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AUGUST WG MAGAZINE 2017

JOSEAN ALIJA

PERFECT HARMONY

ANDRÉ CHIANG OCTAPHILOSOPHY www.wgmagazines.com

MARGO REUTEN

A MASTER CHEF

ALAIN WEISSGERBER

MODERN PANNONIAN CUISINE WG August 2017 -

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Editor Lifestyle Editor Culinary Editor Feature Editor

Fabian deCastro Doug Singer Claudia Ferreres Oilda Barreto

Contributors

Michael Hepworth Rhiannon Shepherd

Photography

Majella O’Connell

FJMdesign WGkonnect Photography Consultant Creative Design Studio Publisher IZZY Publishing Pvt. Ltd.

‘ Identifying underprivileged children with culinary ambitions...

WG™ is an online digital publication published by: Izzy Publishing Pvt. Ltd. Unit 14, Agnelo Colony, Kerant, Caranzalem, 403002 Goa, India Tel: +91(832) 2463234 Fax: +91(832) 2464201 sales@wgmagazines.com Company Registration Number U22100GA2011PTC006731 Marketing & Advertising Call: +91 832 246 3234 E-mail: marketing@wgmagazines.com WG™ Beverly Hills Michael Hepworth 287 S.Robertson Blvd Beverly Hills, CA 90211 WG™ New York Doug Singer - Head of Operations, North America 404 East 66 Street, Suite 2E New York, NY 10065 E-mail: doug@wgmagazines.com WG™ International Representative Point Select Leisure Management DMCC P.O.Box 333581, Dubai, U.A.E. ©IZZY Publishing Pvt. Ltd. All rights reserved. Editorial material and opinions expressed in WG™ digital publication do not necessarily reflect the views of IZZY Publishing Pvt. Ltd. WG™ and IZZY Publishing Pvt. Ltd. cannot be held responsible for any inaccuracies or errors and do not accept responsibility for the advertising content. All contents are strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Production in whole or part is prohibited without prior permission from IZZY Publishing Pvt. Ltd. ©2017 WG™ All rights reserved.

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Cover Image Credit: ANDRÉ CHIANG - 8 in 1 Restaurant André Photo © Edmond Ho


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From the acclaimed restaurant swap in 2016 - The GELINAZ! Brussels HQ and The Grand GELINAZ! Shuffle Two (2). Sunday August 20, 2017 will see the latest GELINAZ! production, a blend of 24 chefs, 8 contemporary artist, 14 course meal and a global sound installation - GELINAZ! Does Upper-Austria. 8 Elements 8 Inspiring dishes - Octaphilosophy is André Chiang’s essence and true value, at the heart of all his cooking. André found these 8 elements a source of his inspiration and he creates a series of completely independent yet cohesive dishes. Bilbao, Spain with Josean Alija who seduces the palate and the heart. Muina is a concept that encapsulates what Josean Alija is and what he offers. A creative process viewed as a journey to the source of the things. Still in Spain, we taste the purest of Mexican cuisine with Roberto Ruíz in Madrid and then head out to Austria to meet Alain Weissgerber at Taubenkobel, Alain sees it as his mission to open people’s eyes to the richness of Austrian, and more specifically Pannonian cuisine. Next we savor a menu that fully reflects Martin Klein’s culinary principles at Restaurant Ikarus in Salzburg. A visit to DAM to meet the rising star of Slovenian gastronomy Uroš Fakuč and then stop at Da Vinci to meet master chef and the only female chef with two Michelin stars in the Netherlands - Margo Reuten, she makes the delicious unforgettable. Turning an enjoyable meal into a unique experience. Our culinary journey takes us to Lisbon and Cascais, Portugal. It’s Cantina Peruana in Lisbon… Diego Muñoz embarks on a new gastronomic adventure with one of the great Portuguese references in gastronomy, José Avillez. We then head 30 kilometres west to one of the richest municipalities of Portugal, Cascais to meet Miguel Vieira, the chef who put Hungary on the gastronomy map and the executive chef of the acclaimed Restaurant Fortaleza do Guincho. We sail across the Atlantic to the Cayman Islands to meet Frederic Morineau, Maître Cuisinier and executive chef of The Ritz-Carlton, Grand Cayman, while still at The RitzCarlton we catch up with Thomas Seifried at Blue by Eric Ripert. We travel to Cape Town and meet with Harald Bresselschmidt at Aubergine and Rhiannon Shepherd takes us on around the world in fifty drinks with Lorenzo Antinorini at Seoul’s Charles. H. IRC’s gourmet week at the Speciality Food Festival and Aira Piva promises a gastronomic experience with Michelin star chefs from Italy, Portugal and Singapore. Bon Appétit

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AUGUST 2017

CONTENTS 32

GELINAZ! Does Upper-Austria

38

Perfect Harmony

56 Octaphilosophy 78

A Perfect Chef

96

The Chef Who Put Hungary On The Gastronomy Map

80

A Gourmet Week With IRC

122 Modern Pannonian Cuisine 138 Lima To Lisbon 148 Festival For Gourmets 156 Purest Mexican Cuisine

168

Aubergine

178 Living His Dream 192 Maître Cuisinier 200 Blue In The Grand Cayman 212 Around The World In Fifty Drinks

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MIGUEL VIEIRA Restaurant Fortaleza do Guincho Cascais - Portugal

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Be inspired by meaningful moments of great delight, upperaustria.at

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LENTOS Kunstmuseum

Incredibly contemporary, Linz. linztourismus.at/en

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GELINAZ!

THE GELINAZ ! HISTORY 2017 GELINAZ! DOES UPPER-AUSTRIA 2016 5 new ambitious projects : Walk with us London, Sao Paulo, San Francisco, then The Shuffle Two(2) plus its Brussels Shuffle Headquarters. 2015 The Grand Gelinaz! Shuffle. 2014 The spiritual retreat in Tuscany. & Project in New York. 2013 Since then, the duo has given birth to 10 projects like Ghent (an 8 hours dinner involving 25 chefs) and Lima in 2013. 2012 The monster came back to life in 2012, when Andrea asked Alexandra Swenden to become his partner, adding a new impulse and creating new concepts for the collective. 2008 After the last gig in Deauville, GELINAZ! was put to sleep. 2007 3 other small-scale gigs were to follow mostly on stage, or at restaurant Noma. 2005 Fulvio Pierangelini (the name Gelinaz! comes from his family name, mixed with the rock band’s name Gorillaz) and the journalist Andrea Petrini created together the first gig on stage with 5 chefs in San Sebastián. Each of them were doing a remixed version of one of Fulvio’s emblematic dish.

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GELINAZ! DOES UPPERAUSTRIA

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GELINAZ!

A TRIBUTE TO UPPER-AUSTRIA AND THE AUSTRIAN CULINARY SCENE From the acclaimed restaurant swap in 2016 -The GELINAZ! Brussels HQ and The Grand GELINAZ! Shuffle Two (2). Sunday August 20, 2017 will see the latest GELINAZ! production, a blend of chefs, artist and sound - GELINAZ! Does Upper-Austria.

24 of the world’s cutting edge chefs 8 major contemporary artists 14 course A global sound installation

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This GELINAZ! culinary experience is by no means a regular dinner, remember GELINAZ! plays food, it doesn’t just cook your supper. GELINAZ! DOES UPPER-AUSTRIA is an itinerant and experimental culinary performance, articulated through seven varying spaces within the restaurant of legendary Austrian father & son Helmut and Philip Rachinger, of restaurant Mühltalhof at Neufelden. Philip and Helmut Rachinger have chosen three core ‘Matrix’ dishes. Working in small teams of three and four, the chefs will freely reinterpret every dish and will be allowed to modify some of the original ingredients and add seasonal produce from UpperAustria to their new creations. These dishes will be deconstructed, dismantled, cut into pieces and remixed by 24 international and Austrian chefs, including René Redzepi, Manu Buffara, David Chang, Milena Broger, Ana Roš, Virgilio Martinez, Heinz Reitbauer, Mauro Colagreco, Konstantin Filippou and other well-known faces.


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GELINAZ!

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GENERATIVE THINKING GENERATIVE MUSIC GENERATIVE COOKING The Itinerant - Guests, in groups of 20, will follow their way through various locations in and around Mühltalhof. At every stage they will taste the remixed dishes prepared by the guest chefs. The Art Of Sitting - The final space, will be known as ‘The Gathering’ - a massive artistic place of work called the HEIM.ART®-Station, just five minutes from the restaurant and run by artist Joachim Eckl who has been appointed as the art curator of the event. He will be inviting along several, likeminded international contemporary artists to create The Chefs… Milena Broger of Klösterle - Austria, generative soundscapes interacting with the chefs. Manu Buffara of Manu - Brazil, Gabriela Camara of Cala - United States, David Chang of Momofuku The dress code is an unusual one… “Leave your high Ko - United States, May Chow of Little Bao - Hong heels behind but bikinis and bathing trunks could Kong, Mauro Colagreco of Le Mirazur - France, come in handy”, since being an outdoor event, Konstantin Filippou of Restaurant Konstantin and as unpredictable as the weather, it’s advisable Filippou - Austria, Margot Janse formerly of The to drape some cashmere across your shoulders to Tasting Room - South Africa, Chiho Kanzaki of Virtus help endure the frisky late night embrace. - France, Antonia Klugmann of L’Argine di Vinco - The curators Andrea Petrini & Alexandra Swenden Italy, Karim Lopez of Franceschetta 58 - Italy, Virgilio are, in essence, ‘agit-pop’ curators of a culinary Martinez of Central - Peru, Lukas Mraz of Cordoba hub that brings together artists, musicians, - Germany, Lukas Nagle of Bootshaus - Austria, scientists, thinkers and producers with chefs and are Magnus Nilsson of Faviken - Sweden, Colombe renowned for constantly pushing the boundaries of Saint-Pierre of Chez Saint-Pierre - Canada, Rosio their projects. Sanchez of Hija de Sanchez - Denmark, Helmut and Philip Rachinger of Mühltalhof - Austria, Heinz GELINAZ! is a world-wide think-tank of avantReitbauer of Steirereck - Austria, René Redzepi garde chefs performing food and remixing each of Noma - Denmark, Ana Ros of Hisa Franko - other’s dishes like in a DJ set giving form to culinary Slovenia, Felix Schellhorn of Hansi Hansi - Austria happenings where art, music and cuisine fusion in unexpected and improvisational ways. and Bo Songivsava of Bo Lan - Thailand. The Artists… Michael Pisaro and John Pisaro from Los Angeles, Marcus Kaiser from Düsseldorf, Anna Pangalou from Athens, Annea Lockwood from New-York, Joachim Eckl from Neufelden, Zanshin from Vienna and Alfred Scharf from Linz.

It is a collective made by chefs for chefs, never repeating itself with no competition in mind and was, at core, solely created to give something back to an ever-evolving industry, adapting to unpredictable situations and charting new territory. WG August 2017 -

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JOSEAN ALIJA

JOSEAN ALIJA Perfect Harmony

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JOSEAN ALIJA

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ZUCCINI FLOWER, ALMOND, STEWED PLUMS, MINT AND CURRY


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From a young age Josean Alija knew that he wanted to be a chef. The opportunities he had during his infancy to visit a few restaurants and the culture that he was shown at home - at the table and during meals, this set the course for his future. As a chef he saw a professional with power, who seduces the palate and the heart, and what is most evident, makes people happy. At the age of 14, he started studying at the Leioa School of Hotel and Restaurant Management and was one of the youngest pupils of that year. Three years later he started my professional culinary career. Josean learned Basque cuisine at traditional restaurants and worked in several avant-garde kitchens, with the aim of forming some criteria that could help him create a personal style, a long path. His cuisine represents all those things that excites him and he shows it through the products from his environment and through the flavors of memory. He shares his experience by developing a personal language to create pleasure and happiness.

FRIED ANCHOVIES, OATS CREAM AND SAGE

Paths are full of coincidences and one of them was he crossed paths with Bixente Arrieta. Bixente gave him the opportunity to take on a beautiful project, and over the years, he has given Josean the confidence to develop it. Without Bixente’s support the personal and professional development that Josean has through would not have been possible. It is essential to have a voice that helps you to think, to keep your feet on the ground‌ WG August 2017 -

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JOSEAN ALIJA

Josean started working in the kitchens of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in late 1998, but in 2000, when his cuisine started to take shape, a motorcycle accident left Josean in a coma for 21 days, on the brink of death. He woke up but without the sense of taste nor smell, the essential tools of any chef, he had to learn how to taste things again, to recognize flavors and aromas. While still recovering from the consequences of the accident, he decided to take part in the Best Young Chef competition, a motivation to restore his passion. His success took him back to his profession, he felt he was a chef again, a feeling that he had lost along with my sense of taste and smell. In the year 2003, he found the key: research. It was essential to analyze the products in depth, to learn about their origins, their uses, their properties and their potential. The creative process, the fundamental part of his cuisine, was born - analyzing, reflecting, and adopting different approaches. With a strong commitment, Josean has been gradually perfecting, season by season, his style of cuisine: pure, essential, without disguises.

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IBERIAN PIG’S TAILS, ARTICHOKES AND BEAN BROTH

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JOSEAN ALIJA

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In 2011, Nerua received its First Michelin Star Guide and 3 Suns in the Repsol Guide... In 2011, he was able to fulfil his dream of having his own space. Juan Ignacio Vidarte, the director of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, offering a taste of Bilbao’s gastronomic culture, made the opening of Nerua a reality. Nerua takes its name from the Nervión River, the backbone of Bilbao, which in ancient Latin was called Nerva. We combine innovation with our roots, our surroundings. It is a space designed for a gastronomic and cultural experience, a space designed for a complete and memorable experience. The experience that invites one to reflect on and question every single thing. While nature sets the pace of Nerua’s kitchen, adapting to each season, a local cuisine that begins at the vegetable gardens, in the sea, and in the farms. With the best techniques and cooking with freedom to create pleasure and enjoyment without losing the flavor of our roots.

