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Fall 2011 Volume 36

Number 1

2011 Conference


Enjoy up to 4 days of Wild West education with non-stop ED TECH presentations and activities! March 13-16, 2012 Northwest Council for Computer Education 41st Annual ED TECH Conference

LINE-UP OF FEATURED SPEAKERS:

March 13-14, 2012 60 Pre-Conference Interactive Workshops • $95 each 3 Hours • Days and Evenings

Mike Agostinelli Hall Davidson Steve Dembo Joe Dockery Chris Harris Annette Lamb Sara Martin Jason Neiffer Tammy Worcester

March 14, 2012 • 9 am - 4 pm Teacher-Librarian Summit • $220* for NCCE Members IT Summit • $220* for NCCE Members

March 15-16, 2012 Over 100 One-Hour Sessions • Exhibit Hall • Keynotes $250* for NCCE Members $275* for Non-Members

LEGENDARY KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Opening: Taylor Mali, American Slam Poet

Closing: Scott Flansburg, The Human Calculator

*Early bird registration deadline: February 10, 2012

Register at www.ncce.org

208.292.2529

1031 N Academic Way, Ste. 242 Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 83814

www.ncce.org


This is LIT

Fall 2011

Volume 36

Number 1

From the Editor: Alice McNeer Times Change, But Not Commitment.................................................................................................................3 WLMA Board News Meet Your Newly Elected Executive Board Members.....................................................................................4 WLMA Regions Washington Library Media Association’s Regions: Connecting Locally ................................................6 President Steve Coker This is LIT: Innovation, Collaboration and Leadership for 2011................................................................7 Book Your Hotel Room Now for Conference!...................................................................................................... 8 Map of Downtown Spokane Washington............................................................................................................. 8

Local Arrangements: Cherie Holm Welcome to Spokane!.................................................................................................................................................9 President-elect Craig Seasholes Welcome to Washington Library Media Association’s 2011 Conference: This is LIT! ................... 11 Maps: DoubleTree and Convention Center........................................................................................................ 12 Conference Schedule Overview.............................................................................................................................. 13 Start LIT Early: Attend Preconference Sessions! ............................................................................................ 15 Free Tech for Teachers with Richard Byrne Technology Workshops with NCCE Secondary Booktalks with Jerene Battisti and Angelina Benedetti Elementary Booktalks with Mary Ellen Braks, Sally Chilson and Gwendolyn Haley Implementing LIT! with Wayne Osborn, Dan Gemeinhart, Mark Ray and Roz Thompson Using the Tools that Scare Us! with Anne Bingham, LeAnn Miller and Carina Pierce Technology Peer Coaching: Starting the Conversation with Linda King and Leigh Lohrasbi

Earn Clock Hours While Attending Conference............................................................................................. 19 Conference Speakers Address and Promote LIT!............................................................................................ 20 Keynote: Make it LIT! with Mike Eisenberg, Sarah Applegate, Lisa Layera and Susan McBurney Friday’s Breakfast: Elementary Level Author/Illustrator Nicole Rubel Friday’s Luncheon: WLMA is LIT! Friday’s Banquet: Spokane Author Jess Walter Saturday’s Breakfast: Middle/Junior High School Level Author Neal Shusterman Saturday’s Closing Luncheon: Speaker and Teacher-Librarian Joyce Valenza

Journal of the Washington Library Media Association


Table of Contents… Presenting LIT! Authors Offer Sessions and Signatures ............................................................................. 23 Clare Hodgson Meeker Kenn Nesbitt Kelly Milner Halls Kit Bakke Karen Cushman Deb Lund Katherine Kirkpatrick Michael Harmon Terry Trueman Susan Blackaby Autographs, Books and More… Oh My!............................................................................................................. 25

This is Lit: WLMA Webinar Workshops with the WWWorld’s Best...................................................... 26

2011 Conference Sessions......................................................................................................................................... 28 2011 This is Lit! Author Autographing Schedule.............................................................................................. 36 Remember to Visit the 2011 WLMA Conference Exhibitors ..................................................................... 37 WLMA Conference Evaluation............................................................................................................................. 37 Stick-Around-Saturday: No Business Social..................................................................................................... 37

Beyond the Jacket Cover: Chris Wolfe Karen Cushman........................................................................................................................................................ 38 Planbook.......................................................................................................................................................................... 40

MEDIUM Journal of the Washington Library Media Association (ISSN 0889-00773) Alice McNeer, Editor Karen Paulson, Advertising Kate Pankiewicz, Business/Subscriptions

Publication Information

As an official publication of the Washington Library Media Association (WLMA), the MEDIUM is published three times annually (September, January, and May) and is included in the WLMA membership dues. Nonmember subscriptions are available by contacting the WLMA Treasurer at: WLMA, Attn: Kate Pankiewicz, 10924 Mukilteo Speedway PMB 142 Mukilteo, WA 98275.

Copyright

WLMA retains electronic representation and distribution rights to the contents of its publication the MEDIUM. Furthermore, WLMA reserves the right to use text, photos, and artwork from the MEDIUM in subsequent editions, with notification to the submitter if possible. Otherwise all rights revert to the creator/author of the work. The contents of the MEDIUM appear in EBSCO’s LISTA database (Fall 2004 issue and forward).

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Editorial Policy

Washington Library Media Association reserves the right to make the final judgment on all submitted material. Inclusion of an article, photo, graphic, or advertisement does not necessarily express the opinion or constitute an endorsement by WLMA. All responsibility and liability for the content of advertising rests with the individual advertiser. Unless otherwise stated, copyright is retained by each contributor.

Advertising

For information about WLMA’s advertising policy for the MEDIUM or to place an ad, please contact MEDIUM Advertising Manager Karen Paulson: E-mail: kpaulson@ scholasticlibrary.com; Mail: 26520 NE Anderson St., Duvall, WA 98019. Phone: 425–788–6431.

Upcoming Issues/Themes Winter 2012 Dynamic LIT: Information Management Services Submission Deadline: Nov. 1, 2011 VOL 36 NO. 1


From the Editor: Alice McNeer

Times Change, But Not Commitment If you have to think of the room in the house where the library is, it’s the kitchen. It’s where you get stuff. But it’s also where you make stuff. And it’s where you share stuff. l Joyce Valenza “Educators that Rock!: Joyce Valenza” finding Dulcinea by Shannon Firth. It all started with a simple e-mail. It was my first year as a school librarian (actually the title was school library media specialist) and this e-mail was an invitation to a meeting with some library group called Oz. Being new and in desperate need of support and wisdom from other school librarians, I accepted the invite, endured the rush hour traffic on the 520 bridge and arrived at a school library in Seattle. Suddenly like-minded people who gladly shared their experience, expertise and love for their job surrounded me. During this meeting I heard the term “Wilma” being tossed about. Before I left, someone asked if I was going to the Wilma conference. Since it sounded like this Wilma was important, I answered with “I hope to go.” When I arrived home that evening, I searched for Wilma, but did not find anything. Then I remembered a journal that my professor at the iSchool gave out during class. Pulling it off the bookshelf, I opened it up to see the acronym “WLMA.” The light went on. I did not make it to the conference that year, but the next year I ventured down to Portland for the combined Oregon Association of School Libraries (OASL) and Washington Library Media Association (WLMA) conference. Being from an independent school, I did not know many other school librarians but that changed there. During the next faculty meeting, I shared about the conference and my new important professional resource—WLMA. Then came the second e-mail. This one was also an invitation, but this time it came from the WLMA listserv. It announced the search for someone to serve as Editor for the MEDIUM. Since I loved writing, had a degree in English: Writing, Rhetoric and Culture and had experience using PageMaker, I knew I wanted to apply. After phone interviews and a meeting, I was offered the position. In May of that year, I went to my first WLMA Executive Board meeting. Over the years, as the Editor and member of the Executive board, I witnessed first hand the growth and work of this organization. When I first joined, WLMA stood on solid ground with strong membership numbers and finances. Over time, the organization rode a roller coaster as membership, budgets and positions changed. However, during this roller coaster ride, one constant remained—WLMA always focused on the importance of strong school library programs staffed with school librarians (teacher‑librarians) for the benefit of students. Fall 2011

This year’s conference demonstrates WLMA’s commitment. Last spring when the conference committee started working, they immediately sought out quality speakers, presenters and authors. During the spring and summer as the group continued planning, they recognized the need to move the conference ahead to the 21st century and to bring to the forefront new ways of presenting and learning. So for the first time, WLMA is offering webinar sessions alongside traditional sessions. This allows the conference to reach out and connect with other teacher-librarians and to bring in via the web, movers and shakers in our profession such as Steve Hargadon (founder of Classroom 2.0 and founding co-chair of Library 2.011), Michelle Luhtala (Head Librarian at New Canaan High School in Connecticut), and Karen Bonanno (Executive Officer for the Australian School Library Association). They realized that the conference provides some socialization, but often it takes place only in short burst between speakers, session or at meals. They wanted to provide members with a chance to socialize with other members without any business at hand so they created and are offering the first ever “Stick‑Around-Saturday: No Business Social.” Are you now intrigued and want to know more about this wonderful conference that is planned for you? Then just continue reading because this is the premiere issue of the MEDIUM as the Conference Program! For the first time, you are receiving all the conference information before you go! The following pages contain information about Spokane, Preconference, Keynotes, Authors, Speakers, Webinars and the full schedule of sessions (including the times and rooms). In addition, this issue is mailed to all current WLMA members and available in digital format for all members and conference attendees. So hang on to this issue to bring to conference because it replaces the binders of the past. Also, check the digital issue for any updates, changes, and to use the hyperlinks for quick access to the web resources mentioned. Welcome to This is LIT!

Alice McNeer is the Teacher-Librarian at Eton, an Independent School in Bellevue. E-mail: mediumeditor@earthlink.net.

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WLMA Board News

Meet Your Newly Elected Executive Board Members President Elect: Leigh Lohrasbi Leigh Lohrasbi worked in Washington State as a Teacher‑Librarian for 17 years in the Yakima School District. She worked in Elementary as well as Middle School Libraries. Leigh served as facilitator for the Central Washington Secondary Book Review Council for the last two years and has participated in Washington Library Media Association as Middle /Junior High Level Chairperson 2010 and Middle/ Junior High Level Chair-Elect 2009 as well as attending many region events over the years. Degrees include a 4-year degree in School Library Media and a Masters in Educational Technology. Hobbies include karate (1st degree black belt), bicycling, zumba, traveling and spending time with family and friends. During her 17 years as a teacher-librarian, she has written about and worked with the integration of technology in the classroom as well as in the library.

She believes that Libraries, Information and Technology opportunities for learning and networking will guide the profession in the future. Technology opens the way for even more collaboration with colleagues becoming an experience where all benefit. Teacher-librarian training provides great insight in how to connect the technology and all the possibilities it offers— evaluating it in order to best serve the needs of our student learners. Leigh believes that each person brings something unique to the work in process. She is interested in encouraging a stronger link for all state teacherlibrarians to collaborate. In addition, she notes that she owes a great deal to Washington Library Media Association (WLMA): attending the conferences, receiving valuable professional training and opportunities to connect with teacher-librarians across the state and being represented in Olympia by our Advocacy Committee. Only WLMA can provide this and she looks forward to serving her colleagues in the President Elect Position and representing both Eastern and Western Washington.

Vice President-Elect: Sharyn Merrigan Sharyn Merrigan ran for the position of Vice President because she has appreciated and benefited from the collegiality and support of the members of the Washington Library Media Association (WLMA). She wants to continue to help build connections among teacher-librarians within the regions and across the state by assisting the Region Chairs with communications, coordination of events, and involving more members. She serves the members of WLMA with commitment and enthusiasm. She is available to Region Chairs and members to answer questions, offer ideas, and collaborate for success. For the past two years, she served on the WLMA board as Middle Level Chair for the 2011 conference She has been a mentor for library students from the

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Antioch and University of Washington and has joined other teacher-librarians in the Teacher-Librarian Tech Peer Coaching program. She has been active with Washington Education Association and represented her local association on the bargaining team. She notes that being the teacher-librarian at Marshall Middle School in Olympia for four years has been the most rewarding years of her professional life, and she loves working with students and staff to develop ideas and explore connections. In addition to being a teacher‑librarian, Sharyn taught middle school language arts and social studies for eight years. She earned her Library Media endorsement through Antioch University–Seattle and Mansfield University. She holds a M.Ed. in Secondary Education from Western Washington University and my B.A. from Pomona College. Sharyn states she is lucky to have a wonderfully supportive husband and a beautiful, bright daughter. They keep busy with a big garden, three chickens, and a house remodel. VOL 36 NO. 1


WLMA Board News

Elementary Level Chair-Elect: Jan Copeland A Teacher‑Librarian since 1995, Jan Copeland has worked in three school districts: Federal Way, Kent and currently in Bethel at Nelson Elementary, which opened in 2009. While in Kent, she was also the technology instructor/coach. She earned her master’s degree in Reading and Literacy in 2005 and taught several workshops at the Washington Library Media

Association’s conferences. As a 15-year member of the Puget Sound Council, Jan has enjoyed serving on their board and reviewing many children’s books. She is passionate about teaching information skills and equipping students to be responsible contributing citizens of the 21st Century. Jan just celebrated 35 years of marriage with her husband, Dave. They have two adult daughters, Breanna, a nurse in Seattle and Amanda, who works for the Sheraton Hotels in Phoenix. Her other interests include volunteer work at her church, fiber arts, photography and traveling.

Middle/Junior High Level Chair-Elect: Carrie Willenbring Carrie Willenbring is the Teacher-Librarian at Bethel Junior High in Spanaway, Washington. In addition, she serves as the social studies department head, assessment coordinator and district council for technology representative. Before obtaining her library media endorsement from Seattle Pacific University in 2007, Carrie taught social studies at Renton High School. She is a graduate of Pacific Lutheran University and holds a M.Ed. from Lesley University.

Carrie enjoys spending time with her two children and husband, Steve. When not taxiing the children to and fro, she enjoys gardening, home improvement projects, boating, camping, reading, and cheering on her beloved, New England sports teams.

