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A combination of colors – “cherry natural” and “espresso” veneers - on the flush-panel Talora cabinetry by Décor adds a furniture feel. European concealed hinges keep the wood looking sleek. Polished chrome knobs and pulls are by Chown Hardware.

Drinda Holroyd wanted the appliances to be “comfortable heights for seniors,” so she chose a separate cooktop and oven. Stainless steel appliances include a Dacor 30-inch oven, DCS 30-inch cooktop, and Jenn-Air refrigerator. The striking range hood is by Broan.

Guests can chat with their hosts at the bar, attached to the living room side of the island. Sandblasted glass glows from beneath thanks to an LED rope light, making the bar the focal point of the room.

The backsplash combines United Tile Lea Stonehenge 12 x12-inch porcelain tiles with Moda Vetro mosaics in Storm. The island countertop features Verde Typhoon Granite. Other countertops are laminate in Wilsonart’s Monterey Storm.

WRITTEN BY AMY MASON DOAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER BRINKMAN

THE PERFECT BLEND


DRINDA AND MIKE HOLROYD aren’t fond of doing what’s expected of them. The two are retired and both in their 60s, but have no plans to slow down. Instead, they race dragonboats down the Willamette River every chance they get. They could have stayed in the suburbs after retirement, but instead opted for the energy of a close-in Portland neighborhood. And when it came to remodeling the 1943 Colonial Heights bungalow kitchen that has been in Drinda’s family for more than 25 years, they went for a modern makeover with unexpectedly hip touches. “When people first visit our house, their jaws drop when they reach the kitchen,” laughs Drinda. “I think it pays enough homage to the house’s roots but it’s fun and modern, too – nobody is expecting it when they see our house from the street.” Designer Diane Foreman of Neil Kelly Design/Build Remodel-ing began working with the couple in June 2006, when they decided to move into what was then a rental property and make it home. The Holroyds had moved up and down the I-5 corridor for years due to Mike’s career with Washington State University in Vancouver. So they had lived in enough different houses to know that they preferred an open floor plan. The 1,200square-foot home with its maze of tiny, closed-off rooms needed a wholehouse remodel. Foreman and architect Dave Spitzer of DMS Architects worked on plans that would add square footage upstairs and open up the main floor by repositioning a central staircase. The new kitchen, completed in early 2008, borrowed some space from the old stairway and is now open to the dining and living rooms, with access to a deck. The style is just as modern as the new, airy floorplan. The 120-square-foot kitchen is a finalist in the National Kitchen & Bath Association’s design competition. “They surprised me a bit by going for such a modern, international type of look,” says Foreman. “When I would show them photos of cottagey kitchens it was clear they wanted cleaner lines.” The Holroyds chose minimalist molding atop flush-panel cabinetry in two rich, dark finishes. One cabinet appears to “float” next to a columnar stainless steel hood. Two wood tones in the room give it more of a furniture look, which is important since the kitchen is visible from so much of the main floor. “With an open floorplan and a smaller space, storage becomes everything,” says Foreman. “You need to think of where the eye travels from the other rooms and ways to keep things neat and… restful.”

RIGHT The old kitchen had an electric stove, linoleum flooring,

A CRAMPED, DATED KITCHEN IN PORTLAND’S COLONIAL HEIGHTS NEIGHBORHOOD NOW FEELS OPEN AND STYLISH

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and hard-to-clean tile. The new kitchen has a separate gas cooktop and range and sleek laminate and granite countertops.

THANKS TO A REMODEL THAT BLENDS THE CONTEMPORARY WITH THE CLASSIC. UNEXPECTED TOUCHES – A FLOATING

Original oak was refinished for the kitchen floor. Small rooms like

CABINET, A GLOWING BAR, THE CORKSCREW TURNS OF A SINGLE ALUMINUM TABLE LEG – ADD A WHIMSICAL, YOUTHFUL

this ground-floor nook are a thing of the past. The original late

FEEL WHILE SHELVING AND TILEWORK RESPECT THE ORIGINAL CHARACTER OF THE 1943 HOME.

new arches that define transitions between rooms.

Portrait™ OF PORTLAND

Art Deco archways were beloved, so they’ve been recalled in

BEFORE

Portrait™ OF PORTLAND

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The Holroyds’ old kitchen was on the side of the home, closed off from other living areas. Designers swapped the old staircase with the original kitchen, repositioning the new, open kitchen at the center of the home. The labyrinth of tiny rooms is gone and traffic flows easily between kitchen, deck, dining and living rooms.

Another example of that care appears on the dining-room side of the island, where built-in shelving cleverly conceals the prep area and dishes in the sink but also pays tribute to the home’s 1940s late Art Deco roots. Most of the cabinet fronts are closed, which keeps the room looking tidy. But two of the fronts feature etched glass and downlighting – just enough to spotlight a few favorite ceramics and add a glow to the room. The drama of lighting is repeated under the sandblasted glass eating bar attached to the island, which is lit with an LED rope light. “That’s definitely my favorite feature,” says Mike Holroyd. “It’s this beautiful little gathering place when we entertain.” The Holroyds considered having the bar raised, with barstools, but decided that table height would be best for aging knees and visiting grandchildren. Holding up one corner of the breakfast bar is an almost Dali-esque, curved aluminum table leg. Foreman was thrilled when she found the whimsical table leg online for $80. Its curves are repeated in an undulating faucet and wavy drawer pulls. But she says her favorite style element is the backsplash. By randomly scattering rectangular glass mosaic sections among large porcelain tiles, Foreman kept costs below that of a pure mosaic. And the pattern channels 1940s design. “I love the various elements of surprise in the room, like the randomness of the mosaics,” says Foreman. “The surprises are subtle but they give everything a great feeling of sophistication.”

REMODELING CONTRACTOR Neil Kelly Design/Build Remodeling 503.288.7461 KITCHEN DESIGNER Neil Kelly Design/Build Remodeling, Diane Foreman, CKD, CBD, CAPS 503.331.9432 Tile: United Tile; Kitchen Plumbing Fixtures: Chown Hardware, Kohler; Lighting: Accent Lighting; Paint: Miller Paint, Devine Color Paint; Appliances: Range: DCS; Wall Oven: Dacor; Range Hood: Best by Broan; Refrigerator: Jenn-Air


Issue 17 Portrait Magazine -The Perfect Blend