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2011

WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS ASSOCIATION

A N N U A L

R E P O R T


Western National Parks Association

OUR VISION

Western National Parks Association believes all humanity will find peace in spirit, cultural touchstones, historical knowledge, and grace in nature through our national parks. WNPA will connect everyone—emotionally and intellectually—to the inherent value of national parks by offering bold innovation, providing real and virtual experiences, and effectively telling compelling park interpretive stories. By the 100th anniversary of the establishment of the National Park Service in 2016: • WNPA philanthropic dollars will significantly enhance interpretation, education, and research in parks in new and impactful ways. • WNPA’s national park stores will have “something for everyone”—a wide range of products that provide long-term meaning and connections to parks. • WNPA will provide in-park experiences to nontraditional visitors, particularly urban and diverse youth, to create lifelong experiences and instill values that will be passed down through generations. • WNPA investments in research will yield important results to parks and the National Park System as a whole.

In the spring of 2011, the WNPA board of directors met with National Park Service employees at John Muir National Historic Site in Martinez, California. They are pictured here at the Vincente Martinez Adobe ranch house, built in 1849. Cover: Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Colorado. In 2011 WNPA funded a project at the park that produced a geological map and assessment of the area burned by the Medano Fire of 2010.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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LETTER FROM THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIR

OUR MISSION In partnership with the National Park Service since 1938, Western National Parks Association advances education, interpretation, research, and community engagement to ensure that national parks are increasingly valued by everyone. Adopted May 20, 2012

ABOUT WNPA Western National Parks Association is a nonprofit education partner of the National Park Service, with sixty-six affiliated sites throughout twelve western states. Headquartered in Tucson, Arizona, the association was founded in 1938 to support the interpretive activities of the National Park Service. In addition to developing educational products and publications, WNPA supports park research and helps fund programs that make park visits more meaningful.

FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS (2009–11), it has been my pleasure to serve as board chair of Western National Parks Association during a particularly important time in the organization’s history. Changes in leadership are always tricky, and when longtime Executive Director LeAnn Simpson decided to step down in the fall of 2010, there was understandable trepidation by both board and staff. But in the proud traditions of WNPA, everyone pulled together throughout the selection process, and James E. Cook was named executive director early in 2011. Together, James, the board, the rest of the staff, and the regional leadership of the National Park Service faced budgetary challenges that this proud partner had never before faced. Despite such constraints, WNPA continued and built on many of its core activities supporting the association’s programs. I think you will find it a testimony to hard work and dedication—by staff, board, and our National Park Service partners. In 2011 the association continued its cornerstone aid to national parks, providing more than $4.3 million in direct financial assistance, research grants, and in-kind donations (including information services and national park-store staff, professional publishing activities, and much more). The association also published books and created educational products that were sold to park visitors and other national park enthusiasts, engaged communities through a wide variety of outreach activities, and operated more than eighty stores in its affiliated parks and home office in Tucson, Arizona. For seventy-three years, WNPA has remained a steady, reliable, critically important partner of the National Park Service. The year 2011 saw the association move strongly forward under new leadership to strengthen this partnership while maintaining the long-term health of the organization. The future looks bright, indeed. And, like a proud parent, I applaud the results reported here. — Karen Wade

WNPA by the Numbers

73 66 57 12 80 100 1.9 64

73-year partnership with the National Park Service

66 national parks supported by WNPA

57 parks at which WNPA provides the visitor center staff

12 states in the WNPA network

80 visitor centers with WNPA stores

$100+ thousand in free publications provided

$1.9 million in research aid provided

$64 million in park aid provided


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W E S T E R N N ATI O N AL PA RK S A SS O C IAT IO N

