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Into the Wild Kindle Fire by Jon Krakauer

Click Here to Download the Book In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild. Immediately after graduating from college in 1991, McCandless had roamed through the West and Southwest on a vision quest like those made by his heroes Jack London and John Muir. In the Mojave Desert he abandoned his car, stripped it of its license plates, and burned all of his cash. He would give himself a new name, Alexander Supertramp, and , unencumbered by money and belongings, he would be free to wallow in the raw, unfiltered experiences that nature presented. Craving a blank spot on the map, McCandless simply threw the maps away. Leaving behind his desperate parents and sister, he vanished into the wild.

Reviews I have to say, I didn't expect the book to be the way it is; because I watched the movie and while it was an incredible story, the book is more like a biography and has people's responses and views of Chris McCandless, and some comments from the author. And maybe, maybe I fell in love with the book so much because I'm already too attached to the concept of the movie. At times when I was reading the book and had to stop, I had to force myself to unfreeze the world and get out of the mindset the book put me in. I mean, how do you go back to real life after reading something so thought provoking and unusually amazing in so many ways?! Whether people judge Chris McCandless as foolish and incompetent or as a genius, it doesn't really matter, because when he set out on the journey in first place, he did it for himself. To get away, to find answers, and eventually come back and put those answers into good use, but he never intended or wanted all of the attention his unfortunate ending brought. I just know that Chris McCandless definitely influenced me and changed the way I think, and that's exactly what great stories do.

Sometimes when people feel that they don’t fit in with society, they look to nature to help solve their problems. The wilderness is by far the best place to explore your thoughts and feelings. Christopher Johnson McCandless, an intelligent and unique young man, set out into the Alaskan Wilderness to escape from civilization. He gave $25,000 in savings to charity, burned all the cash in wallet, and had also abandoned his broken-down car. Four months later, a moose hunter found his decomposed body in an abandoned bus. While Jon Krakauer tells Chris’ story, he explains why and how he believes the boy died. Many people said that he was unprepared and didn’t have things, ”that Alaskan hunters consider essential.” Although he may have been unprepared with what he brought with him, I do think that he was fully prepared mentally. Chris’ knowledge of the wild was quite advanced, but a very unfortunate and simple mistake cost him his life, the author writes. During his hitchhiking experiences Chris met a lot of people, and all of them found him to be a smart kid that just thought too much. One person said that he, “tried too hard to make sense of the world, to figure out why people were so bad to each other so often.” I often think about those things as well, and I have found that they are frustrating topics that we may never know the answer to. I have to say that Into the Wild is without doubt the best book I have ever read. Although it is a depressing story, the author portrays Chris McCandless as courageous and heroic, which I am convinced he deserves. I would recommend this book to people in eighth grade and up. Jon Krakauer talks about good moral values that can be helpful when it comes to making tough choices. I was amazed at his ability to integrate quotes from other novels. Every single one of them had an important meaning. I enjoyed Jon Krakauer’s writing style and I will keep my eyes open for more of his books.


Very sharply written, an easy read that I completed in one evening. I really appreciated Krakauer's sensitivity in the analysis of Chris McCandless (and Alex Supertramp) and his journey. He went through the story thoughtfully but not dispassionately, and I really had a feeling for the people that Chris touched and the times that he had. I did not think I would enjoy the addition of Krakauer's own story into the biography, but it was modest, tastefully done and helped to illuminate the mind of both the author and the subject. In the end, this is a sad cautionary tale. However, we find it to be a much more subtle and nuanced tragedy than most would assume, thanks to the author and his detailed research. I was surprised to find myself at the end of the book rooting for Chris to just make it through the summer, knowing the sad it come all the while. Most highly recommended.

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Into the wild kindle fire