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C O M M U N I T Y

MATTERS T H E W I N S T O N - S A L E M F O U N D AT I O N

Community Newsletter | September 2007

Dean Prim Scholarship Offers Study in China BILLY PRIM CAN CERTAINLY BE characterized as a visionary in the business world. As co-founder of Blue Rhino in 1994, he revolutionized the gas grill propane tank industry by creating tank exchanges at over 40,000 retail locations across the country. After selling Blue Rhino in 2004, Prim founded Primo Water, the first national brand of water for water coolers, utilizing similar distribution networks and retail partnerships. He is now also focusing his time and energy toward revitalizing downtown Winston-Salem as the lead developer for a new stadium for the minor league baseball team he co-owns, the Winston-Salem Warthogs. But Billy Prim has another vision which may not be as wellpublicized — that of a financial supporter of local youth wanting to attend college. Billy was raised and educated in Yadkin County, and his father, Dean Prim, was a member of the Yadkin County Board of Education. Dean Prim was a man dedicated to promoting education in his community. Following the death of his father in 1975, Billy and his family established a college scholarship in his father’s name for students at Starmount High School in Yadkin County. He transferred administration of the scholarship fund to The WinstonSalem Foundation in 1989 and later expanded the fund to encompass three four-year partial scholarships to graduating high school seniors in Davie, Forsyth, and Yadkin counties. The scholarship fund is supported by an annual golf tournament, the Dean Prim Classic. Billy recently began evaluating the success of the scholarship program over the 30+ years that it had been in existence. He realized that the program had accomplished many things for students not only in Yadkin County, but now also in

Forsyth and Davie Counties. As he began to research how he could make an even greater impact, Billy looked at himself and tried to reflect on what had helped him in his own success. One of the things that he felt strongly about was the importance of his exposure to different people and cultures. He wanted to give students the opportunity to be exposed to a larger world view that he believes is so critical in our global economy. Ultimately, Billy decided to add a travel opportunity to the program. Prim remarks, “I believe that China is, and will continue to be a major force in the world economy.” Billy travels to China regularly on business, and wants these students to see the country through their own eyes. He notes, “I also wanted to open this up to high school students in their junior or senior year — the earlier you can impact someone’s life, the more you can influence it.” Beginning in 2007–2008, the Dean Prim Scholarship will include a paid summer travel and study program in China in addition to the four-year college scholarship. The first recipients will participate in a travel and study program of Mandarin Chinese language and Chinese cultural history at Nanjing University in Nanjing, China in the summer of 2008. In the future, the program could move on to other emerging countries such as South Africa or India. Billy Prim, the entrepreneur, is indeed a visionary. His vision may prove very valuable in developing future leaders for our community. FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO THE FOUNDATION’S WEB SITE AT

WWW.WSFOUNDATION.ORG. CLICK ON “STUDENTS”, THEN “LIST OF SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS.” APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR THE DEAN PRIM SCHOLARSHIP IS OCTOBER 31, 2007.


2007 ECHO Award Winners THE WINSTON-SALEM FOUNDATION AND ECHO COUNCIL JOINTLY PRESENTED THE 2007 ECHO AWARDS AT THE FOUNDATION’S COMMUNITY MEETING IN MAY. THESE FOUR INDIVIDUALS WERE RECOGNIZED FOR ACTIVELY BUILDING SOCIAL CAPITAL — BY CONNECTING AND BUILDING TRUST AMONG PEOPLE IN ORDER TO MAKE OUR COMMUNITY STRONGER.

