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A City for People Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life

2016

Endorsed by Council 30 May 2016


Foreword A great city for people Taking its first steps towards a great city for people with the 2007 revitalization strategy, Wollongong City has initiated a visionary process that marks a paradigm shift in the planning culture of the city. Gehl Architects was invited in 2014 to be part of a process that has as its main focus – putting people at the center of planning in order to strengthen city life, vibrancy, sustainability and active mobility. Making this shift will enable the creation of a city center that is more attractive for residents, business and longterm investment. The vision of creating people-oriented, sustainable and livable cities has become a general and increasingly urgent desire for many cities in the 21st century. All these objectives can be strengthened immeasurably by increasing the care and concern for pedestrians, cyclists and city life in general. A ‘Public Space Public Life Survey’ is a tool that enables a city to put public life on the agenda by registering and analyzing the status of ‘life’ between the buildings. The survey results give a better understanding of how streets and public spaces are used, and the behavior of people in the city. The survey results are used to develop targeted strategies for positive change and improving conditions for people using the city that can be further evaluated to measure the success of such change and investment. This method and approach to collect data about people in cities has been used successfully the world-over in cities such as New York, London, Sydney, Melbourne and Copenhagen. In Wollongong, the Public Space Public Life Survey was given high priority by letting a taskforce of City staff take a uniquely ‘hands-on’ approach to conduct and survey all counts and registrations of public space and public life activity, instead of usually having students conduct the surveys. The high degree of involvement by the city staff has given great ownership to the process and knowledge about the methods and the actual status of city life. This will enable the city staff to repeat the surveys and use the data to monitor change and effect of their planning strategies and decisions. The survey was conducted in the summer of 2014 and has given a detailed understanding of life and movement in central Wollongong. The data has since served as a guiding tool for the strategies and schematic projects presented in this report - both as ‘quick wins’ and more long term actions for change. It takes courage and great leadership with a clear and strong vision backed up with the skills to implement the strategies and actions described in this report. What Gehl Architects has seen and experienced with the project team at Wollongong City, with its vision, engagement and enthusiasm through-out the process, and together with the equal enthusiasm and leadership of its politicians, stakeholders and citizens, indicates to us that Wollongong is capable and ready for creating a change of mindset within city planning. We wish you all the best when taking the next steps towards a great city for people. Copenhagen, April 2016

Jan Gehl Architect, Professor (rtd), Dr. hc. Gehl Architects

Acknowledgements Wollongong City Council would like to show their respect and acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the Land, Elders past and present, and extend that respect to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

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This document has been made in partnership between Gehl Architects and Wollongong City Council and in collaboration with McGreggor Coxall.


Contents Introduction 4

How to read

Introduction 4 A liveable city 5 The study area 6 Celebrating achievements 7

Informing the Vision

Directing the focus of city design on the human dimension, a priority is given to delivering high quality city streets and spaces. This will invite people to rediscover their City, and to appreciate the unique and beautiful qualities offered by Wollongong City Centre.

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10

Creating a city for people

12

City centre-wide projects Unique urban life projects Rail Arrival Western Crown Crown Street Mall MacCabe Park Lower Crown - Arts Precinct Foreshore

12 13 14 16 18 20 22 24

City Centre Vision

Inspiration

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Conclusion

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A City for People sets the Vision and Strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong City Centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional City.

Supporting the Vision - A City for People is supported by a suite of documents as outlined below which detail the background analysis and data which informs the way forward. The implementation plan defines the actions to deliver this plan.

The suite A A City for People Sets the Vision and strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong City Centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional city. Introduces 12 vision statements for our City followed by six Urban Life Projects with actions to improve public life.

Strategic Document

01

02

03

04

Public Space Public Life Study

Public Life Data

Engagement Report

Implementation Plan

A presentation of the study area and an analysis of the physical conditions provided for pedestrians in 2014. The analysis looks at issues related to walking, as well as generally getting around and issues related to spending time in the City.

A survey of pedestrian activities on summer and winter days in selected spaces. Data is divided into observations of pedestrian traffic, as well as staying activities in these spaces. This document provides a base to successfully measure change in the future.

An analysis of what we heard from the community during the draft exhibition period, and how this has impacted and influenced the final report. Consists of all engagement undertaken by Council, submisisons received and online survey results.

The Implementation Plan takes each action from ‘A City for People’ and sets a priority of delivery. This becomes a refined list of projects reviewed annually as part of Council’s business planning cycle.

Supporting Documents

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Introduction Reviewing the City Centre Revitalisation Strategy (2007)

Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life a tool for change

Creating ‘A City for People’

In 2007, Council endorsed the City Centre Revitalisation Strategy, a group of documents setting the strategic framework for the city centre.

In 2014 Council partnered with Gehl Architects to undertake a Public Spaces Public Life (PSPL) study. Gehl Architects are world leaders in the study of city life, understanding the complexities required to deliver liveable cities.

A City for People sets the Vision and Strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong City Centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional City.

The 2007 Vision set a 25 year strategic framework for the City Centre aimed to attract 6,000 new residents and 10,000 new jobs. City life is continously evolving. Nine years after the adoption of the Vision, it is important to check-in with progress and make sure we are on track. A City for People is the next instalment in the strategic direction to deliver the high quality, liveable city. A City for People replaces the City Centre Vision and the City Centre Civic Improvement Plan.

The PSPL study investigated our city centre in detail revealing its vulnerabilities in order to set the direction to deliver the city centre the community aspire to enjoy. The data collected will form a baseline from which we can measure change over time and report on progress.

The Vision establishes a benchmark for all aspects of decision making for City Centre life and should be used by policy makers, the development industry and land owners to guide investment and decision making. Directing the focus of City design on the human dimension, priority is given to delivering high quality city streets and spaces to invite people to rediscover their city and to appreciate the unique and beautiful qualities offered by Wollongong City Centre.

Turning the design process upside down - first life, then space and then buildings

Life

We formulate a vision and a program of activities based on the type of life (activities and attractions) that are inherent in a given area.

Space

We develop a public space network that can support the proposed public life through scale, form and climate.

Buildings

We envision how buildings can contribute to our public life aspirations, in terms of height, massing and scale, as well as functionality and interaction.

The Gehl Approach Gehl Architects strives to put public life at the top of the agenda. By doing so cities are able to create a stronger coherence between the lives lived by people and the planned/existing built form. Built around four decades of experience, the Gehl approach requires a thorough understanding people’s use of public space. This approach spends time counting, measuring and analyzing cities, recording the ‘life’ that occurs on streets and in public spaces and measuring the qualities of the surrounding ‘space’. This data, with consultation, interviews and surveys helps us to better understand the interests of citizens in the public realm. This process allows for more qualified decisions about how to make cities for people, creating

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Introduction

outcomes which are beneficial for everyone, so that cities and quality of life gets increasingly better over time. This data-driven approach sits behind well known City Centre transformations in Melbourne, Adelaide, New York and Copenhagen. This clear and thorough documentation of the City, allows changes to be measured while providing empirical evidence of improvements of the quality of Public Life. Gehl has shown that public realm improvements have a large impact on the quality of Public Life in the City as citizens see quantifiable evidence of improved quality of life.

”First we shape our cities, then our cities shape us” Jan Gehl


A liveable city We often talk about creating a ‘liveable’ city’ but what does that mean? A liveable city is one that offers a variety of attractions and opportunites for people to work, live, play, learn, visit and invest.

Lively

Safe

A liveable city puts public life at the centre of its planning, strengthened by an overall focus on liveliness, health, attractiveness, sustainablity and safety. Establishing a high quality city for people delivers a range of health, lifestyle benefits and promotes confidence in economic growth.

Public Life Healthy

A liveble city is an achievable goal for Wollongong and requires collaboration across the community, government agencies and the private sector.

Sustainable

Attractive

The community aspiration for a liveable city A detailed analysis can be found in the supporting Engagement Report.

“It needs to feel vibrant, welcoming and a place where diversity and artistic expression is celebrated. Linkage from the train station precinct through the heart of the city to the beach precinct would be fantastic”

“The development of interesting, small artspaces, cafes and venues for intelligent music has been great to see in recent years - we now need more trees and flowers everywhere, and pleasant places to sit and think and read - we need loads of small interesting places to browse and discover, not large and loud culture for a mass mainstream that doesn’t actually exist - people respond to opportunities to be calm, reflective, open and interactive with strangers, and this is the culture that should be encouraged by public spaces “

Importance of Public Life in Wollongong Cities are complex and face a range of challenges. Improving liveability has been demonstrated to strengthen city appeal, enhancing attractiveness for residents and business. The success of our City Centre directly influences the success of local business, the quality of life of its residents and more broadly the economic prosperity of the Region. To be successful, the city has to be nimble, taking advantage of opportunities as they arise and not be afraid to make mistakes, understanding that you need to try new things to grow and adapt.

As we move into the 21st Century, Wollongong City Centre is evolving and we can see shifts in the city culture and appeal. We value our industrial heritage while growth in the knowledge, health and creative sectors, diversify the economy. Wollongong 2022: Community Strategic Plan sets an objective to expand and improve the profile of Wollongong as a regional city of the Illawarra. identifying clear prorities to deliver a revitalised and active City Centre

the vision, and informed priorities for delivering change and investment. ‘A City for People’ celebrates our communities appreciation and want for improved public life, introducing opportunities for people to meet, converse, stay and be inspired by our City. There is a focus on small elements and the influencial role they play in making life in our City Centre flourish for everyone.

The values and aspirations of the community, industry and government agencies to deliver a high quality liveable City Centre has guided

Introduction

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The study area Wollongong City Centre is defined by the Wollongong Local Environmental Plan 2009. We have gathered data for the inner city area, from Wollongong Hospital to the foreshore, to capture the most intensely used areas of the City. The City Centre, as it is recognised today, has evolved since the early 1800s from a natural landscape to a modern City. It has retained layers of its natural, Aboriginal and European heritage. The series of maps below shows the indicative pattern of European settlement.

Kembla Street

Beaton Park

c. 1830s Original town plan centred on the Harbour

Church

Keira Stre

et

Street

Flagstaff Hill

Market St

reet

Crown St re

et

Burelli St

reet

MacCabe Park

Corrimal

c. 1860s The city grows to the south, and mine tramlines are introduced

10 min

Street

Gladsto

ne Aven

ue

6 min

c. 1880s Rail link to Sydney. Rapid expansion of the city around Crown Street

1km, 10 min walk 500m, 6 min walk Wollongong City Centre Open green space

c. 1900+ By early 1900 the city has spread to the area recognised today

Cities with tightly defined centres provide greater potential for flourishing city life, as well as preventing the dilution of city vibrancy and activity.

The City and its people

The City is nestled between the escarpment and the sea. However weak links to the foreshore and the threat of tall buildings mean that the City’s unique setting is underappreciated. The City is largely defined (4km2) and the core has a retail focus with a void of residents. Vibrancy is lost with street life generally declining after the lunch time peak. A car oriented City Centre causes the public realm to lack diversity in experience, diluting and disencouraging walking between key destinations.

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Introduction

With the University of Wollongong and TAFE on its doorstep, the City Centre has access to a growing student population. However, there is a limited student presence in the City with only 8% of university-provided student accommodation in the inner City Centre. The City Centre has a culturally diverse population speaking over 35 languages and demographically we are changing. Our City Centre supports a high proportion of young people (14-20 year olds 17%). However they are not noticeable in city life.

Just over 650 people live within the core of the City Centre

Over 35 languages are spoken in City Centre households


Celebrating achievements A lot has changed over the past five years in Wollongong. A diverse emerging creative culture is reflected through the community and Council initiatives. A lot of people are

unaware of these new and exciting changes. This page celebrates some of these - there are a whole lot more than we can list.

Viva la Gong recognises our cultural diversity and celebrates this with art and music.

Northbeach Pavillion re-build of prominent landmark celebrates our coastal lifestyle.

Public Art celebrating local talent brings colour and life to the city’s floors, gardens and public walls.

Globe Lane comes to life via a collaboration between Council, GPT and small business.

Constant improvements and growth of markets bring vibrancy to our City Centre.

The Free Green Shuttle Bus, loops around our city every 15 minutes. Planning for improved bike facilities is underway.

50+ new bars and cafes in our City, bringing a new fresh vibe and a refreshed evening economy.

The Blue Mile links the City Centre with our foreshore and harbour, encouraging people to experience public space.

Wonderwalls Festival livens blank walls with evocative street art.

The Pop-Up Garden in Crown Street Mall introduced greening and places for people to sit and interact.

An 80% - 111% increase in residential population within our City Centre core.

Comic Gong festival promotes comic culture and local comic artists.

Introduction

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Informing the Vision The analysis presented by supporting documents relies on city data, technical analysis and analytical observations to understand the way the City Centre functions now. With this analysis we look at the key challenges we currently face and the potential to re-positionWollongong as one of the most liveable cities in the world. Having this thorough understanding of our City Centre allows us to measure changes that occur within the City Centre with our overall city-wide vision.

The city’s rich heritage is hidden and its unique setting is not realised. Challenge

Potential

Celebrate the uniqueness

Weak connections to the foreshore detach the city from its natural assets, while visual connections to the escarpment are under threat by tall buildings.

The City Centre leverages off its world class foreshore, with strong visual and physical connections that reflect its coastal - escarpment setting. The City’s heritage will be prominent and celebrated with pride.

The focus of the City is diluted over a large City Centre area. Challenge

Potential

Develop a human scale city The streetscape quality is compromised by inactive and dull buildings at street level. Planning policy permits buildings to be constructed up to 120 metres which compromises the human scale of the city.

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Informing the Vision

A tightly defined City Centre Core will guide priortize for investments. Buildings will interact with and be considerate of the experience of the City at street level. A push for high quality design excellence will celebrate the built form and how public space can interact with it.


The city is monofunctional and lacks a resident population to bring energy day and night. Potential

Challenge

Grow a living city

The university brings a population of 24,000 students which is not reflected in the dynamic of the City Centre. Large areas of open space and foreshore support the City, but have limited functionality, programming and are disconnected.

Introducing more residents into the City Centre, will bring life to the City day and night and encourage students into the City. The open public spaces will be of high quality and connected with options to eat, relax and play close to homes.

The city is designed to prioritise convenient access for vehicles, leaving alternate transport modes uncompetitive. Challenge

Potential

Create a pedestrian friendly city

P P P

P

P

When rated against Gehl’s 12 quality criteria, pedestrian experience as a whole is poor. Footpath interuptions, lack of covered walkways and intersections that prioritise vehicular movement create a segmented City.

P

The City will prioritise pedestrians and cycling, encourgaging people to walk rather than drive within the City Centre. An increase in public transport offers allow people to experience the City entirely on foot.

Informing the Vision

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City Centre Vision In the 21st century Wollongong City Centre will be a peopleorientated, sustainable and liveable city. Wollongong City Centre is a thriving and unique regional city, delivering a diverse economy and offering a high quality lifestyle. The city centre is nationally recognised as a liveable city and is the place where people want to live, learn, work and play. The City Centre Vision is supported by 12 Vision Statements.

Celebrate the uniqueness Corrimal & opportunity site

History

1

2

3

The natural beauty of the escarpment is seen from city streets and in-between city buildings.

Offering a seamless journey between the city and the sand, the coastal setting underpins city experience and attracts a diverse range of people.

The nostalgia of our past shapes the city identity and tells a story of our rich Indigenous, European and industrial history.

The foreshore is exciting and there are a range of things to do, see and enjoy.

Heritage is revealed in City buildings and the spaces that exist in-between.

Nature is an important part of the City street character, providing comfort and connection to the escarpment setting.

Develop a human scale city Quality

5

6

The City Centre is tightly defined, guiding priorities for investment and a growing economy.

Buildings are designed to relate to City streets, delivering a comfortable scale and connecting people with street life.

A compact City Centre delivers a more connnected CBD, bringing efficiencies and enhancing its regional role.

The character and form of buildings responds to and respects the City’s natural setting and spread public life across the City.

Architectural design excellence is celebrated, and a culture of high quality design is evident in the look and feel of the City.

4

city centre

10

City Centre Vision

Distribution

Street presentation is exceptional, with high quality building edges interacting with the street.


Grow a living city 7

Public spaces

8

9

Active streets

UNIVERSTITY

The City Centre has a strong, growing residential population who enjoy the lifestyle offered by a cosmopolitan City.

The City Centre delivers a network of intuitively connected paths and open spaces.

City blocks, streets and sites provide opportunities to live, work, learn and play.

A diverse community that is socially connected and has a shared sense of pride.

Unique in character and role, the spaces are well designed offering flexibility in the way they supporting city life.

A range of uses engage with the street deliver vibrancy day and night.

Create an accessible, pedestrian-friendly city 10

Public transport

11

12

Private transport

P

P P

P

P P P

Streets prioritise walking and cycling, enticing people to weave through the City and discover its offerings.

Public Transport is the preferred way of accessing the City, seamlessly linking with the pedestrian and cycle network.

Vehicle movements and car parking support City Centre functions while prioritising pedestrian comfort.

Streets are comfortable, enjoyable and safe places. Inviting people of all ages and abilities to meet and socialise, attracting city life day and night.

Regular and reliable, bus and train trips conveniently connect to key destinations (eg, hospital and university).

There is a sense of pedestrian priority on City streets with through traffic redirected and cars encouraged to slow down. City Centre Vision

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Creating a city for people City centre-wide projects A collaborative approach Public committed Private transport transport streets Active History Mobility spaces to change The City Vision reflects the big picture - what the City Centre aspires to become. The vision establishes a benchmark for all aspects of decision making for the City Centre and should be used by policy makers, the development industry, the community and land owners to guide strategy and investment. With a clear vision guiding the long term goal, it is important to recognise that change will be seen over time through a series of small scale, incremental changes. The vision will only be realised when the city works collaboratively so that every decision (small or large) is aligned with the big picture. Some actions will deliver visible changes to the look and feel of the City Centre, while others will be policy focused and work behind the scenes. Some actions affect the whole City Centre, while others are site specific. What is most important is that every project needs to bring the City Centre closer to achieving its vision.

P

P P

P

P

Implementation – Ideas into action A series of public life projects have been identified, highlighting important locations across the City Centre to focus investment to deliver incremental change. The projects are interconnected along Crown Street, the city spine that links east to west and binds together the city from its rail arrival and health precinct to its world-class foreshore.

12

Creating a City for People

Through these projects, it becomes clear how the vision relates to on the ground change, with key principles guiding short, medium and long term outcomes in each location. Delivering against the vision will require collaboration across government agencies, private industry and the community.

The City Centre Implementation Plan accompanying this document sets out the actions to deliver city-wide and area specific outcomes outlined in this report. It provides a series of projects, priorities and commitments to budget. The City Centre Implementation Plan is reviewed annually in accordance with Council’s Annual Planning Cycle and will be an ongoing tool to discuss, prioritise and guide the delivery of A City for People.


Unique urban life projects Rail Arrival

CROWN STREET

Crown St Mall Western Crown

MacCabe Park Foreshore CROWN STREET

Lower Crown St

Creating a City for People

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Rail Arrival The city will offer an inviting, high quality and well connected rail arrival. With strong pedestrian links to the City Centre and hospital, it will greet visitors and locals with an exciting and safe arrival experience of vibrant, active, enhanced public spaces and lanes.

Forecourt provides high quality connection for

Cro

wn

pedestrians and cyclists

St

with City High quality city centre arrival

t

iS

rell

Bu

experience.

Regeneration supports increased residential living Buildings are inviting

Active Public Space

at street

High Quality Pedestrian Mainstreet

level

High Quality Pedestrian Experience Enhanced Laneway Experience Major Activation Node Regeneration Opportunity Heritage Contributes to Streetscape Strengthened Pedestrian Link Active Edge Bicycle Link

Short term strategies enhance existing laneway links to station.

Before

Photomontages are for visioning and are an example of potential changes only.

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Creating a City for People


Key outcomes to achieve this In the short term (1-2 years)

In the medium term (5+ years)

In the long term (10+ years)

A range of temporary and permanent projects will offer a welcoming station arrival experience, and improve connections with key destinations across the City Centre - Mall, Hospital and Foreshore.

Upgrades to the streetscape refresh the appearance and comfort of the station.

The rail arrival is welcoming and has become a preferred mode of travel to access the City Centre.

Buildings along lanes and streets incorporate a range of fun public art projects to bring life to blank walls. Temporary wayfinding will experiment different ways to invite people to link to the City Centre.

Permanent wayfinding is established and coordinated across the City Centre, enhancing the walking and cycling connections to the station. Buildings along lanes and streets open up and interact with the street, and offer opportunities for people to stop and spend time in this part of the City Centre.

There are clear connections, leading people through the City Centre and to key destinations. A new resident population in surrounding areas supports lively streets which are friendly and safe at all times. The eastern entrance supports a strong, coordinated connection to the city’s public transport, bicycle and pedestrian network.

Hole in the wall coffee shop and seating enhances

Large scale temporary art to activate forecourt and help with local information.

Well defined, pedestrian friendly streets create a safe and legible access for commuters.

Artistic and innovative wayfinding solutions using the existing fabric.

Small businesses enhance lane-ways and provide passive surveillance.

New and active Crown Street railway forecourt.

Artistic and innovative wayfinding solutions.

Innovative art uses existing urban spaces to enhance experiences.

Regeneration of industrial sites for mixed use/ residential development. Creating a City for People

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Western Crown The city will have a pedestrian prioritised spine with plenty of spaces to stop and sit. A thriving hub for local businesses, Western Crown’s high quality revitalised shopfronts will establish a strong and active engagement with the street.

Quality pedestrianfriendly high Keira St

Regeneration for residential

street uniquely Wollongong.

population allows for a thriving street - day and night

Crown St Burelli St

Active Public Space

Streetscape

High Quality Pedestrian Mainstreet

protects and

High Quality Pedestrian Experience

enhances ‘fine grain’ small tenancies.

Enhanced Laneway Experience Major Access Node Regeneration Opportunity Heritage Contributes to Streetscape Strengthened Pedestrian Link Active Edge Bicycle Link

Short term strategies enhance the pedestrian experience of Western Crown.

Before

Photomontages are for visioning and are an example of potential changes only.

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Creating a City for People


Key outcomes to achieve this In the short term (1-2 years)

In the medium term (5+ years)

In the long term (10+ years)

Streets and lanes are clean and inviting with a range of permanent and temporary projects delivering light and colour to enhance the comfort of the street for people day and night, and enhancing the connection between the Mall and the train station.

The street looks and feels more like a city high street with the streetscape upgraded (between Atchison Street and Jubilee bridge) to improve accessibility and amenity.

Western Crown is a hive of activity day and night, offering a uniquely Wollongong experience.

Vacant shops are being used to showcase an eclectic mix of uniquely Wollongong offers to bring vibrancy and interest to the street.

Bus stops look refreshed with temporary solutions to improve seating and the waiting experience.

The street delivers a high quality pedestrian environment, alive with outdoor dining, interesting shopping and wide footpaths and there is a continuous connection between the rail arrival and the Mall.

Planning policy is in place which offers incentives for regeneration opportunities and ensures the human scale of the existing heritage streetscape and small shopfronts are protected.

Temporary parklet provides places to sit & wait for public transport.

Legible, pedestrian-friendly crossing points.

Pedestrian prioritisation & street trees define the street edge.

Affordable arrangements for local creatives brings life to empty shopfronts.

Enhanced street address & night time programming keeps streets active during the day and at night.

Wider footpaths allow for on-street dining.

Shopfront revitalisation engages with the street.

Lighting and enhanced public domain create a legible streetscape.

Increased density in surrounding areas supports local business. Creating a City for People 17


Crown Street Mall Crown Street Mall will be a dynamic activity centre for the city. At the centre of the city, the Mall will be a destination with regular free programming and a diversity of functions both day and night. Flexible spaces will invite people of all ages to spend time, creating a constant hive of activity. A vibrant and exciting network of laneways will connect the Mall with the City.

Reinforce visual connection to the Church

Support active laneways

Market St

encouraging a diversity of uses

Designate spaces for regular programming both day and night

Active Public Space

Crown S

t

High Quality Pedestrian Mainstreet High Quality Pedestrian Experience Enhanced Laneway Experience Major Activation Node Major Access Node Regeneration Opportunity

Burelli St

Heritage Contributes to Streetscape Strengthened Pedestrian Link Active Edge Bicycle Link

Before

Short term strategies activate the Mall with regular temporary programming. Photomontages are for visioning and are an example of potential changes only.

