Issuu on Google+

 

S P R I N G

&

S U M M E R

2 0 1 2

Special Topics Courses Department of Humanities

Spring 2012 Desperate Housewives (ENG 278­01) 

Unless otherwise noted, the following courses are aimed at non-majors but are available to all students. The courses listed below do fulfill students’ general studies requirements.

Dr. Steve Criniti (scriniti@westliberty.edu)    The popular culture phenomenon that is the TV show  Desperate Housewives, while certainly entertaining, also raises  some key questions about women’s social roles in a post‐ feminist world.  Do women still idealize and even lust after the  “perfect” domestic life?  Did they ever?  Or, given that the  women of Wisteria Lane appear to have a lot more agency than  did their apparent 1950s counterparts, does the show  challenge us to reverse stereotypes about the “lowly  housewife” social role?  This course seeks to examine the  ways that female characters in domestic settings have responded to challenging situations and the  ways in which representations of social and cultural roles of women have shifted across eras and  cultures.  Therefore, this course’s objectives include not only an introduction to literary history,  increased proficiency in critical reading, and continued development of written and oral  communication skills, but we will also utilize these texts to examine some key questions about  representations of domesticity and the shifting roles of women in society.  Possible Texts [not a finalized list—I will be choosing a handful of texts from possibilities like  these]: Euripides     Medea       Anonymous     “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight ”  Chaucer, Geoffrey     “The Miller’s Tale” and/or “The Wife of Bath’s Tale”   Shakespeare, William     All’s Well that Ends Well or Macbeth   Austen, Jane     Pride and Prejudice   Flaubert, Gustave     Madame Bovary   Ibsen, Henrik     Hedda Gabler or A Doll’s House   Chopin, Kate      The Awakening   Glaspell, Susan     Trifles   Faulkner, William      “A Rose for Emily”   Larsen, Nella     Passing   Morrison, Toni     Beloved   Fielding, Helen     Bridget Jones’s Diary 


HUMANITIES SPECIAL TOPIICS

SPRING/SUMMER 2012

Into the Wild: Discovering the American Landscape (ENG 278­02) 

Mr. Scott Hanna (wshanna@westliberty.edu)    From the newly colonized Virginia of the early 1600’s to the Alaskan wilderness of 1990’s, this  course explores the various ways in which writers experience, depict, construct, respond to and  identify with specific geographic spaces and places in America. While tracing the development of  America’s complex cultural landscape beginning with John Smith’s adventures in the Virginia  colony in 1607 and ending with Chris McAndless’ journey into the wild of Alaska in 1992, we will   investigate through prose, poetry, and film various shifting interpretations of  ‘wilderness,’ ‘landscape,’ and ‘nature’ in an attempt to more fully develop our  own sense of place in America.  

War in Literature and Media (ENG 278­03) 

Dr. Dave Thomas (thomasdj@westliberty.edu)    This course will study five phases of war: 1) Outbreak of War,  2) Everyday Life during Wartime, 3) Harsh Realities of War,  4) Returning from War, and 5) Aftermath of War: Peace. The  course will focus on America's involvement in war as depicted  in novels (like Crane's The Red Badge of Courage,  Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms, and Heller's Catch­22,  poems (like Whitman's Drum­Taps and Crane's War Is Kind),  films (like Born on the Fourth of July, Full Metal Jacket, Saving  Private Ryan, Platoon, and The Hurt Locker), television shows  (like M*A*S*H, Hogan's Heroes, and China Beach), and some  songs (like "War," "Something's Happening Here: For What  It's Worth," "Give Peace a Chance," "I Feel like I'm Fixin' To  Die," "Flag Decal: Jesus Don't Like Killin'," "Four Dead in Ohio,"  and "Peace Train"), among other similar works of the  students' choosing. 

King Arthur: Fact, Fiction, and Film (ENG 278­04)  Dr. Dominique Hoche (dominique.hoche@westliberty.edu)    This class explores the legend of King Arthur from its origins in sixth century  Britain through the great romances of the High Middle Ages to some treatments of  Arthur in modern times. We will look at several versions of the legend, and  consider the themes of chivalry, constructing modern masculinity, the quest for the  Holy Grail, the Lancelot/Guinevere/Arthur love triangle, and the Death of Arthur.  We will read Sir Thomas Malory, the Pearl Poet, Marion Zimmer Bradley and other  writers, plus view Arthurian‐themed films as texts.    2


HUMANITIES SPECIAL TOPIICS

SPRING/SUMMER 2012

Practical Latin (ENG 278­05) 

Dr. Dominique Hoche (dominique.hoche@westliberty.edu)    This course is an introduction to the Latin language, and  constructed primarily for students to learn to read Latin and translate it into English  – based on the needs of pre‐law, pre‐med, biology, nursing, history, art or other majors that are  exposed to the Latin language in their work.  The aim is for students to have the skill to translate  any Latin script they may encounter in the future, whether it is in law, medicine, or in a museum.  Students will take four exams and be required to answer oral questions on homework every day in  class. 