Senior High Level Chair-Elect: Eileen Ray Building on a bachelor’s degree in Comparative Literature and fifteen years as an English teacher, Eileen Ray became a librarian in 1994. She has worked as the TeacherLibrarian for Toppenish High School for the past fourteen years. During the course of that time, Eileen completed a Masters of Education with a focus on working with English Language Learners in the library media center. She has served on numerous committees including: Tech Committee Chair, Site Council Chair, Senior Boards, Reading Committee and Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Eileen states that attending the fall Washington Library Media Association Conference is a highlight of my school year. Each year my goal is to implement one new idea that will improve or enrich our library program. Recent Fall 2011

examples are Bookcasts (extremely popular with students) and New Book Widgets on the library homepage, which have increased the circulation of nonfiction. Her most satisfying career opportunity began in 2005 when Toppenish School District made plans to gut and completely remodel the library, doubling the size. She traveled all over the state of Washington, visiting thirteen library media centers and taking hundreds of digital photos to share with architects. Other librarians were tremendously helpful in sharing ideas. The result is a beautiful new 7,000 square foot library media center that is packed with students all day long. Eileen has participated in the Central Region Book Review Council since 1994, serving two terms as Chair. She has secured a steady supply of galleys of the latest Young Adult fiction from Baker & Taylor for our group to review. Eileen notes that because librarians work in isolation—always one of a kind in school buildings — the information and support she gets from this Professional Learning Community is invaluable to her. o MEDIUM | 5


WLMA Regions

Washington Library Media Association’s Regions: Connecting Locally When you become a member of the Washington Library Association, (WLMA) you gain more than just a membership card. You receive a discount on your conference registration, a board that works and advocates on behalf of teacher-librarians and school libraries. In addition, you gain membership in a local

region group. Your region can be where you work or where you live—the choice is up to you. The regions meet, share professional resources and offer you a way to connect with others close to work and home. For more information on your region, please visit the WLMA Region web page: www.wlma.org/regions.

Descriptions by County Central (12)—Yakima, Kittitas and eastern Klickitat Columbia Gorge (9)—Clark, Skamania and western Klickitat Crossroads (13)—South King County (south of Interstate 90 & Seattle) Lower Columbia (4)—Cowlitz, Wahkiakum and southern Pacific Mount ‘n Isle (1)—Whatcom, Skagit, San Juan, Pilchuck Island Mt. Pilchuk (14)—Snohomish and southern Island Mt. Rainier (8)—Pierce County North Central (11)—Chelan, Douglas, Grant, and Okanogan North Lakes (15)—North King County (north of Interstate 90 & Seattle) Northeast Seven (7)—Adams, Ferry, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Stevens, Whitman Oz (6)—City of Seattle - Seattle School District Peninsula (2)—Kitsap, Jefferson and Clallam Sea to Summit (3)—Grays Harbor, Lewis, Mason, Thurston and northern Pacific Three Rivers (5)—Benton, Franklin, Walla Walla, Columbia, Garfield and Asotin

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VOL 36 NO. 1


President Steve Coker

This is LIT: Innovation, Collaboration and Leadership for 2011 A glance at our conference program confirms it: the shift is underway, and Washington Library Media Association and its partners are at the forefront of innovation in education in Washington. This is LIT 2011: school library information and technology programs for today and the future—a future for which our students must be prepared with the critical thinking and literacy skills necessary to adapt to rapid and continuous changes in their academic, personal and professional information landscapes. Washington Library Media Association (WLMA) is leading the way not just through dynamic and exciting conference offerings, but also through our leadership activities on building, district and state levels. In the last three years, we have seen unprecedented support for school library information and technology (LIT) programs in our state legislature, and—though we continue to endure the ill effects of the recent and ongoing economic crisis—our programs are established as an integral part of the long-term vision for education in the State of Washington. But we have not done it alone.

Engage, improve, extend

In our buildings, we know that in order for a LIT program to be effective we cannot operate in isolation. Besides students, we must engage the entire educational community: teachers, administrators, parents and support personnel. WLMA continues to encourage members to extend building leadership skills to district decision-making teams, and as a larger organization, we model these priorities on state and regional levels. It has been a pleasure over the last two years to work with many outstanding, dedicated and visionary teacher-librarians from around the state as we have worked together to improve our professional practice and promote robust LIT programs. Equally important, however, has been the working relationships WLMA has fostered with other like‑minded organizations in our state and region. You will see this reflected in our conference program: offerings from the Northwest Council for Computer Education (NCCE), the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instructions (OSPI) and the Library 2.011 Worldwide Virtual Conference compliment a wide variety of author presentations, management sessions and teaching workshops. WLMA 2011 reflects the fact that we are not alone in our mission to provide innovative and engaging learning opportunities for our students.

New opportunities and partnerships

WLMA’s collaborative efforts will only increase in the coming years. As our members know, for the last year the WLMA Executive Committee has worked closely with the Fall 2011

NCCE Board of Directors to formally combine conference efforts beginning in 2013. This initiative has grown out of a mutual desire to provide more effective, economical and efficient professional development and greater financial sustainability. It allows WLMA to streamline conference and other professional development offerings, providing the best value for members while maintaining our core organizational values: provide support for members, offer the most innovative professional development and advocate for quality and equitable school library programs. Both formal and informal discussions regarding this process will take place during our 2011 Conference. Please seek out these opportunities to engage WLMA leaders and the broader membership as we work together to establish and ensure a long-term vision for WLMA professional development and professional practice.

Innovation in learning

This year’s conference also offers something completely new: the opportunity to take part in a unique and collaborative webinar series within the regular conference schedule. This ‘unconference within a conference’ is designed to model non-traditional, web-based professional development opportunities and explore new ways to approach continuous learning in a networked world. Be sure to leave room in your schedule for at least one of these sessions, and join Steve Hargadon, David Loertscher, Richard Byrne, Mike Eisenberg Michelle Luhtala, Joyce Valenza and others as they model new ways to inspire and engage learners.

Finding new friends, reconnecting with old friends

As has been the case with past conferences, the 2011 Conference Committee has provided us all with a good problem: so much good stuff in so brief a time—how to squeeze it all in? As you plan and prioritize, please be sure to remember to leave time for relaxation, socializing and reacquainting with old friends. Without a doubt, the most powerful aspect of my ongoing association with WLMA and conference attendance has been the professional and personal relationships I have built with my fellow teacher‑librarians. Building, maintaining and strengthening these relationships for all of our members will continue to be the priority as we move forward. Enjoy the conference! o Steve Coker is the Teacher-Librarian at North Thurston High School, North Thurston SD. E-mail: scoker@nthurston.k12.wa.us

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This is LIT! Local Information

Book Your Hotel Room Now for Conference! Washington Library Media Association reserved a block of rooms at the DoubleTree Hotel Spokane City Center for October 12, 2011 – October 15, 2011. This offers conference attendees a special room rate and provides a 50% discount on overnight self parking in the hotel parking garage. This conference hotel room rate is only available until September 13 or until the group block is sold-out, whichever comes first.

Conference Room Rates: 130.00*

2 Double Beds Nonsmoking 2 Queen Beds Deluxe Nonsmoking 1 King Bed Deluxe Nonsmoking 160.00* 2 Queen Beds Premium Nonsmoking 1 King Bed Premium Nonsmoking *Rates are for single or double occupancy. For each additional person, add $20 to the rate. To obtain this special conference rate, book a reservation from the DoubleTree Hotel Spokane Center by phone (509-744-2310) or through their website (www.spokane.doubletree.com) and use the group code WLI. DoubleTree Spokane City Center, 322 North Spokane Falls Court, Spokane, WA 99201 o

Map of Downtown Spokane Washington

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VOL 36 NO. 1


Local Arrangements: Cherie Holm

Welcome to Spokane! The local conference committee welcomes you to Spokane. I am amazed how much Spokane has changed over the years and how this city continues to grow with local activities and attractions. It reminds me of our jobs as teacher‑librarians and how our profession continues to change as we always try to meet the information technology and reading needs of our clients. The preconference and conference committee have put together a variety of sessions to help us learn how to better meet the needs of our patrons. From the authors to presenters, this conference will invigorate your teaching and library programs. As you take in all of the informative and fun sessions to inspire you during the 2011 conference, we hope you will take some time to enjoy Spokane. To learn more about local attractions please visit Spokane’s Regional Visitor’s Guide 2011-12: http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/spokane/vg1112/#

Spokane’s Top Ten Attractions 1. Bike, run, or walk the Centennial Trail. This trail follows the Spokane River starting at beautiful Riverside State Park to Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Catch the trail right outside the DoubleTree Hotel and Spokane Convention Center. Spokane Centennial Trail Map: http://www.spokanecentennialtrail.org/Page/Overview-Map.aspx 2. Visit one of Spokane’s historic neighborhoods, Browne’s Addition. West of the Doubletree Hotel, Browne’s Addition is also the home of the Museum of Arts and Culture (509.456.3931). This museum houses the Northern Plateau tribal art and history collection. Also there is a walking tour of this historic neighborhood. Walking Tour Map: http://www.northwestmuseum.org/index.cfm/Walking_Tour.htm. Map of Spokane and more great places to visit: http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/spokane/vg1112/#/60 3. Have dinner or drinks at the historic Steam Plant Grill (509.777.3900). Previously a steam plant that provided heat and electricity to Spokane, it now houses an award winning restaurant. More downtown Spokane restaurants: http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/spokane/vg1112/#/54 4. View the falls from the Spokane Falls SkyRide in Riverfront Park. This ride gives its passengers the best seat in the house to view the falls and downtown architecture. After the ride, spend more time exploring the 100 acre Riverfront Park. Riverfront Park official website: http://spokaneriverfrontpark,com 5. Take a Spokane Sculpture Walk. Learn about the sculpture in Riverfront Park and along the Centennial Trail. Learn more about it and download a brochure: http://spokaneriverfrontpark.com/index.php/RFP/page/369 6. Visit local wineries and tasting rooms. Spokane has many local wineries within walking distance. Stretch your legs after a day of sitting and relax. More information: http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/spokane/vg1112/#/68 7. Visit The Runner’s Soul, Spokane’s only specialty running store. Stop in and say hi to Kurt, the owner who tirelessly works to promote races in Spokane and youth running. If you forgot your shoes or gear, it’s just a bit of a walk from the hotel at 221 N. Wall Street (509.624.7654). Website: http://www.runnersoul.com/spokane/ 8. Don’t miss Boo Radley’s, a shop that sells “pop culture with a wacky twist” at 232 N. Howard (509.456.7479). Just south down the street, enjoy coffee or tea as you browse and find just the right gift to bring home at Atticus Coffee and Gifts at 222 . Howard (509.747.0336). See a link in the names? Yes, the beloved To Kill a Mockingbird. 9. Check out the local bookstore, Aunties in the historic Liberty Building. Aunties has books on site to purchase from featured authors at the conference, but if you have time, take a walk to their store at 402 West Main Avenue (509.838.0206). Website: http://www.auntiesbooks.com. They offer new, used, and collectible books. Also visit Uncle’s Games and Puzzles as well as one of my favorite restaurants, Santé Restaurant and Charcuterie. 10. Stick around for the Saturday night “No Business Social” event to listen and dance to local band, featuring Nick Herman from That Goodtime Band at the convention center. Next catch Karl Olsen of the Brother’s Four and then DVJ Mark Ray and the Flying Buttocks Productions. (Find details for this event on page 37 of this issue.) The Local conference committee invites you to Spokane to experience This is LIT! 2011 WLMA Conference. As always, the sessions will be informative and fun. There is something for everyone in Spokane this year. I always come away feeling invigorated and ready to share what I have learned with our students and staff. I also have bibliographies of new books that I may not have time to read, but can confidently suggest to our readers because of the experts who provide exciting and informative book talks. See you in Spokane! o Fall 2011

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VOL 36 NO. 1


President-elect Craig Seasholes

Welcome to Washington Library Media Association’s 2011 Conference: This is LIT! Embrace InfoTech instructional leadership, reading advocacy and school information access to ensure that all students are effective users and producers of ideas and information. Amidst the changes and challenges brought by shrinking budgets and educational reform, librarians must continue to do what we do best: question and connect, teach as we lead. As an association and as individuals, we must step forward to lead our schools, to stand up and stand out as leaders in our communities. Now more than ever, we are the experts in our schools who teach and support students as they learn to navigate a world of information and ideas.

Learning is the key Now is the time. Explore. Take risks. Share your ideas and dare to learn more. Our conference should provoke and provide, challenge and confirm that to be a teacher-librarian is to be a learning leader, and the best educational decision you ever made. Now is the time to learn a LIT-T-L bit more. Do not think for a minute that quieter aspects of our profession are being lost in this call to lead. The love of reading, the wisdom in well-formed questions and subtle suggestions are still essential tools in our repertoire. During conference, we urge you to whet them well. But it is absolutely essential that we all pursue additional tools and strategies that will ensure that the lights will continue to burn brightly in our libraries and in the minds of our students.

What we already know is not enough Make a point to reach beyond your established skills and comfort zone to remember how refreshing new ideas can be. Attend workshops that support your effort to build allies in your school, district, and legislative advocacy efforts. Make sure you engage in at least one of our WLMA/Library 2.011 Webinar sessions to learn more about what, why and how online learning is changing professional development as it broadens our horizons. It’s time to learn and lead.

We are the experts we have been waiting for I urge everyone to take time during the conference to share a one or “Two Minute LIT-TL Treasures” in our video salon. You provide the content while we edit and share. Commit yourself to describing just one trick from your toolbox, one lesson that went well, one challenge met, one student success that might help inspire and inform others. You have already done the work, now share your experience with WLMA and the world. You share the content and we will do the rest.

And yes, our social network is important, too! Starting with preconference sessions or a rousing LIT Keynote through Joyce Valenza’s invigorating closing address and Saturday’s informal social evening of music and dance; I hope you have fun associating at WLMA’s conference in Spokane. Find that healthy balance of fun and function, professional development and personal satisfaction and you are sure to realize that you too are an effective user and producer of the ideas and information.

Get ready folks, ‘cause “This is LIT!” Craig Seasholes is the Teacher-Librarian at Sanislo Elementary, Seattle SD. Blog: bookmansbytes.blogspot.com. E-mail: seasholes@gmail.com.