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JOSEAN ALIJA

WG Magazine catches up with Josean Alija… Josean Alija describes his culinary philosophy… Core, heart, essence… Muina has no literal translation in English. But is the term that best identifies my way of seeing things, among them gastronomy. It is the world that best defines me. It refers to the soul, the substance, but also the brain and knowledge. Muina is a general concept that encapsulates what I am and what I offer. It enables the creative process to be viewed as a journey to the source of the things, to their roots, allowing their true potential to be developed fully through the description of rounded, complete and pleasurable sensations. This is what Muina holds: a very personal representation of the world and the reality that surrounds me. Acceptance, specification and loyalty to a series of values lead me to follow the same path constantly, never straying from it. It is the determination to share knowledge, research, projects, life experiences and emotions. Muina is the way in which I understand a complete gastronomic experience, the unique result of focusing attention on the purity of things. Every season, we leave our kitchens to get to know the products in depth. We do it in the company of our producers, who feel Nerua as theirs, they know that without them we could not do what we do. We study every product deeply, from every possible point of view: anthropological, historical, scientific, sensorial... Once we know all the secrets of each product, we experiment with them to merge all those ideas into flavours, textures and memories. We taste it raw, we analyze its flavours and aromas, and try grilling, cooking, scalding, sautéing it to observe how their organoleptic characteristics change. Knowing its history and its flavour, we begin to define the concept of the dish that we want to reach and try to reach it through different combinations. We work to achieve a perfect balance between technique, idea, taste and presentation, in order to find a perfect harmony, which reflects the identity of the product and its essence.

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Creativity, Technique or Produce… “The knowledge and the observation, that three aspects are complementary and keep a perfect balance”

SQUID, RED ONION AND PEA JUICE

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JOSEAN ALIJA

Pairings without alcohol, you seek the same goal: to awaken the senses through the dishes and our essences...

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BABY TROUT, PRAWN BROTH AND GARLIC


WG MAGAZINE

Your research on fermented beverages and creating dishes in glasses‌ Our maÎtre, Stefania Giordano, realized that more and more people accompanied the tasting menu with water (because they had to drive, work, for health reasons...) and that is a bit disheartening. And there we wondered what alternative do we offer: water, soft drinks, tea ... Why do not we apply what we know about alcohol marriages to build a marriage with soft drinks? The diner has to go out from Nerua with the feeling of have known something new. We must enhance the experience. When we started to raise it, we decided that it had to be something which could cannot be a sauce, a juice, it has to have a different line to separate it from what you have on the plate, but that the combination of both tells you something. The important thing is that it has to tell you things. We started in October 2012. We were even embarrassed to present it at the beginning, the first steps are always complicated, but today they are part of our cover letter. In pairings we play with subtlety... It is a different way of extracting the soul from the products that you do in the kitchen. In the kitchen, what you are looking for is that the flavours are recognized and they are very well represented, instead in the world of the drink looks for delicacy, suggestion, nuances... above all subtlety, using the same techniques. They are not juices, they are essences, since our objective is to extract the soul of each ingredient.

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JOSEAN ALIJA

STEWED SPINACH, ALMOND MILK AND OLIVE OIL

Inspiration to create the best… It is the motivation, the desire to share with the guests what makes me happy and to work every day to see happy people, while still learning new things and evolving!

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Josean’s cuisine is unique, where aromas, textures and flavours are the main components inspired by a combination of ingredients… My secret is the creative process, which is the tool I use to develop my cuisine and the experience Nerua’s customer live. Analysis, reflection and rethinking about all the aspects that affect our activity. Innovation is making the things as we understand them more efficient, ecological, simple and satisfactory. It involves continuous questioning.


WG MAGAZINE

BRAISED BROAD BEANS, PULS, SARDINE JUICE AND OREGANO

PRAWN, RED ONION AND RED CABBAGE

RED MULLET SOUP, VELVET CRAB BROTH AND RED CURRY

COD KOKOTXAS IN PIL-PIL SAUCE

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JOSEAN ALIJA

“Our experience is the best technique - we cook with freedom to create pleasure and enjoyment. Faithful to our principles, we defend our environment and the producers who make our goal possible: to be at the cutting edge and to innovate without losing the flavor of our roots” Josean Alija

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Ingredients that inspires Josean Alija, his favourite ingredients and ingredients that he may have given up on… We are working on the autumn-winter 2018/2019 menu, we explore our environment, we select the most special and magical products to be able to cook. It is about discovering, recovering products and playing with the excellence of temporality and local products. My favourite ingredients… “I am mad about vegetables, whether domestic or wild, and seafood”. I feel lucky about that because I have enough patience to get things and I do not stop investigating until I get the expected result.


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TOMATOES IN SAUCE, HERBS AND CAPER SAUCE

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JOSEAN ALIJA

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STRAWBERRIES, ROSES, COCONUT AND BLACK PEPPER


WG MAGAZINE

Josean Alija’s cooking techniques… Intelligence. It is about knowing in depth the product in question, knowing what is what makes it special or exciting for me, make a speech and apply the technique that helps me to achieve excellence. Work with the highest number of ingredients and the most pure technique. The less a product is manipulated more special will be the result. Less is more. Back in 1978, Josean started his career working with some of the great chefs - Ferran Adrià and with Martin Berasategui at Lasarte, he explains how it has helped him as a chef… “They helped me to find a way, they nourished me with values, they made me reflect and I came to the conclusion that to triumph it is necessary to make the cuisine that you feel, that makes you happy, developing a personal style and work hard giving the best of you every day.”

MOCHI BOLLO DE MANTEQUILLA

Being a chef is perceived as a glamorous profession, Josean’s advice to chefs who are first entering the kitchen for the first time... Being a chef implies a great commitment to the craft, to the team, to the customer, and gives you the opportunity to see happy the people that come to your restaurants and that is magic and wonderful.

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ANDRÉ CHIANG

ANDRÉ CHIANG Photo © Edmond Ho

Pure, Salt, Artisan, Texture, South, Unique, Memory, Terroir These are the eight most important words in Restaurant André. They are the backbone of everything that is created at Restaurant André. From a single dish to the restaurants overall philosophy – Octaphilosophy – is a method of encouraging and managing the creative process, and a principle to live by... WG Magazines speaks with André Chiang, as he takes us through each of the eight elements of Octaphilosophy...

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ANDRÉ CHIANG

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“The most beautiful process of cooking is time…” André Chiang The initial question André Chiang asked himself at the very beginning of creating his first restaurant after coming back from Europe was - Who is André, what is André’s cuisine – is it French, Chinese, Japanese or what is it? How could he define himself as a chef and be free from all the strong personalities he had previously as mentors? He decided to go and work on everything that he created and to find the trace of where the inspirations came from. “I realized, in fact I don’t have a certain technique or a certain flavor combination that has been consistent along the years and I change all the time and provide them spontaneously, but 8 elements is always there. I always have a pure dish that will use no seasoning, always have a dish that is dedicated to the Artisan, I always have unique ingredients introduced in the menu, and that’s where I found the 8 elements. This is actually my source of inspiration throughout the past 15 – 20 years. So I decide to write down and tell people that this 8 elements is André” says André Chiang. Eight words rose to the surface – and, from there, it all seemed so natural. André Chiang adds “My culinary philosophy is the eight elements, so the eight elements represent eight different dishes that is basically is our principal. Everything that we create it always goes back to this eight works so it is our approach to cuisine, the approach that how we create dishes, we want eight different dishes in the menu and you have different dimensions, so it not like only okay you have landscape dish, you have everything in the landscape. So every dish has a different approach. In our restaurants we call it the Octagon Analysis. The octagon analysis it is a chart of an octagon we look into every dish and it creates a DNA of the dish, so if you have for eight different dishes or eight different DNA overlap on each other and should create almost a complete Octagon. So that how we make sure all our dishes are balanced.” Octaphilosophy has been developed as a tool to explain a dish. At Restaurant André there are no starters or main courses but all dishes are there for a reason and all are equally important. Each dish is built up around an Octaphilosophy concept and finds its ultimate expression in the dining room setting. WG August 2017 -

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ANDRÉ CHIANG

8 in 1

Melon, Mandarin, Chrysanthemum; Hibiscus, Lychee, Vitelotte; Yoghurt, Caillé de Brebis, Sakura; Pickled Shallot, White Peach, Champagne; Caviar, Onion, Blinis; Pumpkin, Nasturtium, Ginger; Avocado, Cucumber, Wheatgrass; Black Cherry, Sea Coral, Balsamic

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8 Elements 8 Inspiring dishes: Octaphilosophy is André’s essence and true value, at the heart of all his cooking. With Octaphilosophy, he devotes each dish to another inspiration; this creates a series of completely independent yet cohesive dishes. Octaphilosophy engages and yet constantly surprises the diner’s palate and senses with new taste sensations: Personal, Spontaneous and Emotional; a new generation of French Nouvelle cuisine.

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ANDRÉ CHIANG

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PURE

WATERMELON SKIN, THYME, FLEUR D’ORANGER

Beauty is in anything and everything. Truth is in simplicity. Allow an ingredient to unfold and evolve to its full potential without being altered. To release its honest flavor, aroma and texture. Let everything be untouched.

An idea of Pure… Now a days we are surrounded by seasonings, people are crazy about seasonings, you need seasoning for everything, even a salad you crave for a dressing. This is one dish on my entire menu that has no seasoning, there’s no electric consumption, no fire, just pure ingredients as it is that will break the palate from heavy seasoning, and the palate is still sharp sensitive at the beginning of a meal. It is not a dish that will jump up on your face, it is very subtle, elegant, and it is a quiet dish. Here I want people to pay attention to the watermelon skin, which is almost like a cucumber texture but infused with the fleur d’oranger jelly and thyme. You taste the sweetness and subtleness of the watermelon skin and get your palate prepared for what’s coming after. WG August 2017 -

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SALT

OYSTER, BABY MUSHROOM, GREEN APPLE

Sal-vation, salary, salad. Salt is not only the key of life, it also preserves, has been used as a currency, keeps away daemons and makes food taste delicious. Salt is sea, civilized and essential.

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For the elements of salt, we have no salt added, just some pure minerals of the sea flavor, when I think of a sea flavor, and the first thing that comes to mind is Normandy, Brittany. Brittany is famous for its oysters, mussels. You dive into this dish as you dive into the underwater world, you see corals, oysters, mussels and the foam of the sea water, and all this is the combination of the salt elements.


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ARTISAN

MAIS VERSION 1: CREAM, SILK, BURDOCK

Partitioners of the art of cultivation deserve to be celebrated. Artisans carry history on their shoulders by passionately dedicating their lives to the craft of taking a simple ingredient and turning it in gold.

Artisan is an element we dedicate to different artisan producers we work with, so here we have this beautiful delicate baby corn. I do not want to think how to work on this dish or this ingredient. Chefs are selfish and they always think of cooking thing in their own way, I want these artisan farmers who know better than chefs the best way to eat it. The best way to eat this 14 day old baby corn is to just chew on the husk like a banana and eat the whole thing raw together with the corn silk. Raw corn with fired burdock to give more texture along with baby corn cream with sesame salt.

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TEXTURE

‘CHARCOAL’, SQUID MOUTH, PIQUILLOS A combination where we have dip of piquillos, squid, garlic, smoke paprika, olive oil and charcoal. So the whole dish is very Basque combination, creating a dish that has the sense of Basque country, a dish which has Spanish and French culture. I want to create something to go with the piquillos that has both these elements “Charcoal”. The charcoal is a combination of half traditional French baguette and half Spanish churros, together with tossed vegetable ash to get that black color which looks exactly like real charcoal. You pick one piece of the charcoal and you have it with piquillos and squid. It’s crunchy on the outside and piping hot on the inside, its kind a bread churros.

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Texture refers to the sensory impact of varying layers within a dish. Soft, crusty, hard, porous, slimy, dense, elastic… layers of texture composed as a symphony, with the complexity of rhythm, loudness, silence… A delicious sensory.


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SOUTH

ROCKFISH, TOMATO, ROSE CHAMPAGNE

Inhale the perfume of sun-drenched olive trees and ripe tomatoes. The air vibrates from joie de vivre. This is the South of France, the region that generously invites the adventurous, colorful spirit we call life.

A lot of people asks me why there is South in the Octophilosophy, there are some who can relate to it. South is a reference to South of France where I spent most of my time in my career and it has a strong influence in my cuisine. South of France has a strong influence of Mediterranean or the ingredients flavours come from Italy and Spain. Southern French style is very much focused in seafood, very light cooking, which is fruity, colorful, vibrant, acidity and you don’t see too much cream, butter or cheese. I want people to feel the South of France.

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UN I Q U E

PICKLED CARROT HEARTS

Explore an ingredient with curiosity. Forget about habitual rules. Dare to challenge the imagination.

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When you think about unique, what is unique? It is something that you haven’t had before. The Pickled Carrot Hearts… there is nothing unique about a carrot, you see carrots all the time but if you do it in a different way then you see the uniqueness of it. We bring the uniqueness of the carrot to the plate – the carrot heart. After lightly roasting the piece of carrot, it is peeled until the heart of the carrot. A humble vegetable seen in a different perspective and the beauty of it which makes it unique.


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MEMORY

FOIE GRAS, TRUFFLE, CHIVE

You are your memory. Memories are your best reference and your best friend. A memory can be revitalized and updated for as long as you live. Use your memories to enhance your practice of hedonism.

This is the only dish what I have kept on the menu at Restaurant André for the last 20 years, everywhere I go, I carry this dish with me that’s why it’s called “Memory”. It is my first created dish in my career as a chef. At the very beginning, a few years in my career and working in the best restaurants you try to perfect your craft and at that moment you don’t really create, we basically do what the chefs asks you to do and you learn from it but after few years you start to understand flavours, understand techniques, understand flavor combinations. In 1997, I created my first dish that I call my own - the “Memory” dish with Foie Gras, black Truffle, and chive. A dish I first created but also when I prepare everyday where I came from and why I want to become a chef.