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Creating a City for People


Key outcomes to achieve this In the short term (1-2 years)

In the medium term (5+ years)

In the long term (10+ years)

The role and identity of the Mall is diversifying with a range of temporary and permanent activation projects enhancing the experience of the Mall and invite people to explore their City Centre.

Laneways are alive and have unique characters of their own with outdoor dining, music and lighting.

The Mall is a unique and exciting place at the heart of the City Centre with a real sense of connection with its history and foreshore setting.

Art brings colour and interest, and gives a sense of change, and markets continue to bring diversity during the week and on the weekend.

The Mall is home to outstanding public art which is of regional and international interest, and visitors are compelled to explore the length of the Mall with a range of play, shopping and free street performance.

The diversity of attractions bring excitement and promote inquisitive visitors to explore beyond the Mall, into the lanes and city offerings beyond.

The unique history of the Mall is celebrated by permanent and temporary projects.

The stage is the focal point and meeting place with regular performances day and night and is enhanced with temporary shade and seating to improve comfort.

There is activity day and night and people are drawn to a range of different experiences which invite them to spend time and enjoy city life.

Temporary regular programming creates a sense of place and destination.

Permanent structures which can be used for a range of activities help define spaces.

Temporary pop up use of spaces encourages new visitors.

Busking enhances the visitor experience.

Temporary installations bring play into the Mall.

Permanent structures which can be used for a range of activities help define spaces.

Quality outdoor displays & stalls strengthen the Mall.

Temporary activities help to define place and space.

Frequent events such as markets create a destination. Creating a City for People

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MacCabe Park A premier city park offering a range of activities for all ages. MacCabe Park will be celebrated as a lively, high quality urban park supporting a balanced lifestyle for city residents and workers. A place of pride for the city supported by activities (large scale events and festivals) cafĂŠs, and public facilities, it will be an active space connected to the City Centre.

Globe Ln

Establish an Burelli St

inviting and active park edge

A high quality park programmed with a range of Stewart

activities

St

Active Public Space Bank St

High Quality Pedestrian Mainstreet High Quality Pedestrian Experience Enhanced Laneway Experience

Residential

Major Activation Node

density supports

Major Access Node

park life

Regeneration Opportunity Heritage Contributes to Streetscape Strengthened Pedestrian Link Ellen St

Active Edge Bicycle Link

Short term strategies engage a variety of ages within the park

Before

Photomontages are for visioning and are an example of potential changes only.

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Creating a City for People


Key outcomes to achieve this In the short term (1-2 years)

In the medium term (5+ years)

In the long term (10+ years)

The perception of the park is changing. A range of fun, temporary play elements engage people to use the park in different ways.

The city cycle network extends through the park with unique cycling play options that tap in to the park’s velodrome history.

MacCabe Park is the premier city centre park, integrating with the city and supporting high quality links with the Mall, Station and Foreshore.

A range of temporary food offers are trialed to build diversity and encourage people to stay and enjoy the park for longer.

The park has a strong connection to the Mall with north/south connections (physical and visual) via Globe Way, Church and Keira Streets.

Buildings along the park incorporate a range of fun public art projects to bring life to blank walls.

Buildings interfacing with the park interact with a range of complimentary uses which bring vibrancy day and night.

Evening activities enhance the park at night.

New cafĂŠs with park vistas activate the park edge and support busy playgrounds.

Improved youth services with integrated facilities.

Recreation space for children uses the existing topography.

Re-use can activate the park and work with park aims to enhance park activities.

Permanent play structures and community garden enhances the park’s focus on youth and education.

Temporary businesses support park users.

Strong connections to the pedestrian network.

Active play offers spaces that cater to all age groups.

People use the park day and night for a range of activities and the park hosts important city centre celebrations. Appropriate development supports park activation, with surrounding development integrating with and enhancing park life.

Creating a City for People

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Lower Crown - Arts Precinct Interconnected laneways, streets and buildings which celebrate art, music and literature. The precinct becomes a focal point from which Wollongong’s cultural expression and experience can radiate through the City Centre. Surrounding buildings interact with, support and open on to the Central Urban plaza, providing offers for residents and workers to sit, eat, work and play day through to night.

Market St

Generate cultural programming of public spaces day

Improve

and night

connections with the city and Lower Crown Street

Crown St

Buildings to interact with, and

Active Public Space

open up onto

High Quality Pedestrian Main street

plaza.

High Quality Pedestrian Experience

Burelli St

Enhanced Laneway Experience Major Activation Node Major Access Node Heritage Contributes to Streetscape Strengthened Pedestrian Link Active Edge

Before

Short term strategies enhance enclosure in arts square and temporarily program edges.

GALLERY TOWN HALL

CAFE

ARTS HUB

LIBRARY

Photomontages are for visioning and are an example of potential changes only.

22

Creating a City for People


Key outcomes to achieve this In the short term (1-2 years)

In the medium term (5+ years)

In the long term (10+ years)

Changing art and cultural displays create a focal point in the plaza and build on the creative Arts Hub established in the lower Town Hall.

There is a coordinated program of spaces and buildings with Art and Culture celebrated.

Streetscape upgrades in Lower Crown Street reinforce its role of an outdoor dining precinct and key connector between the Mall and Foreshore.

Spaces and buildings are alive with local creative projects (temporary and permanent) delivering seating and shade to improve comfort.

Lanes are enhanced to promote improved pedestrian connections between Lower Crown Street, the Town Hall forecourt, Town Hall pocket park, laneways and the central urban plaza.

There are welcoming links between the Arts Precinct Plaza via activated laneways which draw people in.

An Arts Precinct Committee oversees the integration and programming of all sites, spaces and events day and night.

The Arts Precinct feels alive with people day and night and buildings are inviting, fronting onto streets and public spaces.

Temporary food trucks activate lanes during the evening.

Pop up galleries activate laneways during opening and closing hours.

Artist in residence programs/galleries.

Temporary outdoor public exhibition spaces offer a constant and changing attraction.

Improved public domain that caters to workers and students.

Cheap artistic strategies employed to create a sense of enclosure.

Temporary seating and structures create a sense of enclosure.

Art fair and stalls bring together local creatives.

Improved building interface & local gallery.

The plaza is programmed with a range of events day and night and these extend and connect to venues in surrounding lanes and streets.

Creating a City for People

23


Foreshore A thriving outdoor culture will connect the city with its relaxed beach lifestyle. The foreshore’s natural beauty informs the character and identity of the City Centre. Strong visual and physical connections along Crown, Burelli and Market Streets invites pedestrians to move easily between the City and Foreshore. South Beach forecourt provides an exciting sense of arrival with a range of activities and programmed spaces to invite people.

Harbour St

Market St

Mari ne

Dr

Market Sq

Support strong

Pedestrian & cycling

visual links to

connections

beach

between foreshore and city

Crown

St

Active Public Space High Quality Pedestrian Mainstreet High Quality Pedestrian Experience

Improve Burelli St

Enhanced Laneway Experience Major Activation Node

building interface with Foreshore

Define the South Beach Forecourt

Major Access Node Regeneration Opportunity Heritage Contributes to Streetscape Strengthened Pedestrian Link Active Edge Bicycle Link

Short term strategies enhance the link between the city and the foreshore Before

Photomontages are for visioning and are an example of potential changes only.

24

Creating a City for People


Key outcomes to achieve this In the short term (1-2 years)

In the medium term (5+ years)

In the long term (10+ years)

The link to the foreshore feels better connected as new development adds interest to the street and innovative projects bring life to blank walls.

A collaborative Foreshore master plan is developed in partnership with WSEC, Catholic Diocese and other relevant stakeholders to guide the future of the Foreshore.

The Foreshore feels seemlessly connected and has a strong sense of arrival, offering a range of things to see and do as you journey between the city and the sand.

Temporary wayfinding that is fun and artistic helps connect people and the beach is more visible from Crown Street.

Crown Street has well established pedestrian and cycle links connecting the Blue Mile to the Mall, and buildings front onto and activate Crown Street.

The history of the City is celebrated and the spaces and streets deliver a sense of identity that is uniquely Wollongong.

A range of temporary public space projects deliver a sense of arrival and offer a range of different things to see and do to invite people to stay and spend time.

The connection to the Harbour is enhanced and more people are walking between destinations.

The WSEC is a celebrated international entertainment facility supporting diverse events and integrating with its coastal and city centre setting.

Outdoor dining improves streetscape.

Decking creates a strong visual and physical connection between the city and the beach.

Active street edges with ample room for dining, pedestrian and cycle movement connects the city with the foreshore.

Outdoor dining supports the growth of a restaurant corridor.

Sensitive architecture provides an urban engagement with the foreshore.

Public domain that responds to natural settings.

Wide footpaths to enable street alfresco.

Visual connections enhance engagement with the beach.

Mixed use development encourages street activity. Creating a City for People

25


Inspiration Innovative government design culture

Mixed land use and transport integration

Commitment by government to create a world class city for people

Auckland, New Zealand

Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Copenhagen, Denmark

Once described as “the bad boy in the class” and “the city of cars”, Auckland’s remarkable short term turnaround has largely been a result of renewed, persistent and determined organisational and institutional cultures. A strong shared vision of “Creating the World’s Most Liveable City” laid the platform for policies, processes, projects and people to flourish. Auckland Council acknowledges that design leadership must be mandated from the top to act as a sustainable agent of change.

The ‘Connecting Cleveland 2020 Citywide Plan’ was introduced with the aim of shifting the city from a homogenous pattern of zoning to a focus on pedestrian prioritisation and diversity of uses. It is now dedicated to integrated transport solutions to connect downtown, harmonise traffic flow, improve the streetscape and allow for multi-modal uses. Their ‘Smart Zoning’ policies use innovative zoning techniques allowing for diversity in development. The improved links and diverse mixed use areas have led to a very considered series of accessible districts each with their own goals and identity, all celebrating Urban Life.

The City of Copenhagen has had a sustained commitment to producing a high quality city for its residents, workers and tourists since the 1960s. Consistent and coordinated policies have produced a city that has been successful in catering to all facets of urban life. The city has ensured a coherent and holistic consideration of the relationship between transport, land use and urban form, with human experience at the forefront.

Recent reduction in height limits to reinforce human scale

Actively pursuing multifunctional outcomes

Making difficult decisions for long term benefits

Kyoto, Japan

Melbourne, Australia

Sydney, Australia

Described by Mayor Yorikane Masumoto as “a major project looking a century ahead”, the 2007 Kyoto City Landscape Policy resisted the trend to ‘upzone’ cities and reduced their inner city building height limits. A more appropriate distribution of building height was enacted that sought to reinforce the Kyoto character as a point of difference to other competing Japanese cities. The policy also ensures that the supply of new development space is distributed more evenly around the city rather than being isolated by few sites.

The City of Melbourne’s Postcode 3000 strategy is an exemplar of how to plan and execute an ambitious city direction. In 1992, the Postcode 3000 strategy was introduced with the aim of actively and quickly shifting from a city with a conventional ‘Central Business District’ (dominated by a 9-5 economy) to a ‘Central Activities District’ (with offices, retail, residents, events and arts and culture). The Council used a variety of levers at their disposal, including technical support, financial incentives and demonstration projects in what was a strong contributor in making Melbourne what it is

The City of Sydney Cycle Strategy and Action Plan 2007-2017 shows a commitment to making cycling as attractive a choice of transport as driving or using public transport. The implementation of this large and costly infrastructure upgrade of this plan came with community concerns, leaving the Council to make costly decisions without community support to strive towards a liveable and cycling friendly city. Met with many barriers, the persistance to strive for a long term goal has paid off, with the number of cyclists doubling over the past three years, with a push to introduce more cycling infrastructure and events.

today.

26

Inspiration


Conclusion A City for People sets the Vision and Strategic direction to guide the delivery of a peopleorientated, sustainable and liveable City Centre. By guiding city design to reflect a comfortable human scale, priority is given to the delivery of high quality city streets and spaces. Inviting people to explore their city and to appreciate the unique and beautiful qualities offered in the City Centre. Turning ideas into actions requires collaboration, partnerships between the community, Council, industry and government agencies. Through consistent dedication to change, all aspects of decision making and investment will continue to drive the City Centre closer to realising it’s future vision. The City needs to be flexible, open to new approaches and understand that over time, incremental changes will shape the City Centre’s continuous journey of revitalisation.

The process of the Public Spaces Public Life Strategy Green city

Market St

0238

Crown St

Burelli St

Wollongong 2022

City Centre Vision 12 Aspirational Goals

Actions City-wide + Project-specific

Implementation

1

2

3

Guides City Centre priorities and strategic objectives of the next thirty years.

The first steps in how we will realise the vision city wide.

Implement Public Spaces Public Life city-wide and project-specific actions.

Continue to review in the context of Community Strategic Plan.

Measure and Evaluate

4 Gather data to measure and evaluate the outcomes of the actions.

Analyse data and review City Centre Vision.

Conclusion

27


Public Space, Public Life Study Wollongong

01 2014 - 2015

OCTOBER 2015 DRAFT


Acknowledgements Wollongong City Council would like to show their respect and acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the Land, Elders past and present, and extend that respect to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

The following people from University of Wollongong have participated in collecting data for a public life survey: James Benning Susannah Clement Kate Corbett Flora Cresswell Caius Don Brady Gilchrist Nannita Gyanehandaui Sarah Jacobson Jocelyn McGarity Darren Norman Samira Noweoozipour Issac Palmer Dominique Pezzutto

Molly Porter Bindi Reeves Ben Slattery Sue Subedi Jessica Volkanovski Katelin Volkanovski Louisa Welland

The following people from Wollongong City Council have participated in collecting data for a public life survey: Kathy Adams Sally Anderson Amy Bottomley Jon Bridge Karen Brown Maria Byrne James Chappell Will Coote Roberta Costa Mike Cowdy Joel Di Fonzo Luke Dorahy Mike Dove Sam Ebzery Chris Flanagan Chris Fuller Kiosha Gardener Rose Grozdanic Lachlan Harris James Hoyland Rebecca Jardim Bridget Jarvis Peter Jones Cathy Joukador Hayden Knoble Della Kutzner Marina Lamers Sarah Leussink

Emily Lonsdale Luke McNamara John Madry Bonnie Mae Hammerschmidt Erin Masters Kieren Mowbray Sarah Navarrete Jamie O’Connell Dan O’Keefe Andrew Ogg Margaret Panozzo Drew Pinazza Michael Renko Debbie Roberts Jessica Saunders Toby Schafer Darling Kate Sebben Ziza Shavreska Gina Siroky Mark Stratford Emily Tolhurst Miriam Tolhurst Ryan Tolhurst Eugene Turner Bianca Van Essen Rosie Welch Megan Wilson

Project Team: Gehl Architects, Wollongong City Council and McGregor Coxall Henriette Vamberg Solvejg Reigstad Bridget Jarvis Drew Pinazza Sally Anderson Rebecca Jardim Jerah Fox Anna Field Michael Cowdy

2

Acknowledgements


Contents Introduction 4

How to read

Background for the study 4 A tool for change 5

Wollongong Public Space Public Life Study presents the study area and an analysis of the current (2014) physical conditions provided for pedestrians. The analysis looks at issues related to walking, as well as generally getting around and, issues related to spending time in the City.

Public Life Study 6 The study area 6 A unique setting underutilised 7 Residents on the periphery 8 A retail city with a daytime focus 9 An underwhelming city arrival 10 A car orientated city 11 12 quality criteria 12 City streets lack diversity of experience 13 Human scale under threat of tall buildings 14 A large pedestrian mall active during the day 15

This analysis looks to direct a focus of city design on the human dimension, a priority is given to delivering high quality city streets and spaces to invtie people to rediscover their city, and to appreciate the unique and beautiful qualities offered by Wollongong City Centre. Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life is one of four supporting documents that sits behind the Vision document, ‘A City for People’. The diagram below describes the role of each supporting document and how they inform the Vision.

Towards a city for people 16 Ideas into actions

16

Reflections 17

The suite A A City for People Sets the Vision and strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong City Centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional city. Introduces 12 vision statements for our City followed by six Urban Life Projects with actions to improve public life.

Strategic Document

01

02

03

04

Public Space Public Life Study

Public Life Data

Engagement Report

Implementation Plan

A presentation of the study area and an analysis of the physical conditions provided for pedestrians in 2014. The analysis looks at issues related to walking, as well as generally getting around and, issues related to spending time in the City.

A survey of pedestrian activities on Summer and Winter days in selected spaces. Data is divided into observations of pedestrian traffic, as well as staying activities in these spaces. This document provides a base to successfully measure change in the future.

An analysis of what we heard from the community during the draft exhibition period, and how this has impacted and influenced the final report. Consists of all engagement undertaken by Council, submisisons received and online survey results.

The Implementation Plan takes each action from ‘A City for People’ and sets a priority of delivery. This becomes a refined list of projects reviewed annually as part of Council’s business planning cycle.

Supporting Documents

Contents

3


Background for the study Reviewing the City Centre Revitalisation Strategy (2007)

Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life - a measured approach to delivering a high quality city

In 2007, Council endorsed the City Centre Revitalisation Strategy. The Strategy is a group of documents setting the strategic framework for the city centre. The Strategy consists of four documents: (1) City Centre Vision, (2) Local Environmental Plan, (3) Development Control Plan, and (4) Civic Improvement Plan.

In 2014 and 2015 Wollongong City Council has been partnering with internationally recognised consulting firm, Gehl Architects, and prominent urban designers McGregor Coxall, to undertake a Public Spaces Public Life (PSPL) study. The PSPL study will inform the review of the City Centre Vision.

The 2007 Vision set a 25 year strategic framework for the City Centre aimed at attracting 6,000 new residents and 10,000 new jobs.

By putting people first in the planning process, the approach is centred on crafting animated, attractive, sustainable and safe cities. It will inform future planning of the city; strengthen a data-driven approach to infrastructure delivery; and allow change in the city to be measured over time.

Recognising the importance of our City Centre locally and as a regional city, Council committed to commence the review of the 2007 endorsed City Centre Revitalisation Strategy. The first step of this process is to review the vision for the City Centre.

Informing the Wollongong Analysis Since March 2014, a team of students and Council staff have been collecting a range of data about how people use the Wollongong City Centre. Pedestrian counts recorded the number of people moving through our streets. Also using maps, we have recorded where people spend time and enjoy city life. Through field work and desktop research in 2014, over 60 data sets have been collected and analysed, including quality assessments of city streets and buildings, data on traffic planning, urban planning, parks, recreation, and community, cultural and economic development. The analysis presented is based on this information.

Celebrating achievements Wollongong City Council and private industry stakeholders have delivered a range of projects against the 2007 City Centre Vision. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Key Council achievements include: Footpath renewal program (ongoing) Crown Street Mall refurbishment 2014 Keira Street refurbishment 2014 Bathers Pavilion refurbishment 2012 Stewart Park and MacCabe Park renewal 2014-2015 The Blue Mile 2008 to current Implemented the Free Shuttle Bus (Green Bus) Upgrade to bus shelters (ongoing) Cultural Plan 2014 Live Music Action Plan 2014 Wollongong City Centre Evening Economy 2014 Review of the Access and Movement Strategy 2013 Bike Plan 2013 Creative Spaces Strategy 2015 Public art installations (ongoing) Cultural events like Viva La Gong (ongoing).

Significant private investment includes: • Shaping Wollongong - Property Council • Wonderwalls • City Centre Market • 50 new small bars and cafes • GPT - $200m investment • Wollongong Private Hospital - $120m • Wollongong Public Hospital Expansion • Major mixed use developments completed and under construction (ongoing).

Project Timeline

Property Council - Shaping Wollongong City Centre Revitalisation Strategy endorsed

2007

Wollongong 2022 adopted

2012 Councillor aspiration to improve the attractiveness of the Wollongong City Centre

4

Introduction

Commence a review of the City Centre Revitalisation Strategy (2007)

2013

WE ARE UP TO HERE Draft report, community consultation and refining recommendations

Collecting and analysing city data

early 2014

mid 2014

late 2014

Start Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life Community conversations about the early findings

2015

late 2015 - onwards Delivery of recommendations and ongoing monitoring


A tool for change A Public Spaces Public Life study measures how cities function from the perspective of the people who use them. All cities have traffic departments that collect data to investigate and manage traffic in a city. But who is responsible for collecting information on how people use and move through a city?

A Public Spaces Public Life study provides information on where people walk and stay, either as part of their daily activities, or for recreational purposes. This information then informs future decisions about which streets and city spaces need improvement. These studies gather information on how many people choose to stay, and where they spend time in a city. People spending time in a place, recorded as ‘staying activities’, acts as a good indicator of the quality of the urban spaces.

Buildings

Space

Life

We envision how buildings can contribute to our public life aspirations, in terms of height, massing and scale, as well as functionality and interaction.

We develop a public space network that can support the proposed public life through scale, form and climate.

We formulate a vision and a program of activities based on the type of life (activities and attractions) that are inherent in a given area.

Turning the design process upside down - first life, then space and then buildings

Towards liveable cities globally Gehl Architects have performed Public Spaces Public Life studies in cities around the world, and have gained a unique insight and understanding into what influences positive city change.

NUUK

RED DEER

VANCOUVER

In Copenhagen, surveys have been conducted every ten years over the past forty years, clearly documenting the gradual change from a caroriented city to being one of the most liveable cities in the world. In other cities, like New York, surveys and pilot projects have been used as a tool to positively change the city’s mindset, moving towards a more sustainable future.

ST PETERSBURG HAMAR ESKILSTUNA OSLO STOCKHOLM GOTHENBURG RIGA HORSENS HELSINGBORG MOSCOW VEJLE EDINBURGH ODENSE GEHL ARCHITECTS, SVENDBORG DUBLIN CAMBRIDGE COPENHAGEN LONDON APELDOORN BRIGHTON ROTTERDAM

TORONTO

EDMONTON

SEATTLE

BORDEAUX

ZURICH ISTANBUL

NEW YORK

BEIJING

SAN FRANCISCO TOKYO

AMMAN

WASHINGTON DC

SHANGHAI LOS ANGELES

CHONGQING DOHA

KUWAIT CITY

KUNMING

MUSCAT

GUANGZHOU

XALAPA MEXICO CITY

HONG KONG

CHENNAI

BOGOTA SINGAPORE

With this strategy, Wollongong has a unique opportunity to join these great cities in leading the way for liveable cities globally.

ZAMBIA

LIMA

RIO SÃO PAULO

JOHANNESBURG

NEWCASTLE SYDNEY

PERTH

CAPE TOWN

ADELAIDE MAR DEL PLATA

WOLLONGONG

MELBOURNE LAUNCESTON HOBART

WELLINGTON CHRISTCHURCH

25,200

Case Study: Melbourne’s story, from inactive city centre to world’s most liveable

AUCKLAND

GLOBAL NETWORK

space on streets

Pedestrian traffic has increased at all hours of the day

and in squares between 1994 and 1978

2004 1980’s: 2 sidewalk cafés

107 sidewalk cafés

1993

Opening of Federation Square

1994

1982: 658 dwellings

13,398 dwellings

1,209% increase Degraves st c. 1985

in inner city residents

(The Economist Intelligence Unit, 2014)

1993 2004

389 sidewalk cafés

2004

liveable city four years running!

Weekday 10am - 6pm

2002

World’s most

12,880

71% more public

Degraves st, after

534 sidewalk cafés

2014 28,099 dwellings

“Melbourne wouldn’t be where it is today if it weren’t for the data collected in 1994 by Jan Gehl and his team.” Professor Rob Adams AM, Director City Design at the City of Melbourne, 2013

Introduction

5


Public Life Study The study area This Public Spaces Public Life study considers the broader extent of the Wollongong City Centre as defined by the Wollongong Local Environmental Plan 2009. It has specifically gathered data for the inner city area, from Wollongong Hospital to the foreshore, to capture the most intensely used areas of the city.

Kembla

Street

Beaton Park

Flagstaff Hill

Church Stree

t

The City Centre, as it is recognised today, has evolved since the early 1800s from a natural landscape to a modern city. It has retained layers of its natural, Aboriginal and European heritage. The series of maps below shows the indicative pattern of European settlement in the city centre.

c. 1830s Keira Str eet

Original town plan centred on the Harbour

Market S treet

Crown St ree

t

Burelli St

Street

reet

MacCabe Park

1km, 10min walk

Corrima l

The city grows to the south, and mine tramlines are introduced

Gladsto

c. 1860s

ne Aven ue

500m, 6min walk

c. 1880s South Coast Railway links to Sydney. Rapid expansion of the city and focus shifts to Crown Street

c. 1900+

Wollongong City Centre

By early 1900 the city has spread to the area recognised today

Open green space Topography

Cities with tightly defined centres provide greater potential for flourishing city life, as well as preventing the dilution of city vibrancy and activity.