Fall 2011

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2011: This is LIT!

Maps: DoubleTree and Convention Center DoubleTree Hotel Spokane City Center

Spokane Convention Center

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VOL 36 NO. 1


2011: This is LIT!

Washington Library Media Association

Fall 2011

Spokane

Conference Schedule Overview Thursday, October 13

7:00 am  –  7:00 pm Registration Open (DoubleTree Hotel) 9:00 am  –  12:00 pm Preconference Session 1 12:00 pm  –  1:00 pm Luncheon: Box (DoubleTree Salon IV) 1:00 pm  –  4:00 pm Preconference Session 2 4:00 pm  –  9:00 pm Exhibit Hall Open with Reception 4-7 pm (Convention Center Ball Room 100 B & C) 6:00 pm  –  8:00 pm WLMA Full Board Meeting (DoubleTree Salon III)

Friday, October 14

6:45 am  –  7:00 pm Registration Open (DoubleTree Hotel) 7:00 am  –  8:15 am Breakfast with Nicole Rubel (DoubleTree Salon IV & V) 8:00 am  –  5:00 pm Exhibit Hall Open (Convention Center Ball Room 100 B & C) 8:00 am  –  4:30 pm Aunties Bookstore Open (Convention Center Bay 111A) 9:00 am  –  10:00 am Keynote Address (DoubleTree Salon IV & V) 10:15 am  –  11:15 am Session 1 12:15 pm  –  1:45 pm Luncheon: WLMA is LIT! (DoubleTree Salon IV & V) 1:45 pm  –  2:45 pm Session 2 3:00 pm  –  4:00 pm Session 3 4:15 pm  –  5:15 pm Session 4 6:00 pm  –  6:45 pm Celebration and Awards Reception (DoubleTree Foyer of Salon IV & V) 7:00 pm  –  9:00 pm Banquet with Jess Walter and autographing afterwards (DoubleTree Salon IV & V)

Saturday, October 15

6:45 am  –  12:30 pm Registration Open 7:00 am  –  12:00 pm Aunties Bookstore Open (Convention Center Bay 111A) 7:00 am  –  8:45 am Breakfast with Neal Shusterman (DoubleTree Salon IV & V) 9:00 am  –  10:00 am Session 5 10:15 am  –  11:15 am Session 6 11:30 am  –  12:30 pm Session 7 12: 30 pm  –  2:15 pm Closing Luncheon with Speaker Joyce Valenza (DoubleTree Salon IV & V)

Post Conference-Saturday

5:45 pm  –  9:00 pm Stick-Around-Saturday: No Business Social Fall 2011

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2011: This is LIT! Washington Library Media Association

School Library Information and Technology Programs for 21st Century Learning Mission: To ensure that students are effective users and producers of information and ideas Three essential functions of Teacher-Librarians: 1. Information Technology Instruction 2. Reading Advocacy 3. Information Management The scope and mix of these functions will depend on the program priorities and goals of each local school district and school building 1. Information and technology instruction • Leads information literacy instruction including evaluation and analysis of the credibility, relevance and currency of information • Coaches instructional staff in support of curriculum, information technology and information management • Teaches students to be critical consumers and producers of information • Teaches students and staff to use emerging learning technologies for school and lifelong learning • Teaches students to be safe, ethical and responsible digital citizens 2. Reading advocacy • Establishes and models a powerful, fashionable and ubiquitous culture of reading in the school community • Motivates and guides students to read for enjoyment and understanding • Develops a relevant collection of fiction and non-fiction in a variety of formats, ensuring quality reading choices for all students • Manages resources in support of established curriculum and student passions 3. Information management and services • Provides open and equitable access to resources, technology and information services for the entire school community • Develops and administers inviting and effective physical and digital library environments • Manages resources to support teaching and learning • Administers information management systems to support student learning and school and district programs 14 | MEDIUM

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2011 Preconference

Start LIT Early: Attend Preconference Sessions! Outstanding half-day sessions addressing all areas of LIT allow in-depth professional development. (Box lunch included in the $115 registration)

Free Tech for Teachers with Richard Byrne Free Tools for Digital Storytelling

Google Across the Curriculum

9:00 am–12:00 pm Conv. Center 102 C & D

1:00 pm–4:00 pm Conv. Center 102 C & D

One of the true powers of the modern web is the wealth of resources for creating new digital content. In this half‑day session, participants explore free tools for creating digital stories in the forms of videos, podcasts, interactive books, and digital maps.

Google offers something for every educator and student. Participants explore advanced search options, Google Sites, Google Docs, Google Books, Google Groups, Google Maps, and other Google Tools. One of the highlights is learning to create, administer, and grade quizzes online.

Richard Byrne works full‑time teaching United States History, Civics, and Global Studies to high school students at Oxford Hills Comprehensive High School in South Paris, Maine. In the past, he also taught courses in English/ Language Arts. He believes that when used correctly, technology has the power to improve student engagement and achievement. He also believes that technology gives teachers the ability to form powerful, global, professional learning communities.

Recognitions & Awards Nominated for an Edublogs 2009 “Lifetime Achievement” Google Certified Teacher (http://www.google.com/educators/gta.html) Finalist for 2010 Association of Computer Technology Educators of Maine’s Educator of the Year Award Named one of “30 To Watch for the Future of Ed Tech” in Tech & Learning Magazine (http://www.techlearning.com/article/32466) Monthly column for the School Library Journal

Technology Workshops with NCCE Introduction to the Library

Microsoft’s Free Tools

of Congress Teacher Pages

for Educators

9:00 am–12:00 pm in Conv. Center 102D

1:00 pm–4:00 pm Conv. Center 102 B

This workshop introduces you to the richness of the Library of Congress’s Teacher Pages. From Primary Source Sets, to Collection Connections, to Lesson Plans, see how easily primary source materials can be used in a variety of classroom settings. Try out the new search engine, and learn how easily you can find materials for classroom lessons, bulletin boards, and research projects.

Have you heard of SongSmith? AutoCollage? Have you looked at Windows Movie Maker recently? How about Photo Gallery? Can you “stich” pictures? Create a 3-D image? Have you used their new Web Apps? This three‑hour workshop introduces you to a multitude of free tools for educators, including the links to download them.

Canceled

Fall 2011

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2011 Preconference

Secondary Booktalks with Jerene Battisti and Angelina Benedetti “You’re Invited” : A Feast of New Literature for Teens 9:00 am–12:00 pm DoubleTree Salon II

1:00 pm–4:00 pm Salon II

Whet your appetite with this feast of new books for teens and the readers who love them! Divided by theme, this menu presents new fiction and nonfiction for middle school, junior high and high school readers—including fantasies, biographies, fun nonfiction, historical and realistic fiction titles. Each participant takes away an annotated bibliography of approximately 100 titles, an understanding of recent trends in publishing and great stories to read and share with students. Jerene Battisti (photo background) is the Education and Teen Services Coordinator for King County Library System. She served as a member of the 2009 Best Books for Young Adults committee for YALSA, a division of the American Library Association. Angelina Benedetti (photo foreground) also works for the King County Library System in Collection Management Services. She served on Best Books for Young Adults from 2002-2005 and again in 2008. She writes the “35 Going On 13” online column for Library Journal, featuring teen titles of interest to adult readers.

Elementary Booktalks with Mary Ellen Braks, Sally Chilson and Gwendolyn Haley Who’s Got Lit? We Do! Books for the Elementary Crowd 9:00 am–12:00 pm DoubleTree Salon III

1:00 pm–4:00 pm DoubleTree Salon III

And do we have a whole lot of lit for you! During this session, we share books from the past year or so for grades K-5th. Our list includes both fiction and nonfiction that we found irresistible. Each hour we focus on a different age group starting with K–2nd grade, moving to 2nd–3rd grade, and finishing with 4th – 5th grade. You will reap a harvest of fresh new titles for your library. Mary Ellen Braks is a Youth Services Manager for the Spokane County Library District. She has been a Youth Librarian for over 20 years. Sally Chilson is the Youth Services Coordinator for Spokane Public Library. She has been a Youth Librarian for 19 years.

Mary Ellen Braks (left) and Gwendolyn Haley (right)

Gwendolyn Haley is a Youth Services Manager for the Spokane County Library District. She has been a Youth Librarian for 10 years.

Sally Chilson

Mary Ellen, Sally and Gwendolyn love to play together and are all voracious readers. They all think that the only thing better than sitting down and reading a book is getting to share books with others.

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Implementing LIT! with Wayne Osborn, Dan Gemeinhart, Mark Ray and Roz Thompson

According to Mike Eisenberg, Washington Library Media Association (WLMA), the Spokane Moms and others, we are Teacher-Librarians and ours are Library Information and Technology (LIT) Programs. Our mission is to ensure that students are effective users and producers of information and ideas. This introductory hands-on session is a boot camp showing you how to align our jobs, programs and spaces with emerging thinking about 21st century learning, the millennial learner and the role of the school information professional as a curriculum and technology leader. If you are new to LIT and want to know more about putting it into practice, this session is for you.

LIT Framework: Elementary Level

LIT Framework: Secondary Level

9:00 am–12:00 pm DoubleTree Suite C & D

1:00 pm–4:00 pm DoubleTreeSuite C & D

After spending seventeen years in the retail grocery business, Wayne Osborn decided to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a teacher. After graduating from Pacific Lutheran University, he taught special education at Oakbrook Elementary in Lakewood for five years. Nine years ago he started his “dream job”, and has been the teacher-librarian and building “Site Tech” at Hillside Elementary school on Joint Base Lewis‑McChord ever since. A committed life-long learner, he has a Masters Degree in Education from the University of Washington and a Masters in Library and Information Science from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He became a National Board Certified Teacher in the area of Library Media in 2008. Wayne lives in Puyallup with his lovely wife Robin, an annoying but lovable dog and an ornery cat, and has three grown children of whom he is very proud. They are neither annoying nor ornery.

Mark Ray, self-styled Slayer of Information Ignorance (with a Black Belt in Think Kwon Do) earns his keep as a high school teacher‑librarian and instructional technology facilitator in Vancouver Public Schools. In his rare time, he coaches tennis and sporadically writes for his nascent wiki‑bloggy thing called Librarian Provocateur. If all that sounds terribly flip, he is dead serious about rocking the school library world. He has worked with library patrons from pre-school to graduate school in both Vancouver and Brussels, Belgium, led the design of four school libraries and consulted on the design of programs for several more. Currently, he is among those project LIT rabble-rousers who hope to transform teacher‑librarianship. He wears non-sensible shoes.

Dan Gemeinhart graduated from Gonzaga University in 2001. After teaching abroad for a year, he obtained his Library Media teaching endorsement and became the K-5 teacher-librarian at Mission View Elementary in Wenatchee, Washington. He feels ridiculously lucky to have a job sharing great literature with great kids. In 2009, he received his National Board Certification in Library Media. Dan lives with his wife and two beautiful daughters in Cashmere, Washington. Learn more about Dan at his website (http://www. dangemeinhart.com/Writer/Welcome.html). Fall 2011

Roz Thompson works in the Tumwater School District as a teacher-librarian. Currently at Tumwater High School, she also spent a year‑and-a-half at East Olympia Elementary. Before becoming a librarian, Roz taught high school English, Math and Social Studies for ten years. Roz loves organizing things, collaborating with others, teaching kids, finding answers to questions, reading and simply learning. Several years ago Roz realized that she was destined to become a librarian when her mom brought her some of her childhood books and on the inside cover she saw that she had created her own check out cards when she was young. Roz has a wonderfully supportive husband, Jon, two amazing boys, Owen (13) and Drew (11), and two very friendly Boston Terriers, Otis and Crissy. MEDIUM | 17


2011 Preconference

Using the Tools that Scare Us! with Anne Bingham, LeAnn Miller and Carina Pierce Morning Only 9:00 am–12:00 pm in Convention Center 102 B Google really is not scary, is it? After all, we all use it every single day (admit it, you do!). Google has some of the most creative and intelligent people in the world working in their labs, and they are still the most successful and most used search engine around. We show you some of the great (FREE!) tools we should be using and teaching for all of our students’, staff’s and our own searching needs. Wikipedia: Friend or Foe? Encyclopedia or Graffiti board? Revolution? Devolution? Let’s check it out! Guided tour of this popular source and what libraries are doing with it. Animate your library with Quick Response (QR) codes! As more mobile devices integrate into schools, adding QR codes to books, shelves and displays creates an interactive environment. Use QR codes to link to book trailers, author blogs and much, much more to spark an interest in reading. Blogs and wikis are here to stay, but do not fear! The tracking and revision features of most blogs and wikis allow you to control access and monitor content. We explore the flexibility of these tools and how to use them for communication and collaboration. Google, Wikipedia, QR codes, blogging and using wikis are Library Information and Technology (LIT)! In the past, these emerging technologies have often received a bad rap. Join us to learn some ways to use these tools successfully in your library while encouraging digital citizenship from your students. Anne Bingham has a MLIS from University of Washington and a MEd from Grand Canyon University. She is in her seventh year as a school librarian at University Prep in Seattle. She worked at the University of Washington Libraries for 10 years. In her spare time, she likes to search in Wikipedia and play ukulele, but not simultaneously.

LeAnn Miller is currently a K-12 Instructional Technology Specialist for Seattle Public Schools. She recently completed an M.A. Ed with Library Media from Antioch University. Previously, she taught Second grade at Syre Elementary in Shoreline. In her spare time, LeAnn blogs about books and tech at All About Literacy (www.allaboutliteracy.com) and loves gardening, traveling, and letting her dog walk her.

Carina Pierce is beginning her third year as a teacher-librarian and her second as a full‑time teacher-librarian at Cougar Mountain Junior High in the Bethel School District. After graduating from the University of Washington with an English degree and Central Washington with her secondary teaching certification, she taught high school English for a couple of years in the mid-nineties, then took a decade or so off to raise a family and find a better fit for herself in the education field. She found it in the Library Media Science endorsement and M.A. Ed program at Antioch University Seattle. Carina serves as the Washington Library Media Association Webmaster and lives in Puyallup with her super supportive husband and three crazy-busy children (8, 11, and 13).

