swindells Exeter Blitz ............................................... David Rees The Lantern Bearers ................................. Rosemary Sutcliff Josh ......................................................... Ivan Southall The Family from One End Street .............. Eve Garnett The Ghost of Thomas Kempe ................... Penelope Lively The Last Battle ......................................... CS Lewis The Edge of the Cloud .............................. Kathleen Peyton Storm ....................................................... Kevin Crossley Holland

Foundation Activity 4: Spot the Word sprimiseon = PERMISSION birrayl = LIBRARY

ryter phectartt = TERRY PRATCHETT grindea = READING

Can you find and underline relevant words inside these sentences? Siesta marks the beginning of the afternoon in hot countries. ‘I love to play the banjo’ she said. More spectators attended the match than expected. My old bike needs proper tyres. If it’s OK with Anne, Fine with me. Don’t rest until leg allows.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 18

chootygoppin = PHOTOCOPYING alm tepe = MAL PEET


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CORE | ANSWERS

Core Activity 1: Spot the Word L

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Core Activity 2: Who Does What? Newspaper Licensing Agency (NLA) Licenses schools and other organisations which want to reproduce items from newspapers. Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) Runs the annual Carnegie Medal and Kate Greenaway Awards. Public Lending Right (PLR) Collects money for books which have been borrowed from libraries and pays it to authors. Copyright Licensing Agency (CLA) Issues licences to schools and other organisations that want to reproduce parts of books. Authors’ Licensing & Collecting Society (ALCS) Collects money for authors of books, plays, magazines articles and other writing which has been reproduced under licence.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text Š Susan Elkin | Page 19


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CORE | ANSWERS

Core Activity 3: You ask the questions (1) Q: Which organisation collects money for authors from books that have been reproduced under licence? Or, what does ALCS stand for? A: The Authors’ Licensing and Collecting Society. (2) Q: Am I allowed to copy an extract of a book I like? A: Only if your school has bought a licence. (3) Q: How long does copyright last for? A: 70 years after the author’s death. (4) Q: Who was the first winner of the Carnegie award? A: Arthur Ransome in 1937. (5) Q: Who runs the Carnegie awards? Or, what does CILIP stand for? A: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. (6) Q: Where in law is copyright set out? A: The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. (7) Q: Why does copyright exist? A: To make sure that writers are motivated to go on writing. (8) Q: Who won the Carnegie award in 1959? A: Rosemary Sutcliff for The Lantern Bearers.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 20


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CORE | ANSWERS

Activity 4: Copyright Carnegie Quiz 1.

Who won the Carnegie Medal in 1966?

c.

No one because no book was considered suitable.

2.

Who holds the copyright on Peter Pan?

b.

Great Ormond Street Hospital.

3.

Which organisation collects reproduction fees for authors of books?

d.

ALCS.

4.

If you want to quote someone else’s writing in an essay or piece of course work what to you have to do to remain with the law?

c.

State clearly what you are quoting and who wrote it and keep the quotation fairly short.

5.

Most British copyright law depends on an act of parliament passed in:

d.

1988

6.

Five authors have won the Carnegie medal twice. Who were they?

c.

Anne Fine, Peter Dickinson, Jan Mark, Robert Westall, Margaret Mahy.

7.

All Carnegie medal winning books are still in copyright because:

a.

The prize began 70 years ago in 1937 so none of the authors has been dead for more than 70 years.

8.

In 1996 the Carnegie medal was, controversially, won by a book about heroin addiction. Was it:

d.

Junk by Melvyn Burgess.

9.

If you or your teacher wants to photocopy or scan from the page of a book so that everyone if the class has a copy you are breaking the law unless:

c.

The school has paid for an appropriate level of licence from the CLA.

10. Copyright matters because: a.

Without it writers don’t get paid for their work so they might stop writing.

ALCS Copyright Awareness Pack | Text © Susan Elkin | Page 21

Copyright awareness pack  

ALCS Teachers information pack on current copyright law

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