A largely defined city

Wollongong / 2014

Adelaide / 2002

Adelaide Adelaide 3,970,000 m 1,575,000 m2 m2 4.050.000 m2 4.050.000 Adelaide 14K residents in the city centre (2011) 1.9K residents in the city centre (2002) 4.050.000 m2 285K residents in the regional area 1.3M residents in the metropolitan (source 2011 Gehl Adelaide PSPL) (source 2011 Gehl Adelaide PSPL) (2012) area (2012) (source 2011 Gehl Adelaide PSPL) (EDITED TO 2002 (EDITED TO 2002 BOUNDARY) BOUNDARY) 2

(EDITED TO 2002 BOUNDARY)

6

Public Life Study

Sydney / 2007

Perth / 2009

Sydney Perth Sydney Perth 2 2 2,200,000 m 2,200,000 m m2 m2 2.200.000 m2 2.200.000 2.200.000 m2 2.200.000 Sydney Perth 15K residents in the city centre (2006) 1K residents in the city centre (2006) 2.200.000 m2 2.200.000 m2 4.7M(source residents in the metropolitan 1.9M residents in the metropolitan 2007PSPL) Gehl Sydney PSPL) (source 2009 Gehl Perth PSPL) (source 2007 Gehl Sydney (source 2009 Gehl Perth PSPL) area (2012) area (2012) (source 2007 Gehl Sydney PSPL) (source 2009 Gehl Perth PSPL)


A unique setting underutilised The escarpment setting under threat by tall buildings and lost connections The escarpment provides a dramatic backdrop to the City Centre, framing city buildings and emphasising its unique natural setting. However, as building heights increase, the escarpment setting is compromised and visual links lost. Historically, the city was accessed from the ridges running from the escarpment to the waterfront. Connections to the escarpment have been lost over time. Re-establishing these links is important to the identity and quality of the city.

A world-class foreshore detached from the city by busy roads and a lack of destinations Defined by a world class foreshore, the city boasts a relaxed lifestyle and beach culture. The Blue Mile lines the foreshore with dedicated walking and cycling tracks, seating and viewing platforms. A breathtaking Harbour setting provides play spaces, cafes and restaurants inviting people day and night. However, Corrimal Street separates the city from the foreshore with 16,500 vehicles per day, and South Beach is lined with car parking and a bus depot area, with limited places to visit and spend time. Improving the physical connections to the foreshore, and the offer on arrival will reconnect the city with one of its most valueable assets.

A rich Aboriginal, European and industrial history hidden from view A rich diversity of natural landscape, historical buildings, and places, each with fascinating stories to tell, are scattered throughout the city centre. Traditionally occupied by the Dharawal people, the escarpment is a rich source of cultural legend and spiritual significance. Any buildings and places with heritage value go unnoticed due to a lack of shared knowledge, or because they are ‘hidden’ in the city landscape. Many historic buildings have been altered, with historic features covered up, or are in a state of disrepair. Recognising that these buildings and places are important to understanding the story of the city and what makes it truly unique will allow the city to reveal its unique identity.

Wollongong Harbour

St. Michaels Anglican Church

Mount Kembla

Continental Pool

The Gurungaty Water Place

View from Flagstaff Hill to Mount Keira

View south from Flagstaff Hill

St. Andrews Presbyterian Church

Threatened by increasing building heights

A foreshore separated from the city

A rich history ‘hidden’ in the city

Flagstaff Hill Park

Celebrate the uniqueness

Mount Kembla

The visual connection of the escarpment to the city is under threat from increasing building heights.

Corrimal Street

Mount Keira

A world class foreshore is separated from the city by Corrimal Street, and an uninviting walking experience.

Aboriginal heritage is not revealed across the city, and a number of historical buildings and places are hidden in its built fabric. Public Life Study

7


Residents on the periphery

Densify the City Centre with residents

In 2014, the Wollongong City Centre displays a void of residents in its core.

Church Stree

t

Kembla

Street

Residents living in the core of city centres contribute to their vitality day and night, by going about their daily tasks. Residents create an image of a city lived in and looked after. They also boost city safety and support local businesses, events and attractions. With residents in the city, a more diverse offer of goods and services is demanded, contributing to resilience in the local economy. Encouragingly, Wollongong has a supply of residents in the pipeline, but in keeping with the trend, future development is located on the periphery of the city centre core.

Avenue

Keira Stre et

Smith Str eet

Market S treet

Burelli St

Gladston e

reet

A city void of residents

Corrima l

Street

Just over 650 people live within the inner City Centre. 24,000 students at UoW

50-150 50-150 50-150 50-150 residents per hectare (net) 150-250 150-250 residents per hectare (net) 150-250 250+ 150-250 residents per hectare (net) 250+ 250+

Students on the edge

Just 8% of university-provided student accommodation is within the inner city centre, but there are 34,000 students within 2km of the city.

250+

Residential Density

City Centre

34% of residents

Over 35 languages

residents have a

in in the suburb of

are spoken in City

median age of 31

Wollongong

Centre households

Only 4.5% of citizens live within the Wollongong City Centre.

Future development

Residents are in the pipeline, but continuing the trend of being on the periphery of the city.

MPLES EXAMPLES

City Centre resident snapshot Children Young Children Children Children Young Children Young

ge bpage

9 years and younger

10-19 years

12% of residents

7% of residents

Women Young Young Women

Combined Combined Combined Combined Combined

8

Public Life Study

Women Women Men Men Women Men

20-24 years 17% of residents Basic

Basic

MenMen Old

Old

Old

Old Old

35-45 years

65+ years

11% of residents

16% of residents

Basic

BasicBasic


A retail city with a daytime focus Crown Street Mall hosts the highest footfall in the city centre Church Stree

t

West Crown Street has the highest footfall in the city outside the Mall

Street

3,270

1,044

4,800

10,890

Market S treet

3,132

9,618

Denison

1,890

7,884

Keira Stre et

Street

Kembla

3,420

3,912

Crown St ree

t

2,382

1,980

2,886

2,454

1,134

4,692 2,490

6,612

Burelli St

reet

Corrima l

Wollongong Station

0238

Street

1,326

4,050

Footfall declines 63% on Burelli Street on a weekend

Pedestrian counts Map shows counts taken on Wednesday 19 March 2014, between 8am and 10 pm. Comparison weekend counts were taken on Saturday 10 May 2014, between 10am and 10pm

The general walking pattern shows that the highest concentrations of pedestrians are found in the retail core and western Crown Street. Most of the pedestrian traffic is isolated to a few locations and there is a limited spread over the rest of the City Centre.

Activity

Pedestrian activity over the day

Desirable city rythm

34,000 University and TAFE students are enrolled within 2km of the City Centre

Daytime commerce and activity Evening entertainment

Night Day the A desirable city rhythm - activities around clock ensuring city diversity, safety and resilience 12.000 in the local Bars and economy nightclubs 10.000

Evening Daytime commerce Evening entretainment

Sleep, city regeneration: cleaning and rest

Weekda y 84,192 /Day (8am-10pm)

8.000 6.000

Weekda y

Activity

Low level activity in the evening

Sleep, city regeneration

4.000

Pedestrian numbers drop dramatically when shops and offices close and the majority of visitors leave the City Centre. Large sections of the City Centre become more or less deserted.

Weeken d 59,628 /Day (10am-10pm)

2.000 0

8am

9am

8am

9am

10am

11am 12pm

1pm

Weeken d

10am

11am 12pm

1pm

2pm

3pm

2pm

4pm

3pm

4pm

5pm

6pm

5pm

6pm

Wollongong city centre average - activity generally Night Day declines following lunch time peak

Key locations performing well

7pm

8pm

8pm

9pm

9pm

400

400 200

Weekda y 1,584 /Day (8am-10pm)

200 0 100

Weekend 1,884 /Day (10am-10pm)

Weekda y 1,584 /Day (8am-10pm)

300 100

8am

9am

10am

11am 12pm

Weekend 1,884 /Day (10am-10pm) 1pm

2pm

3pm

4pm

5pm

0 Globe Lane - a place that attracts people into the 8am 9am 10am 11am 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm evening

24,000 people work in the City Centre

Evening

600

600 300

On a typical Saturday night, only Corrimal Street, lower Crown Street, Globe Lane and Keira Street experience a rise in footfall.

7pm

6pm

6pm

7pm

7pm

8pm

8pm

9pm

9pm

3M overnight and domestic day trips every year in the Wollongong LGA

Regular events promote city life 4,400 more people counted in the Mall on Friday market day

117% more people counted in Globe Lane on Friday market day Crown Street Mall on a typical weekday

Crown Street Mall on a market day

Public Life Study

9


An underwhelming city arrival Wollongong’s superb regional arrival generates strong anticipation for experiencing the city. City centre arrivals establish the tone of the city experience and set an expectation for city quality. Cities around the world celebrating the arrival experience have a strong sense of identity at their entry points. Visual cues, such as landscaping, gateways, wayfinding, or welcoming signals contribute to the quality of urban arrival spaces. Like many cities nestled within a beautiful setting, it is easy to forget that the city itself is a destination. Leveraging off its natural and urban qualities, Wollongong can create city arrival experiences that set a high standard, welcoming people to the city.

Arriving to the region

Arrival points in the city centre

Improve pedestrian experience Arriving by train

Arriving by bus

Arriving by car

At some point in the day, most of us become pedestrians. Whether it be walking from public transport, a bike rack, from parking the car, or from home, the street experience should be welcoming to all of us.

Case Study: welcoming city arrivals Connecting a lively railway station with the main street

A welcoming and comfortable environment at the bus interchange

Newtown, NSW

Noosa Junction, QLD

Melbourne, VIC

Introduction of a forecourt creates a physical and visual connection with the main street. Shops activate and bring life to the space day and night. Colour and art bring vibrancy to the urban space and reflect the eclectic culture of the community.

Buildings and spaces are designed to maximise light and reflect the coastal lifestyle. Use of natural materials creates a warm and inviting atmosphere. Spaces are designed for purpose with comfortable and flexible seating options to cater for all ages.

Art that celebrates place and arrival becomes a focal point and meeting place. Illuminated at night, this artistic signage assists with wayfinding and creates a sense of safety. Art becomes an interactive play element engaging all ages.

10

Public Life Study

Art and sculpture transform the arrival experience


GETTING TO AND AROUND

A car orientated city

Basic

Combined

Young Walking

Walking

Combined Men

Women

Cycling

Cycling

Basic Bus/Rail

Public transport

2.3km of laneways in our City Centre

This is compared with 3.2% of residents in the Wollongong Local Government Area (LGA) who walk to work. Walking provides an opportunity to spend time in the public realm and experience the city.

Pedestrian priority streets and squares make cities more accessible, safe and enjoyable for walking. Wollongong has a number of pedestrian priority spaces scattered across the City Centre.

Wollongong has a large, fine grain network of lanes that permeate the city’s blocks. The city is uniquely positioned to offer a different urban experience in the laneways, each with their own potential separate identities.

180km of formal bicycle connections in the LGA

11.1km of proposed cycle links in the City Centre

20 bicycle parking locations in the City Centre

A prerequisite for a strong cycle culture is that conditions are safe and appealing. The extent of formal connections within the Wollongong LGA provides a sound basis for an improved cycle network.

Wollongong 2022 seeks to establish the city as bike-friendly. Council’s Bike Plan 2014-2018 responds to this with recommendations to link the foreshore with the core of the city centre, leveraging off the flat topography.

Bicycle parking in the City Centre should cater to any pre-existing demand for cycle facilities and complement the proposed links outlined in Council’s Bike Plan 2014-2018.

5,170 people come and go from the station on a typical weekday

260,000 patrons board the Gong Shuttle in an average month

6,600 people board a bus at west Crown Street in a typical week

Rail-based public transport enables city centres to function in a space-efficient manner with a relatively sparse supply of parking. At present, rail speeds average just 50km/h from Wollongong to Sydney’s CBD.

The Gong Shuttle offers a free of charge, easy and dependable way of getting around the City Centre. Encouragingly, evidence suggests that patronage of this service is still trending upwards.

Council has delivered several bus stop improvements in the City Centre. Yet in 2014, departing and arriving from a bus was an experience that could be improved at several well-utilised locations.

More than 20,000 vehicles/day pass through west Crown Street

691 car parking spaces per 1000 city centre jobs

On-street parking peak occupancy levels average 75-78%

High volume traffic affects a number of streets, placing pressure on the City Centre and decreasing the quality of the streets for people. Great cities for people closely manage the volume of vehicular traffic passing through streets. In addition, other modes of transport need to be developed in order to offer people an alternative to the car.

Wollongong has a relatively generous supply of parking compared with other cities around the world. In 2008, there were 11,285 on- and offstreet parking spaces in the Wollongong City Centre. This figure has since increased with the added supply of publicly accessible parking in recent years. Parking availability is a factor impacting on the use of public transport.

Alongside the relatively generous supply of parking, more than 22% of on-street parking is available during peak times. Many leading cities around the world are building strategies to promote active and public transport. An objective of Wollongong 2022 is that walking, cycling and public transport is an accessible and well-resourced means of transport.

Basic

Old

Bus/Rail

Car

Car

Private transport

Wollongong

Vancouver

Brisbane

Sydney

209

293

389

691

Car

Bus/Rail

19,000m2 of pedestrian priority areas in the City Centre

22.2% of inner city residents walk to work

Cycling

Old

Men

Public Life Study

11


The great public spaces of the world offer a combination of protection, enjoyment and comfort. Analysing successful public spaces throughout the world reveals several common characteristics. Gehl Architects have categorised and summarised these characteristics into ‘12 quality criteria’.

PROTECTION

12 quality criteria

1. Protection against traffic and accidents – feeling safe

Public spaces must be inviting, attractive, and provide room for recreation, pleasure, exercise, play, and so on. They must be able to attract a broad variety of people, so that children, teenagers, adults, the elderly and people with special needs all feel welcome.

• Protection for pedestrians • Eliminating fear of traffic

2. Protection against crime and violence • Lively public realm • Eyes on the street • Overlapping functions day and night • Good lighting

3. Protection against unpleasant sensory experiences • Wind/rain • Cold/heat • Pollution • Dust, noise, glare

The great public spaces of the world reflect the majority, if not all, of the 12 quality criteria. As such, the list of criteria provides a good design checklist. The ‘12 Quality Criteria’ tool has been used to analyse Wollongong’s key streets and public spaces.

Enhance street comfort to invite people to spend more time

ENJOYMENT

4. Opportunities to walk • Room for walking • Interesting facades • No obstacles • Good surfaces • Accessibility for everyone

7. Opportunities to see

COMFORT

• Reasonable viewing distances • Unhindered views • Interesting views • Lighting (when dark)

10. Scale • Buildings and spaces designed to human scale

5. Opportunities to stand/ stay • Supports for standing • Facades with good details that invite people to stay

• Zones for sitting • Utilising advantages: views, sun and people • Good places to sit • Benches for resting

8. Opportunities to talk and listen

9. Opportunities for play and exercise

• Low noise levels • Street furniture that provides ‘talkscapes’

• Physical activity, exercise • Play and street entertainment • By day and night • In summer and winter

11. Opportunities to enjoy the positive aspects of climate

12. Positive sensory experience

• Sun/shade • Heat/coolness • Shelter from wind/breeze

12

Public Life Study

6. Opportunities to sit

• Good design and detailing • Good materials • Fine views • Trees, plants, water


City streets lack diversity of experience Crown Street - evaluating the city’s main street

reet

n St w o r C West

Lin

k

68% of all stationary activities were in Lower Crown

Lower Cr own

Corrima l

Street

Street Kembla

Parade

The Mall

Market S treet

(on weekends)

Street

Foreshor e

Osborne

Street

Railway

the Mall. Hospital

Children playing was the most dominant staying activity in Lang Park

t

the highest footfall in the city outside

Church Stree

Keira Str eet

West Crown has

Link

Burelli St

reet

Wollongong Station Stewart S treet

Corrimal Street acts as a barrier to the foreshore with 16,500 vehicles everyday

Hospital Link

West Crown Street

The Mall

Lower Crown Street

Foreshore Link

This link provides a very poor pedestrian experience to a critical destination

A busy walking link with a strong structure, compromised by heavy traffic and an unattractive streetscape

A high quality refurbishment ready for activation to create a sense of place

Offers a great city experience. Effortlessly supports active and varied street life during the day

An underwhelming journey and no sense of arrival to a worldclass foreshore

Burelli Street - evaluating the city’s key public spaces Globe Lane

More people were

increases footfall

recorded staying at

by 36% on a

the station than at

Globe Lane

weekend

the Arts Precinct

(compared to a weekday)

Arts Precinct

Wollongong Station

MacCabe Park

The Arts Precinct invites a diversity of staying activities (on a weekday)

Play was the most popular staying activity in MacCabe Park (on a weekend)

Wollongong Station

MacCabe Park

MacCabe Park

Globe Lane

Arts Precinct

A confusing entry to the city

An underutilised park in the heart of the city

Play is the most popular activity in the park

A city laneway transforming and attracting people day and night

A city square that is more of a thoroughfare than a meeting place

Public Life Study

13


Human scale under threat of tall buildings Wollongong has a fine human scale with buildings mostly under 8 storeys in height. Lower building heights moderate the city winds and let in greater levels of sunlight for the city’s public spaces. Evidence around the world indicates that streets become more people-friendly as the dominance of taller buildings diminishes.

Lower heights also contribute to perceptions of safer streets as building occupants can maintain a connection with the street, by recognising faces or hearing sounds. People in lower buildings can more easily wander outside and contribute to street activities, helping to create a vibrant urban environment. While a human scale can be observed in Wollongong in 2014, a large portion of the city centre has a permitted height limit over 32 metres (9 storeys approx.) and even up to 120 metres (34 storeys approx.).

Human scale cities

Before and after benefits of a low-rise City:

Iconic Buildings

Iconic Place

Inconsistent Density

Consistent Density

Competing with Heritage

Respecting Heritage

Deliver a high quality human scale city

Windy City Spaces

Protected City Spaces

Shaded City Spaces

Sunny City Spaces

Existing buildings 9 storeys + Existing buildings 9 storeys + Existing buildings 9 storeys + 32m (9 storeys approx.) 32m (9 storeys approx.) 32m (9 storeys approx.) 48m (14 storeys approx.) 48m (14 storeys approx.) 48m (14 storeys approx.)

60m (17 storeys approx.) 60m (17 storeys approx.) 60m (17 storeys approx.)

Permitted building height: Existing buildings 9 storeys + Existing 99storeys ++ Existing buildings 9 storeys Existingbuildings buildings storeys

13,5 metre

13.5 metre

+

65m (18 storeys approx.) 65m (18 storeys approx.)

65m (18 storeys approx.) 60-65m (17-18 storeys approx.)

32m (9storeys storeys approx.) 32m (9 approx.)

80m (23 storeys approx.) 80m (23 approx.) 80m (23storeys storeys approx.) 80m (23 storeys approx.)

48m (14 storeys approx.) 48m (14 storeys approx.)

120m (34 storeys approx.) 120m (34 storeys approx.) 120m (34 storeys approx.)

32m (9 storeys approx.)

32m (9 storeys approx.)

48m 48m(14 (14storeys storeysapprox.) approx.)

Poor Connections with Street

Good Connections with Street

120m (34 storeys approx.)

60m (17 storeys approx.)

60m 60m(17 (17storeys storeysapprox.) approx.)

Similar density, different built form outcome 65m (18 storeys approx.)

65m(18 (18storeys storeysapprox.) approx.) 65m

Living human scale cities

80m (23 storeys approx.) 80m(23 (23storeys storeysapprox.) approx.) 80m 120m (34 storeys approx.) 120m(34 (34storeys storeysapprox.) approx.) 120m

Smith Street terraces

Corrimal Street apartment tower

Paris (Faubourg Saint Antoine)

Barcelona (Eixample)

Density Height

Density Height

Density Height

Density Height

286 residents per hectare (net) 2-4 storeys

279 residents per hectare (net) 16 storeys

512 residents per hectare (net) 4-6 storeys

359 residents per hectare (net) 7-9 storeys

How the building lands on the street is important Façades have a significant influence on the quality of a street at eye-level, and the pattern of pedestrian activity. Building frontages with many small units, many doors, good detailing and materials are considered ‘active’. Frontages with large units, no or few doors, no details and nothing to look at are deemed ‘inactive frontages’.

14

Public Life Study

An active street frontage which is pleasant to look at and spend time beside

An inactive street frontage which is unpleasant to look at and encourages people to hurry by

60% of frontages surveyed in Wollongong City Centre are either inactive or dull


A large pedestrian mall active during the day Successful pedestrian streets and spaces are important to the amenity and economic vitality of a city.

and land uses that adjoin them. This is to ensure that life is encouraged into the civic spaces both day and night. A diversity of offers can be encouraged by flexible programming of events and activities.

They make a city more productive and efficient for people, and invite people to experience cities, socialise and spend time. Many elements contribute to the success of a pedestrian street. The design of the space is important to its comfort and appeal. Successful pedestrian streets pay close attention to the design of the building interface

The refurbishment of Crown Street Mall delivers a high quality urban street. It is an important part of the City’s spine and main street. The pedestrianised street comparison below demonstrates that Crown Street Mall is more than double the length of Pitt Street in Sydney, and close to double that of Bourke Street Mall in Melbourne –

Wollongong

Sydney CROWN STREET MALL Total length: 385m Street width: 20m Status: Pedestrian street dominated by retail.

CROWN STREET Total length: 1580m Street width: 20m Status: Main street with shopping and heavy traffic.

two of Australia’s global cities. In 2014, Crown Street Mall is dominated by daytime retail. This means that it is a difficult space to bring life to after 5pm, when the shops close.

Create a sense of place and reason to stay Melbourne

GEORGE STREET Total length: 2550m Street width: 22.3m Status: Main street with shopping and heavy traffic.

PITT STREET MALL Total length: 186m Street width: 18.5m Status: Pedestrian street dominated by retail.

SWANSTON STREET Total length: 1270m Street width: 30m Status: Main street dominated by shopping, trams, taxis and bicycles.

BOURKE STREET MALL Total length: 213m Street width: 30m Status: Shopping street for pedestrians and public transportation.

Vic tor i

Circular Quay

aS tre

0m

et

Gladstone Avenue

Swanston Street

Wollongong Station

Martin Place Elizabeth Street

King Street

Keira Street Globe Lane

500m

Bourke Street

1000m

Market Street

Church Street

Flinders Street Kembla Street 1500m

2000m

South Beach

Central Station 2500m Crown Street Mall Section

4m

8m

8m

Pitt Street Mall Section

4m

4m

4m

8m

14m

8m

Bourke Street Mall Section

Public Life Study

15


Towards a city for people Ideas into Actions The analysis presented in this report relies on city data, technical analysis and analytical observations to understand the way the City Centre functions now, and the key challenges to positioning Wollongong as one of the most liveable cities in the world.

The city’s rich heritage is hidden, and its unique setting is not realised.

Celebrate the uniqueness

Weak connections to the foreshore detach the city from its natural assets, and visual connections to the escarpment are under threat by tall buildings.

The city is monofunctional and lacks a resident population to bring energy to it day and night.

Grow a living city

The university brings a 24,000 student population which is not reflected in the city dynamic. Large areas of open space and foreshore support the city, but have limited functionality/programming and are not connected.

A largely defined city, the focus of the city is diluted.

Develop a human scale city

The street level quality is compromised by inactive and dull buildings at street level. Planning policy permits buildings to be constructed up to 120 metres which compromises the human scale of the city.

The city is designed to prioritise convenient access for vehicles, leaving alternate transport modes uncompetitive.

P P

P P

When rated against Gehl’s 12 quality criteria, pedestrian experience as a whole is poor.

16

Towards a city for people

Create a pedestrian friendly city

P

P


Reflections Wollongong City Centre is a world class city enjoying a spectacular natural environment and a relaxed lifestyle offering great conditions for active public spaces and public life. Despite this, Wollongong City Centre still appears dominated by vehicular traffic and has a lack of night time activity. In 2014, Gehl Architects in partnership with McGregor Coxall were invited to cast a critical view on how the public spaces in Wollongong City Centre were performing in terms of public life. A summary of the findings are presented in this document and in a separate “Public Life Data” report. The analysis undertaken revealed a city with a void of residents at its core, contributing to an absence of vitality both day and night. In addition, the analysis revealed an imbalance between transport modes, with pedestrians and cyclists at the bottom of the hierarchy. Similarly, the extraordinary physical qualities, such as the city’s connection to the foreshore and escarpment are not celebrated. Looking to other cities it is evident that change is possible. Common to all of them is a shift towards a more balanced traffic system, a prioritisation of public space and the development an urban environment that transforms the streets and squares into more people-friendly places. Altering the present situation in Wollongong demands a change of attitude. A more integrated approach needs to be applied where infrastructure, planning and public spaces are thought of as one. Visions need to be developed looking at what ought to be achieved to celebrate Wollongong as one of the world’s most liveable cities. Strategies need to be in place to gradually change the current course and deal with how the visions can be achieved in practical terms. Wollongong will no doubt change dramatically during the coming years. The potential is certainly there, but how the city will transform is yet to be seen.