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Technology Peer Coaching: Starting the Conversation with Linda King and Leigh Lohrasbi Afternoon Only Session: 1:00 pm–4:00 pm in Convention Center 102 A

What is it really like to be both teacher-librarian and technology peer coach? What are the benefits and challenges? This is a hands-on session for those considering taking advantage of this opportunity. Practice collaboration techniques, discuss technologies utilized and find out how this program could benefit your students, staff and Library Information and Technology program. Take a survey to find out where you and your colleagues are in the use of technology. Leigh Lohrasbi (sitting) began her Technology Peer Coaching program in 2010, working with science teachers in her middle school building. Linda King (standing) began her Technology Peer Coaching program in 2007, working with special education, science, social studies and math teachers at her middle school. o

Earn Clock Hours While Attending Conference Once again, Washington Library Media Association provides the opportunity for you to earn clock hours during conference. To obtain clock hours at the 2011 WLMA conference, you need to do the following: 1. Visit the clock hour table upon arriving to sign up. The clock hour table is located near the registration area. It opens at 7:00 am Friday and closes at 12 pm Saturday. Open hours will be posted during conference. You only need to sign in once! 2. Pay (check or cash), turn in your registration form (www.wlma.org/conference2011) and pick up a schedule of sessions for initialing.

Clock Hour Fees:

$15.00 for 7.5 hours $30 for 15 hours (Must attend at least 1/2 of Thursday to earn 15 hours for conference) 3. Obtain the presenter’s initial on the session form for each session you attend. 4. Complete the process by dropping off the list of sessions you attended (with your name and the sessions you attended initialed) before you go home. You must complete this step to earn/qualify for the clock hours. All clock hour records are mailed to clock hour registered participants that complete all steps of the process by early December. They arrive in an envelope from Antioch University. Keep your eyes open for this letter! Do not throw it away!

Questions? Contact Sarah Applegate, Clock Hour Supervisor via e-mail: sarcmc@comcast.net

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2011 Conference

Conference Speakers Address and Promote LIT! Keynote: Make it LIT! with Mike Eisenberg, Sarah Applegate, Lisa Layera and Susan McBurney We, in Washington State and the Northwest, have drawn a line in the sand. The decline of school libraries and loss of school librarian positions stops right here, right now. It is time to reverse the trend — by making it LIT: Library, Information and Technology programs focused on direct and measured impact on student learning. Embrace the brand (teacher-librarians, LIT programs), re-envisioned and restructure our programs, and shout it from the rooftops (and across the electronic universe). We are essential because information and technology skills instruction, reading advocacy, and

information management and services are basic and core to K-12 education in the 21st Century. In this keynote session, Mike Eisenberg shares his passion and commitment to the LIT framework and offers a practical “call to action.” Sarah Applegate shares her “street smarts” on how this makes a difference in school settings, and Lisa Layera and Susan McBurney share how to translate the LIT framework so you have parents, politics and the community covered. This keynote is one of those, seminal, “wowza” events that they will be talking about for years.

Mike Eisenberg is widely known for his strong advocacy and passion for library, information, and technology programs and teacher-librarians. He is also the “founding dean” of the Information School at the University of Washington, serving from 1998 to 2006. Mike’s current work focuses on information literacy, information problem-solving in virtual environments, and information science education K-20. His “Big6™ approach to information problem-solving” is the most widely used information literacy program in the world. Mike is a prolific author (9 books and dozens of articles and papers) and he has worked with thousands of students—pre-K through higher education—as well as people in business, government, and communities to improve their information and technology skills. Sarah Applegate is a National Board Certified Teacher-Librarian at River Ridge High School in Lacey Washington, where she has been teaching for 16 years. Sarah is an adjunct faculty member in the library media endorsement program at Antioch University, Seattle, and has been a Professional Certification facilitator as well as a National Board facilitator in North Thurston Public Schools. Sarah has also held various positions on the WLMA board, including President, Secondary Levels chair and Advocacy Co-Chair. Sarah recently completed a four month Fulbright Distinguished Award in Teaching grant researching school libraries and information literacy instruction in Finland, where she discovered she loves -20c weather, public transportation and salty black licorice. Sarah and her husband Rob, also a teacher, also enjoyed lots of cross country skiing while pulling their daughter Marieka, 3, visited lots of amazing libraries and sadly, learned very little Finnish. Lisa Layera is a citizen advocate for school libraries and education funding. Lisa is known as a “Spokane Mom” for her work lobbying the Washington Legislature to recognize school libraries and information technology as a part of “basic education.” She is a co-founder of the Washington Coalition for School Libraries and Information Technology. Lisa continues to advocate, lobby and engage at the local, state and national level. Her most current role will be as spokesperson for the levy campaign of Washington’s second largest school district and development of a parent and community engagement network. Susan McBurney is a co-founder of the Washington Coalition for School Libraries and Information Technology (WCSLit), a grassroots coalition that advocates for school library programs and basic education funding in Washington State. Along with co-founder Lisa Layera, Susan has presented at several library and technology conferences and has facilitated a series of regional workshops for the Idaho Commission for Libraries. Prior to her work as a citizen advocate, Susan worked as a teacher of the deaf, a sign language interpreter, and a university instructor and researcher. She holds degrees in English Literature, Deaf Education, Teaching English as a Second Language, and Linguistics.

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Friday’s Breakfast: Elementary Level Author/Illustrator Nicole Rubel Rotten Ralph: 36 Years Young

An inside look at how Rotten Ralph has morphed over the years and his current fascination with the great artists. Rotten Ralph as you have not ever seen him (or his art) before. Nicole Rubel is an author and illustrator known for her uniquely colorful illustrations and charming stories. She has over sixty books to her credit and is the co-creator of the popular Rotten Ralph series, which has sold over one and a half million copies. Her debut book, Rotten Ralph earned the children’s book Showcase Award for Outstanding Graphic Design. Her work has garnered awards from the American Book Association, American Institute of Graphic Arts, and American Booksellers. A Cowboy Named Ernestine was named a Junior Library Guild Selection, Twice as Nice/What’s It Like to Be a Twin won the 2005 Oppenhelm Toy Portfolio Platinum Book Award, and her Rotten Ralph series was the basis for an animated TV series, which began airing on the Fox Family channel in 1999. Rubel’s childhood home was in Coral Gables, Florida but she currently resides with her husband on a farm in Aurora, Oregon. Learn more about Nicole Rubel and her books at www.nicolerubel.com.

Friday’s Luncheon: WLMA is LIT! WLMA’s Luncheon is a great big deal of a meal, smack in the heart of our annual conference. Here’s where highlights, business, awards and networking come together. Where our association—people gathered for a common purpose—celebrates accomplishments and gathers forces for the work ahead. Join us.!

Friday’s Banquet: Spokane Author Jess Walter A Middle School Librarian Saved My Life What “Lifts off like a rocket” is “Deliciously antic” yet “Dangerously astute?” Need another hint? It is “a joy to read,” “gasp-out-loud funny” and “witheringly dead-on?”* Spokane’s own Jess Walter! Please, do not just listen to his critics, but see and hear him in person as he shares his writing, his books and reveals how a middle school librarian saved his life. *Critic reviews of The Financial Lives of the Poets in order from: Boston Globe, Washington Post, New York Times, Nick Hornby Parade, New York Daily News and the LA Times.  Jess Walter is the author of five novels, including The Financial Lives of the Poets, Time Magazine’s #2 book of 2009, The Zero, a 2006 National Book Award finalist and Citizen Vince, winner of the 2005 Edgar Allan Poe Award for best novel. His work has been translated into more than 20 languages and his essays, short fiction, criticism and journalism have been widely published, in Playboy, McSweeney’s, ESPN The Magazine, Details, Newsweek, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Boston Globe among many others. If there were an award for largest and longest lasting snow castle, Jess would have won it several years in a row for his impressive show of craftsmanship in building dual-function fortresses and sledding slopes. He lives with his wife Anne and children, Brooklyn, Ava and Alec in his childhood home of Spokane, Washington. Fall 2011

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Saturday’s Breakfast: Middle/Junior High School Level Author Neal Shusterman “Writing for Teenagers and Other Alien Species” The award-winning author of The Schwa Was Here, Unwind, and more than twenty novels for young readers, discusses the challenge of reaching teenagers where they live, and giving them quality stories that are more compelling than text messaging or videogames.

Neal Shusterman was inspired to write by an English teacher who offered extra credit for monthly creative writing. As a full-time writer, he has gone on to pen everything from novels to screenplays to music and even games. He has also directed several films and written for the “Goosebumps” and “Animorphs” TV series. His children’s and young adult novels have garnered numerous awards and honors. Sometimes funny, sometimes dark, but always poignant, Neal Shusterman’s books are “genre-busters” that defy categorization. They challenge readers to think, while keeping them on the edges of their seats. In 2005, Full Tilt (2003) appeared on the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) “Popular Paperbacks” booklist and the International Reading Association’s “Young Adult’s Choices Reading List.” The Schwa Was Here (2006) received a Starred Review from School Library Journal, the 2005 Boston Globe/Horn Book Award for Fiction, and selected for the American Library Association’s (ALA) “Best Books for Young Adults” and “Notable Books.” Everlost (2006), the first in the “Skinjackers Trilogy,” appeared on the 2009 ALA “Popular Paperback “ book list, the 2008 School Library Journal “Best Books of the Year” and the Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA) “Top Shelf Fiction for Middle School Readers 2008” list. Unwind (2007) is a 2008 ALA “Top Ten Picks for Reluctant Readers,” a 2008 ALA Best Young Adult Book and received the 2010 Japanese Sakura Medal,and the 2010 Washington Evergreen Young Adult Book Award. Neal’s most recent books Bruiser (2010) and Everfound (2011) are the third in the “Skinjackers Trilogy.” Neal Shusterman grew up in Brooklyn, New York, before spending two years of high school in Mexico City. He currently lives in Southern California and is the father of four children. For more information visit his website (www.storyman.com) and find him on Facebook and Twitter.

Saturday’s Closing Luncheon: Speaker and Teacher-Librarian Joyce Valenza 10 Important Things Teacher-Librarians Must Teach

What are the ten big things modern Teacher-Librarians must teach to ensure learners at all levels grow as literate/transliterate citizens? From a better understanding of intellectual property to best tools for telling stories and communicating new knowledge, Joyce counts them down and reveals strategies for delivering instruction. Joyce Valenza is the Teacher-Librarian at Springfield Township High School in Erdenheim, Pennsylvania. She received her Ph.D. (2007) at the University of North Texas’s School of Library and Information Science. For ten years she was the techlife@school columnist for the Philadelphia. She is the author of Power Tools, Power Research Tools and Power Tools Recharged for American Library Association (ALA) Editions. Her blog for School Library Journal, “NeverendingSearch” won the Edublogs Award for 2005 and 2009. Joyce is a Milken Educator, an American Memory Fellow, and a Teacher with Primary Sources Fellow. She was selected as a Technology and Learning 100@30. Her video series, Internet Searching Skills was a YALSA Selected Video for Young Adults in 1999. The video series Library Skills for Children was released in 2003, and her six-volume video series Research Skills for Students was released in Fall 2004. Her Virtual Library won the International Association of School Librarians (IASL) School Library Web Page of the Year Award for 2001. She received the Pennsylvania School Library’s 2005 Outstanding Program Award and the 2009 Outstanding Contributor Award. Joyce is active in ALA, AASL, Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) and the International Society for Technology Education (ISTE). She contributes to Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA), Technology and Learning, Library Media Connection (LMC) and School Library Journal. Joyce speaks internationally about issues relating to libraries and thoughtful use of educational technology.

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2011 Conference

Presenting LIT! Authors Offer Sessions and Signatures Clare Hodgson Meeker Session 1

Clare Hodgson Meeker is an award-winning author of eight published books and over 24 magazine stories for children. She teaches writing and makes author appearances in schools throughout Washington and Oregon. She also teaches writing for children to adults at Richard Hugo House, a writers’ cooperative in Seattle, Washington. Born and raised in New York, Clare graduated with a B.A. in Music from Boston University and received a law degree from Hofstra University. She left the practice of law to raise two children and began her career writing children’s books in 1993. Clare is a founding member of The Righteous Mothers, a female vocal group and she performs with a funk band called Funk Pro Tunc. Visit her website: www.claremeeker.com.

Kenn Nesbitt

Session 1 and Session 7 Kenn Nesbitt is the author of numerous books of poetry for children, including Santa Got Stuck in the Chimney (2006), When the Teacher Isn’t Looking: And Other Funny School Poems (2005), and The Aliens Have Landed at Our School! (2001). His books abound with hilarious and silly situations. In addition to writing books, Nesbitt has also written lyrics for the music CDs Snail’s Pace, Snowy Day, and Monkey Business by Eric Herman and the Invisible Band. Kenn Nesbitt was born in Berkeley, California, in 1962. He grew up in Fresno and San Diego and currently lives in Washington with his wife, children, and pets. Kenn created an online “Funny Poetry Playground” at Poetry4kids.com; it features funny poems, lessons, games, and poetry-related activities. Visit Kenn’s website at: www.poetry4kids.com.

Kelly Milner Halls

Session 2 and Session 4 (with Claire Rudolph Murphy and Kenn Nesbitt) Kelly Milner Halls is a nonfiction writer for young readers. She wrote for adults, but she found writing for children ideal as she could write about weird topics. She started writing bylined articles and reviews for publications before moving to nonfiction books where she claims she “made being ‘weird’ really cool.” From Dinosaur Mummies to Tales of the Cryptid and beyond, Hall combines top notch research and interview skills with lively writing and images to capture the imagination of young readers (and adults who appreciate them). Kelly lives and works in Spokane with one dog, two daughters, too many cats and a 4-foot rock iguana named Gigantor. As a single mom with two kids in college, writing and speaking is not just a hobby for her, it is her full-time job, which she views as her never‑ending bliss. Visit her website: www.wondersofweird.com/index.html.