Funding for Parks WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS ASSOCIATION has been committed to donating aid to our national parks since 1941, when the first donation was a modest $160. Today, aid totals $4.3 million a year, with a cumulative total of more than $64 million! For nearly eight decades, this aid has played an 5. Donations (ISA), w/ summary of why/what/how essential role in enhancing the experiences of park pages) visitors by supporting the National Park Service A. BRVB living history event (talk to Valerie) (NPS) in educational, interpretive, research, and B. BRVB art competition winners publication activities at each of our sixty-six affiliC. BRVB Civil War symposium ated sites. D. SAGU cultural fair (info, no pics)

much WNPA donates, etc. (3–4

E. part ofFOSC candlelight An essential WNPA’s mission is totour provide F. Chaco cultural exchange? (info and pics) funding for the scope of activities that NPS employG. TUMA ees would like to offer park citizenship visitors, since day federal H. TUMA fiesta (pics, no info) funding is not always enough. Proceeds from sales I. PAIS sand sculpting (pics, email Chelsea for info) at our national park stores in park visitor centers J. TUZI visitor center redone (info and pic) and at our home-office store in Tucson are the K. BAND film foundation for this support, as well as contributions L. Separate side-bar list of performances, demonstrations, through various in-kind activities. Read on to learn about the abundance of diverse activities that WNPA’s support provided to park visitors during 2011.

etc.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

WHITE SANDS NATIONAL MONUMENT Full Moon Nights White Sands National Monument hosted Full Moon Nights from May through October 2011. Once a month, the park offered a variety of free events to park visitors, ranging from regional music to ranger-guided tours of the monument to tales of historical figures who once lived in the area.

FORT SCOTT NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 30th Annual Candlelight Tour Held the first full weekend in December, this year’s Candlelight Tour was in commemoration of the Civil War Sesquicentennial. The light of 700 candle lanterns set the scene for breathtaking historical reenactments.

CHACO CULTURE NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK International Indigenous Cultural Exchange In August 2011 a group of indigenous Maya youths from Yucatán, Mexico, and Laguna Pueblo youths from New Mexico participated in a weeklong field study and cultural exchange at Chaco Culture National Historical Park.

Guitarist Felipe Ruibal and double-bass player Luis Guerra performed soothing Latin songs at White Sands National Monument’s Full Moon Nights.

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ADDITIONAL WNPA DONATIONS • ALIBATES  FLINT QUARRIES NM—Audio/visual media system for visitor center • BANDELIER NM—Student Conservation Association interns •B  LACK CANYON OF THE GUNNISON NP—Film re-editing •B  ENT’S OLD FORT NHS—Period appropriate food and supplies for Living History Encampment demonstrators •B  ROWN V. BOARD NHS—Art competition prizes; Civil War symposium • CAPULIN VOLCANO NM—Library bookcases

BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE Forging Freedom’s Pathway—Living History Walks On June 11, 2011, park visitors participated in living history walks from Ritchie House to Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site, highlighting the evolving views of race and freedom that developed in Kansas. The walks featured the Lecompton Reenactors and National Park Service rangers portraying historical characters.

•C  ASA GRANDE RUINS NM—American Indian Arts and Music Fest • CHANNEL ISLANDS NP—World Ocean Day storyteller • FORT DAVIS NHS—Photo contest prizes •G  REAT SAND DUNES NPP—Geological mapping and assessment of area burned by 2010 fire • L ITTLE BIGHORN BATTLEFIELD NM—Archeology field survey • NICODEMUS NHS—Buffalo Soldier reenactors • PADRE ISLAND NS—Sand-sculpting classes • P ETROGLYPH NM—High-definition video footage of “steaming” volcanoes • SAGUARO NP—American Indian Heritage Cultural Fair • S ALINAS PUEBLO MISSIONS NM—Visitor center mural designed by artists in the community • S AN ANTONIO MISSIONS NHP—Archeology Day; economic impact study that determined visitor use and potential expansion of park boundary and programming •T  UMACÁCORI NHP—La Fiesta de Tumacácori; Citizenship Day • WALNUT CANYON NM—R. Carlos Nakai performance

LYNDON B. JOHNSON NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK Frontier Life Days Frontier Life Days is held each October in Johnson City at the Johnson Settlement, the 1860s home of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s grandparents. The program began in 2006 as a two-day educational program to complement the park’s already popular Farm and Ranch program.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

A Family of Forts S P E C I A L F E A T U R E:

Six of WNPA’s affiliated national parks were established in the mid-1800s as western frontier forts in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. The forts were essential during the nation’s war with Mexico, Civil War, and wars with American Indian tribes.