The Process of the Public Spaces Public Life Strategy Green city

Market St

0238

Crown St

Burelli St

Wollongong 2022

City Centre Vision 12 Aspirational Goals

Actions City-wide + Project-specific

Implementation

1

2

3

Guides City Centre priorities and strategic objectives of the next thirty years.

The first steps in how we will realise the vision city wide.

Implement Public Spaces Public Life city-wide and project-specific actions.

Continue to review in the context of Community Strategic Plan.

Measure and Evaluate

4 Gather data to measure and evaluate the outcomes of the actions.

Analyse data and review City Centre Vision.

Reflection

17


18

Introduction

Introduction DRAFT

18


Public Life Data Wollongong PSPL

02 2014 - 2015

Public Life Data


Acknowledgements Wollongong City Council would like to show their respect and acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the Land, Elders past and present, and extend that respect to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The following people from University of Wollongong have participated in collecting data for a public life survey: James Benning Susannah Clement Kate Corbett Flora Cresswell Caius Don Brady Gilchrist Nannita Gyanehandaui Sarah Jacobson Jocelyn McGarity Darren Norman

Samira Noweoozipour Issac Palmer Dominique Pezzutto Molly Porter Sue Subedi Ben Slattery Bindi Reeves Jessica Volkanovski Katelin Volkanovski Louisa Welland

The following people have participated in collecting data for a public life survey: Kathy Adams Sally Anderson Amy Bottomley Jon Bridge Karen Brown Maria Byrne James Chappell Will Coote Roberta Costa Mike Cowdy Joel Di Fonzo Luke Dorahy Mike Dove Sam Ebzery Chris Flanagan Chris Fuller Lachlan Harris James Hoyland Rebecca Jardim Bridget Jarvis Peter Jones Cathy Joukador Hayden Knoble Della Kutzner Kiosha Gardener Rose Grozdanic Marina Lamers Sarah Leussink

Emily Lonsdale Luke McNamara John Madry Bonnie Mae Hammerschmidt Erin Masters Kieren Mowbray Sarah Navarrete Jamie O’Connell Dan O’Keefe Andrew Ogg Margaret Panozzo Drew Pinazza Michael Renko Debbie Roberts Miriam Tolhurst Ryan Tolhurst Eugene Turner Jessica Saunders Toby Schafer Darling Kate Sebben Ziza Shavreska Gina Siroky Mark Stratford Emily Tolhurst Bianca Van Essen Rosie Welch Megan Wilson

Project Team: Gehl Architects, Wollongong City Council Henriette Vamberg Solvejg Reigstad Bridget Jarvis Rebecca Jardim Drew Pinazza Sally Anderson Jerah Fox Anna Field

2

Public Life Data


Contents Method

4

How to read

Pedestrian Traffic

5

Walking in the City Centre Weekday summary Weekday counts Weekend summary Weekend counts

5 6 7 13 14

Most cities have traffic departments that collect data to investigate and manage traffic in a city. Very few have people responsible for collecting information on how people move through a city and the quality of city streets and places from the perspective of pedestrians.

Stationary Activities

20

Survey of stationary activities Weekday summary Weekday counts Weekend summary Weekend counts

21 22 23 27 28

Reflections

38

Wollongong has a very unique setting, nestled between the escarpment and the sea, and is the Regional City supporting the Illawarra. It is very important to understand pedestrian activity to inform how the city should be shaped. In 2014 Wollongong City Council formed a partnership with Gehl Architects, and McGregor Coxall to undertake a Public Spaces, Public Life study. The study will inform the review of the City Centre Revitalisation Strategy endorsed by Council in 2007. Supporting the Vision - ‘A City for People’ is supported by a suite of documents as outlined below which detail the background analysis and data which informs the way forward, and the implementation plan which defines the actions to delivering against this plan. The detailed data is published in this document.

The suite A A City for People Sets the Vision and strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong City Centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional city. Introduces 12 vision statements for our City followed by six Urban Life Projects with actions to improve public life.

Strategic Document

01

02

03

04

Public Space Public Life Study

Public Life Data

Engagement Report

Implementation Plan

A survey of pedestrian activities on summer and winter days in selected spaces. Data is divided into observations of pedestrian traffic, as well as staying activities in these spaces. This document provides a base to successfully measure change in the future.

An analysis of what we heard from the community during the draft exhibition period, and how this has impacted and influenced the final report. Consists of all engagement undertaken by Council, submisisons received and online survey results.

The Implementation Plan takes each action from ‘A City for People’ and sets a priority of delivery. This becomes a refined list of projects reviewed annually as part of Council’s business planning cycle.

A presentation of the study area and an analysis of the physical conditions provided for pedestrians in 2014. The analysis looks at issues related to walking, as well as generally getting around and issues related to spending time in the City.

Supporting Documents

Public Life Data

3


Method Pedestrian Counts and Observations This Public Spaces Public Life Study measures how cities function from the perspective of the people who use them. The study provides information on where people walk and stay, either as part of their daily activities or for recreational purposes. This information then informs future decisions about which streets and city spaces need improvement, to make them easy and pleasant places to visit, and not just act as traffic conduits. ‘Staying’ or stationary activities act as a good indicator of the quality of an urban space. A large number of pedestrians walking in the city doesn’t necessarily indicate a high level of quality. A high number of people choosing to spend time in the city indicates a lively city with an inviting urban quality.

How the data was collected -- Counting Pedestrians -- Surveys of stationary activities (behavioural mapping)

Method The method for collecting this information has been developed by GEHL Architects and used in previous studies such as Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, Stockholm, Moscow and London. -- Pedestrian counts were carried out in selected streets for 10 minutes every hour between 8am -10pm during the week, and 10am-10pm on the weekends -- Stationary activities were mapped every hour between 10am and 8pm -- The surveys took place during March-May 2014 -- The data was collected on weekdays (Tuesday/ Wednesday) and on Saturdays -- Weather conditions were required to be fine/ sunny -- Additional data was collected during Friday Markets and Thursday Eat Street as case studies to demonstrate the impact of these activities on pedestrian activity. This data is not included in this report.

Study Area The counting positions and areas for recording staying activities were chosen to provide the best overview of pedestrian activity through the city centre and along the foreshore.

4

Public Life Data


Pedestrian traffic Walking in the city centre At some point we are all pedestrians in the city centre. Whether we arrive by car, bike or public transport, at some point in our journey we become pedestrians. As such, streets should be welcoming and enjoyable for all.

At some point we all become pedestrians

Walking is more than a mode of transportation, it is a way to experience the city streets and enjoy city spaces. When walking through the city at a comfortable pace, there is an opportunity to engage with the city environment, looking at shop windows, smelling the coffee or flowers as you walk past different shops, appreciating the buildings, enjoying interesting views and people watching. Walking also allows for planned and spontaneous social activities.

Counting positions

Bourke

20

Street

oad

fR

Clif

01 04 Gladstone Avenue

Crown Street

02 05

08 06

13 Crown St reet

12 Burelli St reet

09 Stewart

tre et bo u Ha r

rive

17

19 eD

11

18

Market Sq

14 22

15

Mar in

07

21

rS

10

Corrima l Street

03

Kembla Street

Market St reet

Street

Smith St reet

Street

Street

Church

Victoria

Keira St reet

Campbell

16

ive

our Dr

Endeav

01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

Crown Street A Crown Street B Keira Street Gladstone Avenue Station Street Burelli Street A Crown Street C Globe Lane Church Street A Church Street B Crown Street D Kembla Street A Kembla Street B Ethel Hayton Lane Crown Street E Crown Street F Corrimal Street Harbour Street Marine Drive Cliff Road A Cliff Road B Burelli Street B

Street

Bank Stre et

Public Life Data

5


Pedestrian traffic Weekday 8am - 10pm Pedestrian activity over the day

The number of pedestrians during the week vs weekend

The general walking pattern shows that the highest concentrations of pedestrians are found in Crown Street Mall and western Crown Street, followed by parts of Burelli Street. The number of people moving along Crown Street reduces east of the Mall (heading toward the foreshore)

85,824 15,138

59,628

70,686

Low level activity in the evening

14,634

Pedestrian numbers drop dramatically from 2pm after the lunch peak, and as shops and offices close. Large sections of the city centre become more or less deserted after 6pm.

44,994

Key locations performing well

After 5pm Before 5pm

On a typical weekday night, areas that offer dining including Corrimal Street, Cliff Road and Keira Streets experience additional pedestrians traffic after 4pm.

Weekday 8am-10pm

There were

85,824 pedestrians (weekday) 4,374

3,270 3,420

1,044

4,800 10,890 7,884 1,584 1,134

4,692

Public Life Data

2,886 6,612

2,490

6

4,050 2,382

3,912

1,890

1,326

3,132

9,618

2,454

1,980

Weekend

10am-10pm


Pedestrian traffic Weekday 8am - 10pm 1,890 pedestrians all day

Crown Street A

7, 884 pedestrians all day

Crown Street B

300

1200

252

250

1000

222

960 906

216

200

792

800

186

876 828

804

864

162 144 132

510

114 102

100

102

48

50

48 36

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

Time

am

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

400

240

228

200

84

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

15-16

90

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

1,134 pedestrians all day

Station Street

200

250

174

180

210

160

200

132

132

132

126

156 114

120

102

96

100

150

96

120

80

66 60

42 40

30

20

0

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

am

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

pm

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

84

Pedestrians per hour

14-15

Time

am

1,326 pedestrians all day

108

0

pm

Gladstone Avenue

140

594

600

126

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

150

96

100

72

90 72

72

66 54

50

36

36

30

24

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

am

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

Public Life Data

7


Pedestrian traffic Weekday 8am - 10pm 1,584 pedestrians all day

Globe Lane

2,886 pedestrians all day

Kembla Street A 600

250

570

216 500

198

200

186

180 168

162

400

150

336 300

96

100

78

84 72 60

50

42 24

18 0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

Time

am

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

300

264 222 198

200

168

114

114

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

300

16-17

Time

36

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

2,490 pedestrians all day

Church Street A

800

30 0

am

4,692 pedestrians all day

168

100

pm

Burelli Street A

198

168

282

744 700 250 600

234 204

516

200

432

336

318

300 234

200

100

66

48

48

20-21

21-22

0 9-10

10-11

11-12

am

Public Life Data

162

162

336

300

8-9

186

168

150

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

pm

18-19

19-20

Pedestrians per hour

348

174 156

402

400

Pedestrians per hour

186

180

500

8

228

564

102

100

66 50

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

am

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22


Pedestrian traffic Weekday 8am - 10pm 10,890 pedestrians all day

Crown Street C

1,980 pedestrians all day

Crown Street F

2000

300

1836 1800

1782

264 252

250 1600 1400 200

1248 1200

168

1000

Pedestrians per hour

978

972

954

800

678

636 600 400

318 162

200

114

90

72

19-20

20-21

21-22

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

Time

am

17-18

18-19

9,618 pedestrians all day

132

120

120 108

102

100

78

78

50

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

3,912 pedestrians all day

Crown Street E 700

1600

1542

600

1434 1400

564

582

1326 1188

1200

500

1134

432 400

1000

366

894

570

546

600

342

300

200

84

90

78

90

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

am

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

pm

Pedestrians per hour

800

Pedestrians per hour

132

am

1800

400

132

pm

Crown Street D

150

144

150

Pedestrians per hour

1050

300

276 240 210

186

200

228

216

192

180

162

100

78

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

am

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

Public Life Data

9


Pedestrian traffic Weekday 8am - 10pm 3,132 pedestrians all day

Kembla Street B

2,382 pedestrians all day

Corrimal Street

500

300

450

450

258

258

250

400

240 228

336

350

198

200 300

288

270

282

264

294

174 156

150

150

198

200

198

192 150

150

96

100

78 36

50 0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

Time

am

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

250

156

138 120

100

96

90

50

0 8-9

9-10

pm

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

Time

am

6,612 pedestrians all day

Burelli Street B

120

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

2, 454 pedestrians all day

Ethel Hayton Lane 500

1200

1116

462 450

1002

1000

954

400 350

774

800

684

400

216 384

330 282 198

200

162

120 36

12

0 8-9

9-10

240

250

558

10-11

am

10

300

Public Life Data

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

pm

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

600

384

210

210

186

200 150 100

132

126

96

90 54

50

24

24

20-21

21-22

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

am

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

pm

18-19

19-20


Pedestrian traffic Weekday 8am - 10pm 4,374 pedestrians all day

Cliff Road A

3,270 pedestrians all day

Cliff Road B

450

500

420

366 350

336

348

350

294

294 264

300

246

250

210

250

204

Pedestrians per hour

174

168 150

100

60 50

0 7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

am

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

216

200

6-7

420

400

330

300

300

360

462

444

450

400

200

204

168

108 100

66

72

11-12

12-13

72 48

50 0 6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

13-14

14-15

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

4,050 pedestrians all day

Marine Drive

200

15-16

Time

am

1,044 pedestrians all day

246

228

150

144

150

pm

Harbour Street

222

600

186 180

168

486

500

480

160 140 400

378 354

114

120

354

102 300

90 78

80

66 60

42

36

40

36

42 30

24

30

20 0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

am

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

pm

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

100

276

270

200

276

270

258

162

156 126

126

100

54 24 0 6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

am

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

Time

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

Public Life Data

11


Pedestrian traffic Weekday 8am - 10pm 3,420 pedestrians all day

Keira Street

4,800 pedestrians all day

Church Street B 800

500

744

732

456 450

700

400

618

378

600

350

312 300

264

204

500

414 400

200

180 150

150

120

100 50

30

0 8-9

9-10

462

276

222

10-11

11-12

am

12

300

264

Public Life Data

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

pm

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

250

264

360

336

318

300

300

234 200

156

100

66 24

36

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

am

12-13

13-14

14-15

Time

15-16

16-17

17-18

pm

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22


Pedestrian traffic Weekend 10am - 10pm Less pedestrian traffic on weekends

The number of pedestrians during the week vs the weekend

There is a significant drop (just over 30%) in pedestrian traffic recorded on weekends when compared to weekdays.

85,824 15,138

The overall trend in pedestrian traffic demontrates that more people walk through the city during the day than at night, which remains consistent with weekday pedestrian counts.

59,628

70,686

14,634

Key locations performing well

44,994

On a typical Saturday night, only Corrimal Street, Lower Crown Street, Globe Lane and Keira Street experience a rise in footfall. Overall evening traffic is 18% of daytime traffic.

After 5pm Before 5pm

Weekday

Weekend

8am-10pm

10am-10pm

There were

59,628 pedestrians (weekend)

1,494

4,440

2,748

684

3,030

690

2,940

5,508

5,382

1,092

4,458 1,884

564

1,314

1,464

8,226

2,568

2,358

1,602

1,848

2,100 3,144

Public Life Data

13


Pedestrian traffic Weekend 10am - 10pm 1,092 pedestrians all day

Crown Street A 200 180

900

174

780

800

168

798

738

160

700

600

126 114

120

114

108

100

500

60

54

48

42

36

40

18

0 11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

400

80

10-11

492 426

90

20

282

300

222 186

200

96

100

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

690 pedestrians all day

126

0

pm

Gladstone Avenue

630

606

140

Pedestrians per hour

5, 382 pedestrians all day

Crown Street B

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

564 pedestrians all day

Station Street 80

120

72

108

72

70 100

60

60

78

80

60 54

78

72

54

54

48

50

66 60

60 48

40

30 24 20

12

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

14

40

54

Public Life Data

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

60

30

24

24

24 18

20

10

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22


Pedestrian traffic Weekend 10am - 10pm 1,884 pedestrians all day

Globe Lane 250

234

1,464 pedestrians all day

Kembla Street A 250

234

210

210 198

200

198

200

168

204

174

168

156 150

120

Pedestrians per hour

102 100

72

66

50

0 11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

120

10-11

144

150

138

96

100

78

66

36

0 10-11

11-12

500

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

2,358 pedestrians all day

72

50

pm

Burelli Street A

84

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

3,144 pedestrians all day

Church Street A 450

468

420

450

400

400

384

350

330

318

306

350

336

300 300

264

276

216

210

192

174

168

156

150

114

102

100 50

30

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

250 200

250

252

198

200

168

168

18-19

19-20

186

150

100

66 50

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

20-21

21-22

pm

Public Life Data

15


Pedestrian traffic Weekend 10am - 10pm 8,226 pedestrians all day

Crown Street C

1,848 pedestrians all day

Crown Street F

1600

600

534

528

1368

1400

1338

500

1248

474

486

1200

372

348

876 800

384

400

966

1000

342

342 312

828

810

300

400

180

200

126

180

204

102

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

168

100

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

4,548 pedestrians all day

Crown Street E

276

882

800

756

250

774

768

210

684 200

624 600

168

522 500

150

400 300 200

96

100

78

90

18-19

19-20

114

120

20-21

21-22

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

Public Life Data

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

pm

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

16-17

300

900

16

15-16

Time

am

1000

700

200

pm

5,508 pedestrians all day

Crown Street D

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

258 600

168

156

150

156 144

114

108 96

100

102

50

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22


Pedestrian traffic Weekend 10am - 10pm 2,568 pedestrians all day

Kembla Street B

2,940 pedestrians all day

Corrimal Street 600

350

312 300

288 270

282

516

270

270

500

270

504

252

250

400

354 200

294

150

126 108 100

54

66

50

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

300

216 200

162 138

150 120

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

2,100 pedestrians all day

138

132

100

pm

Burelli Street B

216

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

1,602 pedestrians all day

Ethel Hayton Lane 350

350

324 300

300

250

250

288

234

222 204

204

200

200

150

150

132

132 108 90

100

66

90

90

54

50

0

10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

162

216

192

180 150

150

126

114

102

100

72 50

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

Public Life Data

17


Pedestrian traffic Weekend 10am - 10pm 1,494 pedestrians all day

Cliff Road A

4,440 pedestrians all day

Cliff Road B 700

250

234 624

200

600

204

198

552 500

162

306

108

100

54

54

50

42 24

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

438

400

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

114

Pedestrians per hour

444

144

300

200

168 96

100

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

Time

am

684 pedestrians all day

78 42

pm

Harbour Street

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

pm

1,314 pedestrians all day

Marine Drive 250

120

102

204

100

204

200

80

558

486

156

150

648

78

78

192 168

78

72

72

150

138

138

48 40

30 18

20

18

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

18

48

42

Public Life Data

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

60 100

96

90

50

36 24

18 6 0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22


Pedestrian traffic Weekend 10am - 10pm 2,748 pedestrians all day

Keira Street

3,030 pedestrians all day

Church Street B

350

500

318

474

450

300

408

276

400

258

252

250

258 240

234

246

354

336

350

312 300

200

186

50

10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

282

250

100

0

282

150

150

16-17

17-18

18-19

pm

19-20

20-21

21-22

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

162

168

276

200 150

108

108

100 50

42

48

20-21

21-22

0 10-11

11-12

12-13

am

13-14

14-15

15-16

Time

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

pm

Public Life Data

19


20

Public Life Data


Stationary activities Survey of stationary activities To better understand the usage and role of the different public spaces across the city centre, a stationary activity survey was undertaken in a selection of public spaces. The survey registers the number of people staying or spending time in a place and how they are using the space. The survey uses a series of categories to record activities which include: standing; sitting; lying down; as well as those who are engaged in cultural or commercial activities, such as vendors and street artists; and children playing.

Where people spend time is a

Stationary activities were recorded in 13 locations across the City Centre between 8am and 9pm*. The survey recorded stationary activities each hour, recording the distribution of people using a space, and type of activity.

measure of city

quality

A high number of people engaged in stationary activities tell a story of a city with popular and inviting public spaces. The more diverse the types of activities people are engaging with in a space, the more ‘complete’ the space is considered to be. *foreshore areas 6am-9pm

Counting positions

Bourke

Street

k

Clif oad

fR

Campbell

Crown Street

a

Burelli St reet

d

rb

ou rS

f

g

e

Market Sq

Driv

e

Ha

Corrima l Street

Street Crown St reet

ive

our Dr

Endeav

Mar ine

c

Kembla

Church

Market St reet

j

Railway Station MacCabe Park Crown Street Mall Lower Crown Street Corrimal Street Market Square Lang Park City Beach Belmore Basin Flagstaff Hill Blue Mile Arts Precinct Pioneer Rest Park

tre et

Smith St reet

Street

Street

i

Keira St reet

Victoria

Street

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l. m.

h

Stewart

Street

Gladstone

Avenue

b

Bank Stre et

Public Life Data

21


Stationary activities Weekday summary

Physical Active

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

Overall, the location which supported the highest number of people stopping and spending time is Belmore Basin, followed by the Blue Mile and Corrimal Street. The Arts Precinct and Belmore Basin, are recorded to have the most diversity in stationary activities. The least amount of diversity in activity is demonstrated in Corrimal Street, with the majority of recorded stationary activity being cafe seating.

There were

Pioneer Rest Park, Market Square and City Beach recorded the least amount of stationary activities.

staying activities

4,664 (weekday)

800

700

600

500

Stationary activities - Totals

Stationary activities - Totals

400

22

300

200

100

0

Wollongong Railway

McCabe Park

Crown Street Lower Crown St Mall

Corrimal St

Market Square

Lang Park

City Beach

Belmore Basin

1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400

Weekend

200 0 Wollongong Railway

McCabe Park

Public Life Data

Crown Street Lower Crown St Mall

Corrimal St

Market Square

Lang Park

Belmore Basin

Flagstaff Hill

North Beach

Arts Precinct

Weekday

Flagstaff Hill

Blue Mile

Arts Precinct


Stationary activities Weekday 8am - 10pm 417 activities

MacCabe Park

(at selected times)

Physical Active

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

45 activities

Market Square

60

(at selected times)

14

12

50

10 40

8

20

10

0 8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Time

am

18

19

20

21

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

30 6

4

2

0 8

9

10

pm

11

12

13

18 activities

(at selected times)

15

16

Time

am

Pioneer Rest Park

14

17

18

70

7

60

6

20

21

pm

299 activities

Lang Park

8

19

(at selected times)

50

5 40

3

2

1

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

pm

19

20

21

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

4 30

20

10

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

pm

Public Life Data

23


Stationary activities Weekday 8am - 10pm 374 activities

(at selected times)

100

100

90

90

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

30

20

10

0 8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Time

am

17

18

19

20

21

pm

359 activities

(at selected times)

100

90

80

70

60

Pedestrians per hour

50

40

30

20

10

0 9

10

11

am

24

Public Life Data

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

pm

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

327 activities

(at selected times)

40

30

20

10

0 8

9

10

11

am

Crown Street Mall

8

Folding Chair Seat

Arts Precinct

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

Railway Station

Physical Active

18

19

20

21

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

pm

19

20

21


Stationary activities Weekday 8am - 10pm 883 activities

Blue Mile

(at selected times)

Physical Active

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

436 activities

Flagstaff Hill

(at selected times)

90

140

80 120 70 100 60

50

40

60

40

20

0 6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Time

am

18

19

20

21

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

80

30

20

10

0 6

7

8

pm

10

11

12

(at selected times)

13

14

15

16

Time

am

55 activities

City Beach

9

17

18

20

21

pm

708 activities

Belmore Basin

25

19

(at selected times)

140

120 20 100

80

10

5

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

pm

19

20

21

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

15

60

40

20

0 6

7

8

9

am

10

11

12

13

Time

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

pm

Public Life Data

25


Stationary activities Weekday 8am - 10pm 188 activities

140

30

120

25

100

20

80

15

60

10

5

0 8

9

10

11

Public Life Data

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

pm

19

20

21

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

555 activities

Corrimal Street

35

am

26

(at selected times)

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

Lower Crown Street

Physical Active

(at selected times)

40

20

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

pm

18

19

20

21


Stationary activities Weekend summary

Physical Active

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

There are a similar number of staying activities recorded during the weekend as compared to weekdays. Overall, the location which supported the highest number of people stopping and spending time is Corrimal Street. This is dominated by cafe seating. Belmore Basin and the Blue Mile recorded higher numbers of staying.