Kit Bakke Session 3

Kit Bakke wishes she had taken more history in school because now she spends most of her time researching all the cool people in the past who have so much to teach her. Miss Alcott’s E-Mail is not only about Louisa May Alcott, the Civil War, the women’s suffrage movement and transcendentalism, but also about Kit’s rowdy politically active days in the antiwar movement of the 1960s and 70s. Dot To Dot is about a young girl down on her luck who intends to never to get off her bedroom floor. She recovers with the help of an eccentric aunt, a trip to England, interesting characters from the past, tarot cards and an unusual boy. Kit Bakke only recently dares to call herself an author—for many years she was a pediatric oncology nurse, worked in hospital clinical information systems and as a consultant for a Seattle-based consulting company Point B. Along the way she collected two undergraduate degrees and two masters’ degrees. Visit her website for more: www.kitbakke.com. o Fall 2011

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Karen Cushman Session 5 and Session 7

Karen Cushman does her writing in a cozy red-walled writing studio on Vashon Island, in the company of her husband Phil and her cat Murphy. Karen has written seven historical fiction novels featuring “gutsy girls figuring out who they are.” Catherine, Called Birdy (1994), a Newbery Honor book, and Newbery winner The Midwife’s Apprentice (1995) both take place in the Middle Ages, bringing alive the struggle to survive for rich and poor as well as the limitations set on girls at that time. Later books The Ballad of Lucy Whipple (1996), Rodzina (2003), and The Loud Silence of Francine Green (2006), all set in historical United States. Matilda Bone (2000) and Karen’s latest, Alchemy and Meggy Swann (2009), return to historical England and explore themes of loneliness and belonging. Karen Cushman hails from Chicago but finds living on a Pacific Northwest island to be a dream come true. Hers is a bookish family—her husband is a professor and her daughter is a librarian—and Karen holds two master’s degrees from Stanford University. In the lush climate of Vashon Island, Karen produces tomatoes, rosemary, lavender, daisies, apples, pears, hazelnuts, blackberries, and, of course, her wonderful novels. Visit her website: www.karencushman.com and check out an interview with her by Chris Wolf in his column “Beyond the Cover Flap” on page 39 of this issue.

Deb Lund Session 6

Deb Lund is the author of Monsters On Machines, Dinosailors, All Aboard The Dinotrain, and other books for children. A certified classroom and music teacher and librarian for over twenty years, Deb has extensive experience teaching writing to students and teachers. She has a master’s degree in applied liberal studies from Hamline University with a focus on Orff Schulwerk and teaching writing. Deb has led writing groups, book groups, storytelling troupes, and has conducted choirs and directed plays and musicals. This versatile writer founded and co-directed an arts-based homeschool support program. When not teaching adult writers, students, or teachers, Deb visits schools, bookstores, and libraries as an author and workshop leader. She is a frequent presenter at conferences for writers and teachers. Deb’s three young children provide her with inspiration, humor, chaos, joy, and messiness. Learn more about Deb at www.deblund.com.

Katherine Kirkpatrick Session 6

Katherine Kirkpatrick is the author of fiction and nonfiction books for young readers, all reflecting her fascination with history. These include Mysterious Bones: The Story of Kennewick Man illustrated by Emma Stevenson, The Snow Baby: The Arctic Childhood of Robert E. Peary’s Daring Daughter, and Redcoats and Petticoats illustrated by Ronald Himler. A former children’s book editor and now a full-time writer, she lives with her family in Seattle, Washington, and is a frequent visitor to the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, the current home of Kennewick Man’s bones. Learn more about Katherine on her website: http://www.katherinekirkpatrick.com.

Michael Harmon Session 6 and Session 7

Michael Harmon was born in Los Angeles, California, and now lives in the Pacific Northwest. As the award winning author of Skate, The Last Exit To Normal, Brutal, The Chamber Of Five, and A Kid From Southie (collaborated with John ‘Red’ Shea, a former associate of Boston mobster Whitey Bulger). Michael draws upon his own feelings and experiences as an alternative learner and eventual high school dropout to write contemporary and realistic novels that reach teens from all backgrounds. Visit Michael’s website to learn more: www.Booksbyharmon.com.

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Terry Trueman

2011 Conference

Session 6 and Session 7

Terry Trueman grew up in Seattle, and attended the University of Washington and Eastern Washington University, earning degrees in applied psychology and creative writing, including his M.F.A. Terry has lived in the Spokane area over 35 years. He teaches writing classes and travels widely, meeting his readers and touching their lives with his heartfelt message and humor. His books have won numerous state readers’ nominations and awards, and the Printz Honor Award for Stuck in Neutral. The genuine sequel to this title and its companion, Cruise Control, is expected to be out in 2012. Learn more about Terry on his website: http://www.terrytrueman.com.

Susan Blackaby Session 7

Susan Blackaby wrote over 100 leveled readers, early chapter books, and high-low fiction for the educational market. On her own she authored Rembrandt’s Hat (Houghton Mifflin 2002), which was named by the Washington Post as one of the “Top Ten Picture Books of the Year.” In 2009, she published the middle grade biography, Cleopatra: Egypt’s Last and Greatest Queen (Sterling), and her recent collection of poetry, Nest, Nook, and Cranny (Charlesbridge 2010) was included on the New York Public Library’s “100 Titles for Reading and Sharing” and on the 2011 Bank Street College “Best Children’s Books of the Year.“ Also, it recently received the “2011 Lion and Unicorn Award for Excellence in North American Poetry.” Brownie Groundhog and the February Fox, a new picture book, was published in January of this year, and a second printing is available this fall. Susan makes her home in Portland, Oregon, in a “lab-mandatory neighborhood.” She is active within the Portland writers’ community, where she exhibits humor and a gentle and quick wit. For more on Susan, see her writer’s profile on JacketFlap (www.jacketflap.com/profile.asp?member=sblackaby) and read blog interviews with her on Check It Out (maclibrary.wordpress.com/2010/03/19/poetry-friday-susan-blackaby-interview/) and Heather Vogel Fredrick’s blog (www.heathervogelfrederick.com/blog/2010/04/pie-of-the-national-poetry-month-club-susan-blackaby/). o

Autographs, Books and More… Oh My! Washington Library Associations (WLMA) has lined up amazing authors to speak, present and sign autographs (schedule on page 36) at the 2011 conference. In addition, the conference offers sessions addressing reading advocacy, literacy and Washington State book awards. With all of this going on, it is only natural for WLMA to also line up a place for you to view, read and purchase books. This year, WLMA chose Aunties, a local independent Spokane bookstore, as the conference on site bookstore during conference hours. Make plans to drop by Convention Center Room 11A to browse and enjoy all that Auntie’s has to offer! Fall 2011

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2011 Conference

This is Lit: WLMA Webinar Workshops with the WWWorld’s Best In a new variation for conference, Washington Library Media Association teams up with Steve Hargadon’s Library 2.011 Worldwide Virtual Conference to offer and feature online learning opportunities for first-time and seasoned online learners alike. These webinar sessions feature a stellar lineup of workshops (some live from Spokane and some via the web). Join other conference attendees in one or more of these exciting “fishbowl” workshops where you can fire up your laptop and log in to participate in the online webinar and/or join in live-and-in-the-flesh discussions with the webinar presenters and moderators. Keynote and closing session take place in Salon IV & V. All other webinars take place in Convention Center 102 D.

Friday’s Webinar Sessions Keynote (9:00 am – 10:00 am) Make it LIT! with Mike Eisenberg, Sarah Applegate, Lisa Layera and Susan McBurney We, in Washington State and the Northwest, have drawn a line in the sand. The decline of school libraries and loss of school librarian positions stops right here, right now. It is time to reverse the trend — by making it LIT: Library, Information and Technology programs focused on direct and measured impact on student learning. Embrace the brand (teacher-librarians, LIT programs), re-envisioned and restructure our programs, and shout it from the rooftops (and across the electronic universe). We are essential because information and technology skills instruction, reading advocacy, and information management and services are basic and core to K-12 education in the 21st Century. In this keynote session, Mike Eisenberg shares his passion and commitment to the LIT framework and offers a practical “call to action.” Sarah Applegate shares her “street smarts” on how this makes a difference in school settings, and Lisa Layera and Susan McBurney share how to translate the LIT framework so you have parents, politics and the community covered. This keynote is one of those, seminal, “wowza” events that they will be talking about for years. (See page 20 for more information on the speakers.) Session 1 (10:15 am  –11:05 am) Developing a Powerful Personal Learning Network Richard Byrne Oxford Hills Comprehensive High School (South Paris, Maine) This session is for those teachers who want to expand their professional learning opportunities beyond the traditional in-service days, occasional conference, and graduate course. If you have tried Twitter before, but you “just don’t get it,” this is the session for you. (See page 15 for more on the presenter.) Session 2 (1:45 am –2:45 pm) Library 2.011 Hargadon Interviews Loertscher Steve Hargadon Social Learning Consultant, Founder of the Web 2.0 Labs David V. Loertscher, School of Library and Information Science at San Jose State University With David Loertscher in Spokane and Steve Hargadon online, the WLMA webinar series hosts this interview as a prelude to the Library 2.011 Worldwide Virtual Conference (www.library20.com/page/2011-conference). David V. Loertscher has been a school library media specialist at both the elementary and secondary school levels and president of the American Association of School Librarians. He has taught at Purdue, University of Arkansas and University of Oklahoma. He is presently a professor at the School of Library and Information Science at San Jose State University. He served as head of the editorial department at Libraries Unlimited for ten years and is President of Hi Willow Research & Publishing. Steve Hargadon, is founder of Classroom 2.0 (www.classroom20.com), the Global Education Conference (www.globaleducationconference.com), and is the founding co-chair of the Library 2.011 conference. Steve hosts the popular The Future of Education (www.futureofeducation.com) interview series and blogs about educational technology (www.SteveHargadon.com).

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2011 Conference Session 3 (3:00 pm – 4:00 pm) The School Learning Commons David Loertscher, San Jose University Betty Marcoux, University of Washington (Retired) In the three years since the proposal to transform school libraries and computer labs into a learning commons, much experimentation has happened across North America. Tour with us the idea of a learning commons, how it is being developed, the whys and so whats, and a vision for building a fascinating information and technology environment for the learner of today. Presenters David Loertscher and Betty Marcoux are co-editors of the Teacher Librarian journal and life-long proponents of school library programs in their distinguished careers. Session 4 (4:15 pm –5:15 pm) Lessons from Down Under: 7 Effective Strategies for Library Advocacy Karen Bonanno In this webinar Karen Bonanno explores 7 advocacy strategies that have worked very successfully for the Australian school library profession: identify a memorable message, capture killer statistics, gather startling facts, source quotable quotes, find remarkable stories, massage the media, and leverage the network. WLMA provides local moderator for this report from half a world away. Karen Bonanno is the contracted Executive Officer for the Australian School Library Association (ASLA).

Saturday’s Webinar Sessions Session 5 (9:00 am –10:00 am) Improving Online Safety by Investigating Our Digital Footprint Brent Howard, Instructional Technology Specialists, NorthEast Washington ESD 101  Conn McQuinn, Director, Educational Technology Support Center - Puget Sound ESD Social Networking sites such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have become a mainstay in our society. While these and other social networking sites can be wonderful collaboration tools, it is important to keep in mind that participation in these communities contributes to the development of our digital dossier. This session draws attention to the risks involved with social networking and provides an overview of skills and resources that can help both children and adults navigate the social web safely. Session 6 (10:15 am –11:15 am) Big6™ by the Month Overview Mike Eisenberg, University of Washington Janet Murray, Big6™.com Colet Bartow, Montana Office of Public Instruction Mike and the Big6™ Team present an overview of the “Big6™ by the Month” program. They explain how a month-to-month approach helps you achieve a clearly defined, predictable, measurable, reported system of teaching information literacy skills. This live session include ample time to ask questions. Session 7 (11:30 am –12:30 pm) 2.0 for L4L: Empowering 21st Century Learners with Social Media Michelle Luhtala, Head Librarian, New Canaan High School, Connecticut Internet censorship is rampant in K-12 education. How does this impact our ability to prepare students for 21st century citizenship? Is it deepening the digital divide? During this session, Michelle Luhtala, Library Department Chair at New Canaan High School, a free-range media high school from Connecticut, demonstrates how using social media for instruction helps embed 21st century learning into core content curriculum. Visit Michelle Luhtala’s blog for more information. Closing Session (12:30 pm –2:15 pm) 10 Important Things Teacher-Librarians Must Teach Joyce Valenza, Teacher-Librarian at Springfield Township High School in Erdenheim, Pennsylvania What are the ten big things modern Teacher-Librarians must teach to ensure learners at all levels grow as literate/transliterate citizens? From a better understanding of intellectual property to best tools for telling stories and communicating new knowledge, Joyce counts them down and reveals strategies for delivering instruction. (See page 22 for more information on the speaker.) o Fall 2011

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2011 Conference Sessions

October 14 Friday Session 1 10:15 am–11:15 am Conference Tips for Newbies

Betty Marcoux, University of Washington (Retired) Lorraine Bruce, University of Washington Learn how to best successfully navigate a conference like Washington Library Media Association’s and get the most out of your time there! Information Management and Services All DoubleTree Suite C (Main Floor)

Connecting with Others to Save and Revive School Libraries

Roz Thompson, Christie Kaaland and Carolyn Logue WLMA Advocacy Committee In this session, WLMA Lobbyist Carolyn Logue, Legislative Liaison Roz Thompson and National Legislative Advocate Christie Kaaland discuss and share ideas for communicating and connecting with people at the district and building levels to show how libraries are helping positively affect student learning as well as staying abreast of the latest initiatives and bills related to school libraries at the state and national levels. Remember, we all need to be advocates at some level for our profession… whether it is with students, parents, staff, administration, the business community or our legislators. Pick your level of involvement, be informed, and present a positive message about how important your position really is! Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon III (Main Floor)

Creating and Using GLOGS: Online Multimedia Posters

Deena Kelly, Glogster Glogster EDU is the leading global education platform for the creative expression of knowledge and skills in the classroom and beyond. We empower educators and students with the technology to create GLOGS— online multimedia posters—with text, photos, videos, graphics, sounds, drawings, data attachments and more. Check http://edu.glogster.com. This is a hands on session, so please bring your laptops! Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Salon I (Main Floor)