BENT’S OLD FORT NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE FORT DAVIS NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

FORT SCOTT NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

La Junta, CO, 1833–49 Became NPS unit in 1960, WNPA affiliate in 1963

Fort Davis, TX, 1854–91 Became NPS unit in 1961, WNPA affiliate in 1965

Fort Scott, KS, 1842–53 Became NPS unit in 1978, WNPA affiliate in 1979

William and Charles Bent and Ceran St. Vrain built Bent’s Old Fort to trade with Plains Indians and trappers. For years, the fort was the only major permanent white settlement on the Santa Fe Trail. The fort was a staging area during the war with Mexico.

The military outpost originally provided protection from Indians to travelers on the San Antonio–El Paso Road. With the outbreak of the Civil War and Texas’s secession from the Union, Confederate troops occupied the fort until Union forces retook it in 1862.

Fort Scott was established in 1842, and soon became involved in events that would lead to momentous spurts of growth and expansion for the young nation. Tensions over slavery led to the Civil War, and Fort Scott was a key post during that conflict.

• For more information, visit www.nps.gov/BEOL

• For more information, visit www.nps.gov/FODA

• For more information, visit www.nps.gov/FOSC

FORT BOWIE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

FORT LARNED NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

FORT UNION NATIONAL MONUMENT

Bowie, AZ, 1862–94 Became NPS unit in 1964, WNPA affiliate in 1970

Larned, KS, 1859–78 Became NPS unit in 1964, WNPA affiliate in 1971

Watrous, NM, 1851–91 Became NPS unit in 1954, WNPA affiliate in 1963

Fort Bowie commemorates the twenty-year conflict between Chiricahua Apaches and the U.S. military, paving the way for settlement of the Southwest by non-Indians. Geronimo and a small band of followers drew the attention of Fort Bowie troops.

In 1859, Camp Alert—later moved and renamed Fort Larned—was built to provide protection and escort service along the Santa Fe Trail. The fort was a key post in the wars with American Indian tribes.

Fort Union was established as the guardian of the Santa Fe Trail. It became the largest fort in the Southwest and functioned as a military garrison, territorial arsenal, and supply depot.

• For more information, visit www.nps.gov/FOLS

• For more information, visit www.nps.gov/FOUN

• For more information, visit www.nps.gov/FOBO

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Research

WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS ASSOCIATION proudly supports scientific research in our national parks with grants awarded to qualified individuals and institutions. The funds are used to support a wide range of research projects that have helped create a better understanding of our parks, including the natural resources, the culture and heritage of the people who once lived there, and the social, economic, and political history of the sites. In 2011, research grants for new projects totaled $52,329. WNPA also supported thirty continuing projects awarded in previous years, many of which were completed in 2011.

GREAT BASIN NATIONAL PARK Researchers from Ohio State University (Bryan Mark, David Porinchu, and Jason Box) are conducting research at Great Basin National Park into the sources of high levels of contaminants, such as DDT and mercury.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

ADDITIONAL WNPA-FUNDED RESEARCH •A  ZTEC RUINS NM—Ceramic provenance and raw materials study • BANDELIER NM—Study of ancestral Puebloan agricultural fields •B  IGHORN CANYON NRA—Developing cultural interpretations of prehistoric tipi rings and Native domestic life  HANNEL ISLANDS NP—Lone Woman historical research •C for “connecting youth to national parks via award-winning children’s literature”  L MALPAIS NM—Study of the age, history, and •E composition of “pygmy” forests • L YNDON B. JOHNSON NHP—Research into the resonance with visitors of park educational programming

EL MALPAIS NATIONAL MONUMENT Many of the lava tubes and caves at El Malpais National Monument support bats. Unfortunately, the lava tube and cave climates also furnish the ideal conditions for White Nose Syndrome. This highly contagious disease, first discovered in 2006 in New York, has spread across seventeen states and killed at least 5.5 million bats. Dr. Diana E. Northup and Debbie Buecher, of Buecher Biological Consulting, are conducting research in an effort to understand which species of bats are at greatest risk of contracting the syndrome.

