Page 82

Ever since, Danielle has found steady success, but still keeps a relaxed mentality. She works out of her living room, a couch butting up against her work space, and she talks about artists getting too caught up in sketching or over-thinking. Her work is much quicker. Still, as relaxed as Danielle seems to be, one cannot help but notice her attention to detail. Precision is evident in all she does: from the slightest rotation of a piece of cereal, to the multiple ways in which she arranges the tail off a letter in order to see every possibility, to her insistence on the use of natural light when photographing her work, to her careful selection of collaborators. Erin Robey, a hand-picked collaborator and a friend, watches Danielle work, waiting to take pictures of the finished project. She occasionally adds her own insights, often joking with and making fun of Danielle. “She’s so thoroughly unimpressed with me,” Danielle laughs. “It’s awesome.” The two have worked together for a long time, dating back to before either was making a living off of art. Working at an unfulfilling job, Danielle says she learned what not to do to be successful. “Mostly this [success] came from being super broke. It’s really tough on your self-esteem,” she says. “I missed a Christmas one year and I realized I wasn’t doing things I

wanted to be doing.” Still, it took time for everything to click. “Reliving those moments, people gloss over details. That’s not how I go. People are in this position of crying on the floor, running to work after getting a flat tire so you’re not fired for being late one more time. There are a lot of people in that position, so it’s nice to share how much of a screw-up I am.” These days Danielle is flown all over the country to do work in Los Angeles, Brooklyn, Minneapolis, Dallas, and plenty of cities in between. She even recently worked on a project in Dublin, Ireland. Her home, however, continues to be Columbus. When she was struggling with the often-lonely reality of a freelancer, she would reach out to other successful local artists on Twitter and meet with them for coffee, gaining insights and making friends. “I like living here a lot. I love the artistic community here. I’m surprised you don’t hear about them more, but it’s because they’re all busy. I’m so thankful and honored to call these people my friends.” The community is one reason she prefers Columbus to traditional art centers on the coasts. Not only does Danielle say that people there are surprised to hear she can afford rent, but she says artists are more competitive, whereas here “people just want to help each other.”

Profile for Wonderfilled Magazine

Wonderfilled Magazine Volume Two  

Discover Columbus, Ohio! Exploring the world around us, one city at a time, through food, craft, art and design. Everything that makes life...

Wonderfilled Magazine Volume Two  

Discover Columbus, Ohio! Exploring the world around us, one city at a time, through food, craft, art and design. Everything that makes life...

Advertisement