There were

4,888

Belmore Basin is recorded to have the most diversity in stationary activities. Similar to the weekday, the least amount of diversity in activity is demonstrated in Corrimal Street, with the majority of recorded stationary activity being cafe seating.

staying activities (weekend)

1200

1000

Stationary activities - Totals

Pedestrians per day - Total

800

600

400

200

0

Wollongong Railway

McCabe Park

Crown Street Mall

Lower Crown St

Corrimal St

Market Square

Lang Park

Belmore Basin

Flagstaff Hill

Blue Mile

Arts Precinct

1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400

Weekend

200 0 Wollongong Railway

McCabe Park

Crown Street Lower Crown St Mall

Corrimal St

Market Square

Lang Park

Belmore Basin

Flagstaff Hill

North Beach

Arts Precinct

Weekday

Public Life Data

27


Stationary activities Weekend 8am - 9pm 256 activities

MacCabe Park

(at selected times)

Physical Active

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

16 activities

Market Square

50

4.5

45

4

40

(at selected times)

3.5

35 3 30 2.5

15

10

5

0 8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Time

am

18

Pedestrians per hour

20

21

1.5

1

0.5

0 8

9 activities

(at selected times)

8

40

7

35

6

30

5

25

4

20

3

2

1

0 10

11

am

Public Life Data

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

pm

11

12

13

19

20

21

14

15

16

17

Time

18

19

20

21

pm

210 activities

Lang Park 45

9

10

am

9

8

9

pm

Pioneer Rest Park

28

19

Pedestrians per hour

2 20

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

25

(at selected times)

15

10

5

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

pm

19

20

21


Stationary activities Weekend 8am - 9pm 367 activities

Railway Station

(at selected times)

Physical Active

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

151 activities

Arts Precinct

100

(at selected times)

35

90 30 80

70

25

60 20

40

30

20

10

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Time

am

10

11

12

13

14

pm

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

50 15

10

5

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

pm

1,077activities

Crown Street Mall

(at selected times)

100

90

80

70

60

Pedestrians per hour

50

40

30

20

10

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

pm

Public Life Data

29


Stationary activities Weekend 8am - 9pm 488 activities

Blue Mile

(at selected times)

Physical Active

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

626 activities

Flagstaff Hill

160

(at selected times)

100

90

140

80 120 70 100 60

50

60

40

20

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

80

40

30

20

10

0 8

9

10

pm

11

12

13

14

15

16

Time

am

17

18

19

20

21

pm

837 activities

Belmore Basin

(at selected times)

200

180

160

140

120

Pedestrians per hour

100

80

60

40

20

0 8

9

10

11

am

30

Public Life Data

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

pm

18

19

20

21


Stationary activities Weekend 8am - 9pm 452 activities

Lower Crown Street

(at selected times)

Physical Active

Folding Chair Seat

Culture Active

Secondary Seating

Social Active

Cafe Seating

Commercial Active

Bench Seating

Children Playing

Waiting for Transort

Lying Down

Standing

1077 activities

Corrimal Street

80

(at selected times)

250

70 200 60

50 150

30

20

10

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

pm

19

20

21

Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

40

100

50

0 8

9

10

11

am

12

13

14

Time

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

pm

Public Life Data

31


32

Public Life Data


Engagement Report Wollongong PSPL

03 2015 - 2016


Acknowledgements Wollongong City Council would like to show their respect and acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the Land, Elders past and present, and extend that respect to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.


Contents Executive Summary

2

1.0 Introduction 1.1 Purpose of Engagement

3 3

1.2 Engagement Methods

3

2.0 Feedback - What we heard

13

How to read A City for People sets the Vision and Strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong City Centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional City. Directing the focus of city design on the human dimension, a priority is given to delivering high quality city streets and spaces. This will invite people to rediscover their city, and to appreciate the unique and beautiful qualities offered by Wollongong City Centre.

13 Online Survey 31 Online discussion forum Social Media 32 33 Written Submissions 41 Workshops

Conclusion

41

Appendices

42

The Engagement Report collates an analysis of what we heard from the community during the draft exhibition period. It consists of all engagement undertaken by Council, submisisons recieved and online survey results. Supporting the Vision - A City for People vision is supported by a suite of documents as outlined below which detail the background analysis and data which informs the way forward.

The suite A A City for People Sets the Vision and strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong City Centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional city. Introduces 12 vision statements for our City followed by 6 Urban Life Projects with actions to improve public life.

Strategic Document

01

02

03

04

Public Space Public Life Study

Public Life Data

Engagement Report

Implementation Plan

A presentation of the study area and an analysis of the current (2014) physical conditions provided for pedestrians. The analysis looks at issues related to walking, as well as generally getting around and issues related to spending time in the City.

A survey of pedestrian activities on summer and winter days in selected spaces. Data is divided into observations of pedestrian traffic, as well as staying activities in these spaces. This document provides a base to successfully measure change in the future.

An analysis of what we heard from the community during the Draft exhibition period, and how this has impacted and influenced the final report. Consists of all engagement undertaken by Council, submisisons recieved and online survey results.

The implementation Plan takes each action from ‘A City for People’ and looks at these in terms of priority of delivery. This becomes a refined list of projects reviewed annually as part of Councils business planning cycle.

Supporting Documents


Executive Summary The draft ‘A City for People’ Plan was prepared by Wollongong City Council in partnership with Gehl Architects and urban design firm McGregor Coxall. The draft Plan was placed on public exhibition between 14 November 2015 and 11 March 2016. A wide variety of promotional and engagement methods were used to seek the community and stakeholder’s views on the draft Plan. Highlights from the engagement included: • Hundreds of conversations about the draft Plan (with community members, businesses, land owners and school students) • 9000 promotional postcards distributed in hard copy and sent to residents and landowners in the Wollongong suburb. • 1060 people completed the online survey. • 1120 views of the online project page. • 14 participants posting on the online discussion forum, producing 18 forum posts. • 19 written submissions received from 15 residents and agencies. • 150 students offered comments and ideas for the future of Wollongong City Centre. • 1200 people reached through Social Media (Facebook, Instagram & twitter) and online forum. Overwhelmingly the majority of responses were supportive of the Vision and objectives of the draft Plan. Community and stakeholder feedback expressed support for the revitalisation and investment in the City’s public spaces and streets. Significantly, there were no submissions that directly opposed the draft Plan.

The most common themes identified within the submissions were: • A connected city A desire for improved connections throughout the city and between the six project sites, particularly to the Foreshore; • Activation Support for increasing activities in public space (and many ideas for) activating and beautifying public spaces through ‘quick wins’. • Celebrating Diversity Increased diversity of activities and experiences creating a vibrant & dynamic city, also one that is an inviting and welcoming city for all. • Connecting to our Natural Setting Support for connecting with, and reinforcing the city’s proximity to the foreshore and green environments. • Accessible, Pedestrian & Cycle Friendly Support for improving accessibility in the City Centre and for making it more pedestrian and cycle friendly. • Arts & Culture Encouraging more events, artistic and musical displays or performances. • Maintenance Creating a cleaner, brighter and more colourful City.

These community aspirations and priorities are aligned with the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan, with the responsibility to deliver these aspirations becoming a combination of Council and private investment. Partnerships between Council, agencies, business, community groups, residents and landowners will be required to deliver upon the community’s vision for the Wollongong City Centre. 2


Online Survey An online survey was devised to collect feedback on how people felt about the future of the Wollongong City Centre and to capture the communities’ great ideas. The survey was made available online from 22 January to 11 March 2016 (accessible through the project webpage) and promoted via the resident notification postcards, across social media platforms, at pop up kiosks, in the media and through project signage installed across the city. To encourage community participation the survey was incentivised. Completing the survey online placed you in the draw with the chance to win one of five $100 vouchers. The survey was visual and used accessible language to ensure its suitability for a wide audience. The survey contained targeted questions designed to clarify and test the communities’ response to the draft City Centre Vision and to better understand priorities relating to turning ideas into action by delivering quick wins across the six Public Life projects A total of 1060 responses were received. Survey responses directly informed the refinement of the draft ‘A city for people’ report and recommendations prior to being reported to Council. A copy of the online survey is provided in Appendix A

Engaging with Businesses Council officers visited businesses in the Wollongong City Centre, handing out approximately 1500 postcards to raise awareness of the draft ‘A city for people’ Plan and seek comments throughout the month of February 2016. Council facilitated a forum with the ‘Movers & Shakers’, a group of local creatives, entrepreneurs and business owners to discuss their aspirations for the future of the City Centre and build rapport between these stakeholders and Council. Information on the draft plan was also shared by the Property Council to all members

Newspaper Advertisements and Media Advertisements appeared in the local newspapers on 14 November 2015 in the Advertiser and 18 November 2015 and 27 February 2016 in the Illawarra Mercury which has LGA wide reach. Media coverage was achieved by interviews with Gehl Architect’s Henriette Vamberg which appeared in additional newspaper articles, featured on WIN news reports and ABC radio.


1.0 Introduction In 2014, Council began a review of the City Centre Revitalisation Strategy. In order to undertake this review Council partnered with internationally recognised consulting firm Gehl Architects to develop a measured approach to delivering a high quality City Centre. The draft ‘A City for People’ Plan was placed on public exhibition between 14 November 2015 and 11 March 2016 to seek community and stakeholder comments through a process of external stakeholder workshops and meetings, internal staff workshops and a broad range of community engagement activities, including a series of pop up kiosks, school visits, consultation with government agencies, Council Reference Groups, Retailer and Neighbourhood Forums and an online survey. This report provides an overview of this process and the feedback received.

1.1 Purpose of the Engagement Across the three month exhibition period the purpose of the engagement was to: • • •

Build awareness around the draft ‘A City for People’ in the local community and invite people to access information and join the conversation online. Share the draft ideas and strategies detailed in the draft ‘A City for People’ report. Seek community and stakeholder feedback to understand aspirations for the Wollongong City Centre, test the validity of the draft City Centre Vision and identify priorities within the six unique public life projects. Continue to work collaboratively with the community and key stakeholders to build relationships and a sense of ownership to assist the long term delivery of the draft ‘A City for People’ report.

1.2 Engagement Methods A wide variety of engagement methods and activities were employed to reach as wide an audience as possible and aimed to reflect the community profile. A focus on young people Wollongong City Centre has a significant population of people aged under 25 years of age. As part of project we identified the importance of engaging with the younger demographic in our community. Typically, we find that these younger cohorts are underrepresented in providing feedback in relation to long term strategic plans. Engagement methods targeting this younger demographic were selected to increase participation. Stakeholders were able to have their say through a range of media including online, by posting written submissions and in person. Engagement activities were promoted through the local media channels as well as through Council’s social media platforms. A summary of the engagement activities is provided below. 3


Online Survey An online survey was devised to collect feedback on how people felt about the future of the Wollongong City Centre and to capture the communities’ great ideas. The survey was made available online from 22 January to 11 March 2016 (accessible through the project webpage) and promoted via the resident notification postcards, across social media platforms, at pop up kiosks, in the media and through project signage installed across the City. To encourage community participation the survey was incentivised. Completing the survey online placed you in the draw with the chance to win one of five $100 vouchers. The survey was visual and used accessible language to ensure its suitability for a wide audience. The survey contained targeted questions designed to clarify and test the communities’ response to the draft City Centre Vision and to better understand priorities relating to turning ideas into action by delivering quick wins across the six Public Life projects A total of 1060 responses were received. Survey responses directly informed the refinement of the draft ‘A City for People’ report and recommendations prior to being reported to Council. A copy of the online survey is provided in Appendix A.

Engaging with Businesses Council officers visited businesses in the Wollongong City Centre, handing out approximately 1500 postcards to raise awareness of the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan and seek comments throughout the month of February 2016. Council facilitated a forum with the ‘Movers & Shakers’, a group of local creatives, entrepreneurs and business owners to discuss their aspirations for the future of the City Centre and build rapport between these stakeholders and Council. Information on the draft plan was also shared by the Property Council to all members.

Newspaper Advertisements & Media Advertisements appeared in the local newspapers on 14 November 2015 in the Advertiser and 18 November 2015 and 27 February 2016 in the Illawarra Mercury which has LGA wide reach. Media coverage was achieved by interviews with Gehl Architect’s Henriette Vamberg which appeared in additional newspaper articles, featured on WIN news reports and ABC radio.

4


Project Webpage A webpage on Council’s ‘Have Your Say’ online engagement platform was created for the project. The webpage was branded ‘A City for People’ and included a project summary, link to the online survey and to the draft ‘A City for People’ report, FAQ’s, photomontages illustrating the six Public Life projects and a discussion forum. The discussion forum was an interactive element of the webpage and invited people to submit their thoughts in relation to the six unique Public Life projects and to support the Vision statements outlined in the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan. The discussion forum allowed people to discuss ideas and respond to the elements depicted in the photomontages with other members of the community with little intervention or prompting from Council. This webpage was updated periodically to ensure members of the public and stakeholders could be kept updated on the status of the project. Key statistics from the project webpage are detailed below • • • • • • • •

Total webpage visits Photo views Document downloads Maximum single day visitors Engaged participants Aware participants Informed participants Contributed on forums

1120 45 416 38 14 809 447 14

A copy of the project webpage FAQ’s section is provided in Appendix B

Figure 3: A City for People – Have your say page.

5


Resident & Stakeholder Notification Over 7300 postcards were delivered to residents of the Wollongong suburb promoting the draft ‘A City for People’ study and online survey. These postcards acted as resident notification, illustrating each of the six Public Life photomontages and providing a summary of the draft Plan as well as directions to project webpage. Copies of the postcard were also distributed to morning commuters at Thirroul Railway Station on the 25 February 2016 from 6-8am. A copy of the postcard is provided in Appendix C. Letters were emailed to more than 75 stakeholders and agencies. Emails were sent to local business owners and creatives identified as key stakeholders within the Wollongong City Centre. Letters were sent to State and Federal members Noreen Hay Member for Wollongong, Gareth Ward Member for Kiama, Anna Watson Member for Shellharbour, Ryan Park Member for Keira and Sharon Bird Federal Member for Cunningham. Hard copies of the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan in A3 and A4 sizes were made available at all Central, District and Branch libraries within the Wollongong LGA and at the Customer Service Centre in Council’s administration building. All reports were also available electronically via the dedicated project webpage. Promotional postcards were available at the Customer Service Centre.

Signage & Displays Signage with information and graphics relating to the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan was displayed in key locations across the Wollongong City Centre. This signage appeared in a variety of formats, and was selected to be most appropriate in each location. A series of large scale decals were applied to the pavement in the Crown Street Mall at the Church Street intersection. These decals were designed to increase awareness of the project and to direct the community to the dedicated project webpage to find additional information. Corflute signage was also attached to Council owned infrastructure in the Crown Street Mall, within MacCabe Park, in the Arts Precinct, at North Beach as well as being affixed to Transport NSW infrastructure at entry points to Wollongong Train Station. The objective of the signage was to promote the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan widely within the community and to encourage people to jump online and ‘join the conversation’ A visual display of A1 boards with information and graphics taken from the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan were installed on fencing running alongside the cycleway adjacent to Wollongong Harbour. This location provided an opportunity to promote the Plan and to provide a detailed account of the draft City Centre Vision and the six Public Life Projects in a high exposure location. The project was also promoted at the Pop-Up Botanic Garden which was situated at the Western Entrance of the Crown Street Mall running over the holiday period from December 2015 through to February 2016.

6


Figure 4: Pop Up Garden- Crown Street Mall

Figure 5: A1 Corflute boards - Wollongong Harbour

Project Promotion through Social Media The project was promoted on Council’s social media platforms and included frequent posts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Social media was used to build awareness, collect feedback and to direct people to the online survey. The project was also shared by a number of key stakeholders through their own social media platforms including Yours & Owls, Headspace Wollongong and University of Wollongong. 7


Figure 6: Instagram posting on 29 January 2016

Figure 7: Facebook posting on 24 February 2016

8


Figure 8: Twitter posting on 22 February 2016

Community and Stakeholder Forums The project team made presentations on the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan at various stakeholder and community forums. Presentations where given to U3A Wollongong on 12 October, City Centre Retailers Forum on 24 November 2015 and 30 March 2016, Lions Club Wollongong 1 December 2015, Sydney Trains on 14 December 2015 and at the Piccadilly Centre Strata AGM on 17 February 2016.

School Consultation Activities Council officers visited five local schools (primary and secondary) over the course the exhibition period. Over 150 students participated in the consultation. Council officers ran activities that aimed to gather feedback around what children and youth would like the Wollongong City Centre to be in the future and also assisted students in completing the online survey. Feedback from these activities informed the project workshops which featured PowerPoint presentations of the student’s illustrations and comments running throughout and also assisted with the refinement of text in the ‘A City for People’ report. Council consulted with Coniston Primary School on 10 February 2016 and Wollongong Primary School on 25 February, attended ESL classes at both Keira High School and Wollongong High School of the Performing Arts on the 11 February and 25 February 2016 respectively as well as running activities on two separate occasions at St Mary Star of the Sea College.

9


Figure 9: School consultation activities –Wollongong City Centre in the future

Council Reference Groups Documentation about the draft report was circulated to all Council Reference Group convenors to be shared in their meetings. Council officers attended the Wollongong Heritage Advisory Committee, 11 November 2015 and the Active Transport Reference Group on 2 December 2015 to provide a more detailed project update. The Wollongong Heritage Advisory Committee provides advice to Council on polices and strategies relating to the management, conservation and promotion of Wollongong’s heritage. The Active Transport Reference Group provides advice to Council on the preparation and implementation of active transport (bicycle and pedestrian) policies and strategic plans in Wollongong. Additional information about the draft Plan was also promoted through the Access Reference Group and the Multicultural Reference Group forums.

Workshops A series of workshops took place facilitated by John O’Callaghan from JOC Consulting to enable the community, stakeholders and internal staff to provide their input on the draft ‘A City for People’ report and shape priorities for public space within the City Centre. Invitations to the workshops were sent electronically to key stakeholders via Eventbrite. Two external workshops where held at City Beach Surf Life Saving Club on 16 March 2016. Attendees included representatives from private industry, government agencies, University of Wollongong, and local business owners with over 60 participants taking part on the day. 10


These workshops were documented through photographs and a video was produced on the day that aimed to share the atmosphere of these workshop sessions. Additionally, an internal staff workshop was run on 18 March 2016 which focused on sharing the feedback from the external workshops and helped to refine the draft plan and Council’s approach to delivering quick wins across city centre locations.

Figure 10: ‘A City for People’ workshops

Figure 11: ‘A City for People’ Eventbrite invitation

11


Information Kiosks Pop up kiosks were held in various locations across the Wollongong City Centre aiming to raise community awareness and allowing people to speak with Council Officers about the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan. These pop up kiosks were designed to ‘lead by action’, demonstrating fun and quick ways to improve the quality of public spaces. Pop up kiosks took place at Viva La Gong in MacCabe Park on Saturday 14 November 2015 and Crown Street Mall on Thursday 17 December 2015. This kiosk coincided with the ‘Eat Street’ food markets and one of the ‘Christmas Movies on Crown’ events. Pop-Up kiosks were also set up at North Beach and Wollongong Harbour on 12 and 13 December 2015. Council officers attended the University of Wollongong’s ‘O-Week’ festival on 25 February 2016. This roaming pop up kiosk provided an opportunity to engage with the new and returning student population of Wollongong and assisted to promote the draft plan and online survey. These kiosks proved to be popular and fun way to engage with the community and provided valuable feedback on the draft ‘A City for People’ plan.

Figure 12: Photograph of Information Kiosk, Viva La Gong 14 November 2015

Neighbourhood Forum 5 Meetings Council officers facilitated a workshop with members from Neighbourhood Forum 5 to test the draft City Centre Vision statements and to identify any gaps in the draft report. The workshop was attended by eight Neighbourhood Forum 5 members. Council officers also attended the Neighbourhood Forum 5 meeting on the evening of 3 February 2016 at Wollongong Town Hall presenting to the group on the draft ‘A City for People’ plan. This Neighbourhood Forum meeting was attended by 25 members of the forum and three Council staff.

12


Councillor Briefings A series of working sessions and briefings were held with Councillors across the life of the project. A Councillor briefing session following public exhibition of the draft plan was held on 29 March 2016 and on 26 April 2016.

2.0 Feedback- what we heard This section reports on feedback we received from the community and stakeholders through the online survey, written submissions, workshops, social media and online discussion forums.

Online Survey The survey was the most widespread engagement tool used during the exhibition with 1,060 surveys completed and returned or submitted to Council. Respondents were asked to identify their age with the results presented below.

Figure 13: Completed online survey demographic analysis

The main themes identified through the online survey a result of the public exhibition of the draft ‘A City for People – Public Spaces Public Life’ project included: A Connected City Strong support for increased connection to the Foreshore, while a marked lack of support for focus on MacCabe Park. The exception to this was the under 18 age group who identified MacCabe Park and Crown Street Mall as important sites, reflective of feedback that the City needs more family friendly spaces and activities. 13


Activation Support for increasing activities in public space was a popular theme, with many submissions providing ideas on how to activate spaces and increase activity throughout the City. Popular ideas included: more markets, art and music events in the City, increased shade and seating throughout the city spaces, increased diversity of retail with a focus on boutique, niche retail, pop-up shops and kiosks/food trucks, activities such as outdoor chess, exercise classes, skate ramps, and extension of hours of trade and activities in the City. Celebrating Diversity People’s experiences of the City were discussed; focusing on creating a vibrant and dynamic city, as well as one that is welcoming, inviting and diverse. A popular response was the potential of sites throughout the City that required urgent renewal and upgrade, most notably, the area around Wollongong Train Station and Western Crown Street. Connecting to our Natural Setting Support for increased development of sustainable practices and green spaces, including urban greening – the planting of more street trees, landscaping and planter boxes was a common theme. Connecting with our natural setting and reinforcing the city’s proximity to beach and green environments was seen to provide aesthetic, environmental, economic and practical benefits. Accessible, Pedestrian & Cycle Friendly Support for making the Wollongong City Centre more pedestrian and cycle friendly. Submissions highlighted issues with the City’s existing pedestrian infrastructure (maintenance of the streetscape), with requests for more shared paths, improved walkability, and greater use of public transport. Arts & Culture Support for increased arts and cultural activities, including more public art, festivals, events, and celebration of multicultural diversity was another popular theme. Maintenance A need to make the City Centre clean, bright and fresh through greater use of colour and scheduled maintenance of the public domain Accessibility Support for improving the accessibility of the Wollongong City Centre for older people and people with a disability.

14


Other popular themes identified were: more outdoor dining; improving safety; upgrades to shopfronts/facades; and improved connectivity between the City Centre and Railway Station and Foreshore. A more comprehensive account of feedback received is outlined below. Survey responses The following tables and figures present the results of the open-ended survey questions. The survey was open to the public via Council’s online engagement site, www.haveyoursaywollongong.com.au, from 22 January – 11 March, 2016. A total of 1,060 survey responses were received. The survey focused on three open-ended questions that drew on people’s identified preferences in terms of the six project sites, and asked them to explore further why they favoured such sites and/or what else could be done to further activate the sites and the City Centre more generally. Of the 1,060 responses received, the participation rate in the open-ended questions ranged from 60% (question 3) to 80% (question 1). As such, the answers analysed and collated here are indicative of the respondents’ ideas and sentiments. • •

The first open-ended question asked survey respondents to qualitatively identify how they thought the City needed to look, feel and to discuss their use of the City. The second question presented visual images of the six project sites so that respondents could choose their favourite three project sites. The open-ended question following from this asked respondents to list the elements within the visual images that appealed to them. Finally, the third open-ended question asked respondents to list and discuss any other potential good ideas they had for change and activation throughout Wollongong City Centre.

Analysis of Open-Ended Questions The following analysis presents the total results of each open-ended question. It also organises the results into two categories; ‘elements’ and ‘experiences’. Elements refers to tangible elements that could be installed or delivered in the City Centre such as seating or shade. Experience brings together the responses that focused on atmosphere, long-term outcomes or processes that are aspired to in the City Centre, things like vibrancy and fun. The responses have been analysed in this way to highlight tangible elements that people felt would immediately and positively impact the City Centre either through improving opportunities for activation or people’s experience of specific places. This information assists by identifying steps that could be quickly and immediately taken to improve the Wollongong City Centre. At the same time, results from the experiences category illustrate people’s hopes for the future of our City. Further to that, the elements category identifies the things respondents believe the City needs in order to celebrate, develop, grow and create a user-friendly City for People. The figures in the following section are organised by question, and work through a range of graphical information to support this analysis. The graphs presented reflect total results on each question, followed by responses to elements, and then experiences responses.