MARY BOLTON has built social capital by building bridges across ethnic and economic lines through her work with El Buen Pastor Latino Community Services. She was instrumental in creating an after school program for Spanish-speaking children to teach them English. Her recruitment of volunteers from various churches has provided opportunities for relationships to be built across many different backgrounds and income levels. Mary was nominated by Ron Lowry.

that grows out of standing together with a common purpose. Tracey was nominated by Sylvia Oberle. RABBI MARK STRAUSS-COHN has built social capital by building bridges between diverse religious communities in Winston-Salem. He has sought to educate community members on what they all have in common, rather than dwell on differences. He has offered courses on Judaism to the broader community in order to create better understanding among faiths. He has ensured that the Temple has participated in many community activities such as a Habitat for Humanity house building which has created bridging social capital. Mark was nominated by Dr. Andrew Schneider.

EFFLEY HOWELL uses creativity, history, and art to tell a story of division and triumph in our community. He has built social capital by working to improve race relations in our area through a traveling black history museum. Both the exhibits and workshops that he conducts Each ECHO Award reciparound the exhibit have enabled ient received $1,000 to grant to him to open a dialogue between a nonprofit organization of different ethnic and age groups. SCOTT WIERMAN, RABBI MARK STRAUSS-COHN, TRACEY their choice. They were selected They enable Effley to impact MAXWELL, EFFLEY HOWELL, MARY BOLTON AND JIM LAMBIE by a committee representing individuals’ perceptions and misthe ECHO Council and the Foundation. conceptions about discrimination in a visible, tangible, and perThe 2008 ECHO Award nomination process will begin in sonal way. Effley was nominated by Lisa Miller. February 2008. Keep this in mind as you observe social capital bridge builders at work throughout our community. TRACEY MAXWELL has created bridges across lines of race, faith, and income through her work with Vigils of Healing, a volunteer group that holds interfaith vigils at the site of each homicide in Forsyth County. She founded the group not only to mourn the victim’s loss, but to acknowledge and counteract the negative effect that violent deaths have on families, neighborhoods, and communities. The vigils also bring many people to neighborhoods where they would not normally travel. Participants have remarked on the trust and sense of community

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE ECHO COUNCIL AND SOCIAL CAPITAL, VISIT THE FOUNDATION’S HOMEPAGE AT

WWW.WSFOUNDATION.ORG AND CLICK ON “LEADERSHIP INITIATIVES.”


Candide Jones Receives 2007 Winston-Salem Foundation Award and leadership roles in the development of the YWCA’s “Chili CANDIDE JONES WAS AWARDED the 2007 WinstonLuncheon” and Crisis Control Ministry’s “Hope du Jour.” Salem Foundation Award at the Community Meeting on May Established in 1996, the award is given to individuals who 9th at the Benton Convention Center. The Foundation’s highest honor, the award honors her passionate commitment and creative demonstrate the Foundation’s values of generosity, excellence, inclusion, and integrity, along with visionary leadership in a comdirection to many nonprofit organizations in our community. munity activity or on behalf of a Jones’ leadership has elevatcommunity organization, particed nonprofits in our community ularly in the recent past. Past while bringing diverse people recipients have led nonprofits, together to work for important provided community leadership, causes. Innovative fundraising and created opportunities for the events have become her hallbroader community. Candide mark. When presenting the Jones was selected by a commitaward, Foundation President tee comprised of members from Scott Wierman noted, “Most various Foundation committees recently she brought the idea of and the community at large. “Art Unleashed” to WinstonJones received a $10,000 Salem with the Forsyth FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: SCOTT WIERMAN (FOUNDATION PRESIDENT), CANDIDE JONES, JIM LAMBIE (FOUNDATION COMMITTEE CHAIR) grant to designate for a local Humane Society. She spearnonprofit. She chose Forsyth headed the event and worked Humane Society to receive the $10,000 grant award for their tirelessly with a committee to make the event successful.” He New Leash on Life program. She was nominated by Jan Detter. added that over the years she has also played significant creative