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TERROIR

‘CAMEMBERT’, HAY ICE CREAM Terroir hails the produce of a specific time and place. The characteristics of a specific time and place, tradition and culture, geography and climate – incarnated into the everpresent origin.

When we started Restaurant André in Singapore, It was hard for us to talk about terroir as in Singapore we don’t have cows and mushrooms, so we were thinking of how we could create something that belongs to us here and what if we make something that looks like a cheese or camembert that’s shows our Terroir. That was the first idea, second was that not many Asians appreciate a strong heavy terroir artisan cheese, this is something which is not in our

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culture. That is why I created a terroir that everyone can enjoy and which also part of Singapore. We start the ageing process for a milk bavarois, it’s a very light bavarois milk and after the ageing process it has a crust on the outside and it looks almost dehydrated like a cheese, like a camembert which is the interesting part of it. It looks a like a cheese and everybody can appreciate it and yet it’s a dessert.


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MARGO REUTEN

MARGO REUTEN Photo Š Jan Bartelsman

Making the delicious unforgettable. Turning an enjoyable meal into a unique experience‌ In Haute Gastronomy, the pursuit of excellence is a constant requirement. It has been her guiding principle, since 1984, and then for the ten years of her apprenticeship, Margo Reuten gained experience in the kitchens of starred restaurants as Juliana in Valkenburg, De Swaen in Oisterwijk, Toine Hermsen in Maastricht and Der Bloasbalg in Wahlwiller.

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Since 1993, with her life companion and husband Petro Kools she opened Restaurant Da Vinci. At Maasbracht, nothing is left to chance from welcoming guests to ensuring that they are comfortable. Margo’s cooking style is describe as a classical French and loyal to the region, and also her meticulous choice of ingredients (using as much as possible locally grown ingredients), scrupulous use of equipment, her respect for tradition and awareness of the latest techniques. In 1990, Margo Reuten was the first woman in the Netherlands to become SVH Meesterkok – Master Chef. In 1999 Da Vinci was rewarded with a Michelin star and in 2009 a second star was awarded, making her the only female chef with two Michelin stars in the Netherlands.

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The kitchen, which is wide open to the dining room, leaves no room for error. Nor do my expectations, nor those of my guests. To see smiles appear on their faces as they enjoy a series of delicate, subtle dishes which sensitively revisit the classics is my greatest reward... WG Magazine speaks with Margo Reuten… It’s interesting to learn how chefs find their passion for cooking, tell us how you found your way into the culinary field to become one of the most soughtafter chefs! I grew up in Maasbracht which is a town in the municipality of Maasgouw. Maasbracht has the largest inland harbour of The Netherlands – so there are a lot of hard-working people. My parents used to have a farm were they brought up livestock for meat. Through my father I started working at a local butcher, it was here where I made the choice to start working in the restaurant business. I grew up as the eldest of 4 children and I started working at Restaurant Prinses Juliana with two Michelin stars. I started out as a resident, where I stayed for one year, and afterthat I worked there for another 3 years. Because I was already working at this high level I thought to myself “This is what I want to do later as well”. It is also very special for me that I had the opportunity to start an own restaurant in 1993 in my own home town, 200 meters away from my paternal home.

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You present every dish with unparalleled beauty, a delight to both the eyes and the palate. A composition of locally sourced ingredients combined with flavors and textures which is brings a perfect harmony on each plate, a perfect balance‌

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I enjoyed a classical education with great chefs to look up to, that’s why my view is classical but with my own female touch. This profession is about developing and continuation, so we keep fine-tuning our dishes and ingredients, we also use a lot of local ingredients, eel from the river de Maas, asparagus from central Limburg which grow in a loamy soil, local fruits, and of course “Pietjesveld” beef - these are the cows my father brought up. The challenge in creating a dish is that you are never done. You are always busy with creating. Besides, Da Vinci himself was also a busy man. The creating and developing of a dish is always a special process, but if you have surrounded yourself with a good crew and use great ingredients, it comes naturally. Personally I have this thing about plates: I take my plates with colours and patterns into consideration when we are thinking of a new dish, we create or adapt our dishes playfully while we are working in the service. The busier the service the better. WG August 2017 -

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Margo Reuten shares her experiences in the kitchens of Princess Julliana, Der Bloasbalg, and De Swaen‌ While I was working for Toine Hermsen’s two Michelin star restaurant at Princess Julliana I learned how to cook, how to be inspired by this profession and line of work. My time here definitely made me dream about an own restaurant. At the two Michelin star restaurant De Swaen I also learned how to cook of course but also learned how to present my dishes and how to present myself. When I worked at the one Michelin star restaurant De Bloasbalg I learned how to work and bring it off at a high level with a small team.

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It’s my passion to give my guests intense sensations, to treat them with products of high quality and fantastic FLAVOURS so they will forget the drag of daily life. With respect for the products, the quantities and the numerous possibilities of taste I try to keep my dishes in balance. I try to detect the piece of beauty that’s hidden in the products given by the earth and to pass it on to the guests. In this way I propagate concern for food. I want to express in my dishes awareness of health and sensible use of products as sources of energy for the body and, moreover, of joy and satisfaction during the meal. It should be a ‘total experience’ for the senses of smell, taste and vision. I get charged up again by cooking for others, by the challenge to create for everybody an ecstatic moment in our restaurant Da Vinci. In 1993, when we started, the restaurant by the harbour of Maasbracht, it bore the name of Da Vinci. It has been built in the form of a ship. We strive to express the versatility of Leonardo da Vinci and the flexibility of a ship in the experience we give our guests. Living in a boat is living in a world of its own. In the same way the guest who comes to us will embark on a culinary voyage.

Margo Reuten’s culinary philosophy, inspiration creating her dishes…

I’m aware of the influence of food and drinks on the body. That’s why we try to take the quantities in account. The liver plays an important part in the body. I take this in consideration in the composition of dishes so that the balance will not be disturbed – by using too much fats for instance. I also support the Kupffer Cell Foundation because of the significance of liver research. This metabolic motor is vitally important and defines in a large extent the quality of life. WG August 2017 -

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At the farm, we used also a lot of home-grown vegetables and fruits - beans, peas and cherries for example. For me it’s always special to keep working with these products. It’s a pleasure to keep combining new flavours and different textures with these products. For instance: at this moment we have a dish of bass with peas, cream of lettuce, wild anise, fennel and a crisp of sourdough bread with Canadian lobster. I like to work with lobster. From day one we have it on the menu, because I am a great lobster fan. Other products I really like to use are sole, vegetables, strawberries and raspberries. A fan of the luxurious kitchen, I always try to get luxurious products to use in my kitchen such as Atlantic King crab and Anna Dutch caviar, produced in the Netherlands. WG August 2017 -

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Special cooking techniques or equipment you particular enjoy using…

Da Vinci is unforgettable in a masterly way... “We do our utmost to make everything perfect and master host and sommelier Petro Kool arranges this all – every day and unconditionally” Margo Reuten

The kitchen tools I use most of all are my 4 small forks. I use them to dress up my dishes and I use them to turn fishes, vegetables and meat products. Also I like making my classical roux, to which I give my female touch. Produce, Creativity or Technique… These are 3 really important elements for me as well as for my kitchen. Personally I got all 3 elements. A good production means good preparation work, to serve our guests quickly with quality, a good creativity is important to adapt to the wishes of the guests and to surprise them again and again, and techniques are important to combine the classical kitchen with the newer ways of cooking. It is a pleasure to combine these 3 elements in my kitchen and to make our guests happy. WG August 2017 -

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Take us through your book, a day at Da Vinci and recipes… what was the inspiration while writing this book? Our first book was created to be the best and the most beautiful Dutch cookbook. It has been awarded with the Sappi-Award. Our second book was made to celebrate our second Michelin star. The only female chef in the Netherlands to hold two Michelin stars and several accolades… what was the feeling to receive your second Michelin star in 2009; and what keeps you motivated? Receiving a Michelin star gives an indescribable feeling – all the more a second one!! In the year before we got it we were given the Espoir. It sounded like a wake-up call to us. “Go for it and give everything we’ve got” and 365 days later we received our second Michelin star. Now I am the only female chef in the Benelux with 2 Michelin stars, and this year I was named Woman of the Year by Relais en Chateaux. Through these accomplishments we are known throughout the world now and receive guests from all corners. What keeps us going is that we know we are not at our peak. This is where the 3 elements of Production, Creativity and Techniques are a solid base to work from and to develop not only the dishes but ourselves as well. Being a chef is perceived as a glamorous profession, what advice could you give to chefs who are entering the kitchen for the first time? My advice for the next generation? It is a great profession, in which you will meet a lot of different people, cultures and ways of life. But keep loyal to yourself and to your own creativity in your cooking style.

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PETRO KOOL AND MARGO REUTEN

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MIGUEL ROCHA VIEIRA

Photo © Edmond Ho

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WG Magazine catches up with Miguel Rocha Vieira… Miguel Vieira finds his passion for cooking…

Born and raised in Cascais up to the age of 19, when Miguel Vieira then headed to London to study gastronomy at the prestigious cooking school “Le Cordon Bleu”. Since then, with a solid education and background in classic French cuisine, he worked in some of the most prestigious kitchens One Lombard Street, Château de Divonne, Masion Pic and El Bulli Hotel, until he arrived in Budapest in 2008 to open the “Costes” restaurant, where he won the first and then only Michelin star in Hungary in 2010 and put Hungary on the gastronomy map. His performance as a judge in the Masterchef Portugal TV Show earned him the admiration and respect of the general public. Miguel Vieira is the first Portuguese Chef to assume the leadership of one of the most prestigious and influential cuisine in the country, whose foundation was a classic French cuisine, when it opened in 1998.

Unlike most of colleagues, I decided to become a chef quite late (I was already in my 20`s). During my youth, apart from going out at night and partying there was nothing that really caught my attention. Once I finished high school I had to take a decision regarding my future or start looking for a job or to continue my studies and get a degree. After a discussion at home, the possibility to continue my studies in London came to the table and I didn’t have to think twice mainly because the idea of living alone in a city like London was very appealing. After looking at colleges and degrees, I thought that going into hospitality would be a good idea because is quite an important industry in Portugal and thinking that once I was done with the degree I wouldn’t have any problems to find a job back home. A couple of months and living in the British capital I enrolled at City of London College to do Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management. During the second year of studying, one of the subjects was cuisine, and since that the very first class, everything changed and it clear to me. Handling a knife for the first time, feeling the heat from the stoves and the freedom to create from scratch, I just knew that cooking was what I was looking for and what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. When I reached home after school, I started to look for cooking schools nearby and a month later I was enrolled in cuisine and pastry at one of the most prestigious schools in the world Le Cordon Bleu. The rest is history as they say... WG August 2017 -

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Restaurant Fortaleza do Guincho was opened in 1998, as the Hotel. Acclaimed French Chef Antoine Westermann introduced an haute cuisine restaurant, which quickly became a reference in Portugal. In 2001 the restaurant received its first Michelin star... Inspired by the Atlantic, your cuisine is a combination of fresh and quality ingredients - a composition of flavours which is impeccably balanced - how do you bring about this balance on a plate? First let me tell you that we take that as a big compliment as we strive daily to give our guests a unique experience. We like to think that a meal at “Fortaleza do Guincho� just can be taken there and nowhere else, definitely because of the amazing location but mainly to our cuisine. Balance is very important indeed, like in everything in life I would say. We have that in mind when trying new dishes and designing the menus, keeping in mind that a meal of 6,7 or 8 dishes can take over 2 hours and we need it to be well balanced . Then it is the experience, talking between each other, the tasting and a lot of experimenting. One of the golden rules in our kitchen is trying to put ourselves as guests and not cooks, so we cook for our guests and not for us. Cooking is part of the service industry, we are there to provide a service and not to boost of feed our egos.

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Miguel Vieira’s culinary journey... Lombard Street in London Château de Divonne and Masion Pic in France El Bulli Hotel in Seville… For me it was very important that the first years to be a chef was to build on to a good background as this would dictate the future but equally important is to know the person behind the chef. I mean, there are sacrifices to be made, working long hours in the kitchen together and working with someone where I learn more than a few recipes or knife skills, and it started with working under the guidance of Chef Herbert Berger at 1 Lombard Street. Lombard Street was a very busy city brasserie and a Michelin star restaurant where everything came from the same kitchen (breakfast included). It was a great starting point because it was all very classic and I could put in practice what I learnt in school but here on a larger scale. One day, Chef Herbert Berger told me that it would be a good idea for me to go to France as they have a different approach and culture for food and that’s what I did.

After France, I headed to Spain and Hotel el Castell de Ciutat was the next culinary stop. A small Relais Chateaux in the Catalonian Mountains where for the first time a chef trusted me and made me his right hand man. Chef Erwan Louaisil is one of the chefs that I still admire till today. Have a brilliant background, he had a great approach to food and making me his sous chef gave me the boost and confidence that I needed. It´s very important for a young chef to feel that someone cares about your opinion and actually listens to what you say.