 ONTEZUMA CASTLE NM—Removal of nonnative •M slider turtles and effects on native Sonora mud turtles at Montezuma Well  AVAJO NM—Footprints of the Ancestors: community-based •N research at Keet Seel • P INNACLES NM—Lead exposure-monitoring in California condors • S AGUARO NP—Effects of buffelgrass invasion on habitat use of desert tortoises • S ANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS NRA—Water sources of Santa Monica Mountains streams and creeks • S ONORAN DESERT NETWORK—Pilot project in mentoring for improved science communication in national parks

SAGUARO NATIONAL PARK

• TIMPANOGOS CAVE NM—Monitoring cave climate changes

Four graduate students from the University of Arizona received funding to conduct research during the 2011 BioBlitz at Saguaro National Park, an event that allowed scientists, students, and citizens the opportunity to participate in a twenty-fourhour inventory of the flora and fauna of the desert park. The students led programs related to fungi, passerine birds, beetles, and saguaro cacti.

•W  HITE SANDS NM—Assessment of moths and discovery of new species

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Publications

Civil War reenactors marched at the 2009 dedication of the Glorieta Pass battle site at Pecos National Historical Park, New Mexico. WNPA released a trail guide to the battle site in 2011.

& EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS

WNPA has been publishing books and producing other educational products since the association’s founding in 1938. In cooperation with the National Park Service, WNPA also publishes numerous free publications distributed in parks and online.

Top: The Juan Bautista de Anza trail guide is available in both English and Spanish. Bottom left: Frequently Asked Questions About Bats is the newest addition to our FAQ series. Bottom right: Tumacácori National Historical Park’s Junior Ranger booklet was the first published by WNPA with full-color illustrations.

OUR MOST ANTICIPATED PUBLICATION in 2011 was Frequently Asked Questions About Bats by Rose Houk. WNPA also produced three trail guides—the Civil War Battle of Glorieta Pass Trail Guide for Pecos National Historical Park, and English and Spanish language versions of the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail in Arizona. The association also released two DVDs—Sky Island, an awardwinning film about the mountains, canyons, and mesas of the high Pajarito Plateau in Bandelier National Monument; and Treasure in the Sea for Channel Islands National Park.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

In 2011 we redoubled our efforts to add many more Americanmade items to our store lines. Deneen Pottery crafted handmade mugs for twenty of our parks. T-shirts and sweatshirts from Earth Sun Moon Trading Company’s Advice from Nature line have broadened our shirt offerings. And collapsible hats from Henschel Manufacturing Company help keep visitors cool. We continue to expand on our popular Junior Ranger products, which make up our biggest sales category and accounted for a large portion of an overall 34% increase in 2011 wholesale sales.

Above: Treasure in the Sea, an official film about Channel Islands National Park, includes this aerial view of one of the islands. Left: The DVD Sky Island about Bandelier National Monument was released in 2011.

Deneen Pottery handcrafted mugs for twenty affiliated parks.

In addition to providing over $100,000 for printing free publications in 2011, WNPA worked collaboratively with the NPS to create many of these non-sales items, including park newspapers, site bulletins, periodicals, trail guides, translations, and brochures. WNPA also produced new Junior Ranger booklets for several of our parks, including Coronado National Memorial, Tumacácori National Historical Park, and Fort Davis National Historic Site. WNPA publications and products were exhibited at select trade shows and events, including the third annual Tucson Festival of Books. In addition to our expansive National Parks Store tent at the festival, WNPA hosted twenty affiliate national parks’ booths in our National Park Pavilion.

A Junior Ranger shows off his new vest.

VISIT WWW.WNPA.ORG TO PURCHASE BOOKS AND PRODUCTS ONLINE.