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Question 1: Imagine the City Centre in the Future. The survey asked participants to list their thoughts about the way they would want the City Centre to look and feel, and the ways in which they would use the City Centre in the future. 822 people answered this question, creating a total of 2,465 comments across 36 different themes. Four themes were identified as particularly important to the respondents. • • • •

209 people supported improved walkability and pedestrian access in the City. 230 people spoke of the importance of a clean City. 241 people responded by discussing the importance of creating a welcoming and inviting City. 255 people identified that creating a vibrant and dynamic City was critical to the future of Wollongong.

The following graph reflects the overall results to this question.

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Question 1- Imagine the City Centre in the future 'Total Responses' 0

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Vibrant & dynamic Welcoming & inviting Clean Walkability Safe Arts & culture Sustainable & green Cosmopolitan & modern Family friendly Attractive & beautiful Retail Activities & things to do Dining Parking Happy Connections with transport Open & spacious Colourful Cycling friendly Other Busy & bustling Shade Innovative Beachy & coastal Fresh Functional Public amenities Seating Unique Signs Engaging Building scale Housing Employment Information Wifi

The following two graphs reflect the results when broken into two categories, elements and experiences. In terms of tangible elements, a total of 1,258 comments were made, with walkability (16.5%) and cleanliness in the city (18%) being the most popularly supported elements to improve the look, use and feel of the City in the future.

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Question 1- Imagine the City Centre in the future 'Elements' 0

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Clean Walkability Arts & culture Sustainable & green Retail Activities & things to do Dining Parking Connections with transport Open & spacious Colourful Cycling friendly Shade Public amenities Seating Signs Building scale Housing Information Wifi

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Thinking about other dimensions important to the City in the future, people made 1,207 comments, with almost half of these comments focusing on improving the atmosphere associated with the City Centre. Results showed 21% of the other comments focused on wanting to create a vibrant and dynamic City Centre, while 20% of comments spoke of ensuring Wollongong City Centre is welcoming and inviting, and supportive of diversity. The following graph presents these results.

Question 1 -Imagine the City Centre in the future 'Experiences' 0

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Vibrant & dynamic Welcoming & inviting Safe Cosmopolitan & modern Family friendly Attractive & beautiful Happy Other Busy & bustling Innovative Beachy & coastal Fresh Functional Unique Engaging Employment

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A selection of responses to Question 1 In the future I need Wollongong City Centre to….are detailed below.

“Be able to offer me a vibrant, exciting and entertaining night life with a strong focus on cultural expression. The council need to support small businesses that like Sifters, Rad Bar (Yours and Owls), Music Farmers and the like to develop the culture of our town. It's small; local venues like these that foster cultural growth, not mammoth developers like the new ghost-town mall. Invest in and support local initiatives! “

“I want [it to be] connected to the sea, vibrant at night, architecturally inspiring, full of art and music”

“I want to see a City Centre that is inspiring, active, and safe. I would like a City Centre that doesn't close at 5pm and hosts a collection of different venues, shops, and amenities. I want to see people living in the City Centre, and I want there to be things to do which are not just bars and retail outlets.”

“Vibrant, stylish, friendly, clean, entertaining.” “Clean, commercially prosperous, busy, nonthreatening, safe, friendly with a community

“Welcoming, lively, with character, personality, interest, open late at night all over town. I want the city to be a place which facilitates meeting new people, and is vibrant and welcoming on the streets at night”.

“Vibrant, accessible, inviting and interesting - reflect the uniqueness and diversity of our city. A place where all ages feel they belong”.

“I need the city to feel and look clean, vibrant, inviting and a better community in general. There needs to be innovative ideas that engage visitors to come and there needs to be a variety of interactive events and stalls”.

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“More diversity, a community space that appeals to all ages and is a comfortable place to be, more bike and pedestrian-friendly, it should look interesting and feel like a "happening" place - a good vibe”.

“I need Wollongong City Centre to reflect its stunning geographical location; to be creative, innovative, ever-changing; to be fulfilling in the goods and services it offers; to be different in all ways from a suburban shopping centre; to encourage community use”.

“Inviting to a wide crosssection of the community, easily and quickly accessible for all, interesting enough that people want to stay, offer quality retail and activity opportunities “.

“Be more artistic, more art galleries, more metropolitan, more exciting community events. More family events. More for young entrepreneurs.”

Question 2: Your top 3 Public Life Projects - Why did you choose these 3 public life projects? What elements appealed to you? Question 2 consisted of two parts. The first presented images of the six Public Life project sites, and asked people to choose their top three for the City. The survey then asked people to identify the elements in the images that had led to their choice of sites specifically, and why they chose those particular project sites more generally. 720 people chose three sites, with 700 people identifying the reasons for their choices. Western Crown, Rail Arrival and Foreshore project sites ranked as the three most popularly chosen project sites, which is consistent with the results sourced throughout the exhibition generally.

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Public Life Project Preference The second question of the survey identified the six Public Life Projects, and provided visual imagery of each site. Respondents were asked to pick their top three sites with results indicating the Foreshore ranking in top position (417) followed by Western Crown (399) and the Rail Arrival (373).

Question 2 -Public Life Project Preference All respondents 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 Rail Arrival

Western Crown Crown St Mall MacCabe Park

Arts Precinct

Forshore Foreshore

Public Life Project Preference by Age Group Looking at the results across all age groups shows there is little distinction between the sites, with results quite evenly spread. The following points highlight key differences across the sites by age group. •

• • • •

For respondents under the age of 18 the Foreshore was selected as an important site (20%). There was a heightened focus on Crown Street Mall (22%) and MacCabe Park (19%). The 18- 24 year olds preferences are fairly evenly clustered together with the Foreshore remaining significant (21%). Site preferences for the 25-44 year olds show the Foreshore to be the most popular choice (23%) whilst MacCabe Park is lower than any other age cohort (9%). 45-64 year olds selected Western Crown as their most preferred site (21%) closely followed by Rail Arrival (19%). Respondents over the age of 65 years selected Rail Arrival is the preferred site (19%).

The Foreshore is consistently considered to be of high value across all age demographics. Interestingly, MacCabe Park is weighted highly by the under 18 years and the over 65 years demographics. 22


In the open-ended part of this question that asked which elements appealed to them most, people made 832 comments across 32 different themes. In these comments, four themes were identified as particularly important to the respondents. •

• • •

67 people identified that these sites were chosen because they affected people’s first impressions of Wollongong, and felt that improved City sites would assist people’s experience of Wollongong. 68 people spoke of the importance of having an activated City Centre. 71 people discussed significant potential of the chosen sites. 89 people said they chose those sites because they were in urgent need of renewal, upgrade and revitalisation.

The graph on the following page reflects the overall results to this question.

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Question 2- Public Life Project- Total Responses 0

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Upgrade & revitalisation essential Untapped potential Activation & activities First impression important Colour, bright, fresh Family friendly Sustainable & green Arts & culture Inviting & welcoming Seating Beautiful Important site already Open, public space Safe Retail Connections thorugh the city Public transport Building renewal Food Tourism Events Shade Unique & inspiring Clean Cycling friendly Access (pedestrian & traffic) Leisure Modern & cosmopolitan Signage Other Parking Public amenities

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The following two graphs reflect the results of Question 2 when broken into two categories; elements and experience. A total of 474 comments were made with reference to the tangible elements. Almost a quarter of all comments focused on the need for further activation (14%) and the importance of creating a bright, fresh, colourful City (10%) to improve the City Centre.

Question 2- Public Life Project -Elements 0

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Activation & activities Colour, bright, fresh Family friendly Sustainable & green Arts & cuture Seating Open, public space Retail Connections thorugh the city Public transport Building renewal Food Tourism Events Shade Clean Cycling infrastructure Access (pedestrian & traffic) Leisure Modern & cosmopolitan Signage Parking Public amenities

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Respondents made 358 comments about the experiences people have in these six project sites. Two thirds of these comments focused on three themes: the critical urgent need for upgrade, renewal and revitalisation of the chosen sites (25%), the significant untapped potential of the sites (20%), and the way these sites shaped people’s first impressions of Wollongong (19%). The following graph presents these results.

Question 2-Public Life Project- Experiences 0

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Upgrade & revitalisation essential

Untapped potential

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Inviting & welcoming

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Other

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A selection of responses to Question 2 I Chose those 3 public life projects because…… are detailed below.

“I chose Western Crown third as the area because while busy with activity, it doesn't have a great look visually. Giving the buildings and footpaths on each side of the street a make-over was an element that appealed to me.”

“Crown Street Mall. I think the food stalls on Thursday night and the market on Fridays are great. Probably need to have something on the weekends. It’s a great space that is underutilised.”

“Western Crown because it is ugly and unattractive. It does not feel safe walking to bus stops or train station alone at night. Wollongong has too much spread out commercial/retail areas, so perhaps Western Crown could be changed to attract different kinds of specialist businesses.”

“The western end of Crown St - it looks like 'dead space' and lacks the vibrancy and ambience of the other end.”

“Western Crown St is dilapidated and badly needs redeveloping. At the moment it heavily detracts from the relatively new and vibrant malls nearby, making them less appealing.”

“Western Crown St desperately needs revitalising. The addition of small garden and lawn areas seems like a great idea.”

“Rail arrival: vitality and way finding essential to make new arrivals feel safe and excited about being in Wollongong”. “Entry into Wollongong by rail at current is drab and appears to be a forgotten/neglected space at the back of Piccadilly. Due to its distance from the centre of Wollongong a vibrant and pleasant arrival point is required as it would enhance the perception of Wollongong based on what you see when you exit Wollongong train station.” “More activity in the mall, keep the activities coming, more temporary artworks, more activity, more kids activities. Park needs a lot of work. Leave it alone for now.....The arts precinct doesn't need any more money spent on it. The whole city should be an arts precinct. The concept that art occurs in the precinct as the big end of town is boring and ignores the neighbourhoods which should have cultural activity as well. MacCabe Park needs a lot of work. Leave it alone for now.....” “Using spaces that already exist, just improving them - doesn't need to be new or expensive or large or fancy”.

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Question 3: Your very good idea- Do you have any other ideas for Public Spaces within the City Centre, or other places you think these kinds of changes should take place? This question asked respondents if they had additional ideas for improvement of the six project sites or other potential sites where changes would be welcomed. This question received 607 answers, providing 1,263 comments with over 37 themes. Three themes were identified as having greater importance to respondents than others. • • •

112 people spoke of the need to improve and support arts and cultural initiatives in the City, such as events and festivals and public art. 80 people spoke of the importance of greater sustainable practices and green spaces in the City. 72 people identified Western Crown as sites that they believed needed focus.

The following graph reflects the overall results to this question.

Question 3 -Your Very Good IdeaTotal Responses 0

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Arts & culture Other sites identified Seating & shade Family friendly Cycling friendly Mall Parking Connections throughout the city Community focus Colour Public transport Beaches & coastal Footpath Inviting & welcoming Mt Keira Modern & cosmopolitan Open & spacious Libraries

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The following graph presents the results of Question 3 broken down into elements. A total of 732 comments were made about tangible elements. Almost a quarter of all comments focused on the need to support arts and cultural initiatives in the City (15%) and creating a City Centre that is sustainable and green (11%). These were the most significant additional ideas for improving the City.

Question 3- Your Very Good Idea -Elements 0

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Arts & culture Sustainable & green Seating & shade Activation & activities Food & dining Cycling friendly Retail & small business Parking Walkability Colour Public space Public transport Buildings Footpath Roads & traffic Clean Public amenities Open & spacious Chess Libraries Smoke & alcohol free

Respondents made 324 comments about additional ideas for improving people’s experiences in the City. Comments covered a range of issues. The top themes included creating a family friendly City Centre, improving connections through the City and a renewed focus on laneways. Additionally, some comments related to other sites considered important in the City Centre such as Market Square and entry points to the City. Commenters also expressed the desire for Wollongong to feel like a modern and cosmopolitan city. These type of comments were not considered to be statistically significant. 29


A selection of responses to Question 2 I chose the 3 public life projects because…… are detailed below.

“Roof top bars - roof top gardens and cafes. Light installations shinning on the empty walls e.g. from Humber Bar you can see blank white buildings. Light installations would be epic. Also along the esplanade walk from North Gong to harbour, light installations along here- very dark and scary at night and the two night spots are disconnected. Space could be utilised more made to feel as one area not two separate locations.”

“More public sculpture needs to integrate into our city - and not just safe, traditional work. Make it big, modern, even controversial. Give people a reason to come to the city centre! “

“I think in the mall we should have some kind of water feature for kids to walk through eg like Pyrmont Park, or Darling Harbour. We also need some sort of equipment for kids in the mall for mums shopping in the mall. We also need more seats and tables in the mall.” “Outdoor sculpture park/garden.” “Live entertainment and events, further encouragement of small bars and areas like Globe Lane”.

“More opportunities for performing arts. More vibrant nightlife.”

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“Embrace professional local, interstate and international artists to inform public art projects in public spaces - tired of seaside murals and tile projects. So many great sculptors or contemporary artists, designers and architects could contribute.”

“Building a permanent covered stage in an outdoor park with power & toilet blocks so the city has a permanent outdoor venue”. “It would be great to have young people part of the revitalization. Such as maybe painting of the old buildings. It would even be greater if it was part of a mentoring program. Or have those living library people on public spaces.” “Further clean-up of Wollongong Station and Piccadilly area”.

Online Discussion Forum (Project Webpage) One of the engagement tools used during the exhibition was an online discussion forum, with opportunities for participants to comment on each of the six Public Life project sites identified in the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan. The following table presents the results of the discussion forum by site, listing both the number of contributors, comments and types of comments made by the community. Site Rail arrival

Number of Visitors 72

Western Crown

73

Crown St Mall

42

Number of Comments Content of comment Contributors made 2 2 Signage & stairs need improving at the station Laneways at the station provide potential for access & first impression, need to be activated 4 3 Improved pedestrian experience necessary Uncertain the importance of Western Crown Need for more parking, multistory car park between the hospital & Keira Street 1 1 Importance of investing in quality street art

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MacCabe Park

63

3

5

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49

3

4

Foreshore

70

3

3

Need to use the space for events, activities, festivals, innovative sports MacCabe Park suffering from a lack of visibility Centre of the City has moved to the east, focus on Lang Park instead of MacCabe Park Trip hazards at corner of Burelli Street & Kembla Street Need for updated multiuse cinema complex or a unique cinema to operate as a destination cinema Retain historic elements & natural setting Turn the foreshore into a culture & entertainment precinct Stencil art on the walkway & focus on cycling supported

The use of online tools on the haveyoursaywollongong.com.au site complemented the other methodologies used during the exhibition. The project page comprised of photos of relevant project sites, important project dates, Frequently Asked Questions about the project and the exhibition, and a suite of documents, including the Wollongong Public Spaces, Public Life Report and A City for People Strategy Report and the Public Life Data Set.

Social Media A range of social media platforms were used to promote visibility of the ‘A City for People’ project, and encourage residents to complete the survey tool. This messaging was promoted across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The following table presents this messaging, reach and response to the various social media platforms used. A comment was posted on Facebook that reached 342 people, while tweets were sent via Twitter six times, over the period 23 February – 3 March 2016. The reach of the tweets was much greater with a maximum of 903 impressions reached in response to a poll. Two pictures were posted to Instagram, with both receiving 31 likes.

A copy of the ‘A City for People – Social Media Strategy’ is provided in Appendix D

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Written Submissions Resident Submissions The community had the option to provide their feedback in open format. Council acknowledged all written submissions by post, responding directly to key issues raised. Further detail of the written submissions and how they relate to the draft strategy is contained within the Council Report. Seven people sent in ten open emails and/or letters. Community Groups & Organisation Submissions There were a total of nine open submissions received from eight different community groups and/or organisations. Again, the group submissions were supportive of the project and its aims for renewal and activation in the City Centre. A total of 19 written submissions were received. Comments provided by residents, community groups and organisations are summarised in the table below.

AUTHOR

MATTERS RAISED

COMMENT/ RESPONSE

Resident (Wollongong)

Supportive of introduction of colourful planting and flowers in the Crown Street Mall.

Noted. This suggestion is aligned with the Crown Street Mall Unique Public Life Project.

Use tree guards to bring colour to the Mall.

Recent art projects in the Mall have used tree guards to display public art bringing colour and interest along the Mall.

Supportive. Wollongong CBD is dominated by a retail shopping mall.

Noted.

Resident (ACT)

Resident (Anonymous)

Importance of key spaces in the city centre such as Wollongong Train Station, MacCabe Park, Arts Precinct and the Foreshore. Brand Wollongong as a city rather than a town. Encourage major retailers to come to the city.

A City for People highlights these

locations within the six unique public life projects, highlighting their importance. The accompanying Implementation Plan identifies a range of relevant short, medium and long term actions within these locations. Noted. Comments have been forwarded to Council’s Media team and Destination Wollongong.

Increased positive media stories The Vision recognises the Regional to promote the city City role of Wollongong City Centre. 33


Marketing and media is associated with action 1.9 City Centre Event Calendar. Resident (Anonymous)

Wollongong city centre requires increased input from local creatives to make it the fabulous place it deserves to be.

Noted.

A City for People is aligned with the Cultural Plan, promoting an increase presence of arts and culture within our city centre. The final report has been guided by community input from local creatives, business and industry. Aligned with the delivery of Western Crown Public Life Project, and actioned via 1.7 of the Implementation Plan through delivering against Creative Spaces Strategy.

Resident (Wollongong)

Concerns with signage and public facilities in the city centre identifying the need for signage to be upgraded to reflect Wollongong.

Noted. The draft A City for People plan supports creating an increasing liveable city that puts public life at the centre of its planning.

Identifies confusion between City Beach and South Beach, recommends re branding and renaming to Bustle Beach

Aligned with the Foreshore Public Life Project and the accompanying Implementation Plan guides the delivery of a range of actions and investment to reinforce the identity of City Beach and to provide a sense of arrival.

Supports need to deliver sense of journey, representing heritage and arrival where Blue Mile meets Crown Street at the foreshore, suggesting an arch. Identifies a range of events to promote and celebrate the uniqueness of Wollongong.

Noted. Comments have been forwarded to Destination Wollongong.

Requests an economic study to identify business opportunities for the City and Region.

Noted. A City for People aspires to create an increasingly liveable city that promotes economic growth.

Identifies need for toilets through the city centre, noting inaccuracies with mapped areas in the Data Report.

Noted. The draft A City for People plan supports creating an increasingly liveable city that puts public life at the centre of its planning. Comments forwarded to Council’s media team.

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Resident (Wollongong) (x4 submissions)

Identifies need for improved pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure through the city centre. Requests clarification on the role of A City for People in future decision making.

The Vision and supporting actions of A City for People promote a pedestrian and cycle friendly city.

Requested clarity on how the draft influences amendments to Wollongong LEP, particularly relating to building height controls.

In accordance with Implementation Action 1.2 A City for People will guide a review of city centre planning controls to inform amendments to WLEP.

Requested clarification as to the accuracy of the walkability measure (1km = 10min walk).

The walking time depicted in the report reflects an internationally recognised standard walking time for a 1km route. It is recognised that the time to walk 1km remains dependent on physical mobility, and is a guide only.

Highlighting the importance of green open space in the Wollongong City Centre, particularly to support higher density residential areas.

Resident (Woonona)

Noted. A City for People is not an Environmental Planning Instrument; it is a vision document which sets the strategic direction for the City Centre.

Provision of a neighbourhood park in Smith Hill area.

Noted. A City for People supports the delivery of a network of connected and flexible open spaces within the Wollongong City Centre. In accordance with Implementation Action 1.2 A City for People will include a review of the open space network across the City Centre.

Major events at Foreshore & Stuart Park.

Foreshore activation is promoted by the vision and Foreshore Public Life Project. Stuart Park is outside the Wollongong City Centre boundary as defined by Wollongong LEP2009.

Need to change the perceptions and retail offer/ experience in Crown Street Mall.

Noted. The retail mix is determined via land zoning which is not affected by this project. Retail mix is promoted through the Vision to deliver a living city, aspiring to deliver a city experience, beyond a retail focus.

Mall refurbishment underwhelming, needs more shade.

The Mall Public Life Project directs a range of activation projects and projects to improve comfort and amenity, shade is part of this.

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Illawarra Association for the Visual Arts

Requested the Plan identify opportunities to promote local artists work by activating windows on Western Crown Street.

Noted. Aligned with the delivery of Western Crown Public Life Project, and actioned via 1.7 of the Implementation Plan through delivering against Creative Spaces Strategy.

National Trust NSW

Recognition of the importance of heritage in the Wollongong City Centre and keen to be involved in future projects.

Noted.

Investigate opportunity to promote heritage via a phone app.

Aligned with the City Centre Vision, the importance of heritage is highlighted in accordance with Celebrate the Uniqueness. It is noted that items 1.6 and 4.3 Heritage Interpretation Projects are included in the Implementation Plan.

Supportive of design review process. Culture of design excellence needs to be supported by a City Architect.

Noted. Council is establishing a SEPP 65 Panel 2015/16. The future planning study as per item 1.2 of the Implementation Plan will further investigate built form and design.

Supportive of collaborative implementation, noting the need for various departments within Council to collaborate to deliver outcomes.

Noted. The Implementation Plan highlights internal working partnerships between council divisions to deliver projects.

Use of ‘catchy phrases’ alienates less sophisticated readers and reduces the authority of the document.

A series of changes have been made to the vision and associated public life projects to reflect community language received via the consultation process.

Supportive of the general thrust of the draft ‘A City for People’ report.

Noted.

Concerns raised regarding Implementation and when planning policy (LEP) will be updated. Importance of character of city centre streets,

In accordance with Implementation Action 1.2 A City for People will guide a review of City Centre planning controls to inform amendments to WLEP and will lead to more detailed

Neighbourhood Forum 5

A City for People supports high quality streetscapes with the Vision promoting streets that are comfortable, enjoyable and safe with excellent presentation that contributes to the development of a human scale City Centre.

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St Mary Star of the Sea College

requesting urgent review of planning policy LEP and DCP. Requesting clarification s to how the community be involved.

analysis on the design outcomes/ character of city blocks and streets. The community and key stakeholders will be involved throughout this process.

Requests a public meeting to debate the issues following the full report.

Council facilitated public workshops to inform the refinement of A City for People. These workshops engaged around 60 participants representing local residents, business and government agencies.

Raised concerns that the report would not lead to clear implementation. Consider quick wins appropriate but not at the expense of longer term initiatives.

The accompanying City Centre Implementation Plan itemises key actions to be delivered in the short medium and long term, and relevant budget to deliver these.

Raised alarm that the Council appear to continue to use a secretive in-house approach to planning and development in the City Centre without a reference group (specifically representative of the community, retailers, the Property Council, IBC and the National Trust).

To inform the final report, extensive community engagement was undertaken, bringing thousands of ideas, suggestions and included direct engagement with representative of the community, retailers, the Property Council, IBC and the National Trust.

Great concern raised with mismatch between rhetoric of a pedestrian/ cycle dominated environment and the investment in roads and parking.

A City for People will guide strategic

Over 1,060 surveys received, hundreds of online comments, 18 submissions and hundreds of face to face conversations informed the refinement of A City for People. decision making and investment. A balance is required to accommodate a highly accessible and functional liveable city. The Implementation Plan identifies action 1.1 Review of the Access and Movement Strategy which will inform future investment.

When endorsed, A City for People will Request clarification with supersede the Wollongong City Centre regard to the City Centre Vision, and Civic Improvement Plan, Revitalisation Strategy Review. and CBD Action Plan. Consideration of using school Noted. Comments have been facilities outside of school hours forwarded to Council’s Community to support arts and culture in and Cultural Services teams. the city. 37


Illawarra Retirement Trust x2

Illawarra Retirement Trust

Support promotion of walking, cycling and use of public transport.

A City for People aligns with Council’s

Reiterate importance of heritage in the city centre and history of St Mary’s could form part of historic walks.

The Vision and supporting actions of A City for People promote a pedestrian friendly city.

Supportive of partnerships between Council and local industry and businesses.

A City for People and the accompanying Implementation Plan acknowledge the importance of partnerships to assist with the delivery of outcomes.

Provides an analysis of the Links IRT Pioneer Place development against the Vision.

Noted.