I had the most amazing time there but then, all of a sudden I got an invitation from the El Bulli team (the best restaurant in the world at the time) to go to their Hotel in Seville (which does not exists anymore) and to work with Chef Rafa Morales, it was an offer which I could not refuse and yes it was a starting point for me as I had to forget all what I knew about classic cuisine and open the eyes I went to France with no clue of the language to world of molecular cuisine. I know it’s difficult and started to work at the prestigious Chateau to imagine El Bulli was only open for 6 months a de Divonne (that unfortunately meanwhile had years with 40 guests per service which transformed burned down) with the great and talented Chef - in to a hotel 24 hours a day with breakfast (the best Benoit Vidal. After almost a couple of years Chef breakfast in the world with 20 something courses), Benoit decided to leave and it did not make any room service, banqueting, swimming pool, bar, sense for me to stay there without him and yes it gastronomic restaurant and so on. It was hard was time to continue this culinary journey which work but a great learning curve. took me to Valence and Maison Pic to work with one of the world’s best chef - Anne Shopie Pic. I It was after a few years there that I felt for the first learnt to respect the produce, it was the pursuit for time that I was ready to take the next step and to excellence and understanding that it has to be the manage a kitchen for the first time. After looking best every time, if it is not perfect then it is simply not around for opportunities, the not yet opened Costes good. Besides the excellent well balanced plates of Restaurant in Budapest owners came into my life, great flavours, it had to also be the most beautiful they invited me to come to Budapest, and I knew that that would be the next step in the career. plating. WG August 2017 -

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Miguel takes us through with creating a dish… When creating a dish there are 2 staring points that obviously come together – the produce has to be seasonal and has to be local. At our Restaurant you will not find strawberries in December, asparagus in November or chestnuts in August as we are lucky enough to be surrounded by amazing produce. We work directly with small producers, so it does not make any sense to use ingredients that needs to travel on a 12 hour flight to be available. The next is our location and most of our menu comes from the Atlantic. Once we know what´s in season, then we decide what to use, and a bit of research as we like to bring our local costumes and traditions to the table, experimenting and tasting. If not a 100% happy it will never be on the menu. Ingredients that inspire Miguel and his favourite ingredients… Carabineiros (scarlet prawns) and sea urchins (uni) seem to be the favorite at the moment in Portugal. I do not have any fetish or a favorite ingredient. For me a carrot or a potato is equally important as a piece of fish or meat. My obsession, if you want to call it that way, is the quality and freshness of whatever I use and fortunately our suppliers understand and respect that. For me personally, I am discovering a new world, it is the first time that I work so close to the sea and every day I discover something, something new to taste, it could be fish, shellfish, seaweed or a plant that grows nearby. That is one of the challenges, to find produce for the first time so we can show it and somehow educate our guests too.

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RESTAURANT FORTALEZA DO GUINCHO


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As executive chef at Costes restaurant in Budapest, your menu was a blend of traditional and contemporary Hungarian cuisine which earned a Michelin star making it the first restaurant in Hungary to make it on the Michelin Guide – what was the feeling to achieve this? Even though I am at “Fortaleza do Guincho” yet I am still pretty much involved with both Costes and Costes Downtown (both were awarded with a Michelin Star) in Budapest as a Consultant Chef.

Produce, Creativity or Technique…

Costes is and it will always be very special to me as it was the first restaurant that I was in charge of. It was here that I signed my first menu and was involved, not only in building a team and starting a restaurant but pretty much everything as the restaurant was just bare walls when I arrived in the Hungarian capital in 2008. It was an amazing experience to build the restaurant from scratch. It´s all much easy when you trust people around you, from the owners to the entire team from day one. Without any previous planning, we opened Costes on my 30th birthday and that was a good omen, in less than 2 years we made history and became the first restaurant, not only in Hungary but in that part of the world I believe to make it on the Michelin guide.

Produce, produce and produce. Without good produce is not possible to have a good dish and I think that the quality of the raw materials is the “secret” behind any chef. You can master all the techniques and be the most creative person in the world but if you don’t have a good quality produce you won´t be able to make a good dish. I believe that technique and creativity should be used in order to flavor and enhance the produce. Produce, whatever it might be, always should be respected.

It´s very difficult to put feelings into words. It was amazing and still is today. It is something that will stay with me for the rest of my life. We made it and placed our name in Hungarian history, no matter what happens next. We placed Hungary on the gastronomy map and very proud of it. I don´t know many chefs that can say that they were the first to get a star for a whole country. We did it. All of us together. Hard work and dedication (almost) always pays off. This time it certainly did. WG August 2017 -

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2015 was a banner year for the history of the restaurant when Miguel Rocha Vieira arrived as the new Executive Chef of Fortaleza do Guincho - the first time a Portuguese took the reins of one of the most emblematic cuisines of Portugal... What keeps you motivated at this point of your career? The key is to be passionate in what you do no matter what it is. I believe that cooking is what I was born for and that is half way to keep me happy and to continue this culinary journey. After all these years, I still wake up in the mornings and happy to go to work. The day that does not happen anymore then I will stop and think about a solution. Cooking gave me almost everything. I have traveled the world, I had the chance of meeting and being surrounded daily with amazing people, to cook for people I admire, great partnerships, to do a very successful TV program. Doing things like this had never had occurred to me in my early years and not even in my wildest dreams, yes I am very grateful for that. In life you should always have your feet on the floor and never forget from where you come from. I know how lucky I am because I found the one thing which is my vocation. The day that I decide to stop and look back, I know that there are many things I have accomplished and have been recognized that will makes very happy and proud. I know I was lucky, I was probably at the right place at the right time during my career but, as a close friend says, “To be lucky requires a lot of (hard) work�.

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Being a chef is perceived as a glamorous profession, Miguel’s advice to chefs entering the kitchen for the first time… When I receive a CV or get a young guy in our kitchen we always ask the same questions “Are you sure is this what you want to for a living?” “Are you sure you are here for the right reasons?” “Are you willing to sacrifice your youth, your family, relationships, weekends and holidays”? If the answer to all that questions is yes, then welcome to my world but, if not, then think well, think twice before is too late. There are a few professions you can do it even is not what you really love, cooking at this level will simply drive you insane. Cooking at this level is so demanding that there is no point in doing it if you don’t really feel it and sure that is what you really want to do. Forget celebrity chefs, forget chefs that are on TV, that give interviews to fancy magazines or drive sport cars or travel in business class and have restaurants all over the world. They are only a very small minority and if they arrived there is because of the sacrifices they made. Cooking is not glamorous. Cooking is a very hard profession but, if you really feel and like it then it is the most beautiful profession in the world. WG August 2017 -

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IRC-ITALIAN RESTAURANT CONSULTING GOURMET WEEK

IRC’s Gourmet Week… For the fourth year in a row IRC-Italian Restaurant Consulting brings the best of Italy at the Speciality Food Festival in Dubai from 18 to 23 September. With Walter Potenza flying all the way from USA to be the Master of Ceremony and the animator for 3 days of intense activities – the Chef’s Theater, Italian Pizza Lab, the Lavazza Bar, Gianni Gelato with the Gelato and Pastry Lab and Culinary Competitions. Six master classes will be held per day at the Chef’s Theater with different themes… Seafood, Organic Products, Gluten Free, Artisanal Cheeses, Cooking Techniques, Meet the Michelin-Starred Chefs and the focus on the cuisine of the best chefs in Dubai. A dedicated space for Authentic Italian Pizza – The Italian Pizza Lab. The best pizza chefs of Dubai and Italy will play with one of the most popular dish of the world. The world’s acrobatic pizza champion Pasqualino Barbasso and his stunning performances will enhance the quality and the good taste of Italian pizza made according to true Italian traditions.

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Master classes and coffee tasting experiences by Lavazza experts and Michelin star Chef Alfredo Russo who will bring coffee and food together with Lavazza pairing.

The Pizza Challenge will not be the usual pizza completion, this year we will see a blind test and an international jury to decide who the best “Pizza iolo” is in the UAE.

This line-up would not be complete without the touch of Italian sweet – Chocolate, Artisanal Italian Gelato and Gelato with savory flavors.

Barmen across Dubai will compete to make 10 perfect espresso and cappuccino within a limited time and the competition be judged by coffee experts.

Like every year, IRC will organize a series of gastronomic competitions (Young Chefs, Pizza Challenge, Best Espresso, the Gelato Chefs Cup) for the best chefs of Dubai. “This year we decided to focus on the next generation of chefs and the competitions will be for cooks under 30 years old” says Chef Aira Piva, General Manager of IRC. The Young Chef’s Hotel Competition is dedicated to hotels, where teams of 3 chefs will compete to prepare a 3 course menu with discovering the ingredients at the last minute. Two finalist will fly to Italy who will try to win the last challenge.

The Gelato Chefs Cup by Gianni Gelato will decide the best artisanal Gelato in Dubai. A star line up of Michelin chefs from Singapore, Italy and Portugal will do master classes and will also do four hands dinners at selected restaurants in Dubai. The three Michelin star chef from L’ Arpege Alain Passard along with a gourmet and wine expert French actor Gérard Depardieu will grace the event at the Chef Theater. WG August 2017 -

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No. 12 The Best Restaurant in Singapore

LINO SAURO

GATTOPARDO RISTORANTE DI MARE SINGAPORE

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Born in Sicily into an Italian family of farmers, Lino still carries within himself his Southern Italian heritage. His pride in his cultural background is recognizable from his love for fresh and unprocessed food. This philosophy resonates well and truly in his cuisine. Today, Lino is recognized as one of the top chefs in Singapore, specializing in Sicilian and Mediterranean food. His cuisine focuses on sustainable ingredients, with a kitchen always graced by some of the best seasonal ingredients from Italy, and an impressive array of fresh seafood unabashedly on display to greet his guests at the restaurant, Gattopardo – Ristorante di Mare.


WG MAGAZINE

A second-generation celebrity chef from Tokyo, Chef Hatch (born on 24th April, 1979) is a graduate of L’Ecole Tsuji Tokyo (Tsuji Culinary Institute), Japan’s top culinary school. Since the tender age of 14, he apprenticed under his influential father, Master Chef Tokio Hashida, who opened one of Japan’s premier sushi restaurants, Hashida Sushi.

KENJIRO “HATCH” HASHIDA HASHIDA SUSHI SINGAPORE

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No. 12 The Best Restaurant in Singapore

SAM AISBETT WHITEGRASS SINGAPORE

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Sam Aisbett is part of a new generation of Australian chefs, transforming the notion of Modern Australian food with his flavor-driven approach to international ingredients with a distinctly Asian touch. The menu at Whitegrass transcends geographical boundaries and is inspired by Sam’s extensive travels. As ChefOwner of Whitegrass, Sam offers a comfortable and relaxed platform for diners to enjoy inspired food at the highest level. Sam spent several years as Head Chef at Peter Gilmore’s Quay in Sydney, and as a Senior Sous Chef under Tetsuya Wakuda at Tetsuya’s.


WG MAGAZINE

Born and raised in Cascais up to the age of 19, when Miguel Vieira then headed to London to study gastronomy at the prestigious cooking school “Le Cordon Bleu”. Since then, with a solid education and background in classic French cuisine, he worked in some of the most prestigious kitchens One Lombard Street, Château de Divonne, Masion Picand and El Bulli Hotel, until he arrived in Budapest in 2008 to open the “Costes” restaurant, where he won the first and then only Michelin star in Hungary in 2010 and put Hungary on the gastronomy map. His performance as a judge in the Masterchef Portugal TV Show earned him the admiration and respect of the general public. Miguel Vieira is the first Portuguese Chef to assume the leadership of one of the most prestigious and influential cuisine in the country, whose foundation was a classic French cuisine, when it opened in 1998.

MIGUEL VIEIRA

FORTALEZA DO GUINCHO CASCAIS - PORTUGAL

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No. 12 The Best Restaurant in Singapore

MANJUNATH MURAL SONG OF INDIA SINGAPORE

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Manjunath Mural is the first Indian Executive chef to score a Michelin star for an Indian restaurant in Southeast Asia. As Executive Chef of Song of India, a modern Indian restaurant that features regional flavors across India, he was recognized for his decades of hard work in 2016 when the restaurant was awarded one Michelin star in Singapore. In 2017, he once again led his team at The Song of India to garner a Michelin star - still the only Indian restaurant in Southeast Asia to have the honor.


WG MAGAZINE

Piedmont, north Italy, Alfredo was born into a home where importance was placed on good food. ... In 2004, the leading Italian culinary guide “L’Espresso” awarded Alfredo the title “Italy’s best young chef” thanks to the unquestionable culinary excellence at his restaurant “Dolce Stil Novo”. Alfredo Russo is also celebrity consultant chef for Vivaldi by Alfredo Russo Restaurant & Lounge in Dubai, located at the Sheraton Dubai Creek Hotel & Towers. He is renowned for his respect for Italian culinary traditions combined with a constant drive for innovation.

ALFREDO RUSSO

DOLCE STIL NOVO TURIN - ITALY

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No. 12 The Best Restaurant in Singapore

KENTARO TORII BELLA COSA LONDON

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Renowned by critics in the US and Italy for his Japanese infusion to Italian cuisine, is the Executive Chef of Bella Cosa, London. His love for the Italian fare started when he was 17, with his first dish learnt from a cookbook. Impassioned by the Italian culture, he honed his craft through a string of stints in Florence, Lombardy and Sardinia and even working at one Michelin starred Al Pino in Pavia.


WG MAGAZINE

With a rich and expansive culinary background from Australia, Rishi started his career at Taxi Dining Room in Melbourne. In 2011, Rishi relocated to Sydney with an offer to work as Chef de Partie at Tetsuya’s where he developed a relentless attention to detail. A skill that would serve him well when he moved to the award-winning Yellow by Brent Savage. Eager for more challenges, Rishi moved to Singapore to head up Maca, which received praises for the artful combination of seasonal produce and their flavours. More recently, a chance meeting with Loh Lik Peng led to an opportunity for Rishi to call a space his own; Cheek by Jowl.

RISHI NALENDRA CHEEK BY JOWL SINGAPORE

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ALAIN WEISSGERBER

ALAIN WEISSGERBER MODERN PANNONIAN CUISINE

Born and raised in Alsace where the culinary culture takes great part in everyday life. When Alain Weissgerber was little, this self-taught chef use to help his grandmother (who was also a trained chef) in the kitchen, and soon he knew that this is what he wanted for himself. After a one day trial as a baker, he instantly knew that this kind of working hours didn’t suit his rhythm, so chef it was. Dominique Le Stanc, nowadays in Nice (LA MARANDA), was an inspiration to him as a young chef back in the days. As a chef, Alain Weissgerber sees it as his mission to open people’s eyes to the richness of Austrian, and more specifically Pannonian cuisine. Working closely with local farmers, planning out the produce to be grown and farmed for that year, never resorting to importation. At Taubenkobel, and as the purveyor of Pannonian cuisine, Alain is responsible for turning fish from the nearby muddy lake, white asparagus from near their little house in Croatia and wild garlic brought home by their children into the distinctly delicious taste of Pannonia. Alain adds “The taste that I want to convey through my dishes is the real taste, not the industry taste. I want the guests to bite into my food and know that they are dining at Taubenkobel.”