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Connecting People to Parks WNPA’S NATIONAL PARK STORES hosted a variety of events throughout the year. Events and programs enable outreach to a wide audience, provide positive and informative experiences to visitors, and ultimately deepen the public’s connection to our national parks. Our home office in Tucson offers events nearly every Wednesday and Saturday, almost all of which are free to the public and attract over 10,000 attendees annually. Our revenue-generating events help support research and education in our sixty-six affiliated national parks.

Chief of Interpretation Andy Fisher shared animal bones with children at Saguaro National Park’s “Touch Table” at the third annual Tucson Festival of Books.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Artist and instructor Della Cruz helps a basketmaking workshop participant.

NATIVE ARTS AND CRAFTS In 2011 WNPA hosted a myriad of shows and sales featuring native arts and crafts. Pottery from Mata Ortiz, Mexico, was featured at one of our most popular events and included demonstrations and live firings throughout the day by three of the finest Mata Ortiz potters: Jorge Quintana, Damian Quezada, and Diego Valles. Other shows included Zuni fetishes and carvings, Navajo rugs from Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site, native basketry, Huichol beaded art, Oaxacan wood carvings, and Tarahumara and Mayo Indian art.

BASKETMAKING WORKSHOPS WNPA offered two highly successful basketmaking workshops in 2011. Tohono O’odham artists Della and Frederick Cruz taught about the plants, materials, tools, designs, techniques, and traditions of American Indian basketry. Participants spent a full day learning how to make their own Tohono O’odham–style basket.

TUCSON FESTIVAL OF BOOKS

Mata Ortiz pottery was featured at popular events.

The third annual Tucson Festival of Books attracted nearly 100,000 people in 2011. WNPA sponsored the National Parks Pavilion, which was a highlight of the two-day festival and featured twenty national parks from throughout the western United States. NPS rangers offered interpretive materials and a plethora of hands-on activities for kids. In addition, the pavilion included an event tent and our National Parks Store with WNPA publications and products for sale.

CONCERTS AND FILMS Throughout 2011 WNPA hosted numerous concerts and free film screenings. Our Kiva Gallery was at capacity for films including Sky Island (the official film of Bandelier National Monument) and The Sun Dagger (narrated by Robert Redford), as well as for concerts featuring classical guitarists Michael Lich and Tabajara Belo, historic music of the West by Mark Gardner and Rex Rideout, and American Indian flutist and cultural storyteller Gary Stroutsos.

KIVA GALLERY Our auditorium, where our home-office events take place, doubles as an art gallery. Throughout 2011 the Kiva Gallery featured monthly rotating exhibits by varied southwestern artists including photography by Jack Dykinga, western art by Don Weber, and paintings by Dick Myers.

Mark Gardner and Rex Rideout performed at a sold-out show in our Kiva Gallery.

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Affiliated Parks

Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument Flint, Texas

Chamizal National Memorial El Paso, Texas

Aztec Ruins National Monument Aztec, New Mexico

Channel Islands National Park Ventura, California

Bandelier National Monument Los Alamos, New Mexico Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site La Junta, Colorado Big Thicket National Preserve Kountze, Texas Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area North District: Fort Smith, Montana South District: Lovell, Wyoming Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park Montrose, Colorado Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site Topeka, Kansas Canyon de Chelly National Monument Chinle, Arizona Capulin Volcano National Monument Capulin, New Mexico Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Coolidge, Arizona Chaco Culture National Historical Park Nageezi, New Mexico

Chickasaw National Recreation Area Sulphur, Oklahoma Chiricahua National Monument Willcox, Arizona Coronado National Memorial Hereford, Arizona Curecanti National Recreation Area Gunnison, Colorado El Malpais National Monument Grants, New Mexico El Morro National Monument Ramah, New Mexico Eugene O’Neill National Historic Site Danville, California Ft. Bowie National Historic Site Bowie, Arizona Ft. Davis National Historic Site Ft. Davis, Texas Ft. Larned National Historic Site Larned, Kansas Ft. Scott National Historic Site Ft. Scott, Kansas

Ft. Union National Monument Watrous, New Mexico Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument Silver City, New Mexico Golden Spike National Historic Site Brigham City, Utah

Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site Ganado, Arizona John Muir National Historic Site Martinez, California

Great Basin National Park Baker, Nevada

Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail Oakland, California

Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve Mosca, Colorado

Lake Mead National Recreation Area Boulder City, Nevada


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

A ranger at Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Monument stands before the remains of a dock where two ships carrying more than 5,000 tons of TNT exploded in 1944, killing 320 men.

