Issuu on Google+

The Screwtape Letters Online by C. S. Lewis Click Here to Download the Book The story takes the form of a series of letters from a senior demon, Screwtape, to his nephew, a junior "tempter" named Wormwood, so as to advise him on methods of securing the damnation of a British man, known only as "the Patient". Screwtape holds an administrative post in the bureaucracy ("Lowerarchy") of Hell, and acts as a mentor to Wormwood, the inexperienced tempter. In the body of the thirty-one letters which make up the book, Screwtape gives Wormwood detailed advice on various methods of undermining faith and promoting sin in the Patient, interspersed with observations on human nature and Christian doctrine. Wormwood and Screwtape live in a peculiarly morally reversed world, where individual benefit and greed are seen as the greatest good, and neither demon is capable of comprehending or acknowledging true human virtue when he sees it.

Reviews Love this book, to the point of pushing it on acquaintances. If you are a Christian, you really must read this. If you are not a Christian, you should still read it. I think it is the best work I've ever read on the nature of humanity. Lewis has written a book told in letters, from the demon, "Uncle Screwtape", to his nephew "Wormwood". Screwtape is advising his nephew on how best to cause the damnation of the soul of the human to which he has been assigned. While it's been a few years since I last read it, many parts resonate with me often. One of my favorite bits is when Screwtape tells his nephew that one of the most efficient ways of sending a soul to Hell is to influence their thinking so that when they pray, they kneel by their beds and look very pious and gaze vaguely at some corner of the ceiling, as if God is "up THERE somewhere". My very favorite part is when Screwtape discusses the nature of the "sweet little old lady" who "doesn't wish to cause any bother". He ruminates that this type of human may be the most useful of all when it comes to gathering souls for the pit. The "SLOL" doesn't want much. A woman (her daughter, I think) has invited her to a big family dinner, for which she has cooked for two days, preparing all manner of delicious courses. When the SWLOL arrives, she sits down with a sigh, sniffs and says, "Oh, this is all just too much. I simply won't eat it. All I want is a good cup of tea, not too strong, mind you, and a piece of toast, properly toasted. I don't want you to go to any bother for ME." Of course, the younger woman must drop everything and run around trying to please this demon's puppet. And perhaps this woman starts to think unkind thoughts, provoked to anger and resentment. The seeds have been planted, and an act of generosity and kindness is spoiled once more by some timid little genteel creature that wouldn't dream of harming a fly. I can just hear her saying, "I'll have you know I tithe faithfully. Darling, this toast is just a tiny bit burnt. Do take it back and try once more, won't you?" :) It's a brilliant, unforgettable work, and I cannot recommend it highly enough. If we were face to face, I would insist you borrow my dog-eared copy.

My favorite spiritual commentary of all time! It was originally published as a series in the UK paper, The Guardian, between May and November 1941 as a means to "lift the spirits" of English citizens during the aftermath of the Battle of Britain. The "story" is written as a series of letters between a low-level demon named Wormwood and his uncle, Screwtape, a high level bureaucrat in the "Lowerarchy of Hell." In short, Wormwood seeks advice from his uncle Screwtape as he tries to corrupt a young man in WWII and his newly discovered Christian Faith. Screwtape gives his young nephew, Wormwood, detailed advice on how to undermine faith and promote sin in the "Patient." Ultimately, Wormwood fails and his fate is learned in a follow up work titled "Screwtape Proposes a Toast." Throughout the book, Lewis successfully illustrates how it is not the large sins that are most effective in sending "patients" to Hell, but rather the small thoughts and actions that Wormwood deviously encourages in his patient's mind which can gradually cause the Patient to turn away from God. I ended up reading this novella-length story in one sitting. Not only was it entertaining, it was insightful and inspiring.


My favorite spiritual commentary of all time! It was originally published as a series in the UK paper, The Guardian, between May and November 1941 as a means to "lift the spirits" of English citizens during the aftermath of the Battle of Britain. The "story" is written as a series of letters between a low-level demon named Wormwood and his uncle, Screwtape, a high level buereucrat in the "Lowerarchy of Hell." In short, Wormwood seeks advice from his uncle Screwtape as he tries to corrupt a young man in WWII and his newly discovered Christian Faith. Screwtape gives his young nephew, Wormwood, detailed advice on how to undermine faith and promote sin in the "Patient." Ultimately, Wormwood fails and his fate is learned in a follow up work titled "Screwtape Proposes a Toast." Throughout the book, Lewis successfully illustrates how it is not the large sins that are most effective in sending "patients" to Hell, but rather the small thoughts and actions that Wormwood deviously encourages in his patient's mind which can gradually cause the Patient to turn away from God. I ended up reading this novella-length story in one sitting. Not only was it entertaining, it was insightful and inspiring.

Click Here to Download the Book


The screwtape letters online