Supportive of the principles of liveability underpinning the draft Plan

Noted. A City for People aspires to create an increasingly liveable city that establishes a range of health and lifestyle benefits and promotes economic growth. Noted.

Supportive of principles of liveability underpinning the draft plan.

Cultural Plan, and is supportive of measures that will support and enhance arts and culture in the Wollongong city centre.

Wollongong to be an international leader in age friendly cities.

A City for People is underpinned by the principles of delivering a liveable city centre.

Highlights importance of: - accessible & comfortable outdoor spaces - clear signage and wayfinding - efficient and accessible transport links - safe laneway networks - improved street lighting - clustering services for improved access.

The 12 Vision statements promote the delivery of a liveable, diverse and active City Centre which includes a diverse residential community and creates an increasingly pedestrian friendly city.

Identifies need for Council planning instruments to: - support housing density near transport, shopping and services,

Key actions within the Implementation Plan addressing transport, public domain quality and land use include 1.1 Review Access and Movement Strategy and 1.2 City Centre Planning

Actions around accessibility and comfort of the public domain are addressed through the Vision, and also through each Public Life Project.

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Wollongong Sports and Entertainment Centre

- deliver affordable housing models. - ensure older residents have opportunity for inner city living. - promotes diversity in resident population. Overarching support for revitalising public infrastructure and activation at the Foreshore.

Review and 1.3 City Centre Design Review. The points raised will inform this work.

Support to investigate improved heritage interpretation and awareness.

Aligned with the City Centre Vision, the importance of heritage is highlighted in accordance with Celebrate the Uniqueness. It is noted that items 1.6 and 4.3 Heritage Interpretation Projects are included in the Implementation Plan.

Foreshore Activation

Aligned with the Foreshore Public Life Project and the accompanying Implementation Plan, WSEC is a key partner in delivering a range of projects to activate and enhance the Foreshore experience.

City Beach Reference

The referencing of City Beach has been amended in the final report.

Support to explore opportunity for day time activation. Support for vision of the foreshore to be an activated tourist precinct. Support for need to deliver sense of arrival at the foreshore, noting suggestions of an arch or similar. Request referencing and promotion of City Beach as branded (not South Beach).

Noted.

Support for a Convention Centre Council notes the continued support WSEC notes aspiration for WEC upgrade to convention centre and requests WCC support to attract future funding opportunities.

Access and Movement

WSEC happy to consider pedestrian access through WSEC site from Stewart Street. WSEC requests ongoing exploration of multi-level car park.

for WSEC in delivering a convention centre. As noted in Council Community Strategic Plan (objective 2.3, Strategies 2.3.2 - To support the

promotion of the City Centre as a preferred conference and events destination, and the place to live, learn, work and visit.

Alignment with the access and movement comments is noted. The programmed Review of the Access and Movement Strategy (refer 1.1 Implementation Plan) will consider the range of parking and access issues raised by WSEC.

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Support for further promotion of public transport.

Implementation

Illawarra Business Chamber

Importance of long and short term implementation to deliver a range of activation elements. Support for heightened commercial activation in the Wollongong City Centre. Reinforces the importance of relationships between Council and the private sector.

A City for People is underpinned by

the fact that liveable cities delivering high quality environments attracting residents and visitors and driving investment.

IBC recommend: Enhance private sector engagement overall.

The Vision supports a tightly defined city centre that guides priorities for investment and a growing economy.

Formally engage with private sector for Rail arrival master plan.

Council recognises the importance of a collaborative approach to assist in delivering the future vision for the city centre and engaged widely with business, the community and government sector to refine and finalise A City for People. It is also recognised that key to implementation are strong partnerships with local business.

Support pop up / flexible options for upcoming retail and hospitality industry. Investigate activities in the Mall to bolster local business and prosperity of local shop owners. Promote private sector presence along Foreshore and highlight the WEC as a key site for refurbishment. Consider a review of business rates in the Wollongong City Centre.

Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District

The accompanying Implementation Plan sets out a series of short, medium and long term actions to deliver against the Vision.

Key actions identified throughout the plan seek to support and improve local prosperity, and not compete with it. The focus is on building on what is working well, and complementing local business with high quality city experiences. The consideration of a review of business rates is noted. This request has been forwarded to Council’s City Centre Team, and will be under consideration in context of Action 1.2 City Centre Planning Review.

Overall supportive of the draft Noted. plan, congratulating WCC on the approach and consultation. Request consideration of Health Care Services Plan 2012-22.

A City for People supports creating a liveable city that has an overall focus on liveliness, health, attractiveness, sustainability & safety. 40


Ensure there is a sup

Key actions within the Implementation Plan address public domain quality and provision of shade, lighting, seating and facilities in the city centre. The 12 Vision statements promote the delivery of a liveable, diverse and active city centre which includes a safe and increasingly pedestrian and cycle friendly city. Vision statement 11 specifically relates to improving connections to the Hospital.

The importance of delivering affordable housing is acknowledged. This is a broader issue that will be considered as part of LGA wide studies including the Housing Strategy.

41


ply of healthy food in the City Centre and minimise alcohol outlet density. Suggestion to include walking routes, bubblers and gym equipment in MacCabe Park. Public domain improvements -Make drinking water available in public spaces, adequate shade and lighting, facilities (toilets and parent rooms) and improvements to wayfinding, and comfortable seating. -Support a safer pedestrian experience around Hospital site, lower speeds, install pedestrian crossings and improved footpaths. Support for improved public transport, walkability & cycling infrastructure in the city centre. -Promote affordable housing

Workshops Feedback from the external and internal workshops facilitated by John O’Callaghan from JOC Consulting was supportive of the draft ‘A City for People’ Plan and has been used to inform the refinement of the draft strategy with the community’s words being reflected in the draft Vison statements. The ‘A City for People’ workshop report details the feedback from community, stakeholder and internal Council staff. A copy of this report is provided in Appendix E.

Conclusion The feedback received across the broad range of engagement methods was generally supportive of the principles and strategies put forward in the draft ‘A City for People’ plan. This community and stakeholder feedback received was used to refine the draft document including the City Centre Vision text and has been shared internally to help shape ‘quick win’ ideas and help set priorities within the Wollongong City Centre.

Appendix A - Online survey

42


43


44


Appendix B -Project webpage FAQ

45


46


Appendix C - Project postcard

47


Appendix D - A City for People– Social Media Strategy

48


49


Appendix E - JOC Consulting ‘A city for people workshop report’

50


JOC Consulting for Wollongong City Council

‘A CITY FOR PEOPLE’ WORKSHOP REPORT WOLLONGONG PUBLIC SPACES PUBLIC LIFE FINAL | 15 April 2016


INTRODUCTION In partnership with Gehl Architects, Wollongong City Council (WCC) has developed ‘A City for People, Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life’, a draft strategy and action plan to revitalise and improve the City Centre. An important component of the Strategy has been engagement with a number of opportunities for staff and the wider community to provide feedback and input. The latest engagement round included an online survey with more than 1000 submissions and two stakeholder workshops (the purpose of this report). A City for People, Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life 2015 report will “inform a process of creating resilient places that are liveable today and sustainable tomorrow, investigating the relationships between people’s quality of life and their built environment and using data to inform decision making and to measure change”. The Report identifies six ‘Public Life Projects’ for delivery of fun, simple and quick ways to improve public space in the City Centre. Each project is unique, with its own identity and an important role to play in revitalising and improving the Wollongong City Centre. The 6 unique Public Life Projects are: 1. Rail Arrival 2. Western Crown 3. Crown Street Mall 4. MacCabe Park 5. Lower Crown - Arts Precinct 6. Foreshore

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STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOPS ‘A CITY FOR PEOPLE’ WORKSHOP DETAILS When: Wednesday 16 March 2016, 10am-12.00pm (morning session) and 5.00pm -7.00pm (evening session) Where: Wollongong City Surf Life Saving Club Marine Drive Wollongong NSW 2500 Workshop Problem Statement: ‘How can we create liveable and sustainable places that rejuvenate the Wollongong City Centre?’ Workshop Aim: To have the community and stakeholders provide input on the draft ‘A City for People, Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life 2015’ report. Workshop Methodology: The workshop balances traditional engagement best practice with contemporary design thinking methods. Workshop Outcomes: • To identify community values associated with public space in Wollongong, • To finalise ideas developed in the report focused on the six unique projects, • To connect people and build social capital in Wollongong. • To test and identify any gaps in the draft Report.

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ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY

2 WORKSHOPS

60+

PARTICIPANTS

1 2 3 4 5 6 UNIQUE PUBLIC LIFE PROJECTS

200+

QUICK WIN IDEAS

PUBLIC SPACE VALUES PAGE 4

26


PHASE 1 - CREATIVE BRAINSTORMING While ‘design’ is most often used to describe an object, place or end result, the ‘A City for People’ workshop utilised design as a technique for thinking, as a process for unpacking values, needs and creative solutions (metaphors). Creative brainstorming with design thinking methods is fast paced, fun and interactive. It’s purpose was to open the mind of participants to new possibilities and find empathy with users of Wollongong City Centre. By doing so, creative and high level outcomes were achieved in Phase 1 to compliment the more pragmatic and focused feedback sought in Phase 2. The following pages provide a summary with detailed observations on each activity in Phase 1.

ACTIVITY 1A - VALUES ASSOCIATED WITH PUBLIC SPACE Overview: Participants were asked to brainstorm their values associated with public space. Within this activity, the most common values were safety (10 mentions) and accessibility (11 mentions) with people (11 mentions) and place (5 mentions) also recognised as critical to a successful public space. The graphic wordcloud (to the right) has collated these values in visual format. The most mentioned values are larger and located to the centre with the least mentioned values, smaller and located to the edge. Observations: • Participants were able to connect and find empathy with other users of public space. By doing so they identified values common to all experiences and Public Life Projects. • The values, ‘safe’ and ‘accessible’, refer to a sense of protection and care for the self, and others. An emphasis on these values speaks to either a lack of existing provision or growing recognition of their importance. • These values should be revisited and considered when designing new public spaces within the 6 unique Public Life Projects.

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ACTIVITY 1B - ELEMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH PUBLIC SPACE

ACTIVITY 2 - THEMES ASSOCIATED WITH PUBLIC SPACE

Overview: Participants also contributed element suggestions in Activity 1. These were landscape items or experience offers, that participants feel are important to successful public spaces. Within this activity, the most common elements were food (8 mentions), art (6 mentions) and seating (4 mentions).

Overview: Facilitators (on each table) clustered feedback from Activity 1 and with participants identified emerging themes. Overall, the two most popular themes were access (6 mentions) and creative (4 mentions). These themes continue a natural progression of thought and creative thinking from Activity 1.

Observations: • The high mention of food as an important offer, suggests public space requires destinational elements, but also speaks to a level of convenience needed once in the space. • With art identified as a favoured element, public space should be seen as a canvas for artistic expression - a balance between overt, and more subtle artworks. • Anecdotally, many participants identified seating as an important element when discussing values of comfort and gathering. Much seating is currently provided in each Public Life precinct but could the arrangement and design better suit the behaviours of local users?

Observations: • Creativity is important as a philosophy, attitude and in terms of public space, a physical addition or intervention. The values and elements brainstormed in Activity 1 reference this desire and a need for a more creative Wollongong City Centre. • Successful local events, like Wonderwalls, and recent upgrades to public spaces have contributed to a feeling of ‘creative momentum’ in Wollongong City Centre. • Accessibility as a theme, makes reference to the users of public space, ensuring access equality to, from and within the space. It also refers to the physical design of spaces, ensuring people aren’t ‘designed out’ or discouraged from spending time in public. • Other themes mapped during Activity 2 refer to play and activation, with programming recognised as essential for making successful public spaces. In addition, themes of safety, diversity and atmosphere were also developed.

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PHASE 1 - CREATIVE BRAINSTORMING ACTIVITY 3 & 4 - METAPHOR MARKETING Overview: Activities 3 and 4 built upon values brainstormed in Activities 1 and 2 with participants asked to think of objects, ‘things’ or experiences that represented the developed themes. After 5 minutes, the group was asked to select one chosen metaphor and create a short 2-3 sentence pitch to ‘sell’ Wollongong City Centre as a place. Participants were required to imagine Wollongong City Centre as the chosen metaphor, breaking down its individual parts and identifying its unique qualities. By doing so, participants have provided Council with valuable insights into their aspirations for Wollongong City Centre and ways in which public life projects could be improved. The metaphors of playground and street party/neighbourhood street received 2 mentions - voted by their tables as most suitable for Wollongong’s future.

Group metaphor: Playground

Group metaphor: Olympic Games Group metaphor: Neighbourhood Street Observations: Observations: • focuses on themes of • a focus on events and Observations: community and play programming • focuses on theme of • is a ‘call to action’, a physical • a ‘put us on the map’ type community and diversity invitation to engage pitch • individual roles for all • identifies the changing nature • pride in place members of the Street of place, and of Wollongong • recognition that vibrancy City Centre needs people Lessons for Public Life projects: • sense of familiarity and/ Lessons for Public Life projects: • consider the management or regulars of space is • consider ‘playful’ elements in and delivery of small and important everyday material objects or large events during design event based gestures phase Lessons for Public Life projects: • challenge citizens to think • provide opportunities for • recognise that ‘people attract differently and build on their the public to volunteer or people’ ‘worldview’ participate • small ‘neighbourhood’ or pocket spaces throughout the • provide quality space for • provide a choice of activities gathering and celebration and different uses throughout City will make it feel more the space authentic and enjoyable • everyone has a role to play in developing a sense/spirit of place PAGE 7


Group metaphor: Street Party

Group metaphor: Treasure Map

Observations: • focuses on the theme of atmosphere and community • recognises food as important for sociability and convenience • considers time, with evolving needs of space and ‘testing’ of initiatives

Observations: • small moments leading to a big reveal/change • considers intuitive and creative connections and wayfinding • encourages exploration of Wollongong City Centre (and ‘off the beaten track’)

Lessons for Public Life projects: • experiment with different food and beverage licenses to encourage activation at different times, in different locations • consider the informal nature of a ‘street party’ and incorporate a layer of this into the design of public space

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Group metaphor: Storybook (growing into a theme park) Observations: • reference to development and placemaking underway in Wollongong City Centre • plays with local and childhood nostalgia • recognises the importance of a coastal lifestyle to the City’s culture

Group metaphor: Mist

Group metaphor: Playground

Observations: • changing reputation and appreciation for people and place at Wollongong City Centre • optimistic future • maintaining mystery is important

Observations: • involvement by everyone in the community • a variety of activities and reasons for visiting • well designed space

Lessons for Public Life projects: Lessons for Public Life projects: • consider intangible qualities • this metaphor is inspiration Lessons for Public Life projects: of place as equal to tangible for Wollongong City Centre • integrate and prioritise qualities signage, media and/or cultural values into every • promote Wollongong communications place and avoid ‘Copy It City Centre for its unique • promote less obvious choices Yourself’ urbanism, borrowed experiences in higher traffic areas to from other successful places • showcase local knowledge encourage visitation around the world and prioritise locals as • embed forms of creativity in • support local ambassadors important regulars and every space and future leaders of keepers of history Wollongong City Centre

Lessons for Public Life projects: Similar to group metaphor 1 but with the following additions: • design spaces for all users and make accessible for everyone • involve the community in the evolving character of the space


PHASE 2 - PUBLIC LIFE PROJECTS Workshop activities in Phase 2 focused on collecting feedback and input on each Public Life Project. Outcomes from Phase 1 were referenced while considering the actions and vision for each precinct.

Public Life Projects: A detailed listing of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and gaps for each Public Life Project. Lower Crown/Foreshore STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

GAPS

ACTIVITY 5 - PRECINCT ANALYSIS

Overview: Activity 5 shifted the focus of the workshop from creative high level thinking to Precinct based action review and brainstorming. Participants were asked to brainstorm the strengths, weaknesses, gaps and opportunities for their chosen Precinct. Overall, a summary of findings for all Projects is provided below;

• •

• STRENGTHS • Convenience and accessibility • Proximity and relationship of each unique project with Wollongong City Centre and each other OPPORTUNITIES • Activating vacant spaces • More effective marketing of events and programming • Holistic curation of places to achieve vision • Night time activity • Better designed green and passive spaces GAPS • The provision of amenities • A variety of activities • Quality landscape design • Wayfinding and signage

WEAKNESSES • With the exception of Crown Street Mall, the design of Public Life project spaces is poor. Within 1 precinct, built form was identified as a barrier with words like ‘cold’, ‘dark’ and ‘unloved’ used in other precincts. • Lack of amenities and activities in each Precinct • Safety and stigma associated with different locations affecting the Precincts • Lack of ownership by locals

• • • • •

Natural landscape close to the city Usable beach to swim at Relationship to the wider landscape Naturally draws people here and has potential to draw big crowds There will be more inner city rental Lower Crown great nice trees Flat good for walkers and cyclists Restaurants are open Diversity of places to be out People safe

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

Connection to the city The vegetation blocks view to ocean A lot of dead space Lack of attractions No coffee The bus interchange doesn’t have many people Parking No amenities Little shade to sit Signage Corrimal Street as a barrier Construction cutting it off Bad transition (pedestrian experience bad) People driving to the Corrimal restaurants Community of limited wealth – to keep the clientele to maintain businesses hard

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

A sense of arrival at end of Crown St Increase coffee and food Children’s playground Places for pop up Interactive art displays Improve connection access Corrimal St Bus interchange space opportunity Opportunities with new apartments Smarter parked cars along the street Encourage new residents to walk Bike path eastwest to the train station Bike parking (dedicated) Extending the blue mile Offers between Corrimal St and foreshore

• •

Parking – huge gaping hole Sustaining the momentum all on to all off

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Western Crown STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

• • • • • • •

• •

• • •

Proximity to rail Key entry to city Close to hospital Free bus Lots of people Runs down hill Low rent at the moment – allows small businesses Character potential Low rise human rise Historic buildings

• • • • • • • • •

Telstra building no frontage not inviting Yucky overgrown vacant block Place you don’t want to linger Unsafe feel Pedestrian and waiting for bus conflict Piccadilly No trees Traffic thoroughfare Retail offer lacking – not diverse Vacancies – high turnover

• • • • •

GAPS

Change traffic/road type (one way) Creative and multicultural businesses Pop up shops Signage to promote connection Remove visual obstacle to line of sight Brand – purpose, walk through Boutique local retail

• Streetscape amenity o Green o Shade o Seating • Link with beach – see the sea • Way finding • Created as a ‘place’ • Sense that its too far to walk; rail mall - beach

Rail Arrival STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

GAPS

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • • •

Central Lift access (excellent) Commuter car park Appropriate to LGA size/shape Functional role Heritage listed Accessible lift Some good small gardens around

Not an ideal city entry statement Poor way finding Perceived safety i.e. loitering No sense of place/no inviting activities Thoroughfare – not destination Sits poorly in the landscape Poor surrounding – under development Negative perception Cold and dark Can’t see horizon/town Not central to city Needs better connection Disconnected Separated platforms No bus links Disconnected Run down shops Ugly Piccadilly

• • •

Activate Usable cheap retail spaces activated which could attract alternative retailers – different energy Development bonus/ incentives within or around Piccadilly Building Night life potential i.e. bars/ clubs Space over railway line

Mixed amenity issue Need activity Aesthetics Welcome signage


The Arts Precinct STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

GAPS

• •

• •

• • • • •

Physical space (public space) is a blank canvass Art gallery and theatre space in the precinct and form the backbone Green space, but design is poor Central to Wollongong and public transport is good Residential buildings in close proximity Food offerings nearby

• • • • • • •

More food offerings required Hasn’t been claimed by people – does it have an identity? Not a place where people ‘hang out’, unless they’re there for an event Back of Art Gallery and Town Hall aren’t active spaces Vehicle access/service entry restricts opportunities and present safety issues Lack of shade No disability access/unsafe Can’t hammer into grass due to irrigation system Retail precinct swallows activity and draws it away from Arts precinct

• • • •

The precinct is defined by activities rather than lines on a map Connect Art Gallery, Town Hall with the precinct Way finding from Crown Street, particularly from laneways Program coordination and promotion Gallery, cultural services and IPAC to collaborate

• •

Things to do that aren’t scheduled Provide amenities (shade/water) to provide comfort Spontaneity No reason for people to be there

Crown Street Mall STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

GAPS

• • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

• • •

CBD location Vistas Quality of pavers etc Open and flexible Existing laneways Unique pedestrian space Evolving Event activation e.g. Eat Street New businesses Clear building lines Capacity to diversify uses

Safety Lower mall – lack of activity Shade Amenities Dead at night Lack of playfulness Needs softening Lack of duel areas Lack of parking – paid parking

• • •

Redevelopment of lower mall with more diverse uses Openness for activation Strengthen its identity Night time activity

Play equipment – unique Shade Safety systems as CCTV to be maintained Residents

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MacCabe Park STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

GAPS

• • • • • •

• • o o o • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Size - scale Location – central Green space Flexible – amphitheatre Accessibility Already event space – programmed

• • • • • •

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Its forgotten Barriers Built form Closed down Turn back on park History – perceptions (stigma unsafe) Island – cuts it off No strong connections to Crown – no wayfinding Lack of residents – soulless Underutilised Unloved Need a reason – no permanent Go around not through Lack of safety

• • • • • • • • • •

Create an iconic destination ‘Central Park’ gap in urban fabric Residential development To encourage maturation Programming – throughout the year Community garden Small break down Activation – power of 10 Passive recreation Designed green space To re-design - remove roundabouts Enhance the spatial conditions and experience of the the Park with interactions with the City Centre and Integral Energy buildings

Lack of everything Safety Seating Paths Plantings Mature trees No shade Wildlife Sense history Atmosphere Public art Passive surveillance Poorly serviced by public transport Access and movement to park


ACTIVITY 6 - POINT OF DIFFERENCE & MARKETING PITCH Overview: Activity 6 asked participants to develop a Public Life Project marketing pitch based on its point of difference. This activity was similar in style to the metaphor pitch of Activity 4. Summary of point of difference for each Public Life Project: PRECINCT

POINT OF DIFFERENCE A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

Foreshore #1 Foreshore #2 Rail Arrival #1 Rail Arrival #2 Western Crown The Arts Precinct Crown Street Mall McCabe Park The Public Life Projects have been mapped above using the below key elements mentioned in their point of difference and pitch: A - Food and Beverage B - Signage and information C - Smaller Events (Monthly) D - Larger Events (Quarterly or Yearly) E - Boutique Retail F - Connector (and convenience) G - Filling vacant/underutilised space with makers and artists H - Cultural activities I - Popups/temporary uses J - Live and work K- Public art

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Summary of pitch for each Public Life Project: Overall, each project presented a pitch that reflected and aligned with the Public Life Project vision. A review of the alignment and key words from each pitch have been provided below: Rail Arrival #1 and #2 Key words/themes: Beginning place, Departure Point Alignment with Report: High Western Crown Key words/themes: Boutique, ‘Made in Wollongong’ Alignment with Report: Moderate (Workshop participants emphasised the influence and importance of local traders in revtalising the Precinct rather than focusing on the design of public space) Crown Street Mall Key words/themes: Blank Canvas, Emerging Gem Alignment with Report: High McCabe Park Key words/themes: Urban Oasis, Local’s backyard Alignment with Report: High The Arts Precinct Key words/themes: Creative, Entrepreneurial, Curated Alignment with Report: High Foreshore #1 and #2 Key words/themes: Recreation, Activity Alignment with Report: High PAGE 14


ACTIVITY 7 - ACTIONS Overview: In Activity 7, participants were asked to review the key actions for their allocated Public Life Project. Participants provided feedback on the suitability of each action, if it’s within the correct timeframe and if it achieves the desired vision for the Precinct.

LEFT: Selected examples of actions reviewed by participants in Activity 7. The above action lists are for the Rail Arrival (left) and Foreshore (right). All feedback collected during Activity 7 can be found at Appendix 1.

Once feedback was collected, participants were asked to brainstorm additional actions, with a focus on quick wins, and contribute these to the priorities matrix. Observations: • Overall, there were no negative issues with the actions listed for each Public Life Project. • Participants questioned the definition of ‘Medium Term’ and ‘Long Term’ timeframe headings. • Participants suggested some actions move into different timeframe headings considering them either more, or less achievable in that timeframe. • Some terminology used in different actions was edited to be more ‘public friendly’ (less technical jargon) or to better describe the initiative.

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The below quadrant is a replica of the Activity 8 worksheet. It highlights the quick win actions and new ideas brainstormed for each Public Life Project.