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“All over the world food looks the same, tastes the same and is completely faceless and tasteless. If a guest in our restaurant closes his eyes, takes a bite of a dish and knows that he is in the Pannonia region, then we achieved something.” Alain Weissgerber Opened decades ago by Alain’s wife Barbara’s parents Walter and Eveline Eselböck, Taubenkobel has quite literally grown and developed with the family, each generation bringing a new lease of life into what was simply a one room restaurant and kitchen. You feel how the family has built every stone themselves ever since. Alain Weissgerber and his wife Barbara Eselböck continues to take the family heritage by leading the hotel and kitchen into the future. They both have opened the window and let in fresh air. This air flow not only smells of spring and summer, it also brings the archaic flavors of on an open fire grilled food to the noses of the guests. A concept that is delicately woven into every aspect of association – from Alain’s eight o’clock forage for wild herbs to Walter’s well thought out interior design of each individual guest room – they have created an experience that is so personal and geographically specific, one can’t help but fall in love with it. Taubenkobel is where the Eselböck-Weissgerber family eat, sleep and work; this is where they have grown up and are bringing their children up; This is not some fancy big city restaurant where you’ll get turned away for not wearing a tie; This is where converse has previously been a part of the staff uniform and the dishes are served up on locally made clay plates, and it works.

CRUNCHY DUCK (ESSENCE) CHIP WITH MUSHROOM CREAM AND POWDER

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Each element of Taubenkobel complements the other; the image of the lusciously green gardens is intensified by the distinct, warm smell flowing out of the kitchen, whilst the sometimes surprising, yet mouthwatering ingredients take you off on a tour of the local area and into the farms. WG Magazine catches up with Alain Weissgerber… You developed and refined a distinctive culinary style of a regionally inspired cuisine, which emphasize the variety of the Pannonian landscape which is very specific and extremely pure, without complicating the dish with a perfect balance – how do you put it together? The region we are in and the produce that comes within it throughout the seasons instantly make sense themselves. All I have to do is recognize and combine. With each single dish. That is the number one priority. After that the only thing that counts is taste and feeling. Then there is nothing but that. No trends. No makeup. As it has always been the case at Taubenkobel, I follow my instincts, like Walter Eselböck (Barbara’s father) did in his way – to be able to develop a unique style of cuisine that is bound to this place and this place only Taubenkobel lives not singularly of its menu but in the same way of its hosts, its garden, the art, the rooms, the vitality it has grown to have.

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LIQUID MEADOW AND CRISPY CHICKEN SKIN WITH CELERY LEAVES, CHICKEN CREAM, WILD GROWN MEADOW CLOVER AND ROCKET BLOSSOMS.

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ALAIN WEISSGERBER

PHOTO © PHILIP HORAK

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PHOTO © PHILIP HORAK


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BREAD WITH CONDIMENTS PHOTO © PHILIP HORAK

You worked with some of the great chefs, with Elena Arzak in San Sebastian, Joel Robuchon in Paris, and Wolfgang Puck’s Spago in Los Angeles…

“All over the world food looks the same, tastes the same and is completely faceless and tasteless. If a guest in our restaurant closes his eyes, takes a bite of a dish and knows that he is in the Pannonia region, then we achieved something.” Alain Weissgerber

Everywhere you go with an open eye and mind you find something to take with you and improve your personal and professional development. While working with Elena Arzak for example I experienced the importance of a strong family bond which results in pure dedication. During my time with Robuchon in Paris I learnt a lot about meticulously precision of taste and refined it with passion. Also there I met - in my opinion - the world’s best Pâtissier and gained a good friend. In Puck’s Spago in Los Angeles I learnt to perfect the organization and systematic logistic in the kitchen. So, the more kitchens and styles and restaurants I saw I could collect ideas and techniques that made sense to me. On the other hand I could also realize which ideas may work in a specific restaurant but do not work for me. All I saw and experienced freed me to afterwards do my own thing. WG August 2017 -

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Your culinary philosophy… Europe is our home. Since we are bordering to the beauty of Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Slovakia and Croatia and find so many inspiring ingredients there, as well as in Austria we tear down borders on the plate and in the wine glasses. Eating and drinking brings people together and connects on an emotional level. That, we feel at Taubenkobel, is a good thing to strive for.

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RADISH, RADISH LEAVES, GREEN OIL OF RADISH ROOTS, TROUT, RADISH CREAM WITH CRUMBLES, CAULIFLOWER CRUMBLES, CAULIFLOWER CREAM AND OIL.


WG MAGAZINE

Any new ingredients that inspire you... For me there are no new ingredients. I do not feel the need to invent and break with tradition. If something is good, it’s good. Period. If something is new, it is new; it doesn’t have to be good though. I take great pleasure in produce what is considered to be mediocre and then work with it to show the potential that has been there all time long. Sometimes an often laughed at carp can turn out to become a treasure chest that no one before has even looked for the key to open its beauty. I prefer honesty in taste and do not print menus in which you’ll have to google half of the ingredients, just because they are so 2018. Is there an ingredient that you weren’t able to master and have given up? I’ve been a chef since I was 14 years old. Now I’m 50. First of all I’m not very good at failing, and second when one really seeks after something and is persistent, like I am, you get there in the end and get what you want. WG August 2017 -

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FISHLIVER WITH WILD AMARANTH, RARE PIKE, TWO KINDS OF WILD CARP, EEL, PIKE PERCH, SWEET WATER ALGAE, WATERCRESS AND TUMBLEWEED.

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ONION SOUP, TRUMPET OF THE DEAD, ONIONS BRAISED IN OUR WOOD OVEN, SLOES,- NATURAL, PICKLED, CREAM AND PICKLED ROSE HIPS.


WG MAGAZINE

The Taubenkobel Philosophy Our home is Europe Kitchen of the Kronländer k. and k. Pannonia

Any Special cooking equipment… The piece of equipment that provides me with the most joy is essential is my spoon. For tasting. Produce, Creativity or Technique… If the quality of produce is a question then there is something wrong already and does not need further talking. Creativity equals Ferran Adrià. A master of experiences! What keeps on giving me consistent motivation is consequence and persistence. ALAIN WEISSGERBER AND BARBARA ESELBÖCK

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ALAIN WEISSGERBER

Your greatest influence in the kitchen… My father-in-law, Walter Eselböck. Our conversations about food, art, music and literature, about their parallels and overlapping qualities are most inspiring. These conversations seem to just happen randomly late at night or on journeys we have together. I don’t know of anyone else who travels that much in order to taste himself through markets, bars and restaurants of all categories - endlessly capable of being open but does not get distracted and always goes deep beneath the surface. He observes with the outmost care and therefore is my most important and most honest critic. It is a blessing to get unfiltered opinions by someone who understands you as a person and a friend, and has a true understanding of gastronomy since he himself is a twostarred Michelin Chef.

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ALAIN WEISSGERBER AND WALTER ESELBÖCK


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ANTIPASTI FROM THE GREISSLEREI

BRAISED MILK LAMB - COOKED OVER OUR OPEN FIREPLACE, WITH CHERVIL; THE FRESH LEAVES AND BLOSSOMS, OIL, ROOTS AND CREAM

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WALTER ESELBÖCK, EVELINE ESELBÖCK, ALAIN WEISSGERBER AND BARBARA ESELBÖCK


WG MAGAZINE

GREEN ALMONDS FROM RUST, PINK BITTERSALADS, RHUBARB AND ALMOND BLOSSOMS

Two Michelin stars and several accolades - what keeps you motivated? My family, it is the biggest of all and a precious privilege to be responsible for, all included. They are my life, my heart. I also feel a great responsibility for my team which is like a second family, often integrated in my first. Plus I feel the urgent need to keep the magic in this extraordinary place; Taubenkobel, which my parents-in-law have created over the past 35 years - to let it keep breathing freely and elevate. Being a chef is perceived as a glamorous profession, your advice to chefs who are entering the kitchen for the first time... Cutting vegetables, gutting fish, frying the whole day long at a room temperature of 42 degree Celsius. Sweet mother of insanity, it’s far from glamorous. But it’s a privilege to be able to do what you want in life, and it is luxury to know that you master your craft cooking. WG August 2017 -

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CANTINA PERUANA - BAIRRO DO AVILLEZ

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FROM SHORE TO SHORE LIMA TO LISBON

PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

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CANTINA PERUANA - BAIRRO DO AVILLEZ

Diego Muñoz embarks on a new gastronomic adventure - Cantina Peruana in Lisbon with one of the great Portuguese references in gastronomy, José Avillez. Located on the first floor of Bairro do Avillez in Lisbon, CANTINA PERUANA offers a contemporary Peruvian cuisine signed by Diego Muñoz, with some influence of Portuguese ingredients, in a laid-back and joyful atmosphere, along with the city’s best PISCO BAR.

COUVERT PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

It’s the first time José Avillez is representing a foreign chef. Diego Muñoz and José Avillez had been thinking about developing a project together since they worked alongside each other in El Bulli’s kitchen, but it wasn’t until 2016, when Diego came to Lisbon and fell in love with the city, that they started shaping this concept, along with Bairro do Avillez’ project by José Avillez. “I’m very happy to welcome Diego in my ‘home’. He’s a good friend and a great chef. It will be interesting to watch both gastronomies coexist in Bairro do Avillez. At Páteo, we have the best Portuguese cuisine has to offer; on the first floor, we’ll have the best Peruvian cuisine has to offer” adds José Avillez.

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NIKKEI CHICKEN ANTICUCHO PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

“To me, it’s an honor to be in my friend José Avillez’ ‘home’ - Bairro do Avillez. He’s the reference in Portuguese cuisine. CANTINA PERUANA is a joyful place, with a diversified menu, that invites you on to a journey around the different cultures of Peru, with its abundance of flavours, aromas and cooking techniques” says Diego Muñoz.


WG MAGAZINE

NIKKEI CEVICHE PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

NIKKEI CHICKEN ANTICUCHO PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

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CANTINA PERUANA - BAIRRO DO AVILLEZ

DIEGO MUÑOZ AND YURI HERRERA PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

PHOTO © BOA ONDA

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PHOTO © BOA ONDA


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PHOTO © BOA ONDA

Diversified, rich and flavourful, with a strong heritage and many cultural influences, Peruvian gastronomy is now a reference all over the world. One of its most renowned ambassadors, Diego Muñoz is a representative of the new generation of chefs promoting South-America’s cultural heritage. CANTINA PERUANA’S menu is created by Diego Muñoz in collaboration with José Avillez, who has selected the most adequate Portuguese fish species and with suggestions regarding the Portuguese people’s preferences. At the invitation of Diego Muñoz, Yuri Herrera leads the CANTINA PERUANA’S kitchen. Born and raised in the north of Lima, Yuri studied Gastronomy in Escola D’Gallia and met Diego Muñoz in 2009 while doing his first professional internship at Miraflores Park Hotel’s kitchen. In 2012, Diego Muñoz invited Yuri to work on his new project: the restaurant Astrid & Gastón. In 2014, Yuri had already become a line chef at Astrid & Gastón’s Casa Moreyra, and he became the restaurant’s junior sous chef the following year. In January 2017, Yuri Herrera left Astrid & Gastón to embrace a new adventure in Lisbon and represent Diego Muñoz’ at CANTINA PERUANA.

PHOTO © BOA ONDA

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CANTINA PERUANA - BAIRRO DO AVILLEZ

Diego Muñoz divided CANTINA PERUANA’S menu into 6 worlds: Raw Cold World: Peruvian Shore, Red Hot Coals World: Lima’s Streets, Fried World: Cantina Peruana, Andean World: Ancient Culture, Wok World: Peru China, and Sweet World: Coast, Sierra and Jungle. This is the way the different techniques, influences and ingredients that coexist in Peruvian cuisine and contribute to its richness and diversity are presented. At CANTINA PERUANA, all the dishes are meant for sharing. The “Raw Cold Word: Peruvian Shore” reflects the strong bond Peruvians have with the ocean and includes the tiradito and the ceviche, Peru’s most emblematic dishes. At Cantina Peruana, ceviche will be prepared in a traditional manner and have a genuine flavour. The “Red Hot Coals World: Lima’s Streets” takes us to the flavours and aromas of the street BBQs which unite Peruvians around socialization and food - the anticuchos. In the “Fried World: Cantina Peruana”, we find traditional fried food served with different sauces that the Peruvians usually share.

DIEGO MUÑOZ PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

The “Andean World: Ancient Culture” reflects the close relationship Andean Peruvians have with nature and includes dishes with ingredients that Mother Earth, Pachamama, creates and sustains. In the “Wok World: Peru China” we have dishes of wok-cooked rice that result from the Chinese community’s influence in Peruvian gastronomy. Finally, the “Sweet World: Coast, Sierra and Jungle” includes desserts that reflect the confluence of the Inca and Spanish cultures. That’s the case for the Pisco Sour Sorbet, CANTINA’S freshet dessert, for the traditional Cherimoya Brittle, or for the Peruvian Chocolate Mousse, a rich, decadent dessert.

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PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

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CANTINA PERUANA - BAIRRO DO AVILLEZ

PISCO BAR LISBOA PHOTO © BOA ONDA

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PISCO BAR LISBOA PHOTO © BOA ONDA


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DIEGO MUÑOZ AND JOSÉ AVILLEZ PHOTO © JOSÉ AVILLEZ

“CANTINA PERUANA is a joyful place full of life. The menu invites you on to an adventure through the different cultures of Peru, with its abundance of flavours, aromas and cooking techniques. But the experience starts at PISCO BAR Lisboa, a unique bar, home to the best Peruvian cocktails: here, it’s ‘mandatory’ to taste, enjoy and socialize!”