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Creating Change: Teaching and Learning about the Holocaust

Ilana Cone Kennedy, Washington State Holocaust Education Resource Center The Holocaust Center offers a brand new short educational film to schools featuring the stories of local Holocaust survivors. Come see the film, get a copy, and discuss ways to use this new resource in the classroom. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Suite D (Main Floor)

Developing a Powerful Personal Learning Network

Richard Byrne, Oxford Hills Comprehensive High School, South Paris, Maine This session is for those teachers who want to expand their professional learning opportunities beyond the traditional in-service days, occasional conference, and graduate course. If you have tried Twitter before, but you “just don’t get it,” this is the session for you. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102C and D and Webinar

Find Your Voice and Use It in a Children’s Book

Nicole Rubel, Author/Illustrator Learning to express your thoughts and feelings is an important theme in Nicole Rubel’s work. She shares the childhood story of how she started finding her voice thanks to an inspirational art teacher’s project. Growing up as a twin eventually sparked some imaginative, poignant and comical storylines, but there was a time when it also impeded her self-expression. Learn about the challenges of finding a voice and the rewards of learning to use that voice. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Evergreen (Main Floor)

Native Vision

Rachael McClinton and Lily Gladstone, Living Voices During the Depression, a Navajo girl honors her family’s past while struggling to keep her culture in a government‑run boarding school. Her vision of becoming a modern healer is brought to life as her community fights in World War II. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside I (3rd Floor)

NCCE/Library of Congress Professional Development Opportunities

Northwest Council for Computer Education (NCCE) Learn about the NCCE/Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Consortium partnership and discover how you can attend free two-day summer workshops. A lso learn about other professional development opportunities available to educators, including a weeklong summer institute in Washington, DC. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102B VOL 36 NO. 1


2011 Conference Sessions Peer Coaching: Changing Roles for Librarians

Steve Coker, North Thurston SD, Stacey Suhm, Yakima SD Lori Cleveringa, Yakima SD Les Foltos, Director of Educational Innovation, Peer-Ed Participants in this panel discussion will learn about Peer Coaching and hear from teacher-librarians who currently coaching colleagues. Learn how coaching has changed their roles, and gain insights into some of the ways they have helped other educators in their schools to integrate technology into active, engaging learning activities. Participants will also learn how Peer Coaching prepared these teacher-librarians to take on these new roles and how they can participate in Peer Coaching. For more information and handouts for this sessions please visit: http://peer-ed.com/presentations.aspx. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Suite A (Main Floor)

Rhyme and Punishment

Kenn Nesbitt Author Join Kenn Nesbitt, author of The Tighty-Whitey Spider and My Hippo Has the Hiccups as he shows how humorous verse can make lifelong readers and writers of the children in your life, and help anyone overcome a fear of public speaking. (Also offered in Session 7) Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon II (Main Floor)

10 Tips on Teamwork: Helping Kids Work Together On and Off the Pitch

Clare Meeker Children’s Book Author Whether or not you play a sport, teamwork is important. Using her new book, Soccer Dreams: Playing the Seattle Sounders FC Way, award-winning author Clare Hodgson Meeker discusses ways to apply teamwork tips in the classroom and create Buddy Poems with participants. (Includes handout) Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside II (3rd Floor)

Washington State Library, A Partner with K-12 Libraries—Collaboration: Past, Present and Future

Martha Shinners and Jeff Martin Washington State Library Martha Shinners shares an overview of past and current Washington State Library (WSL) K-12 projects. Jeff Martin shares the new Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) Five Year Plan requirements. Discussion and feedback from the audience allows WSL to better understand the opportunities for future collaboration. Information Management and Services All DoubleTree Shade (Main Floor) Fall 2011

Session 2 1:45 pm – 2:45 pm Doctor: Is it a Jokester, Thrill-seeking Party Animal or a Wild Thing?

Barb Langridge, ABookandaHug.com, WBALTV Channel 11 (NBC Affiliate), Books Alive, Howard County Library There is a book for every reader. Learn the eight reading personalities; how to diagnose a student’s reading personality and find books that match those personalities. Help students understand their own reading personality so they can choose books they will want to read. (Also offered in Session 4) Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside II (3rd Floor)

Libguides: Creating Pathfinders and Research Guides to Empower Students and Facilitate Collaboration

Lisa Gallinatti, Auburn Riverside High School Auburn School District LibGuides is growing in popularity. Both Joyce Valenza and Buffy Hamilton use it to make their own practice efficient and effective. Learn how this subscription service can help you create portals to high-quality research information and web 2.0 multimedia. Information Management and Services All DoubleTree Salon III (Main Floor)

Library of Congress PD Planner

Northwest Council for Computer Education (NCCE) This session introduces you to an exciting Library of Congress program that allows you to customize professional development for using the Library’s vast resources. Once the lessons, which are aligned with American Association of School Librarians (AASL) standards, are selected, all materials are available in either PDF or web-based formats. Information Management and Services All Convention Center 102B

Library 2.011 Hargadon Interviews Loertscher

Steve Hargadon, Founder of the Web 2.0 Labs David V. Loertscher, School of Library and Information Science, San Jose State University With David Loertscher in Spokane and Steve Hargadon online, the WLMA webinar series hosts this interview as a prelude to the Library 2.011 Worldwide Virtual Conference. (www.library20.com/page/2011-conference) Information Management and Services All Convention Center 102D and Webinar MEDIUM | 29


2011 Conference Sessions Muddling in Marketing

Unlock Your Reluctant Readers: Why Weird Works

Puget Sound Council’s Best Books of 2010–2011 (Grades K–8)

What’s New in Children’s Literature 2011

Nancy Kuta (Juanita High School), Mary Schroeder (Ben Rush Elementary), Kathy Pazaski (Blackwell Elementary), and Kendra Friday (Redmond Junior High), Lake Washington School District The services libraries provide may not be visible in all districts. Hear how one district raised the awareness of their library program by developing a marketing plan and carrying it forward. Information Management and Services All DoubleTree Suite D (Main Floor)

Venta Silins, University of Washington Bothell Puget Sound Council Members Come see and hear about the best books reviewed by members of Puget Sound Council in the past year. Focus is on books appropriate for readers from grades K–8. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon II (Main Floor)

Reader’s Theatre: You Can Do It Too!

Kimberly Rose,Brouillet Elementary Puyallup SD Learn how to use Reader’s Theatre to provide a low-stress, fun way to enhance students’ reading and collaboration between classroom teachers and librarians. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Suite A (Main Floor)

Teacher-Librarians: Leaders for Tech Integration

Tara Richerson Dennis Small Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Learn how teacher-librarians can lead the implementation of Washington’s new assessments for educational technology.  Join us for an interactive session that explores these dynamic, integrated learning activities, digital resources, and well-guided instructional strategies. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Suite C (Main Floor)

20 Books! WCCPBA Nominees

Amy Cook, Southgate Elementary, Kennewick SD and Kim Guyette, Marcus Whitman Elementary, Richland School District Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award For the 27th year, the committee for Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award (WCCPBA) is happy to present this year’s 20 nominees! We offer book talks on this year’s selection, the author’s of Nubs acceptance of the 2011 WCCPBA, activity ideas and additional enticements for attendees only. Reading Advocacy Elementary DoubleTree Salon I (Main Floor)

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Kelly Milner Halls, Claire Rudolph Murphy and Kenn Nesbitt, Authors Kelly Milner Halls, Claire Rudolf Murphy and poet Kenn Nesbitt walk you through a grand cross section of new books, including their own, sure to reach even the most reluctant readers, thanks to one common factor “The power of WEIRD.” Not only do quirky reads inspire recreational reading, they spark student research and thinking outside the box. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Shade (Main Floor) Linda Warren, TopCopy Books Thousands of children’s books are published each year. Meet 60 of the best 2011 titles for grades K-6. Read-alouds, curriculum connections, books by new authors, and new books by well-known authors will be summarized. Annotated bibliography provided. Reading Advocacy Elementary DoubleTree Parkside I (3rd Floor)

Within the Silence

Rachael McClinton and Lily Gladstone, Living Voices In 1942, thousands of loyal American families were imprisoned. These innocent citizens struggled to maintain their families while incarcerated. Witness this silent chapter of our history. Share one Japanese American family’s fight to sustain faith in the country they love. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside I (3rd Floor)

WLMA’s 2.0 “Back-Channel” Tools Canceled

Session 3 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Collaborative Leadership and the School Librarian

Don Broadwell and Allan Hay The Collaborative Center An introduction to collaborative leading that includes an unscripted demonstration of the technique. Formalizes the link between leadership and problem solving and includes a history of modern ‘participative’ leading from the 1950s to the present. Information Management and Services All DoubleTree Suite A (Main Floor) VOL 36 NO. 1


2011 Conference Sessions Developing Information Literacy through Task Definition

Mind Mapping, Timelines, and Collaborative Brainstorming

Digital Curriculum for 21st Century Learning

Proof Positive: How to Document the Effectiveness of Your Library Program with Follett’s Destiny® Software

John Marino Edmonds School District/University of Washington The initial stage of the information problem-solving process, called Task Definition in the Big6 Information Literacy Approach can have the most impact. This workshop reviews concepts underlying Task Definition and the development of information problem schema. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction Elementary DoubleTree Salon II (Main Floor)

Joy Murray Gale®, Part of Cengage Learning Preparing students to succeed in a digital economy requires a new kind of teaching. Global and computer literacy, problem solving and critical thinking are crucial skills. Learn about trends in learning and searching along with a peek at Gale’s product development strategy. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Evergreen (3rd Floor)

Library Innovations: What are People Doing?

Kathleen Johnson Seattle Academy This presentation describes eight emerging experiments, innovations and new thinking in our profession. These ideas are offered to stimulate your creativity and to extend and enhance your thinking about your own role, program and services. Information Management and Services All DoubleTree Parkside I (3rd Floor)

“Make a Beeline” to Increase Your Cultural Literacy

Gaynor Edwards and Robyn Meenach, Washington Ag in the Classroom (WAIC) Andrea McLaughlin, PRIME Curriculum Get a grip on “Lit”-eracy and agricultural based terms found in everyday statements rooted in Agricultural History. With budgets tied in knots: learn how to do more with less! Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Parkside II (3rd Floor)

Microsoft Office: Right Click, Tips, and Other Tricks

Northwest Council for Computer Education (NCCE) Come spend a little time as we share tips and tricks to more effectively use Microsoft Office. We (almost) guarantee you’ll learn a new tip! Information Management and Services All Convention Center 102B Fall 2011

Richard Byrne Oxford Hills Comprehensive High School South Paris, Maine In this session, participants explore free web-based tools they can use with their students for creating timelines, graphic organizers, and other formats for recording and synthesizing information and ideas. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102C

Andrea Hynes, Graham Elementary and Judy Thompson Spanaway Junior High School, Bethel SD Learn how to use Follett’s Destiny® software as a powerful advocacy tool for evaluations, monthly and/or annual reports, advocacy brochures and websites. Document the success of your library program by working smarter, not harder. Information Management and Services All DoubleTree Suite C (Main Floor)

ProQuest’s New 2011 Lineup: History, Literature, K-8 Resources, and a New Platform!

Deborah Bergeron, ProQuest Session covers essential information for effective use and positioning of ProQuest’s newest content and 21st Century solutions available though the Washington SDL for 2011: History Study Center™, ProQuest® Learning: Literature, SIRS Discoverer® (K-8), and ProQuest’s new platform. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Shade (Main Floor)

RATT! 2.0: Crossover Books for Older Teens

Paige Battle, Union High School, Evergreen SD Joanna Milner, Multnomah County Library The 2nd Annual presentation of crossover books for older teens who are transitioning from young adult literature to adult titles. Participants receive an annotated bibliography and booktalks to share with students and colleagues. Reading Advocacy High School DoubleTree Suite D (Main Floor)

Reading is Traveling

Kit Bakke, Author Reading is a two-way street where readers’ opinions and thoughts matter as much as the writers’. Middle-grade and young adult stories using history and travel are used as examples to help students extract more enjoyment and understanding from their reading. Reading Advocacy Middle/Junior and High School DoubleTree Salon I (Main Floor) MEDIUM | 31


2011 Conference Sessions The School Learning Commons

David Loertscher, San José University Betty Marcoux, University of Washington (Retired) In the three years since the proposal to transform school libraries and computer labs into a learning commons, much experimentation has happened across North America. Tour with us the idea of a learning commons, how it is being developed, the whys and so whats, and a vision for building a fascinating information and technology environment for the learner of today. Information Management and Services All Convention Center 102D and Webinar

Session 4 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm Back To School: Author Visits that Make the Grade

Kelly Milner Halls, Claire Rudolph Murphy and Kenn Nesbitt, Authors A team of critically acclaimed Spokane authors offer a primer on school visits that amaze and delight kids, teachers and administrators. Who should you invite? How should you choose? How do schedules work? How much will it cost? What are the benefits? Is Skype an alternative? How does THAT work? They answer these and many other questions in this informative, fun presentation. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside II (3rd Floor)

Doctor: Is it a Jokester, Thrill-seeking Party Animal or a Wild Thing?

Barb Langridge, ABookandaHug.com, WBALTV Channel 11 (NBC Affiliate), Books Alive, Howard County Library There is a book for every reader. Learn the eight reading personalities; how to diagnose a student’s reading personality and find books that match those personalities. Help students understand their own reading personality so they can choose books they will want to read. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon II (Main Floor)

E-book Options

George Dragich, Follett E-books?! What are the various options for school libraries and how does it all work? Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Shade (Main Floor)

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E-maps: Digital Projection Map Classroom

Kirk Fullmer, Educational Maps & Globes K-12 projection interactive classroom map collection with over 600 maps of state, continent, world and over 150 history maps. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Salon I (Main Floor)

Evergreen Young Adult Book Awards Book Talk

Teresa Jensen WASHYARG Committee Members The Evergreen Young Adult Award is sponsored by WASHYARG. This review group began the award in an effort to give teens in the state a voice in deciding the best literature aimed at their age group. As more teachers and librarians use the list as a source of popular reading and to help their students fulfill required outside reading assignments as pleasurably as possible, we hope that more and more teens will discover their opportunity to voice their opinion to librarians and to publishers. Booktalks are presented and handouts available. Reading Advocacy Middle/Junior and High School DoubleTree Suite A (Main Floor)

Food Literacy: Books and Resources About Food and Food Production

Rick Swann, Bagley Elementary School, Seattle SD Hear about the history of school gardens in America, as well as current issues of food literacy. Learn about books and other resources for children on the subjects of food and food production. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Evergreen (3rd Floor)

InfoQuest: A New Twist on Information Literacy

Kimberly Rose Brouillet Elementary (Puyallup School District) InfoQuest is a game of challenging research questions designed to work with children’s curiosity and motivate them to learn more through active, resource-based learning and helps students distinguish between types of resources. Use at any level – classroom or library. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Suite D (Main Floor)

Integrate Technology in Your Classroom with Britannica Online School Edition!

