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Download Into Thin Air Online by Jon Krakauer

Click Here to Download the Book When Jon Krakauer reached the summit of Mt. Everest in the early afternoon of May 10,1996, he hadn't slept in fifty-seven hours and was reeling from the brain-altering effects of oxygen depletion. As he turned to begin the perilous descent from 29,028 feet (roughly the cruising altitude of an Airbus jetliner), twenty other climbers were still pushing doggedly to the top, unaware that the sky had begun to roil with clouds... Into Thin Air is the definitive account of the deadliest season in the history of Everest by the acclaimed Outside journalist and author of the bestselling Into the Wild. Taking the reader step by step from Katmandu to the mountain's deadly pinnacle, Krakauer has his readers shaking on the edge of their seat. Beyond the terrors of this account, however, he also peers deeply into the myth of the world's tallest mountain. What is is about Everest that has compelled so many poeple--including himself--to throw caution to the wind, ignore the concerns of loved ones, and willingly subject themselves to such risk, hardship, and expense? Written with emotional clarity and supported by his unimpeachable reporting, Krakauer's eyewitness account of what happened on the roof of the world is a singular achievement.

Reviews I don't know what it is about Jon Krakauer's writing. It sucks me in, even though it's not very sensational or attention-grabbing in a flashy way. When I started Into the Wild years ago, it was for a class and I expected it to be a boring survival book. I was so wrong. That book changed my life and way of thinking, and I think that credit must go not just to Alexander Supertramp, but also to the way Krakauer wrote about him. Even though I loved Into the Wild, I still went into Into Thin Air again thinking it would be a "boring survival book". I was totally wrong again. He gives such an emotionally distant, almost dry account of the 1996 events on Everest- yet it really is thrilling to read. And every once in a while he'll throw in a curveball sentence, like "Such and such decision will probably haunt me for the rest of my life."- and you believe him when he says it because he chooses sentences like that carefully. There are a lot of characters that can be hard to keep track of, but I liked the book so much that I've already found myself going back through putting together who is who, and heck- I'll probably just end up reading the whole thing again. I've also had Everest-mania since finishing the book and have been looking up all kinds of stuff online about it. (This reminds me of how I was after Into the Wild, too...) My point is, even if you aren't that thrilled by adventure, mountain climbing, survival, etc books, this is a good one.

I listened to this as an audiobook. I've always wondered which books would work well as audiobooks, as I feel a general preference for reading books myself. However I felt this one worked particularly well, narrated by the author. (Unabridged version, from audible.com, I assume the same as the Audio CD version?) Provides in-depth insights into various ways in which an Everest expedition can be nasty, and makes me very glad that I haven't made this kind of expedition a life mission. (For those that have, I can imagine a book like this might just make some of them more determined... and hopefully better informed of the risks and insanity of it all.) Very potent. At times this book had me on the verge of a visible emotional reaction (perhaps were I reading it myself it wouldn't have been as visceral?)

What a powerful book. Krakauer takes a writing assignment for Outside Magazine and fulfills a boyhood dream of climbing Everest. After preparing for a year and signing on with the best guides in the business, he experiences one of the worst tragedies to befall Everest climbers in the spring of 1996. The book is well-written, meticuously researched, and obsessively engaging; I couldn't put it down.


I especially appreciate that Krakauer wrote this book quickly after returning, without waiting for the "gifts of time and perspective" to review a series of events which he so obviously needs to get off his chest. The book is haunting and unsettling, and its implications about human nature and morality continue to make me think. And I'm making everyone I love in life promise me that they will never, ever, ever have an inkling of desire to climb that great mountain.

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