At CANTINA PERUANA, the experience starts at PISCO BAR Lisboa, a unique bar that livens up the city’s days and nights. “Pisco is a spirit produced in Peru since the 16th century, it can be enjoyed either pure or in cocktails, and its perfect to pair with Peruvian gastronomy”, explains Diego Muñoz.

Diego further adds “PISCO BAR Lisboa is the best in town and here we find genuinely special cocktails that combine colour, freshness, flavour, tradition and creativity. They’re organized into 4 worlds: LOS SOURS, that are the most traditional and famous in Peru; LOS CHILCANOS, my favourites, which combine Pisco Acholado and ginger ale; LOS EXPLORADORES, where we’ve included an aperitif with ginjinha in homage to Lisbon called “Capitán Lisboa”, and finally, OTROS PERUANOS EN PORTUGAL, with a selection of gins, rums and Diego Muñoz pisco. At PISCO BAR Lisboa, it’s ‘mandatory’ to taste, enjoy and socialize!” WG August 2017 -

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MARTIN KLEIN - RESTAURANT IKARUS

ECKART WITZIGMANN, MARTIN KLEIN AND IKARUS CHEFS

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A FESTIVAL FOR GOURMETS Text Hangar-7 Photo © Helge Kirchberger Photography / Red Bull Hangar-7

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MARTIN KLEIN - RESTAURANT IKARUS

A new month, a new menu – this has been the motto of Restaurant Ikarus since 2003. In the festival month of August, the world’s most unusual brigade of chefs is once again taking the lead: under the management of Executive Chef Martin Klein and the patronage of Eckart Witzigmann, the Ikarus Team presents a menu that shows off all their skills. A menu that fully reflects Martin Klein’s culinary principles: product awareness, loving attention to detail, and integrity. Right from the start, the “guest chef” concept has been riding a wave of success. Originally set up by chef of the century Eckart Witzigmann, the concept is now managed by Martin Klein with Eckart Witzigmann in the role of patron. MARTIN KLEIN

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Born in Strasbourg, Martin Klein first managed Restaurant Marstall in Munich, where he won his first Michelin Star in 2002. The following year he started as chef de cuisine in Restaurant Ikarus, and was thus part of the original team. He worked here for a total of 9 years, with responsibility for culinary composition, until he changed direction in 2012 and spent a period of time on Laucala Island, an exclusive private island in the middle of the South Pacific. Returning to his “new old” home in January 2014, he has set himself the challenge of continuing the internationally renowned guest chef concept in Hangar-7 in the role of Executive Chef.


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MARTIN KLEIN - RESTAURANT IKARUS

During the Salzburg Festival month of August, the most exceptional chefs in the world will once again run the show: Under the supervision of Executive Chef Martin Klein and the patronage of Eckart Witzigmann, the Ikarus Team offers a menu which displays their skills to the fullest extent.

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A menu which is entirely influenced by Martin Klein’s culinary principles: product awareness, attention to detail, and honesty. WG August 2017 -

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MARTIN KLEIN - RESTAURANT IKARUS

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Martin Klein travels the world in search of top chefs. He gets to know all the guest chefs in their own kitchens, devising extraordinary menus with them for Restaurant Ikarus. He is assisted by chefs de cuisine Tommy Eder-Dananic and Jörg Bruch – both of whom have worked at Hangar-7 for over 12 years – and sous chefs Martin Ebert and Andreas Bitsch, who have also been at Restaurant Ikarus for over 10 years. Service manager Matthias Berger and restaurant manager Florian Kempinger ensure the general comfort of guests at Restaurant Ikarus. “The chance to work with a unique team on perhaps the most interesting gastronomic concept in the world is something that only comes once in a lifetime,” says the Executive Chef, with a note of awe in his voice. The team is hugely important to Martin Klein. Because the guest chefs change every month, the team has to be particularly flexible – while at the same time remaining true to their standard of total perfection. “What makes it special is that as a chef you cannot ever get used to anything. Other chefs have a schedule, and cook maybe 20 to 30 dishes a year. Here, we often cook that many dishes in a month!” A taste of the creations of what is possibly the world’s most exclusive chefs’ crew can be enjoyed by all when the Ikarus Team sets the tone for the Salzburg Festival in Restaurant Ikarus in Hangar-7 during August. Watch the “Culinary Heights at Ikarus” by the Ikarus Team on 17 August 2017 at 9:15 p.m. on ServusTV in Austria. WG August 2017 -

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Purest Mexican Cuisine Mexican born, Roberto Ruíz opened his first restaurant five years ago in Madrid, but his ties to the capital city began a decade ago. Roberto draws his inspirations from a broad range of flavours found in Mexican cuisine, interpreted from a cosmopolitan perspective. This allows for the inclusion of Spanish ingredients and a more contemporary style in the way that the dishes are presented, while scrupulously respecting the individual essence of each recipe.

ROBERTO RUÍZ Photo © Rodrigo Vázquez

Roberto’s cuisine respects traditional methods of Mexican cuisine, combining them with other innovative gastronomic techniques to obtain a unique style of cooking that is both individual and yet full of authentic Mexican flavours. Mixing modern and ancient techniques, the result is authentic flavors and a constantly evolving concept using only the best produce. Mexican cuisine has finally gained the recognition it is due in Spain and since opening in 2012, Punto MX became the first Mexican restaurant in Europe to receive a Michelin star and Mexican cuisine has finally gained the recognition it is due in Spain. WG August 2017 -

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ROBERTO RUÍZ

WG Magazine speaks with Roberto Ruíz… It’s interesting to learn how Chef’s find their passion for cooking and where they grew up. Tell us how you found your way into the culinary field to become one of the most sought-after Chef in the world! In my case there are several factors that have to do with it. My mother always offered us a meal of 3 or 4 dishes and made dessert every day, and I mean an elaborate dessert, even with decoration. She was so passionate about this and I enjoyed it. Twenty years ago it wasn’t a trend, it was an unknown trade, especially in Mexico. But on TV we saw European cuisine and it seemed fantastic. I know it’s naive but it seemed heroic being a young man of 14-15 years. I got kicked out of school, which was perfect for me, as I could work in the restaurant. At that time it was hard but I loved everything that happened and everything above it all to understand that cooking is just a part of everything behind a restaurant.

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BOCOL DE CANGREJO


WG MAGAZINE

In my house we are almost all economists; my father and my three brothers. So my attraction to the kitchen was not an inheritance. But it instantly caught my attention and I took it very seriously, although at that time there were no cooking schools. There was no way to study, so it was about learning by doing. What seemed like a punishment (working in the summer) for me was a prize. I got more involved and did very well in the restaurant. I was excited to cook, to transform. Turning tomatoes and onions into a sauce, even being a kid, it was the most interesting part. Then you learn technique, knives, fire, and knew that this was what I was meant to do. WG August 2017 -

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CHILPACHOLE, CAMARON, CHICHARRON DE BACON


WG MAGAZINE

Over the past five years you have transferred the purest taste of Mexico in your cooking, a focus on Mexican food rendered with modern techniques results in an extraordinary culinary innovations with a unique personality and authentic Mexican flavors. Even the tortillas are made using traditional methods and the ancient technique of nixtamalization... It’s a super complex machinery with the last step eventually being the restaurant. You have to generate the product, take corn for example – in Spain it is not easy to find it as they usually do not eat corn, so we had to start looking for suppliers, it was difficult so we decided to do it ourselves. In this case organic corn, which I believe is not even being considered in Mexico. Tortillas have never been made in Spain. That’s why our cuisine is special and unique; we sow the peppers, the tomatoes and so on. We have the best produce possible generated by us from seed. You pick it up and cut it at its best, as I wanted, a mix between tradition and avant-garde. Starting with the purism of the product and collection as romantic as possible. And then technique according to variations of climate to make it work well. In summer for example the mass behaves different from winter. It dehydrates faster because of the moisture and other factors. Gathering these elements thanks to the lack of the products, we found our common thread. We potentiated the recipes, improved them and understood that we had to do a Mexican cuisine without rooting. With tradition but without roots. More open to questioning, evolving and improving. We saw the opportunity to make simple but well-cooked cuisine with good products. This is how the kitchen of Punto MX was born, which we are feeding with more ingredients, a better garden, but always starting from the basis that you have to know Mexico - about the authenticity of the flavours. The existing Mexican food might look like, taste good, but it wasn’t what I ate in Mexico. Neither the tacos, nor the sauces, nor the moles... And this was what I wanted to convey in the restaurant. It has become an obsession. Today this is still the case. We are the only restaurant that makes tortillas with nixtamalization and for these details we highlight the virtues that put the Mexican cuisine in high.

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One has to start somewhere… Roberto Ruíz speaks about his culinary experiences which has made him a chef today… Coming to Spain marked my professional career without a doubt, seeing the techniques used and management of a kitchen was completely different from Mexico. The rhythm, the seriousness of the people, in Mexico we are more informal, we listen to music, even dancing! Here, instead, it’s almost a military theme, it is a permanent battle, be silent, uniformed, concentrated. I discovered all the details that make the difference between a trade and a profession. Entering a professional kitchen, I fell in love with it, this made me leave my country, my restaurant, my family, my wife… I was dazzled. Having the privilege of working at El Bodegón, (which no longer exists) living the technique and consistency helped me to discover the potential of traditional Mexican Cuisine.

I wanted to give prominence to this incredible distillate, the mezcal. Mezcal was at that time an absolute stranger to Spain and most of the European continent, so it was an opportunity to tell a story about Mexico, which would also give us strength as a restaurant. We would tell the best version of Mexico that we knew and dedicate an extra space with the idea of a bar where you could eat some guacamole or snack on something. But suddenly we saw a full restaurant with waiting lists that helped us as a filter to meet the demand we couldn’t. So our informal offer, like a taqueria, was mixed with mezcal. Eating with a distillate of 40 percent of alcohol seemed very rare, so we developed a cocktail line with Mezcals and this made it at that time the only mixing bar in Madrid with a unique collection of Mezcales.

Tell us about your Mezcal Lab which makes a complete Mexican experience and having the most Like fx. our Mezcaliña (caipirinha and mezcal); one unique collection in Europe… of those that tells a story of Mexico. Additionally The vocation of the Mezcal Lab was born for the the social responsibility theme, working directly purpose that the word “unique” referred to the with a community of Oaxaca, producers that helps DNA of the restaurant. The only Mexican restaurant giving us the opportunity to offer unique copies. in the Salamanca neighborhood, the only Mexican We have 112 different references of Mezcal, we restaurant that made its tortillas, the only Mexican have all varieties, all denominations of origin and restaurant that made the guacamole at the table … all techniques. Even in Mexico it would be difficult to find a similar collection. For example we have Continuing with the only… in Spain the bad the Ojo de Dios, that there are only 5 bottles in drunkenness were with the tequila they put on a the world, and we have all 5 of them. Something helmet and gave you a blow on the head, its used, very authentic that complements our tradition. seen and valued in a different way. I wanted to tell Discovering the potential of that distillate in 2005 a different story and instead of betting with tequila, was very unique!

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COCTELES MEZCAL LAB

MEZCAL SOUR

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QUESADILLA DE FLOR DE CALABAZA Y HUITLACOCHE

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TUÉTANO A LA BRASA


WG MAGAZINE

Roberto Ruíz describes his culinary philosophy, and take us through the process of creating a new dish…

tacos of the shepherd of Iberian pork of acorn. They are two great products, taken to our land.

The first thing is the taste, we can’t build a dish by sacrificing flavours. The MX equation is based on a traditional Mexican recipe, questioning the ingredients, especially the proteins to focus on the Mediterranean area. By following these three rules we make unique dishes. Except for the “cochinita pibil” which is interpreted. Our menu is our version. It is no longer eaten like that in Mexico.

You think about a dish for several days, but the inspiration comes in a second. It’s a flash that tells you “this is it” and that’s where you develop the idea. That’s what happened with one of our best dishes in Punto MX, the marrow. It’s emblematic.

It’s Mexican food, from Spain. It’s Mexican food that can only happen here because of its Mediterranean ingredients but always with Mexican techniques. It’s a return kitchen. I call it The Reconquest. Bring everything we have there, using their incredible products. From there comes the taco of ribeye or the

Ingredients that inspire Roberto Ruíz… It has got to be the Habanero peppers and corn. The habanero pepper is curious because it’s the most powerful chili in Mexico but it is also most graceful in summer for ceviche’s and aguachile. The corn of course, we grow it in our orchard and it is the best maize for our tortillas. This season we will have incredible scallops and the seafood has caught my attention for a new menu.

MOLE MEGRO JUANA MAYA

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Your greatest influence in the kitchen… In Mexico it’s usually the family. I was fortunate that my mother and my aunts cooked very well. Back then there weren’t any great restaurants or chefs of Mexican cuisine. But French Cuisine I think has always been a great reference. Restaurants like Champs de Elysees in Mexico was amazing for me; to see the chef, the silver spoons ... Things you normally didn’t see at home, it made you think if these people really lived like this and it caught my attention. Produce, Creativity or Technique… Not to say that the 3 equally, would be 30 - 40 - 30, giving priority to creativity, but you have to combine all 3. And I would add skill and management that is something few know and apply, when you have 1 or 5 restaurants. If you don’t know about management, it will surely be complicated.

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Five years on… The only Mexican restaurant with a Michelin star in Europe and in the dining destination of the world ‘Spain’ - what keeps you motivated? I got something I didn’t intend to get, the Michelin star for example. We weren’t looking for it. So now, I want to get things. Get change, dynamism, make decisions. For example having resettled the restaurant on its fifth anniversary, switch to tasting menu. I don’t want to go back to the previous thing. Not because it wasn’t good, but it doesn’t appeal to me anymore. I think you have to evolve and if you don’t have the same interest, you don’t give your best. You take the head off the beast and build another, at your will and desire. Modify staff, dishes, communication, menu, etc. That day to day emotions, understanding each service and being in control it, the season is over and you have to change everything again. That’s motivation. A start of zero daily.