Darcy McCanless and Joann Lee Britannica Digital Learning Highlights include the early childhood Britannica Learning Zone, the Workspace research organizer tool, and Washington Essential Academic Learning Requirements-aligned teacher resources. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Suite C (Main Floor) VOL 36 NO. 1


2011 Conference Sessions Lessons from Down Under: 7 Effective Strategies for Library Advocacy

Karen Bonanno Australian School Library Association Since January 2002 Karen Bonanno has been the contracted Executive Officer for the Australian School Library Association (ASLA). In this webinar she explores 7 advocacy strategies that have worked very successfully for the Australian school library profession: identify a memorable message, capture killer statistics, gather startling facts, source quotable quotes, find remarkable stories, massage the media, and leverage the network. WLMA provides local moderator for this report from half a world away. Advocacy All Convention Center 102D and Webinar

October 15 Saturday

Session 5 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Develop Your Ag “Lit”-eracy: Celebrate Agriculture in Washington!

Northwest Council for Computer Education (NCCE) Just in time for Veteran’s Day, learn all about the Library of Congress Veteran’s History Project, including how students can take part in the project. You also have time to explore the site and discover classroom lessons using materials from the Veteran’s History Project. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102B

Gaynor Edwards and Robyn Meenach, Washington Ag in the Classroom (WAIC) Andrea McLaughlin, PRIME Curriculum Rooted in “Lit”-eracy: When students realize the diversity in the crops grown in Washington, they also learn about JOBS: 20% of jobs are directly connected to agriculture. The foundation for these jobs starts in classrooms when students develop their dreams while on the path to reality! Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Shade (Main Floor)

Teaching Electronic Literacy

Digital Collection Curation

Library of Congress Veteran’s History Project

Lorraine Monprode Monroe High School Tips on how to embrace the wacky and wonderful world of the web and still keep intellectual integrity. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102C

Using NIE to Teach Technology and Literacy

Sarah Johnson-Rich Seattle Times Learn more about how to implement The Seattle Times Newspapers In Education (NIE) program in your classroom. NIE is a free online program for educators that promotes literacy through the use of the newspaper, lesson plans, serialized stories and curriculum guides. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Salon III (Main Floor)

Fall 2011

Joyce Valenza Springfield Township High School Erdenheim, Pennsylvania Collections have shifted and teacher-librarians can be critical players in curating the digital content, tools, and instruction needed to enhance and inspire a school’s learning culture. Joyce will share effective online strategies for scaling your practice as a teacher and information professional for your stakeholders. Information Management and Services All DoubleTree Salon I (Main Floor)

Improving Online Safety by Investigating Our Digital Footprint

Brent Howard, Instructional Technology Specialists, NorthEast Washington ESD 101  Conn McQuinn, Director, Educational Technology Support Center, Puget Sound ESD Social Networking sites such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have become a mainstay in our society. While these and other social networking sites can be wonderful collaboration tools, it is important to keep in mind that participation in these communities contributes to the development of our digital dossier. This session draws attention to the risks involved with social networking and provides an overview of skills and resources that can help both children and adults navigate the social web safely. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102D and Webinar MEDIUM | 33


2011 Conference Sessions Information Literacy and the Educational Technology Assessments

Tara Richerson Dennis Small Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Connect information literacy and the state Educational Technology assessments. Explore the many dimensions of these teacher-friendly, well-guided assessments. We have planned a dynamic learning experience with opportunities to reflect on your role as an instructional leader as schools implement the assessments. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Parkside II (3rd Floor)

Library of Congress Free Lesson Plans for Teachers

Northwest Council for Computer Education (NCCE) Could not make the three-hour workshop? This session shows you how to access and search the Library of Congress’s Teacher Pages. From Primary Source sets to Collection Connections, to Lesson Plans, see how easily primary source materials can be used in a variety of classroom settings. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102B

A LIT: T-L Music in the Library

Mel Luedders, Lesley University Craig Seasholes, Sanislo Elementary School , Seattle Music probably predates language and still holds a special place in the world of ideas and information. Join Mel Luedders and Craig Seasholes for a session brimming with ideas about what, why and how to include music in library programs. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction Elementary DoubleTree Suite C (Main Floor)

Thinkfinity: Engaging Students, Enhancing Learning

Kimberly Rose, Brouillet Elementary, Puyallup SD Thinkfinity has the highest quality standards-based Internet content for education, including resources linked to state standards and content areas. Come and see the resources and lesson plans available through this wonderful tool! Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102C

What’s My Story? Native American Youth Resources

Nadean Meyer and Rayette Sterling Eastern Washington University The presenters share a working bibliography of youth resources about the Northwest Coastal and Plateau Indian tribes created with consultation with tribal members. The new tribal sovereignty curriculum is the context and actual items will be presented. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside I (3rd Floor)

Young Adult Washington (YAWA): One Stop Web Source for Washington State Young Adults

Michelle Lane, Enterprise Middle School Richland SD Maureen McQuerry, Columbia Basin College Stephen Wallenfels, Tri-City Court Club Find out about Washington State authors, set up Skype visits with authors for your school, arrange author visits, read about forthcoming young adult novels, and book reviews including the Cavalcade of Authors conference. Reading Advocacy Middle/Junior and High School DoubleTree Salon II (Main Floor)

On Weaving Nets to Catch the Wind

Karen Cushman Author Award winning author Karen Cushman tells of her journey from childish scribbler to published writer, with many a detour along the way. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon III (Main Floor)

State Library Programs for Teacher-Librarians

Will Stuivenga Martha Shinners Washington State Library This session provides informational updates from Washington State Library staff on projects and programs that are available to assist schools, teachers, and teacher‑librarians. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Suite D (Main Floor)

34 | MEDIUM

Session 6 10:15 am – 11:15 am Big6™ by the Month Overview

Mike Eisenberg, University of Washington Janet Murray, Big6.com Colet Bartow, Montana Office of Public Instruction Mike and the Big6™ Team present an overview of the “Big6™ by the Month” program. They explain how a month-to-month approach helps you achieve a clearly defined, predictable, measurable, reported system of teaching information literacy skills. This live session includes ample time to ask questions. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102D and Webinar VOL 36 NO. 1


2011 Conference Sessions Building an Information Literacy Bridge Between High School and College

Venta Silins Danielle Rowland University of Washington and Cascadia Community College, Bothell High school librarians! Join us in exploring ways high school and academic librarians can collaborate to ensure students are prepared for college level work. During an interactive session, we look at information literacy guidelines, best practices and institutional expectations. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction High School, Higher Education DoubleTree Suite D (Main Floor)

I Hate Reading!

Michael Harmon Author A library full of books and teens who do not want to read them. A national dropout rate that staggers the mind. A battle is being fought for the literacy of our youth. Young adult author Michael Harmon speaks about his own troubled school years, and how we can reach teens through unconventional, and conventional techniques. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside II (3rd Floor)

Making Signals Through The Glass

Terry Trueman Author This award-winning author offers his insights on the compelling realistic fiction he crafts for young adults, featuring the internal and external challenges they face in the process of becoming fully human. (Also Session 7) Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon III (Main Floor)

Put Some Power in Your Point the Lawrence Lessig Way

Deborah Gallaher Nathan Hale High School, Seattle This session demonstrates how to change your narrative for your upcoming year, your library, your mission, and even your objectives with Lawrence Lessig’s compelling presentation style. Transform your message and convert your stakeholders. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Suite C (Main Floor)

Sasquatch Reading Award

Sasquatch Committee Members The Sasquatch award addresses chapter books for students in grades 3-6. This session presents the 2011 winner and introduces the 2012 nominees. Reading Advocacy Elementary DoubleTree Salon I (Main Floor) Fall 2011

School Libraries in Finland: Is There a Phenomenon?

Sarah Applegate River Ridge HS, North Thurston SD Four months in Finland on a Fulbright research grant. What is happening in Finland in school libraries? Do the PISA scores reflect their information literacy instruction? Does it snow until May in Helsinki? Come and learn! Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Evergreen (3rd Floor)

There’s No C in Shusterman

Neal Shusterman Author An informal conversation with author Neal Shusterman, including readings from upcoming works. No jacket required (unless the room is really, really cold). Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon II (Main Floor)

Writing For and With Kids

Deb Lund Author Deb’s tips, tools, and rules for the road will improve your mileage whether you want to write, inspire students to write, or understand choices made by authors. We’ll tour through ideas and plots, character and voice, and structure and format, filling your tank with enough information to send kids to the shelves and inner critics packing! Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside I (3rd Floor)

The Writing of Mysterious Bones: The Story of Kennewick Man

Katherine KirkpatrickFreelance Writer/Author Katherine Kirkpatrick discusses her new nonfiction book Mysterious Bones: The Story of Kennewick Man. Reading Advocacy Elementary, Middle/Junior High School DoubleTree Shade (Main Floor)

Session 7 11:30 am – 12:30 pm The Alchemy of Transforming Facts to Fiction

Karen Cushman, Author Karen Cushman gives her own idiosyncratic views on the writing, reading, and selecting of historical fiction and shares how what her research uncovered showed up in her books. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Parkside I (Main Floor) MEDIUM | 35


2011 Conference Sessions Censorship Strikes Again

Michael Harmon, Author Young Adult author Michael Harmon shares first-hand experiences with censorship attempts against his own writing, and suggests ideas for dealing with challenges. Includes a question and answer period: bring yours! Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Suite D (Main Floor)

E-books and Audiobooks on EBSCOhost

Lisa Dennis EBSCO Publishing Now that the NetLibrary platform has retired, come see how easy it is to search and browse your institution’s collection of e-books and audiobooks using EBSCOhost, the world’s most-used reference resource. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All DoubleTree Parkside II (3rd Floor)

Education Reform: What is the Role for Teacher-Librarians?

Marie-Anne Harkness, Emeritus Teacher-Librarian and Past President of the WLMA John Stokes, Former Legislative Director and Finance Officer for the Washington State Parent Teacher Association (PTA) Mary Fertakis, President-elect of Washington State School Directors’ Association (WSSDA) This Roundtable addresses ways for teacher‑librarians to communicate better and advocate for education reform with community leaders such as the Washington State PTA, their local school boards, and administrators. Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon I (Main Floor)

Rhyme and Punishment

Kenn Nesbitt, Author Join Kenn Nesbitt, author of The Tighty-Whitey Spider and My Hippo Has the Hiccups as he shows how humorous verse can make lifelong readers and writers of the children in your life, and help anyone overcome a fear of public speaking. (Also offered in Session 1) Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Evergreen (3rd Floor)

2.0 for L4L: Empowering 21st Century Learners with Social Media

Michelle Luhtala, Head Librarian New Canaan High School, Connecticut Internet censorship is rampant in K-12 education. How does this impact our ability to prepare students for 21st century citizenship? Is it deepening the digital divide? During this session, Michelle Luhtala, Library Department Chair at New Canaan High School, a free‑range media high school from Connecticut, demonstrates how using social media for instruction helps embed 21st century learning into core content curriculum. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction All Convention Center 102D and Webinar

Where Do You Get Your Ideas?

Susan Blackaby , Author For Susan, finding inspiration is a daily quest, and while it does have a spin to it, it really isn’t that mysterious. It all depends on how you look at what is right in front of your nose. Susan shares interests, intrigues, and insights in a behind-the-scenes look at the creative process. Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon II (Main Floor)

Game-Lessons for the Elementary Library Curriculum

Jenny Sayward Freelance Teacher-Librarian Let’s explore games for learning and analyze how to use different types of games to teach or reinforce different kinds of learning. Presentation focuses on games that teach library and information skills linked to state standards. Information and Technology Literacy Instruction Elementary Convention Center 102 B

Making Signals Through The Glass

Terry Trueman, Author Award-winning author Terry Trueman offers his insights on the compelling realistic fiction he crafts for young adults, featuring the internal and external challenges they face in the process of becoming fully human. (Also offered in Session 6) Reading Advocacy All DoubleTree Salon III (Main Floor)

36 | MEDIUM

2011 This is Lit! Author Autographing Schedule Friday

11:15 am – 12:15 pm 1:45 pm – 2 :45 pm 3:00 pm – 4 :00 pm

Saturday

Nicole Rubel Kit Bakke and Claire Meeker Kelly Milner Halls, Claire Rudolph Murphy and Kenn Nesbitt

9:00 am – 10:00 am Neal Shusterman, Terry Trueman, and Michael Harmon 10:15 am – 11:15 am Karen Cushman, and Susan Blackaby 11:30 am – 12:30 pm Deb Lund and Katherine Kirkpatrick VOL 36 NO. 1


2011: This is LIT!