Mexican folklorico dancers performed at La Fiesta de Tumacรกcori at Tumacรกcori National Historical Park Lake Meredith National Recreation Area Fritch, Texas

Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park Brownsville, Texas

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail Omaha, Nebraska

Pecos National Historical Park Pecos, New Mexico

Timpanogos Cave National Monument American Fork, Utah

Petroglyph National Monument Albuquerque, New Mexico

Tonto National Monument Roosevelt, Arizona

Pinnacles National Monument Paicines, California

Trail of Tears National Historic Trail Santa Fe, New Mexico

Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Memorial Danville, California

Tumacรกcori National Historical Park Tumacรกcori, Arizona

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Crow Agency, Montana Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park Johnson City, Texas Mojave National Preserve Barstow, California Montezuma Castle National Monument Camp Verde, Arizona Navajo National Monument Tonalea, Arizona Nicodemus National Historic Site Nicodemus, Kansas Northwest New Mexico Visitor Center Grants, New Mexico Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Ajo, Arizona Padre Island National Seashore Corpus Christi, Texas

Saguaro National Park Tucson, Arizona Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument Mountainair, New Mexico San Antonio Missions National Historical Park San Antonio, Texas Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site Eads, Colorado Santa Fe National Historic Trail Santa Fe, New Mexico Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area Thousand Oaks, California

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Sunset Crater National Monument Flagstaff, Arizona

Tuzigoot National Monument Clarkdale, Arizona Walnut Canyon National Monument Flagstaff, Arizona

Ruby Hubbard is a master weaver at Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site.

Washita Battlefield National Historic Site Cheyenne, Oklahoma Whiskeytown National Recreation Area Whiskeytown, California White Sands National Monument Alamogordo, New Mexico Wupatki National Monument Flagstaff, Arizona

Southern Arizona Office Phoenix, Arizona The LBJ presidential airplane is on permanent display in the hangar at Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park, seen here with Ranger Cindy Jacoby.


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Accolades EMIL W. HAURY AWARD

David Grant Noble, noted author and photographer, was honored with WNPA’s Emil W. Haury Award at the annual Board of Directors reception in Denver. He is the author of several books, including In the Places of the Spirits, 101 Questions About Ancient Indians of the Southwest (published by WNPA), and In Search of Chaco. The Haury Award, which honors outstanding scientific research and efforts that create a greater understanding of public lands, is named for Emil W. Haury, the University of Arizona anthropologist and archeologist instrumental in the founding of the Southwest Monuments Association, now known as WNPA.

NEW AWARD UNVEILED After a nationwide search by WNPA’s board of directors, James E. Cook was appointed executive director in 2011. James was the obvious choice to lead the association through a period of significant change. He has many years of experience in nonprofits, proven management skills, and a love of our national parks. He is enthusiastic about finding new and creative ways to support the National Park Service, and his face-to-face contact with NPS staff has strengthened our association’s connections with the parks we serve.

In 2011 WNPA announced the creation of the Stewart L. Udall Award, which recognizes conservationists—including authors, photographers, artists, and publishers— who have made outstanding contributions to publications about America’s national parks. The award is named for former U.S. Secretary of the Interior and Congressman Stewart Udall, who served on the WNPA board and cowrote In Coronado’s Footsteps, published by WNPA in 1991. Above: Stewart L. Udall, former secretary of the interior and later WNPA board member, left, and Emil W. Haury, noted archeologist and member of WNPA’s first board, at a 1991 signing for their book, In Coronado’s Footsteps, which they co-authored for the association.

David Grant Noble received WNPA’s Emil W. Haury Award.

LeAnn Simpson retired as executive director after seven years at the WNPA helm. During her time with the association, she was instrumental in guiding us through a period of expansion and, most recently, a time of economic challenges. Her support of education, research, and interpretation in our national parks was valued by all and evident in her many achievements.