LIMÓN VERDE

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HARALD BRESSELSCHMIDT

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HARALD BRESSELSCHMIDT Harald Bresselschmidt has earned worldwide recognition as the owner and chef of Aubergine Restaurant, a gastronomic highlight of Cape Town. “When I was 11 years old, I cooked an elaborate Christmas feast for my family and it was then that I knew that would be a Chef�. Harald began his culinary studies at 14 and achieved his Diploma by just 17 years old making him the youngest chef in the region. Growing up on the family farm in the pristine Eifel region of Germany instilled in him a love for nature and an appreciation for natural produce. His early experiences in a small hotel near Esternach on the Luxembourg border taught him the basics of classical cuisine and impressed upon him the value of making everything from scratch. The following 11 years saw Harald working in kitchens in Germany, Holland, London and Switzerland before being awarded his Masters of Gastronomy and Kitchen Management from the Heidelberg Hotel School.

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When the famed Grand Roche Hotel of Paarl came to Germany scouting for a new head chef, Harald jumped at the chance of a new adventure. He arrived in South Africa in 1992 on a 2-year contract, fell in love with the country and met his wife to be. Thereafter Harald spent a year cooking in France followed by a brief stint at Rhebokskloof Wine Farm while looking for premises to house his own restaurant.

AUBERGINE DINING ROOM

In the historic Gardens area he found a charming old building. Once the home of the first Chief Justice of the Cape, the building has a rich epicurean legacy. Harald felt a resonance between the classic ambience and his personal style and opened Aubergine Restaurant in 1996. The name Aubergine stems from a love of the vegetable. He is inspired by the contrast between the dark skin and light flesh and has incorporated Aubergines into a number of his signature dishes. Initially many of the ingredients we take for granted today, were not available in South Africa. As new items such as Kalahari truffles, Asian vegetables and farmed abalone became available Harald introduced them into his dishes. His cuisine is constantly evolving, but a classic base underlies all the innovations and he places great importance on keeping foods in as natural a form as possible. He strives to maintain the texture and flavor of ingredients and enhance them through marination.

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THE BEST OF RABBIT WITH WHITE BEANS AND PUREE, SPINACH SALAD WITH PUMPKIN SEEDS AND FRIED POTATO DISCS

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DUCK LIVER PARFAIT WRAPPED IN BAUMKUCHEN TOPPED WITH PISTACHIO NUTS AND SET ON A RIESLING GELEE

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MASALA-STYLE YELLOWTAIL WITH DHAL VADDES AND YOGHURT RAITA


WG MAGAZINE

WG magazine speaks with Harald Bresselschmidt… Harald’s passion for cooking… I was born in the pristine Eifel Region of Germany close to the Belgian border. As a child I was strongly influenced by life on a working dairy farm, instilling in me a love of the land and an appreciation for fresh produce. When I was 11 years old, I cooked an elaborate Christmas feast for my family and it was then that I knew that I would be a Chef. I began my culinary studies at 14 and achieved my Chef’s Diploma at just 17 years old. Your cuisine is constantly evolving, keeping the food in its natural form as possible. A composition of textures, flavors enhanced through marination and in perfect harmony on each plate… I use a variety of vegetables and in-season mushrooms in a dish and usually two sauces, juices or oils. A plate should keep evolving with different flavours until the very last mouthful. If you layer a dish in this way with different flavours then a good structured wine will also pair with it beautifully. We steer away from minimalistic protein-driven combinations. WG August 2017 -

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You learned the basics of classical cuisine which then took you kitchen in Germany, Holland, London and Switzerland… Gaining experience by working with good chefs is a key for one’s preparation to be a creative chef and one who is prepared for the challenges a chef’s life.

AUBERGINE DINING ROOM

I can create dishes just by looking at ingredients as I know exactly how they will evolve, look and taste. This helps greatly with my food and wine pairing where I often taste wines weeks before a function and then execute the pairing dishes on the day. The process of creating a new dish… Often the best dishes I create are those ‘A la minute’ as the fresh ingredients arrive in the kitchen. I do not create a dish to be on the menu for long periods of time, mainly because the seasons change rather quickly here in South Africa. I do not specifically therefore ‘design’ dishes but rather create them intuitively and in anticipation of how I would love to enjoy them.

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RACK OF WILD BOAR WITH SOUR FIG SAUCE, PERSIMMON & BRUSSELS SPROUTS

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WILDEBEEST SEARED IN A BLACK PEPPER & CORIANDER CRUST WITH ARTICHOKE CONFIT AND RASPBERRY-BALSAMIC VINAIGRETTE


WG MAGAZINE

Ingredients that inspire you and your favourite ingredients… Locally grown Black Perigord Truffles are now being harvested in South Africa. They bring back memories from my earlier years in Europe cooking with truffles. Oils, vinegars and other sources of acidity; aubergines for their versatility; mushrooms for texture and as a wine pairing component; venison and seafood are also inspiring and Indian spices an absolute necessity. Special cooking techniques… Curing of ingredients to solidify the texture. A Sous Vide bath as a vehicle but not as a complete cooking method. What keeps you motivated?

CRAYFISH WITH SALMON ROE, FRIED LETTUCE AND ORANGE SAUCE

Running my restaurant so that it stays successful. Teaching, mentoring and guiding the next generation Being a chef is perceived as a glamorous profession, your advice to chefs entering the kitchen for the first time… That chefs are craftsmen and not born artists. Too much of the bright lights and ‘glamour’ as a chef and restaurateur detracts from the raison d’etre of being a chef, one who is close to the stove. And this is my motto. WG August 2017 -

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UROŠ FAKUČ LIVING HIS DREAM! The rising star of Slovenian gastronomy, with his imaginative dishes and a passion for raw seafood, where the fresh and traceable raw material is the most important component for the perfection of the plate. Innovative and boldly combining ingredients, an excellent combinations of flavors…

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WG Magazine had an opportunity to speak with Uroš Fakuč… Your passion for cooking - tell us how did you find your way into the culinary field to become one of the most sought-after chefs in Slovenia? My parents had a grocery store, with a butcher shop, delicatessen and a buffet, in the suburbs of Nova Gorica, a border-town, which grew only after the Second World War, when Gorizia belonged to Italy. It was a store for neighbor’s when there were no big shopping malls yet. Here, I grew up around prosciutto, salami, cheeses, the smells of fresh bread and everyday purchases, during conversations between locals about food, dishes, and specialties. As a child, I knew about meat processing and learned to recognize the fresh odors of seas and seafood. When I was growing up, I began to get to know the wine, because here in our country, near the Goriška Brda and the Vipava Valley, the wine culture is well developed, so I first became a sommelier. But since I was creative and dynamic since the early days, and top-notch, local, fresh ingredients were in my genes, I always wanted to have a restaurant, where I could apply my philosophy and impress my guests. That’s how it started 27 years ago, from this desire, which turned into a goal, I first started a wine bar in 2006, which, as the guests so wanted and then quickly turned it into a restaurant. I actually live my dream. WG August 2017 -

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Your cuisine is focused and inspired by a combination of fresh and quality ingredients, creative with the finest produce, creating a composition of flavours which is complex and modest yet impeccably balanced… I stick to the basic rule, which means that less is more. First, I choose the main ingredient, only one, and then I experiment with it for a long time to achieve the desired balance. The superiority, the quality of this main ingredient is essential. Such can only be fresh and local ingredients.

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Take us through your culinary experiences which helped who you are as a chef today? In fact, I am self-taught, because I did not start in the kitchen, but in the organization. First of all, my parents had a restaurant on the Slovenian side of Collio, in the center of Goriťka Brda, on the main square of Dobrovo, that I headed at 22. This was a simple inn with home-made Brda dishes for local guests. Here I first met with a cooking process, but as a boss, not a chef, so I could only be less or more satisfied. That is why I decided learn the hospitality business from the best, so I went to work for the famous Italian chef Gualtiero Marchesi, at his then restaurant in Franciacorta, at the Relais & Chateau L’Albereta. I wanted to get to know the whole process, so I worked both in the kitchen and front of house for almost a year. Guests wanted more and more creative, different, new dishes. Although having a team in the kitchen, I realized that I could only realize my ideas as a chef. Therefore, with a lot of creativity to pursue my goals, it took hard work, self-sacrifice, perseverance, consistency, and also denial. Now I am a chef in my own restaurant‌

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Your culinary philosophy, and take us through the process of creating a dish… My passion is raw seafood, where the fresh and traceable raw material is the most important component for completing the plate. For raw food, it is essential that I get the best raw material, whether it’s local or global. Therefore, I carefully choose my suppliers and follow the origin of their food. It is important where the fish are grown, how fishermen handle the catch or clean the tuna already on board when the fish was frozen. All this effects the flavours of the raw ingredient, and afterward, it requires no more than just a little salt, pepper, and excellent oil. A special challenge is also finding new ingredients that emphasize the basic raw material. In addition to the quality of ingredients, my cuisine is also based on the experimentation of new flavours. I do not offer traditional dishes in a classic way, but rather combining innovative and boldly ingredients and trying to surprise with combinations of different flavours. I find the inspiration for new meals constantly and everywhere, on trips, in the scents surrounding me, during a nightly discussion with a friend who is also a chef.

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Your favorite ingredients you like working with… My favorite ingredients are everything offered by the sea, fish, crustaceans, mollusks. I also prefer to produce fresh and seasoned vegetables and herbs alone, but lately, I am also discovering local, wild herbs. The most challenging ingredient to work with… At present, I am very devoted to rice and techniques of cooking rice. Now I’m just starting to understand why cooking rice in Japan is such an art. Rice really became my great cooking challenge, which is discovering something new every day and offering new riddles for solving. Your greatest influence in the kitchen… The school of my life was definitely working with Gualtiero Marchesi, where I got to know more about the avant-garde cuisine. This is where I realized how important details are, how essential is excellence, both of ingredients and handling them. It shaped me like a chef, and it will stay with me forever.

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Special cooking techniques… Modern cooking techniques are important, however, the most important are ingredients! They decide which technique I will use, which is emphasized by their excellence. Therefore, techniques are only the necessity for achieving the best result. And that’s why I use what I need most, slow cooking, smoking, dehydrating, emulsifying, marinating.

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How do you stay on top of the new cooking trends? Reading and learning a lot, I attend presentations of new devices, techniques, ingredients, and I also like to exchange experience with my colleagues, most of all within JRE, both within Slovenia and internationally. Traveling is essential, even though the chefs are always running out of time. But it is therefore important that we take this time to stop, rethink, study, experiment, but not with guests, but for guests. What motivates you at this point of your career? My greatest motivation is a satisfied guest, I work bother and live my dream for him!

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FREDERIC MORINEAU

FREDERIC MORINEAU Maître Cuisinier

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Born in France and educated in both France and England, Frederic Morineau has presided in the kitchens of some of Europe and the Caribbean’s finest four and five star dining establishments. When an ad in a newspaper attracted him to a chef’s position at restaurant in Aspen, Colorado, he secured the job and moved from Europe to Colorado. While living in Aspen, he was invited by a co-worker to visit a Ritz-Carlton hotel which had just opened. As soon as he walked in, Chef Morineau knew he wanted to work at a RitzCarlton hotel. Since then, he has overseen many Ritz-Carlton premium culinary divisions including those of The Ritz-Carlton Buckhead, Atlanta, Sarasota and now Grand Cayman, where he has won numerous service and leadership accolades. In 2011 he was invited into the ranks of one of the most prestigious associations of chefs in the world: the Maîtres Cuisiniers de France. He is only the second Maître Cuisinier presently working in the Caribbean. WG Magazine speaks with Frederic Morineau… Chef Morineau tells how he found his passion into the culinary field to become one of the most sought-after chefs! I guess it is in my blood! My great grandfather was a pastry chef, owned several shops, my grandfather was a chef and his daughter, my mom, wanted to be a chef too, but in France in the 60’s it was unheard for a woman to be in a professional kitchen, so instead she married my father and cooked for him and for their friends every weekend. At the young age of six I was the official sommelier of our house, picking up wine from my father’s cellar and serving it with great ceremony to our guests, later when my grades in school were not the best, it was natural that I joined the family tradition.


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TAIKUN

You started off with a chef’s position in Aspen, later joined Ritz-Carlton hotels in Buckhead, Atlanta and Sarasota… Yes, it is an amazing story. I was hired by a French Chef, Maurice Couturier, who owned at a time three restaurants in Snowmass, Colorado. I arrived for the first time in the US in December 1992 and found that the biggest challenge for a European chef to work on this side of the world to learn how to cook and prep fast. The three hours that a French guest usually requires for his dinner, in the US it is divided by half, so you have to learn to be quick and be able to produce more; that is what I first learned with Maurice Couturier. After my first week on the job, I was so tired that I almost decided to go back to France but instead the bartender told me “let’s go and have a drink at the newest hotel that just opened in Aspen”. I walked into that place and practically fell in love with it, I told myself that this was the environment that I should strive for, and that brand new Hotel was “The Ritz-Carlton, Aspen“. Lucky for me the Executive Chef at the time, who later became my mentor, was Xavier Salomon (a legend in the company) and was also a good friend to my boss, so it took me two more years before I was able to join but I finally did it in January 1996 at The Ritz-Carlton, Buckhead, the flagship of The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company at that time.

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I believe in maintaining a positive working environment, so in our kitchens there is no yelling, no hitting and certainly no discrimination, but instead a reinforcement of “What are we here for? To create excellence.”

Quality cuisine which offers an excellent dining experience, inspired by the highest quality of finest produce - how do you ensure this balance on a plate across all your restaurants?