Tales of the Supermen (ENG 478­01) (aimed at English majors but open to everyone) 

Dr. Jeremy Larance (jlarance@westliberty.edu)    In Super Gods, comic‐book writer Grant Morrison writes, “Someone, somewhere, figured out that,  like chimpanzees, superheroes make everything more entertaining. Boring tea party? Add a few  chimps and it’s unforgettable comedy mayhem. Conventional murder mystery? Add superheroes  and a startling new genre springs to life…Superheroes can spice up any dish.” And, in truth, be it  mythological champions or Nietzsche’s often misinterpreted notion of the “Übermensch,” mankind  has forever been fascinated with the possibility of the “superman,” particularly when it comes to  “spicing up” their stories. Next spring, coming to a classroom near you, “Tales of the Supermen”  (ENG 478.01) will give students an opportunity to explore this idea more thoroughly as they read a  wide variety of literature from a broad chronological survey of the superhero genre, beginning with  the ancient epics of Gilgamesh and Beowulf, and ending with contemporary graphic novels and  films such as Watchmen and Superman IV: The Quest for Peace…okay, probably not that particular  film. During the course of the semester, students will explore related issues of literary criticism,  theory, and gender studies by tracing the development and evolution of the “superman” and the  superhero genre in general.    Possible Texts Include:  Gilgamesh   Beowulf: A Verse Translation by Seamus Heaney  The Odyssey by Homer   Greek and Roman Mythology  The Holy Bible  Frankenstein by Mary Shelley   The Superman Chronicles, Volume 1  The Wonder Woman Chronicles, Volume 1  The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller  Watchmen by Alan Moore and David Gibbons  V for Vendetta by Allan Moore and David Lloyd  Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie 

3


HUMANITIES SPECIAL TOPIICS

SPRING/SUMMER 2012

Sophia Wisdom: Celebrating Women in Faith (REL 278­01)  Mr. Walt Jagela (wjagela@westliberty.edu)    This course will study the role of the "feminine" image in faith traditions and  the role of women in various aspects of history and society and will focus  primarily on women's contributions to the major religions of our world. This  course will celebrate women through various readings and show how the  unique characteristics of women and their strong values are put forth on behalf  of many. The student will come to appreciate women for women and challenge  each to see and understand how women are viewed in scripture, society, and  the world at large. 

Spiritualities of the World   (REL 278­02)  Mr. Walt Jagela (wjagela@westliberty.edu)    This course is designed to offer the student  an overview of the vast array of spiritual  thoughts which have influenced the world,  modern society, and individuals throughout  history. The course will look at the writings,  times and personal beliefs of the chosen  authors from a variety of multicultural  viewpoints. Students will compare and  contrast the writings and discover how  spirituality influences daily living. 

Spirituality of Healing (REL 278­03)  Mr. Walt Jagela (wjagela@westliberty.edu)    This course is designed to give the medical  professional and non‐professional alike the  opportunity to study, investigate and gain  knowledge into the issue of healing as part  of the human condition. The course will  take a look at the history of healing from  various religious and non‐religious  traditions and its impact on total patient  care: mind, body, and spirit. The course will  also offer practical advice into the whole  concept of pastoral care of the individual,  the family, and self.   

Spanish for Business Professionals (SPAN 478­01) (upper­level Spanish class)  Mr. Leonard Rinchiuso (lrinchiuso@westliberty.edu)    In SPAN 278, students enhance and strengthen their control of standard Spanish grammar and  orthography through the study of representative samples of business letters and formal written  communications in Spanish. In the course students will also develop vocabulary recognition and  writing skills, focusing on the paragraph, e‐mail messages, and other short communications.   

4


THE LOREM IPSUMS

FALL 2012

Summer 2012 Westerns (ENG 278­01) (6­week course  spanning Summer I & II) 

Mrs. Nicole Naegele  (nicole.naegele@westliberty.edu)    This course is designed to introduce students to  literature about the American west. We will  explore the development of the genre from early  dime novels to modern epics. We will look at  history and the literary portrayal of the West,  including its inhabitants, such as ranchers, Native  Americans, and pioneers. Common themes found  in the literature will also be examined, like the  harshness of prairie life, the silent hero, codes of  honor, and the similarity between western  characters and those of other types of literature.  etc. In addition to readings, we will examine the  portrayal of the American West in film and  popular culture. 

Beowulf: Fact, Fiction, and Film (ENG 278­04) (offered during Summer IV session)  Dr. Dominique Hoche (dominique.hoche@westliberty.edu)    This class explores the legend of Beowulf from the original Old English text through its rediscovery  as a source for action‐adventure films.  We will look at several versions of the tale: starting with the  original (using the translation by Seamus Heaney), and continuing with Gardner’s Grendel, and  Crichton’s Eaters of the Dead.  In film we will see many versions of the story, ranging from viewing  excerpts from Benjamin Bagby’s Beowulf to the recent Zemeckis version with Angelina Jolie as  Grendel’s mother.   


Humanities Special Topics Courses Spring-Summer 2012