Derek Gallagher, WNPA director of publications, retired in June 2011 after fifteen years with the association. He oversaw the publishing of dozens of books and trail guides for retail, and hundreds of free publications for WNPA-affiliated parks.

David Laird served two consecutive five-year terms on WNPA’s board of directors from 1993 to 2002, and a third term beginning in 2008 ending with his retirement in 2011. David served as a member of the Publications Committee and, during the last year of his second term, served as the committee’s chair.

Carla Van West retired from WNPA’s board of directors in 2011. She served two consecutive five-year terms and was reelected for a third term in 2007. During her board tenure, Carla served on the Nominations, Strategic Planning, and Performance Review committees. She is pictured here receiving a special achievement award from Executive Director James E. Cook at the Denver board meeting.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Thank You!

Manfred (Manny) Fleischer 1933–2011

WITHOUT THE GENEROSITY and commitment of our many volunteers and members, WNPA would not be able to achieve its core mission of ensuring that our national parks are increasingly valued by everyone. In 2013 WNPA will celebrate its 75th anniversary. We have thrived for so long thanks to the plentiful contributions of our supporters. Our volunteers inspire us daily. Your donation of service is an enormous resource and plays a key role in making our accomplishments possible. Our members remind us why this proud organization was formed. Your passion to protect and preserve our national parks is at the core of all our endeavors. We are tremendously grateful and forever indebted to everyone who has helped this organization support our national parks. If you’re interested in becoming a member or volunteering, please call (800) 910-9672, or send an email to info@wnpa.org. Download a volunteer application at www.wnpa.org/volunteer_app.pdf, or contact our human resources manager at Nancyk@wnpa.org.

Manny Fleischer was one of the first to volunteer at Western National Parks Association’s new headquarters when it opened in Oro Valley in 2002. At the time of his death in August 2011, he had volunteered nearly 2,000 hours, working first in the warehouse and then in Publications. He was retired from Columbia House Records where he supervised that company’s nationwide shipping operations, skills put to good use at WNPA. So much was he valued at WNPA that he was nominated for the Governor’s Volunteer Service Award for 2006, receiving a letter and certificate from Governor Janet Napolitano noting Manny’s “dedication to community and special spirit of service.” He leaves behind many friends among the staff and volunteers at WNPA.

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2011 Financial Summary 2011 AID TO THE PARKS: $4,337,163 99% OF GROSS PROFIT ON SALES Operating activities attributable to aid 3,616,610 Interpretive programs 582,278 Research 56,348 Pre-publication/production expenses 35,363 Other 32,530 Free publications 14,034

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION September 30, 2011 ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Investments Accounts receivable, net Inventories Prepaid expenses and other assets Property and equipment, net

$ 1,308,205 1,212,627 92,065 4,493,884 50,909 2,122,647

TOTAL ASSETS $9,280,337

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS LIABILITIES Accounts payable Accrued expenses Amounts due others Total liabilities

CHANGES IN UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS Revenues and support: Sales $9,258,436 Less: cost of goods sold (4,878,680) Gross profit Contributions Investment income (loss) Memberships Creative services Other revenue Total revenues and support

146,282 238,021 71,883 456,186

NET ASSETS—UNRESTRICTED Property and equipment 2,122,647 Board designated for future donations 759,806 Available for operations 5,941,698 Total net assets

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES AND CHANGE IN NET ASSETS Year Ended September 30, 2011

8,824,151

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS $9,280,337

Expenses: Personnel expenses General and administrative Selling expenses Depreciation expense Creative services expenses Donations to National Park Service Total expenses

4,379,756 4,366 125,854 59,279 84,320 4,288 4,657,863 3,414,335 543,450 360,611 114,814 72,320 720,553 5,226,083

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS (568,220) NET ASSETS, BEGINNING OF YEAR 9,392,371 NET ASSETS, END OF YEAR $8,824,151