Remember to Visit the 2011 WLMA Conference Exhibitors Bound To Stay Bound Books (Len Blau) Educational Maps & Globes (Kirk Fullmer) Follett Library Resources (George Dragich; Leslie McClusky; Bryan Burnett) Follett Software (Stan Winters) Holocaust Education Resource Center (Ilana Cone Kennedy) Illumination Arts (John Thompson) Mackin (Jennifer Maydole) Proquest (Kevin Stewart) Puget Sound Council (Paula Wittmann) Rainbow Books (Roger & Janie Buckman) Renaissance Learning (Jim Church) Scholastic Book Fair (Cynthia Dixon)

School Art Materials (Sam McCracken) School Employees Credit Union (Kendra Edlin; Mary Dawson; Rick Anthony; Jill Warneke) Seattle Times Newspapers in Education (Sarah Johnson; Tamara Galvan; Diane Brady) Sikora Library Services (Nancy Sikora; Maureen Whitmore; Kathy Schmidtke) Stop Falling Productions (Sarah Hedrick) Taylor Educational Media (Dan Taylor) Terry Smith & Associates (Terry Smith) TVW (David Johnson) Washington State Library (Jennifer Fenton) World Book (Darrell Thompson; John Ybarra; Derek Collett; Bob Buck)

WLMA Conference Evaluation Every group effort deserves honest, constructive feedback to help shape future events. Please take a few moments to respond to our post conference survey at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/lbruce/144802. Thanks.

Stick-Around-Saturday: No Business Social Looking to make a great conference even better? All you have to do is Stick-around-Saturday after the conference for informal socializing. Visit Spokane, relax, or get active outdoors along the riverside trail. Grab an early dinner downtown then join colleagues in an informal early evening social with live music and dancing in the convention center—nothing loud or serious, just a LITT-L fun with a great bunch of folks. 5:45 pm

Welcome to the Mobile Lounge, with Spokane’s own Nick Herman and  Dan Schmedjet on electric and nylon string in styles that include jazz, traditional standards and light rock (www.nickherman.org). WLMA-tested and approved, Spokane Teacher-Librarian Debbie Herman’s hubby knows how to make music in the stacks!

7:00 pm

Karl Olsen of The Brothers Four (and hubby to former WLMA librarian Deb Lund) will provide live entertainment Saturday night at the WLMA conference. And since he knows how eclectic librarians can be, you can expect that in his music as well. A masterful musician with a rich baritone voice, Olsen sings folk, jazz, classic, and pop. Deb will join him on a few numbers written just for WLMA that are guaranteed to make you laugh and sing along. This is a not-to-miss opportunity ! Check The Brothers Four website (www.brothersfour.com/) for more about Karl.

8:00 pm

VJ Marky Mark Ray and “Flying Buttocks Productions” provides tunes for a LIT T-L fun: Who said librarians can’t party? Let loose the bun! Flash the tat! Trade the sensible flats for platform heels! VJ Marky Mark, still smokin’ from the Dyno-Mite Disco at NCCE 2011 will set the Inland Empire on fire with epic 70s and 80s videos that will make you laugh, move and shake your groove in this Flying Buttocks Production.

With Joyce Valenza promising to share a few groovy dance steps, it will sure be a lively on Saturday night in Spokane. Join the fun! Fall 2011

Order Direct & Save

Peyton Stafford Associates Library-bound juvenile nonfiction and reference Rourke — Child’s World—Black Rabbit — More Free shipping and processing on most orders Discounts from 25–80%

www.peytonstafford.com MEDIUM | 37


Beyond the Jacket Cover: Chris Wolfe

“Whoa, asking a writer about her favorite books is as dangerous as asking a bookseller or a librarian.” Karen Cushman

Do you plan to write in other formats such as plays, poetry, screenplays, or picture books? I think I wrote all the plays, poetry, and screen plays that I had inside me before I was fifteen. I still have boxes of them: plays like “Jingle Bagels,” the story of Santa Claus going down the wrong chimney on Christmas Eve and finding himself in a Jewish home; a notebook called Plots for Elvis Movies; and of course poetry. I wrote when I was happy, angry, frightened, in love, broken hearted. Now I believe I’ll stick to middle-grade novels. What are your favorite nonfiction books? Whoa, asking a writer about her favorite books is as dangerous as asking a bookseller or a librarian. There are few books that aren’t favorites. The following are some of the nonfiction titles that I love enough to own and keep near me. I love to read biographies of writers: Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay; Blackberry Winter by Margaret Mead; Margaret Wise Brown: Awakened by the Moon, by my friend Leonard Marcus; Will and Ariel Durant: A Dual Autobiography; Annie Dillard’s An American Childhood ’; Flannery, about Flannery O’Connor; Louisa May Alcott: A Personal Biography by Susan Cheever; Sid Fleischman’s Abracadabra Kid. I also love books on writing, which I read like children do comic books—over and over with great glee—A Writer’s Life by Annie Dillard, Jane Yolen’s Take Joy, Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird, On Writing by Stephen King, and Ray Bradbury’s Zen and the Art of Writing. Other favorites are Ruth Reichl’s books about cooking and life; essays about the Middle Ages in A World Lit Only by Fire; The Jewel House: Elizabethan London in

38 | MEDIUM

the Scientific Revolution; Distilling Knowledge: Alchemy, Chemistry, and the Scientific Revolution. And I just purchased a new book entitled Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle, about the evolution, historical and cultural impact, and sheer wonder of avian plumage. Nonfiction favorites have to include my beloved reference books The Oxford English Dictionary, The Oxford Book of Slang, Shakespeare’s Insults, and the whole series of Everyday Life in (fill in the blank). What do you like about living in Washington State? We live on Vashon Island, a wonderfully quiet, green, misty island. And that’s what I like about Washington: the peace, the abundance of growing things, the rain. I’m a moody, romantic artist so it’s the perfect place for me. I love looking at Mount Rainier through the window of the ferry, moving silently through the rain forest, watching the waves crash on the coast, seeing the deer nibbling grass outside my window, admiring our twelve‑foot tall rhodies in glorious bloom. What do you think publishing for kids will look like in 10 years? If I knew that, I think every publisher in the country would want to hire me. I don’t have a clue. My guess is that children’s publishing will not be destroyed by ebooks. Few parents will let their children take a Kindle into the bathtub or snuggle up with a kid and an ereader on their laps. And I imagine adults will still seek out those books that were favorites when they were young to read to their own youngsters. That being said, I am certain there will be changes that I cannot even conceive of. I don’t have answers—I don’t even know what questions to ask. VOL 36 NO. 1


Do you have plans to write a book with a boy as the main character? I am in the midst of revisions on Will Sparrow’s Road, a book about a boy. I wanted to tell the story of a child on the road in Elizabethan England, and I knew that character would have to be a boy. A young girl would not have survived by herself on the road, and in a world with so little privacy, I do not believe she could effectively disguise herself as a boy. So Will Sparrow was born. The runaway Will eventually joins a group of “prodigies and oddities” who travel from fair to fair, and they make themselves into a sort of family. It was a challenge to try and get inside the skin of a boy. In my first attempts I fear Will was more like a girl who wore pants and spat. Do you have favorite letter from a reader? I think this may be my favorite letter, written in her best second-grade script: “Dear Mrs. Cushman, I live in second grade. Second grade stinks. We’re still doing 1 + 1. Can you tell me how to write stories? How can I get good? How long does it take?” Do you have a story of a librarian who helped with your research? My favorite research librarian is my daughter, Leah. Anything I want to know she can answer in minutes. When I was writing The Loud Silence of Francine Green, I planned to have Francine obsessed with the child martyr, Maria Goretti. In two days, I had at my fingertips everything there was relevant to her. In the end, Maria Goretti did not appear in that book but I know all about her just in case. My other favorite librarians are all the King County librarians who find books for me in other branches and in other libraries. I never have fewer than twenty books on hold that I need right now for some book or other. And the librarians never fail to get them for me and to me. I am very grateful. For more about Karen Cushman, please visit her website: http://www.karencushman.com/index.html o

Chris Wolfe, is the NBCT Teacher-Librarian at Griffin School, a K-8 one-school district west of Olympia. E-mail: cwolfe@griffin.k12.wa.us.

Fall 2011

Books by Karen Cushman Alchemy and Meggy Swann, Meggy is new to London with her only friend, a goose named Louise. Meggy’s mother was glad to be rid of her; her father, who sent for her, does not want her after all. The Loud Silence of Francine Green Francine is an eighth-grader at All Saints School for Girls, which she calls the Sinless Academy for the Maidenly, in Los Angeles. It is 1949. Russia has just tested its first atomic weapon. President Truman has called for the development of the hydrogen bomb. Communists are in power in Russia and China and, some say, in Hollywood. Francine has never questioned authority. The new girl at school, Sophie Bowman, questions everything from the existence of God to the wisdom of waging war with nuclear weapons. Sophie changes Francine’s life. Matilda Bone Lonely, proud, and superior, Matilda was raised by a priest to know a lot about Heaven and Hell but not much about this world. Sent to be assistant to Red Peg the Bonesetter in the medical quarter of a medieval town, she learns to cherish and enjoy this life instead of merely waiting for the next. Rodzina A novel of the orphan trains, which took orphaned and homeless children from the slums of big cities to new lives in the west. Rodzina, big, sad, and angry, travels west from Chicago looking for someone to belong to. The Ballad of Lucy Whipple Dragged unhappily from her home in Massachusetts to the gold fields of California, Lucy misses her dog, her grandparents, and her public library and wants to go home. Eventually Lucy learns where home really is. The Midwife’s Apprentice, Alyce, is a homeless girl known only as Brat who longs for a name, a full belly, and a place in the world. She takes refuge in the warmth of a dung heap one night, where she is found by the village midwife. Brat changes her name to Alyce and sets about making her dreams come true. Catherine, Called Birdy Catherine is a medieval girl with no power and little value in a brutal world. This is the diary of her 14th year when her father tries to arrange her marriage and Catherine struggles to avoid it. MEDIUM | 39


Planbook

Conferences

Calendar

WLMA

WLMA

2011

Meetings

2011 Fall Conference

September

Executive Committee

This is LIT! October 13– 15 Spokane, WA

01: WLMA Emeritus Award nominations due. 24: Banned Books Week

October

October

27 – 30: AASL National Conference Minneapolis, MN www.aasl11.org

2012 January

20 – 25: ALA Midwinter Meeting Dallas, TX www.ala.org

March

13 – 16: NCCE Conference Seattle, WA www.ncce.org

April – May

29 – 02: International Reading Association Chicago, IL www.reading.org

June

21 – 26: ALA Annual Conference Anaheim, CA. www.alaannual.org 24 – 27: ISTE 2011 Conference San Diego, CA www.iste.org/conference.aspx

16: Teen Read Week

2012 January

15: Sasquatch Reading Award book nominations due.

February

01: Young Reader’s Choice Award book nominations due. 04: Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award book nominations due.

March

02: Read Across America 15: Evergreen Young Adult Book Award ballots due.

April

School Library Month 01: Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award and Sasquatch Reading Award ballots due. 8 – 14: National Library Week Washington Library Snapshot Day 2012 15: Young Reader’s Choice Award ballots due. 15: WLMA Scholarship Applications due.

July

01: WLMA Administrator/Special Recognition of the Year and Outstanding Teacher‑Librarian Award nominations due.

40 | MEDIUM

September 10, 2011 CWU Ellensburg, WA

Full Board

October 14, 2011 Spokane at Conference

President Steve Coker, Rainier President-Elect Craig Seasholes, Seattle Past President Linda King, Yakima Vice President Gary Simundson, Vancouver Treasurer Kate Pankiewicz, Shoreline Secretary Jean Staley, Yakima Elementary Level Chair Rosemary Saul, Yakima Middle / Jr. High Level Chair Sharyn Merrigan, Olympia Senior Level Chair Terri Litt, Steilacoom Small Dist. / Private Schools Chair Jen Fukataki, Yarrow Point Paula Palmer, Seattle Webmaster Carina Pierce, Bethel Membership Chair Pat McKinley, Cheney Medium Editor Alice McNeer, Bellevue Higher Education Lorraine Bruce, UW-Seattle Exhibiting Partner Nancy Sikora Legislative Chair/Advocacy Roz Thompson, N. Thurston Listserv Administrator Heidi Roycroft, N. Thurston OSPI Liaison Gayle Pauley, Olympia

VOL 36 NO. 1


Do you like to stay ahead of news and important topics related to school libraries and teacher-librarians? Have you considered being more active with WLMA? If you answered yes, then an opportunity is available for you! WLMA seeks two people to fill the following open positions:

WLMA MEDIUM Associate Editor

Position: Appointed by the WLMA President and serves as a voting Executive Board Member. Receives a stipend.

Job Description

Assist the MEDIUM Editor in the publication of the WLMA MEDIUM Journal in the following ways: • Solicit articles related to the theme from WLMA members for each issue of the MEDIUM. (Minimum of 3 articles per issue; 3 issues/year) • Edit submitted articles to meet the WLMA MEDIUM publication standards. Work with the author if any major changes needed for a theme article. • Submit the edited articles and any photos/graphics to the MEDIUM Editor for placement in each issue. • Edit the copy of the MEDIUM before it goes to publication (may take multiple edits). • Write letters to the authors of submitted theme articles and mail 3 copies of the published journal to them OR send them an e-mail letter and the link to the digital issue if no print issue exists. • Option: Write an Associate Editor piece for issue(s). • Work with the WLMA President, President-Elect and the MEDIUM Editor to establish the themes for the three issues each year. (Usually completed just after the Fall conference) • Option: Help maintain/update the MEDIUM web page on the WLMA site. • Serve on Executive Board »» Attend WLMA Executive Board Meetings (Sept/Nov/Jan/ May) »» Attend WLMA Full Board Meetings (Oct/March)

MEDIUM Advertising Manager

Position: Appointed by the President as an on-going position and is an ex-officio and voting member of the Full Board.

Job Description

• Confer with MEDIUM Editor to set publication dates and deadlines. Assist MEDIUM Editor in revising advertising contracts, rates and advertising technical requirements. • Coordinate with MEDIUM Editor the number of advertising pages. Send list of advertisers with sizes of and placement of ads to MEDIUM Editor by copy deadline. • Send letters and contracts to past advertisers. • Contact potential advertisers, advising them of contract rates and publishing deadlines. • Prepare invoices for advertisers that do not prepay. • Mail copies of MEDIUM to advertisers after each edition is published. • Send payment from advertisers to WLMA Treasurer.

Interested? Apply for the position by contacting Steve Coker, WLMA President (scoker@nthurston.k12.wa.us). Questions? Contact either WLMA President Steve Coker or MEDIUM Editor Alice McNeer (mediumeditor@earthlink.net).


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WLMA E-MEDIUM Fall 2011 V36N1 Conference Updates