ACTIVITY 8 - QUICK WINS Overview: Participants were asked to select their favourite quick win for their chosen precinct, and identify how it would be delivered, by who and with what resources. Activity 8 was the final workshop activity. Observations: • The two most popular quick win types were signage (3 mentions) with a focus on wayfinding and popup activation (5 mentions) that included retail, playgrounds and food trucks. • Quick wins were focused on activation, beautification and/or information. • 5 activations are to be delivered within 3 months from start date with the remaining 3 beyond 6 months. • The lowest funding was $15,000 with the highest funding for a quick win project being $250,000. • Budget was rigorously discussed with recognition given to Council time, resources and professional help/input. • Clear lack of community ownership on projects with Council often (5 mentions) listed as a barrier rather than discussion on what could be achieved without Council’s help (or minimal assistance).

High Impact - Add greenery

- Glow in the dark wayfinding

- Update maps

- Deliver activation project in lower mall - Improve/install wifi - Temporary seating - Temporary shade

- Wayfinding - colourful and playful

- Deliver an innovative/artistic wayfinding campaign

- Non permanent art installations

- Markets - Bleacher seating - Activation strategy

- Create a temporary public space

- Flower and fauna beds - Install flower pots and seating like PARKing Day - Fill empty shops - Signage based on reason/ behaviour infographics - Coordinated activities: gallery with IPAC with cultural services with community - Signage based on options and walkability

- Improve street amenity (low cost) - Wayfinding is intuitive and based on markers

- Food vans - Physical access to the beach from next to WEC - Celebrate our multicultural world success story by creating popup shops Low Resources

- Popups

Key: Rail Arrival Western Crown Crown Street Mall MacCabe Park Arts Precinct Foreshore


COUNCIL WORKSHOP Following the Stakeholder workshops, an internal Council workshop was held to share and review feedback. Overview: Participants were presented with a summary of community engagement outcomes at the beginning of the workshop. This included key statistics from the Survey, outcomes from the School workshops and a short video of engagement from the Stakeholder Workshops. Council staff that participated in the Stakeholder Workshops also shared their firsthand accounts of the sessions. COUNCIL WORKSHOP DETAILS When: Friday 18 March 2016, 10am-2.00pm Where: Wollongong City Council Workshop Problem Statement: ‘How can we create liveable and sustainable places that rejuvenate the Wollongong City Centre?’ Workshop Aim: To provide feedback to Council staff on the stakeholder workshops and to identify priority areas and Council department ownership of actions detailed in the draft A City for People, Wollongong Public Spaces Public Life 2015 report. Workshop Methodology: The workshop balances traditional engagement best practice with contemporary design thinking methods. Workshop Outcomes: • To share outcomes and feedback from the community and stakeholder workshops, • To identify priority areas within the draft report, • To identify actions that can be implemented by different Council Departments.

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Implementation Plan Wollongong PSPL

04 2016

Introduction INTERNAL ONLY

1


Acknowledgements Wollongong City Council would like to show their respect and acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the Land, Elders past and present, and extend that respect to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

2

Introduction

This document has been made collaboratively acoss multiple divisions in Wollongong City Council. Reviewed and shaped by feedback recieved during consultation with the community.


Contents Introduction

How to read

4

Background 4 Strategic Alignment 4 A liiving changing document 5

The Implementation Plan

A City for People sets the Vision and Strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong city centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional city.

6

Delivering against the Vision will require collaboration across government agencies, private industry and the community. The City Centre Implementation Plan is reviewed annually in accordance with Council’s Annual Planning Cycle and will be an ongoing tool to discuss, prioritise and guide the delivery of A City for People The City Centre Implementation Plan included in this document sets out the actions to deliver City Wide and area specific outcomes outlined in this report. It provides a series of projects, priorities and commitments to budget. Supporting the Vision - A City for People vision is supported by a suite of documents as outlined below which detail the background analysis and data which informs the way forward, and the implementation plan which defines the actions to delivering against this plan.

The suite A A City for People Sets the Vision and strategic direction to guide the delivery of Wollongong City Centre as a dynamic and vibrant regional city. Introduces 12 vision statements for our City followed by 6 Urban Life Projects with actions to improve public life.

Strategic Document

01

02

03

04

Public Space Public Life Study

Public Life Data

Engagement Report

Implementation Plan

A presentation of the study area and an analysis of the current (2014) physical conditions provided for pedestrians. The analysis looks at issues related to walking, as well as generally getting around and, issues related to spending time in the City.

A survey of pedestrian activities on summer and winter days in selected spaces. Data is divided into observations of pedestrian traffic, as well as staying activities in these spaces. This document provides a base to successfully measure change in the future.

An analysis of what we heard from the community during the Draft exhibition period, and how this has impacted and influenced the final report. Consists of all engagement undertaken by Council, submisisons recieved and online survey results.

The implementation Plan takes each action from ‘A City for People’ and looks at these in terms of priority of delivery. This becomes a refined list of projects reviewed annually as part of the business planning cycle.

Supporting Documents

Introduction

3


Background Why we’ve developed this plan The City Centre Implementation Plan has been developed in parallel with A City for People 20162026. The purpose of the Implementation Plan is to guide the programming and delivery of key projects and actions in a collaborative and coherent way. This document complements A City for People by ensuring: • • • • •

Actions are identified and prioritised to facilitate the efficient delivery of the Plan. Responsibility is defined – with tasks and projects broken down into achievable actions, aligned with the Annual Plan with clear lines of responsibility. Expectations are managed – clarifying which projects are Council led, which projects have secured funding and timeframes for delivery, and clearly reporting unfunded projects. Governance is tested – with a requirement for Council to review the processes and framework needed to give weight to the intent of A City for People in planning and resourcing. Priority projects are defined in sufficient detail enabling the implementation process to commence.

Strategic Alignment Relationship to Councils Strategic Planning This report contributes to the delivery of Wollongong 2022 goal 2. It specifically delivers on the following:

Relationship to Illawarra - Shoalhaven Regional Plan 2015 This report contributes to the delivery of direction 1.1. Grow the national competitiveness of Metro Wollongong to provide housing and jobs.

How we’ve developed this plan

Guiding Implementation

Financial Impact Statement

‘A City for People’ 2016 provides a vision for the future of Wollongong City Centre. The Plan and accompanying documents including this Implementation Plan, detail specific strategies and actions to work towards realising this vision over the next 10 years.

The specific actions/ projects identified to deliver A City for People are defined in the accompanying Implementation Plan. The implementation Plan itemises projects to deliver in the short, medium and long term and will inform the annual planning cycle.

The vision and strategies were co-created by Wollongong Council, Gehl Architects and the community. The actions detailed in the Implementation Strategy are guided by community aspirations and aligned with the vision and strategies of A City for People.

Providing a balance of shorter term/temporary actions alongside longer term/permanent change offers a flexible and achievable framework for delivering Wollongong City Centre as a City for people. The Vision will only be realised when the City works collaboratively to implement change.

This Implementation Plan will be used to inform annual planning priorities and budgeting processes. The role of the Implementation Plan is to align actions and future capital works to strategic aspirations, clarify priorities for Wollongong City Centre and give weight to funding proposals, including Council’s internal budgeting and external grant funding proposals.

The draft ‘A City for People - public space public life’ was exhibited between 14 November and 11 April 2015. A comprehensive community engagement program gathered invaluable feedback across a number of forums from a wide variety of participants, including school students, community groups, businesses, residents, agencies and interested individuals.

4

Introduction

The implementation Plan will continuously evolve against the needs of the City Centre, to deliver against the city centre vision.

The actions within the Implementation Plan contain funded and unfunded projects. Unfunded projects require budget and resourcing to be programmed. The unfunded projects are staged within this Plan and will be considered for funding and programming through a city-wide prioritisation process and aligned with Council’s business planning cycle. Future design work and investigations will inform more detailed costings.


A living, changing document The role of the Implementation Plan The purpose of the Implementation Plan is to guide the delivery of key projects and actions in a collaborative and coherent way to promote best outcomes for the community. As such the Implementation Plan remains flexible and will continue to be refined over time.

This plan is designed to be reviewed annually.

The extent to which the precise timing, responsibility and funding for each action can be predicted varies greatly and will vary over time. It is important to recognise that some actions will require leadership and funding outside of Council control and that actions need to be prioritised taking into account other projects and their resource implications across the Local Government Area. The Implementation Plan needs to be a robust document which can evolve over time, respond to changing demands and allow for transparent reporting. It is also a tool to communicate with investors and the community about future opportunities to partner in the delivery of projects. The Implementation Plan Table will be reviewed regularly to ensure its ongoing relevance, to ensure future opportunities and constraints can be captured and integrated into the annual planning and business reporting process. This Implementation Plan has sought to offer an approach to establish a flexible decision making and delivery framework for the projects identified in the A City for People Plan, 2016 - 2026.

List of abbreviations (project leaders and partners)

Glossary

ESP

Environment Strategy Planning

Q

CCED

Community Cultural + Economic Development

Quick wins are typically in the form of a pilot

DAC

Development Assessment + Certification

project. A low resource (money and time) but high

PR

Property + Recreation

impact project which is temporarily put in place. It’s

PD

Project Delivery

vital that the success of the project be measured

ISP

Infrastructure Strategy and Planning

and adapted if needed, to then inform whether it

F

Finance

will remain in place permanently.

LC

Library + Community Services

S

Short Term (up to 2 years)

RE

Regulation + Enforcement

M

Medium Term (2 - 5 years)

GI

Governance and Information

L

Long Term (5+ years)

HR

Human Resources

CWS

City Works + Services

AG

Art Gallery

DW

Destination Wollongong

DCP

Development Control Plan

APC

Arts Precinct Committee

LEP

Local Environmental Plan

WSEC

Wollongong Sports and Entertainment Centres

PCG

Project Coordination Group

RMS

Roads and Maritime Services

DPE

Department of Planning and Environment

ST

Sydney Trains

OEH

Office of Environment and Heritage

Quick Win (6 months)

* Please note this the timing associated with the projects is commencement dates and not a time frame for completion.

* Please note this is not an exclusive list and all partners may not be listed and additional partners or project leaders may emerge. Many actions within the Implementation Plan will involve community engagement and future consultation activities.

Introduction

5


A City for People: Implementation Plan – last updated 19 May 2016 Q – Quick Win (next 6 months) S – Short term (next 2 years M – Medium Term (2-5 years) L – Long Term (5+ years) TERM

INFORMATION

PROJECT LEADER

PARTNERS

COST (ESTIMATED)

COMMUNITY PARTNERSH IP OPPORTUNI TIES

TARGET PROJECT YEAR (SUBJECT TO FUNDING/RESOURCING)

16/17

17/18

18/19

CONNECTION TO CITY CENTRE VISION

19/20 +

CONNECTION TO OUR COMMUNITY STRATEGIC PLAN: WOLLONGONG 2022

01 CITY CENTRE WIDE PROJECTS 1.1

S

City Centre Planning Review Work with DPE to undertake planning, urban design, open space and economic analysis to inform appropriate distribution of height and scale of buildings across the city centre, including refinement of the city centre boundary and associated planning policy amendments.

ESP

DPE, ISP, C Funded 16/17 CED, DAC, P $15,000 R Unfunded 17/18+ $150,000

1.2

S

Vacant Sites Activation Project Work with land owners of large vacant sites to investigate opportunities / incentives for short term activation.

CCED

PR

Funded $20,000

+

1.3

S

CCED

Merrigong, W Funded SEC + DW

1.4

M

City Centre Event Calendar Continue to deliver and refine a coordinated city centre event calendar. Access and Movement Strategy Review WCC to undertake a review of the Access and Movement Strategy Review to align with the vision and priorities established by A City for People.

ISP

ESP, RMS, D Funded 16/17 based on PE staff time

+

Council owned Land Review (City Centre) WCC to investigate catalyst potential for Council owned sites within the city centre.

PR

1.5

1.6

1.7

1.8

M

M

M

M

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY; GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

2.3.1, 2.3.2, 1.5.1, 1.6.3, 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.6, 2.2.1, 2.2.3, 2.5.1, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 5.2.1, 5.5.1, 6.3.1

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY; GROW A LIVING CITY

2.3.1, , 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

2.3.1, 2.3.2, 3.3.1, 4.2.3, 5.1.7,

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 5.5.1, 6.6.1, 6.1.2, 6.1.3, 6.1.4, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.2.3, 6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.5, 6.3.1

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY; GROW A LIVING CITY

2.3.1, 5.1.7,

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY; GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 3.1.1, 4.2.3, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 5.5.1,

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE

2.3.1, 4.1.3, 5.1.7,

FRIENDLY CITY

Unfunded $300,000

City Centre Design Review ESP Aligning with the City Centre Planning Review, deliver a series of guidelines / policies to guide high quality building and public domain design, including: -Public Domain Technical Manual Review -City Centre Design Review Process Review -Street Frontage Design Guide -City Centre Laneway Strategy City Centre Wayfinding (Permanent) CCED Deliver a permanent wayfinding campaign to creatively connect key destinations across the City Centre, including Wollongong station, foreshore, Mall and hospital. Pedestrian Registrations + data update ESP Undertake relevant data collection to measure and report on

ESP, F, C, E D ISP, PD, CC ED, DAC

Funded $100,000 Unfunded $50,000

FRIENDLY CITY

ISP, LUP

Unfunded $200,000

ALL

Unfunded $15,000

+

FRIENDLY CITY


A City for People: Implementation Plan – last updated 19 May 2016 Q – Quick Win (next 6 months) S – Short term (next 2 years M – Medium Term (2-5 years) L – Long Term (5+ years) TERM

INFORMATION

PROJECT LEADER

PARTNERS

COST (ESTIMATED)

COMMUNITY PARTNERSH IP OPPORTUNI TIES

change in the city.

1.9

1.10

2.1

2.2

2.3

L

ESP

Q

Rail Arrival Quick Win Establish a collaborative working group to consider creative and temporary measures to deliver a welcoming station arrival and improved pedestrian connections with the city centre.

CCED

Denison/ Crown Intersection upgrade Aligned with the A+MS, investigate a range of improvements to the street network intersection and surrounds to improve pedestrian amenity on Denison, Gladstone and Crown Streets.

ISP

Railway Precinct Upgrade Work with and lobby State Government to invest in the planning and upgrade of the station precinct, including a Railway station master plan and infrastructure improvements, improved frequency of services.

State Govern ment

ON GOING

16/17

17/18

18/19

CONNECTION TO CITY CENTRE VISION

19/20 +

CONNECTION TO OUR COMMUNITY STRATEGIC PLAN: WOLLONGONG 2022

CITY; GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY CITY

Heritage Interpretation Project Undertake a Heritage Interpretation Project – celebrating Indigenous, European and Industrial heritage across the city centre. ON Continue to implement a range of City Centre Actions guided GOING by LGA wide strategies including: -Footpath Renewal program -Wollongong Bike Plan -Cultural Plan (Evening Economy + Live Music Taskforce) -Social Infrastructure Plan -Public Art Strategy -Economic Development Strategy -Urban Greening Strategy -Wollongong City Libraries Strategy -Creative Spaces Strategy 02. RAIL ARRIVAL

M

TARGET PROJECT YEAR (SUBJECT TO FUNDING/RESOURCING)

CCED, L+CS

Unfunded $20,000

+

Refer relevant strategy

ALL

ISP, ESP, L+ CS, Railways , local business

Funded $30,000

ESP

Funded $100,00 (design)

+

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

1.4.1, 1.4.2, 3.2.2, 4.2.3, 5.1.7,

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY; GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY CITY

2.3.1, 5.1.7,

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 3.4.1, 3.4.2, 3.4.3, 4.2.3, 4.4.4, 5.1.7, 5.3.3, 5.6.1,

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 5.1.7,

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY; GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 6.2.1, 6.2.2, 6.2.3, 6.2.3, 6.2.4, 6.2.5, 6.3.1

FRIENDLY CITY

FRIENDLY CITY

Unfunded Construction ISP, ESP, C CED, PR

State Government to Fund

FRIENDLY CITY


A City for People: Implementation Plan – last updated 19 May 2016 Q – Quick Win (next 6 months) S – Short term (next 2 years M – Medium Term (2-5 years) L – Long Term (5+ years) TERM

INFORMATION

PROJECT LEADER

PARTNERS

COST (ESTIMATED)

03. WESTERN CROWN 3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

Q

S S

S

Western Crown Quick Win CCED Work with local business to deliver a pilot project to improve cleanliness, comfort and safety with particular focus on the bus stop waiting area. Footpath Upgrades (Atchison to Jubilee) ISP Deliver renewed footpaths between Atchison Street and the Jubilee bridge. City Block Review ESP Work with land owners to develop a master plan for land bounded by Crown, Keira, Burelli and Atchison Streets.

ESP, ISP, P D

Funded $30,000

PD

Funded $2M

ISP, CCEED, PD

Funded 15/16 $8,000

Western Crown Precinct Plan Undertake a feasibility, assessments and concept designs of Western Crown Street to deliver improved pedestrian experience.

LUP, CCED, PD

Funded

S

Princes Highway Corridor Strategy Council to work with RMS in preparation of a strategy to guide future role of Western Crown Street. 04. CROWN STREET MALL

ISP

RMS

ISP, ESP

COMMUNITY PARTNERSH IP OPPORTUNI TIES

+

TARGET PROJECT YEAR (SUBJECT TO FUNDING/RESOURCING)

16/17

17/18

18/19

CONNECTION TO CITY CENTRE VISION

19/20 +

CONNECTION TO OUR COMMUNITY STRATEGIC PLAN: WOLLONGONG 2022

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 3.4.1, 3.4.2, 3.4.3, 4.2.3, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 5.3.3, 5.6.1,

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

FRIENDLY CITY

FRIENDLY CITY

CITY

+

RMS to Fund

FRIENDLY CITY

FRIENDLY CITY

4.1

Q

Crown Street Mall Quick Wins CCED Continue to deliver a range of temporary and permanent projects to activate the mall.

4.2

S

Mall Activity Policy Develop and implement a Mall Activity Policy to coordinate the physical and administrative requirements of programming the Mall.

CCED

GPT, retailers, DW, L+CS

Funded $50,000

Funded

+

GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY CITY

2.3.1, 3.4.1, 3.4.2, 3.4.3, 4.2.3, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 5.3.3, 5.6.1,

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

FRIENDLY CITY

4.3

S

Heritage Interpretation Project Celebrate the unique history of the Mall through a heritage interpretation project.

PD

CCED, L+CS ESP

Funded (15/16) $10,000

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

4.4

S

Mall Public Art Project Deliver public art in the Mall which is of regional and international interest.

CCED

ISP

Funded $400,000

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

2.3.1, 4.2.3, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,


A City for People: Implementation Plan – last updated 19 May 2016 Q – Quick Win (next 6 months) S – Short term (next 2 years M – Medium Term (2-5 years) L – Long Term (5+ years) TERM

4.5

M

INFORMATION

PROJECT LEADER

Crown Street Mall Stage Design Project CCED As an identified major activation node, investigate design options to enhance the identity and comfort of the Mall stage area, including the Church Street intersection.

PARTNERS

COST (ESTIMATED)

ESP, ISP + L +CS

Unfunded $100,000

COMMUNITY PARTNERSH IP OPPORTUNI TIES

+

TARGET PROJECT YEAR (SUBJECT TO FUNDING/RESOURCING)

16/17

17/18

18/19

CONNECTION TO CITY CENTRE VISION

19/20 +

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

CONNECTION TO OUR COMMUNITY STRATEGIC PLAN: WOLLONGONG 2022

2.3.1, 4.2.3, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

05. MACCABE PARK 5.1

S

MacCabe Park Temporary Kiosk WCC to investigate options for a temporary kiosk to support park activation.

PR

CCED, PD

Unfunded $100,000

5.2

S

MacCabe Park Art Project Continue to deliver a range of art projects to rejuvenate the built walls and fences of existing properties adjacent to the park.

CCED

PR

Unfunded $30,000

5.3

M

MacCabe Park Master Plan + Feasibility Investigations Revisit and finalise a MacCabe Park Master Plan, including: Park activation and feasibility of the regeneration of MacCabe Park and surrounding opportunity sites; Built form review to investigate optimal development to support and complement the park and guide appropriate residential intensity around the edge of the park. 06. ARTS PRECINCT (INCLUDING LOWER CROWN)

PR

ESP, ISP, CCED, PD, L +CS

Unfunded $150,000

6.1

Q

Arts Precinct Quick Win Work with Merrigong and local business to deliver a pilot project with a priority to bring more people during the day (temporary art focal point, seating and shade).

CCED

Merrigong, Local business, LUP, L+CS

Funded $10,000

+

6.2

Q

Arts Precinct Creative Displays In accordance with the Public Art Strategy, continue to deliver a range of public art projects that activate building edges.

CCED

Funded Within broader public art budget

+

6.3

Q

Arts Precinct Committee Form an Arts Precinct Committee to oversee the integration and programming of all sites, spaces and events day and night.

CCED

Funded

+

Merrigong + local business

GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS;

+

GROW A LIVING CITY

GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY CITY; DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY

2.3.1, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 5.3.3, 5.6.1, 2.3.1, 4.2.3, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

2.3.1, 3.2.1, 3.3.2, 3.4.1, 3.4.2, 3.4.3, 4.2.3, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 5.3.3, 5.6.1,

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

2.3.1, 3.2.1, 3.3.2, 4.2.3, 5.1.7,

GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS;

2.3.1, 3.3.2, 5.1.7,


A City for People: Implementation Plan – last updated 19 May 2016 Q – Quick Win (next 6 months) S – Short term (next 2 years M – Medium Term (2-5 years) L – Long Term (5+ years) TERM

INFORMATION

PROJECT LEADER

6.4

S

Arts Precinct Master Plan Prepare and deliver an Arts Precinct Master Plan.

CCED

6.5

S

Creative Arts Hub Establish a creative arts hub in the basement of the Town Hall. Extend the activities in the basement into the adjacent plaza.

CCED

6.6

M

Lower Crown Footpath Renewal Undertake footpath renewal of Crown Street between Kembla and Corrimal Streets.

ISP

Central Library Activation Program Continue to deliver a range of library programs and events both within the Library and the Arts Precinct to activate day and night.

6.7

ON GOING

PARTNERS

ISP, ESP, L+CS, PD

COST (ESTIMATED)

COMMUNITY PARTNERSH IP OPPORTUNI TIES

Funded 15/16 $50,000

+

Funded $30,000

+

ESP, CCED, PD

Funded Capital Program

L+CS

ESP, CCED

Funded

TARGET PROJECT YEAR (SUBJECT TO FUNDING/RESOURCING)

16/17

17/18

18/19

CONNECTION TO CITY CENTRE VISION

19/20 + GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY CITY; DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY

CONNECTION TO OUR COMMUNITY STRATEGIC PLAN: WOLLONGONG 2022

2.3.1, 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.3.2, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

2.3.1, 3.3.2, 5.1.7,

CREATE A PEDESTRIAN

2.3.1, 3.3.2, 5.1.7,

FRIENDLY CITY

GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS;

2.3.1, 3.3.2, 5.1.7,

07. FORESHORE 7.1

Q

Foreshore Quick Win Work with WSEC and other local business to deliver a pilot project with a priority to improve wayfinding to City Beach (where Crown Street meets the foreshore) and encourage people to stay and spend time

CCED

ESP, WSEC, local stakeholders

Funded $30,000

+

7.2

M

Integrated Foreshore Planning In partnership, WCC to work with key stakeholders to develop an integrated plan of the City Centre Foreshore, to strengthen the relationship between key sites and the public realm and bringing together a common vision for the foreshore arrival.

ESP

PR, CCED, I SP, PD, WS EC, DPE, R MS, Key stak eholders, St Marys, Housi ng NSW

Unfunded $50,000

+

City to Beach Visual Connection Investigate opportunities to enhance the visual connections to City Beach at the end of Crown Street.

ESP

CCED, ISP, WSEC

Unfunded $20,000

7.3

L

Requires partner funding

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY CITY;

GROW A LIVING CITY; CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS; CREATE A PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY CITY; DEVELOP A HUMAN SCALE CITY

CELEBRATE THE UNIQUENESS

2.3.1, 3.4.1, 3.4.2, 3.4.3, 4.2.3, 4.4.4, 5.1.2, 5.1.7, 5.3.3, 5.6.1,

2.2.2, 2.3.2, 2.3.1, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,

2.3.1, 4.2.3, 5.1.2, 5.1.7,


6

Introduction INTERNAL ONLY

A City for People  

Wollongong City Council's strategy for creating a people-oriented, sustainable and livable city centre. This document includes our main pla...

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