WESTERN NATIONAL PARKS ASSOCIATION 2010–11 Board of Directors Karen Wade, Chairman

Marilyn Alkire

National Park Service, Retired Fortine, Montana

Attorney (non-practicing) Castle Rock, Colorado

James Brooks, Vice Chair

Bill Broyles

President and CEO, School for Advanced Research Santa Fe, New Mexico Nancy Laney, Secretary/Treasurer

Executive Director, Tucson Botanical Gardens, Retired Castle Hill, North Carolina Christine Szuter, Advisor 2007–2009 Board Chair

Author/research associate, University of Arizona’s Southwest Center High school teacher, Retired Tucson, Arizona Jeffrey Froke

Environmental consultant Co-founder, Santa Lucia Conservancy Pebble Beach, California

Director & Professor of Practice, Scholarly Publishing Certificate Program, Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona

2010–11 HOME OFFICE SENIOR STAFF Eugene Gieseler

Kim Sikoryak

Attorney, Duffield Young Adamson & Alfred, P.C., Retired Tucson, Arizona

Chief of Interpretation and Education, National Park Service, Retired Golden, Colorado

David Laird

Sue Sirkus

Owner, rare-books website Director of University of Arizona Library, Retired Tucson, Arizona Edna Romero

Potter School administrator, Retired Taos, New Mexico

Senior Philanthropy Officer, The Nature Conservancy of Arizona Tucson, Arizona Carla Van West

Director of Preservation Research, SRI Foundation Rio Rancho, New Mexico

James E. Cook, Executive Director (as of January 2011) LeAnn Simpson, Executive Director

(Retired January 2011)

Scott Aldridge, Chief Operations Officer Nancy Kroell, Human Resources Manager Katie Walter, Director of Human Resources Chris Anderson, Director of Marketing Derek Gallagher, Director of Publications

(Retired June 2011)

Dana Garza, Chief Financial Officer

Bill Shaw

Professor of Wildlife and Fisheries Science, University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona

Edward B. Danson, Director Emeritus

WNPA BOARD COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS FOR 2011

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Karen Wade, Chairman James Brooks, Vice Chair Nancy Laney, Secretary/Treasurer Christine Szuter, Advisor 2007–2009 Board Chair James E. Cook, Executive Director (nonvoting)

NOMINATIONS & GOVERNANCE Bill Shaw, Chair Marilyn Alkire Bill Broyles David Laird Nancy Laney Christine Szuter

AUDIT Marilyn Alkire, Chair David Laird Kim Sikoryak

PUBLICATIONS, PRODUCTS, & SERVICES Jeffrey Froke, Chair James Brooks Bill Broyles David Laird Edna Romero Kim Sikoryak

FINANCE Nancy Laney, Chair James Brooks Eugene Gieseler Sue Sirkus Christine Szuter

RESEARCH Bill Broyles, Chair James Brooks Jeffrey Froke Bill Shaw Carla Van West STRATEGIC PLANNING & PERFORMANCE Sue Sirkus, Chair Nancy Laney Carla Van West Christine Szuter

Above: Research into the resonance with visitors of national park educational programming was conducted at numerous parks, including Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park, pictured here.


Home Office and Flagship Store | 12880 North Vistoso Village Drive | Tucson, AZ 85755-8797 | (520) 622-1999 | www.wnpa.org In 2011 WNPA funded a study of ancestral Puebloan agricultural fields at Bandelier National Monument, pictured here.

Written and edited by Laurie Miller with contributions from Dan Stebbins Designed by Theresa Reindl Bingham Photographs courtesy of: Scott Aldridge—inside front cover, pages 1, 9 (lower right), 10, 11, 13 (upper right, middle), 14, 15 (left), inside back cover Ernesto Burciaga–back cover James E. Cook—page 5 (far left) Larry Kolvoord, Austin Statesman—page 13 (lower right) David Grant Noble—self-portrait, page 14 Connie Rose—page 9 (mugs) All other photographs courtesy of the National Park Service Map, page 12: Eureka Cartography Pie chart, page 16: Theresa Reindl Bingham

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2011 WNPA Annual Report