At The Ritz Carlton Grand Cayman, we have five very different restaurants: fine-dining at Blue by Eric Ripert, Italian at Andiamo, Steakhouse at Seven, Japanese at Taikun and casual fare at Bar Jack. The key is to make sure that each restaurant offers a different theme, atmosphere and a different level Frederic Morineau of sophistication, but all should offer the same level of attention to details, innovation, service and quality of products. Our average customer stay is Chef Frederic Morineau tells us about his culinary 5 days so they should be exposed to five different experiences while having dinner with us and without experiences… the need to leave our resort. In the Kitchen, your chef is not only your work leader, but he is also a father figure, your personal life As the Executive Chef with responsibilities of coach and sometimes he also becomes your best overseeing and co-ordinating staff at The Ritzfriend. Each chef that I worked for in my career (34 Carlton, Grand Cayman, how do you ensure the years) had great strengths but also weaknesses; the highest quality is constantly maintained? game is to forget the weakness and instead focus on the strength, so after each leadership that you By using the famous and oldest technique “Check experience, you forge in your head who you will be what you expect” every day. I usually tour all my as an executive chef, telling yourself “I will not act kitchens 3 to 4 times a day and along the way I like him in these circumstances, but on the contrary observe, taste and critique what I see to the respective will reuse this great process that I learned from the chef of the outlet. At least once a month I sit down for a meal in each restaurant to understand what same leader.” our guests are experiencing. I also work with some The chef who really made me who I am today is great food purveyor, some for more than 20 years Xavier Salomon. When I started working with him due to the quality and consistency of what they I had no clue about luxury hospitality, and he offer. I believe in maintaining a positive working taught me organization, details, innovation, and environment, so in our kitchens there is no yelling, most importantly how to survive in a luxury hotel no hitting and certainly no discrimination, but environment, how to deal with a guest’s complaint, instead a reinforcement of “What are we here for? how to respond to your General Manager’s/ To create excellence.” and I always tell my staff, Owner’s expectations, how to keep your employee “Put yourself in the shoes of the guest, if you were satisfied and focus and how to have fun with it at paying a $1000 for a hotel room per night what would be a perfect meal for you?” the same time. WG August 2017 -

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BLUE BY ERIC RIPERT

Chef Morineau describes his culinary philosophy‌ First we want our guests to travel through their dining experiences, so we want to make sure that in the Cayman Islands they do not have the same meal that they could have in New York. Each dish should have something that reminds them that we are in the Caribbean or that fits the theme and ambiance of the outlet. Using Fresh quality ingredients is another key and finally simple but consistent technics, sometimes innovation, as we are introducing slowly but surely in our effort the Sous Vide Cooking method which enables you to serve a beautiful product, in a timely manner, eliminates the stress in the kitchen and the food waste.

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SEVEN

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Your favorite comfort food away from work… I cook for my family on Sundays what my mum was cooking for us at home - traditional Home French Cuisine ‘endives aux gratin’ and roasted chicken with prunes and chestnuts. Rabbit with mustard sauce and spaghetti or ‘blanquette de veau’.

ANDIAMO

What does Frederic Morineau do when he needs a break? I love to travel with my wife and two sons. Living on an island is sometimes a little repetitive so we try to go somewhere every two months. Next week we are on our way to the Almafi Coast, it should be fun.

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BAR JACK

A successful chef - what keeps you motivated at this point of your career? Two things: Training the next generation of executive chefs for The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company. For instance, after two years of loyal services, my executive sous chef Sven Wunram is getting promoted to executive chef for the new-to-open The Ritz-Carlton, Tenjin in China. The second is making sure I keep my job to pay for my two sons’ upcoming university tuition! Maîtres Cuisiniers de France and the only second Maîtres Cuisiniers in the Caribbean’s - what was the feeling in 2011 to be inducted in this most prestigious associations of chefs in the world? Very proud and humble to be part of such organization that includes prestigious members as Eric Ripert and Daniel Boulud, but most importantly the networking is just amazing. WG August 2017 -

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THOMAS SEIFRIED

Beginning his illustrious career in Europe, Austrianborn Thomas Seifried worked in some of the world’s most respected restaurants including one Michelin star Le Ciel in Vienna and Atelier the two Michelin star restaurant in Munich. In 2013, Seifried joined The Ritz-Carlton, Grand Cayman after serving as Chef de Cuisine for Sand at The Ritz-Carlton, Sanya in China. At The Ritz-Carlton, Grand Cayman, he works under the guidance of Eric Ripert of New York’s famed three Michelin star Le Bernardin to create an unforgettable dining experience at Blue by Eric Ripert. In 2015, Thomas Seifried became the youngest chef to win Austria’s coveted “Golden Cloche” award, which is presented to chefs who perform abroad at the highest level. WG Magazine catches up with Thomas Seifried… It’s interesting to learn how Chef’s find their passion for cooking and where they grew up. Tell us how you found your way into the culinary field? Thomas Seifried grew up in a gastronomic family, his parents owned a restaurant, where his mother was handled the kitchen and my father the front of house. Showing an early interest of working in the kitchen, he had the support of his parents. At 15, he decided to do his apprenticeship at Laerchenhof in Seefeld, Tirol which was a 7 hours’ drive from his hometown. “I was the only apprentice there for 3 years in which I learned a lot and I’m still very appreciative for this education” says Thomas.

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BREAD CRUSTED SNAPPER, IBERICO, PIQUILLO PEPPER, SAFFRON EMULSION


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Thomas Seifried’s exquisite sea food menu is inspired by seasonal and natural produce each dish is unique, tasteful with his masterful techniques… In a seafood restaurant you have to be very sensitive with the creations because seafood itself is very delicate and fragile. It is a delicatessen on its own and we are working around that to enhance the natural flavours and texture of the product. You have to respect & understand the product you are dealing with (is it fatty, grainy, lean, flaky, etc.) and then you start with applying the technique how to cook the fish and after that we start working on the sauce and garnish. At the end of the day our philosophy is “The Fish is the Star on the Plate” and all what goes with it is to enhance the flavour of the main product.

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Thomas shares his culinary experience, he takes us to Le Ciel in Vienna and the two Michelin star restaurant Atelier in Munich… Restaurant Le Ciel was my first fine dining experience as a young cook and it changed my outlook regarding cooking. My chef, Jaqueline Pfeiffer (it was not a Toni Mörwald restaurant at this time), was very dedicated and drove us to perfection every day. I started there as a commis de cuisine and worked my way up to Sous Chef within 4 years. To this day I’m very thankful to Chef Pfeiffer and her teaching skills. After Le Ciel I got my first Chef de Cuisine job as part of the opening team of a hotel called The Ring with the restaurant At Eight. The Restaurant received 2 toques from Gault Millau after only a year and a half in operation which made me the youngest chef in the city at this time to receive this honour. Then I moved on to the Executive Chef position for Hotel Zur Tenne in Kitzbühel which is one of the most historic and known Hotels in Austria. Restaurant Atelier in Munich was part of the same portfolio and I’ve spend some stages in this restaurant to enhance my skills and share experiences with former Chef Stefan Mezger (now the Executive Chef for the two Michelin-starred Restaurant Heinz Winkler). After I got an offer from The Ritz-Carlton, I moved to Sanya in China to run the Seafood Restaurant “Sand” at The Ritz-Carlton, Sanya.

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OCTOPUS A LA PLANCHA

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HALIBUT (POACHED) MUSHROOMS, TRUFFLE, PARSNIP EMULSION


WG MAGAZINE

POACHED SCALLOP, TURNIPS, SMOKED BUTTER EMULSION

Thomas Seifried describes his culinary philosophy, and take us through the process of creating a dish… Like mentioned before, there is a credo in Blue by Eric Ripert and Le Bernardin that states “The Fish is The Star on the Plate”. Whatever we pair or garnish with the fish is there to elevate the Main Product. We don’t believe in putting too much on the plate or doing certain steps just for presentation purposes… Perfect Product, Perfect Technique, Perfect Taste is the Goal. Presentation is very important but secondary. The key is not to overcomplicate. WG August 2017 -

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Ingredients that inspire Thomas Seifried, his favourite ingredients and ingredients that he has not mastered… I’m inspired every day by the local seafood, veggies and fruits we are getting here on the Cayman Islands like Conch, Spiny Lobster, Wahoo, and the Tuna, which is just fabulous. We try to use as much local as we can and use French Techniques to make something new and exciting. I love to work with caviar and truffle, and pretty much everything the ocean gives us to work with as long it is sustainable.

BLUE BY ERIC RIPERT

The Pastry Section and especially working with chocolate - when it comes to that I’m not the right guy to ask for advice. Special cooking techniques, kitchen equipment… I’m not a big fan of fancy kitchen equipment, I love my knives, cast iron pan and my French top stove. The same when it comes to techniques such as poaching, baking, pan searing, “a la plancha”, etc. Produce, Creativity or Technique… Always the produce, because it’s not worth to put any effort, creativity or knowledge in a product which is not up to standard.

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FLUKE: CONCH, CUCUMBER, QUINOA AND AGUACHILE

TUNA FOIE GRAS

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Greatest influence in the kitchen‌ My team, I’m very fortunate to have people in my kitchen who are coming from all over the world and each of them have a different opinion and outlook on a product. We combine this diversity and try every day to make the best dish possible.

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The youngest chef in 2015 to win Austria’s converted Golden Cloche award – What was the feeling and what keeps you motivated at this point of your career? I was very honoured to get this kind of recognition this early in my career and being part of a List of Award Winners such as Heinz Reitbauer, Eckart Witzigmann, and Dieter Koschina. Being in the kitchen every day, working with an incredible team, creating, and at the end of the day give my guests a very unique dining experience, this keeps me motivated every day and there are many, many more years to come. Being a chef is perceived as a glamorous profession, what is your advice to chefs entering the kitchen for the first time? Dedication, dedication, dedication. Don’t worry about long hours or no weekends off. If you love this job (and I believe you do) eventually it will love you back and then you have the opportunity to do, see and create things you never imagined.

CARAMEL EGG

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WG MAGAZINE

Head bartender at Seoul’s Charles. H, talks accents, ingredients, and the key to a great cocktail!

LORENZO ANTINORINI Around the World in Fifty Drinks...

Currently 27th on Asia’s 50 Best Bars list, Charles H. at the luxurious Four Seasons hotel in Seoul is no ordinary speakeasy. Launched in 2015 by Christopher Lowder, the bar is named after Charles H. Baker - a legendary American author and explorer, famed for his travels around the world in search of the perfect cocktail. Oozing low-key glamour and 1920s New York ambience, Charles H’s exciting menu offers a round-the-world trip of exotic drinks, each with their own lively tale. We chat to current head bartender Lorenzo Antinorini, who flew to Seoul from London to headup the bar earlier this year. Tell us how you found your way to becoming a top mixologist.

I started a part time job as glass collector in a little bar in Rome while studying Law at university. I realized quickly that it was much more fun working TEXT RHIANNON SHEPHERD behind a bar than in a court of law, and that I could enjoy a productive mixology career. It hasn’t been so easy, however, convincing my mum of my choice! WG August 2017 -

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CHARLES H.

How did you find your way to Charles H.? I read about Charles H. in Seoul while working at the Dandelyan at the Mondrian London. I was fascinated by the idea of running a bar in Seoul. It began as somewhat of a fantasy, but then turned into serendipity. I’ve been here 5 months now! Your approach to mixing signature drinks features complex flavours, textures, aromas and working with different ingredients… how do you bring about this balance of different aromas in the glass? I believe the key to a great tasting and aromatic cocktail is to fully understand each of the ingredients in the glass, as well as having in mind a clear, final goal of what it is you want to achieve with that drink. Cocktails are based on ‘structures.’ Once this is understood, it is important to build layer upon layer of flavour. Could you share the process of creating a new cocktail and your philosophy? Every drink needs to have a story, to trigger the drinkers’ curiosity. I am inspired by many different things: gastronomy, nature, history. It is much easier to explain a drink with real ‘meaning’ to a guest, as opposed to simply chucking a few ingredients into a shaker and hoping for the best!

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In your opinion, what makes a good bartender? A personality, and fantastic hosting skills. What are your favorite bars besides Charles. H? I really love Southside Parlour in Seoul. I am a fan of the American Bar at the Savoy Hotel in London, and Attaboy in NYC. What do you predict is the next big thing in the cocktail world? An increased focus on regionality and locally sourced products is going to be big soon. I believe there will probably be a trend for ‘healthier’ cocktails, too.

WELLINGTON TEA PUNCH

What is the coolest cocktail name you’ve evert come up with, and what inspired it? “3AM: 3 Ways Apple Martini.” This was an apple Martini which used 3 different part of an apple in three different ways: the skin, the pulp and apple leaves What has been your most unusual drink request? A virgin strawberry daiquiri! What is your secret weapon behind the bar? I’d like to think my accent! Just kidding ... no secret weapons, just genuine hospitality. BOROCAY OLD FASHIONED

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WG MAGAZINE JANUARY 2017

2016 A COLLECTIVE OF CHEFS

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2016 GELINAZ! WWW.WGMAGAZINES.COM

www.gelinaz.com

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a feast for the palate...

a feast for the palate...

GÉRALD PASSEDAT

PIERRE GAGNAIRE

YANNICK ALLÉNO®

LE PETIT NICE

A CULINARY HYPOTHESIS

REIF OTHMAN

ANDREA BERTON

EXTRACTIONS A REAFFIRMATION OF TASTE

A MASTERFUL TOUCH

MEDITTERASIAN CUISINE

DAVIDE SCABIN

PACO TORREBLANCA

UP&DOWN

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MAESTRO PASTELERO

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a feast for the palate...

a feast for the palate...

ALBERT ADRIÀ

Tickets To 50 Days

RICHARD SANDOVAL A Mexican Flair

ANNE-SOPHIE PIC

ENRIQUE OLVERA

The Artist With Flavours

MEXICO’S GASTRONOMY

ANDRÉ CHIANG Eight Elements

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MARGOT JANSE

The Magic Of The Kitchen www.wgmagazines.com

DAVID TOUTAIN The World’s Most Gifted Chef WG June 2016 -

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JORDI ROCA

A SWEET PERFECTIONIST www.wgmagazines.com

WORLD’S BEST RESTAURANTS1 WG January 2017 -

ANDREAS CAMINADA A CULINARY GENIUS www.wgmagazines.com

SØREN SELIN

PURE FLAVOR CONCEPT

PAOLO CASAGRANDE

GASTRONOMIC EXPERIENCE WG December 2016 -

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WG Magazine August 2017 Issue