CONNECTING PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS WITH MENTAL HEALTH PROVIDERS providing mental health services to their young IN 2001, THE NORTH CAROLINA General patients. Many physicians are unsure as to where to Assembly passed the Mental Health Reform Act. refer patients who come to their practices with a variety Over the past six years, passage of this Act has of age, financial and mental health considerations. resulted in a number of unintended negative conWith this in mind, Andy Hagler, executive sequences, causing many mentally ill persons to fall director of The Mental Health Association in Forsyth through the cracks of the mental health care sysCounty, had an idea for connecting primary care tem. The referral system has become much more providers with mental health resources already existing cumbersome, leading to a great deal of confusion ANDY HAGLER in our community. even within the mental health field. With a two-year grant totaling $15,000 from The WinstonAt the same time, more primary care physicians than ever Salem Foundation, the Mental Health Association are faced with the challenges of treating patients with mental has developed a primary care provider outreach program. health issues, from mild depression to more severe mental illness, substance abuse, and developmental disabilities. Some pediatricians even report spending up to 50% of their time

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C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S [ 2 – 3 ]


THINKING ABOUT MAKING A CHARITABLE GIFT OF REAL ESTATE? IF YOU’RE CONTEMPLATING MAKING a charitable gift, real estate could be a logical choice. But first, there are several points to consider in order to make sure that donating real estate will meet your charitable goals. As with all charitable giving, planning is of critical importance. Many times one enters into a contract to sell real estate, and after executing the contract, realizes that the property would constitute a good gift. The prospective donor then contacts the philanthropic entity and suggests that the contract be assigned to the charity. Unfortunately, the Internal Revenue Service has provided rulings in these situations and the news is not favorable for the donor. If the owner (donor) simply assigns an existing contract, then the IRS will treat the gift as one of proceeds and not of the real estate. The consequence is that the donor must recognize the purchase price as income with a subsequent charitable gift. All the tax implications of income to the recipient are now applicable. The point to be learned is that if you want to make a gift of real estate and a buyer appears, tell the buyer to “hold the thought” and do not enter into a contract. It is important to “keep the buyer in the wings.” Next contact the philanthropic entity to discuss deeding it the property. Once the property is deeded, the nonprofit can move forward with the buyer and execute a purchase agreement in the name of the charitable organization. The donor gets the benefit of the gift of real estate and not of proceeds.

Adequate planning time is needed for the prospective purchaser and the nonprofit. Although nonprofit entities generally want to respond to a donor’s request in a timely fashion, the nonprofit must take the same due diligence actions as any prudent purchaser. The nonprofit may not want to take title to real estate with environmental or other marketability issues and therefore it will need time to complete its investigative processes. You can minimize the duration of the gifting procedures by setting up an appointment with a philanthropic officer and coming to the meeting prepared. Be sure to bring a copy of the existing deed, survey, owner’s policy of title insurance, and an environmental report, if one has been obtained. This will expedite the transfer and will benefit all parties. Real estate could be one of the most beneficial ways for you to give. Be sure to plan ahead and allow adequate time for proper due diligence. And don’t forget — “keep the buyer in the wings.”

ALFRED G. ADAMS IS A MEMBER OF THE REAL PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT PRACTICE GROUP OF WOMBLE CARLYLE SANDRIDGE & RICE, PLLC. HE HAS ALSO CHAIRED THE REAL PROPERTY SECTION OF THE NORTH CAROLINA BAR ASSOCIATION.

Be sure to plan ahead and allow adequate time for proper due diligence. And don’t forget — “keep the buyer in the wings.”


Youth Grantmakers’ Shoot Out Grant Aims to Prevent Teen Smoking YOUTH PHILANTHROPY is not just a growing trend elsewhere in the country. It is alive and well in Forsyth County! In 2005, The Winston-Salem Foundation established a new program to engage youth in the community. Youth Grantmakers in Action (YGA) was created as a diverse youth-led group (ages 14–17) that allows youth to gain leadership experience, represent other youth in the community, and voice their opinions to influence community change. YGA makes grants on an annual basis to youth-led projects that address community issues and challenges in Forsyth County. One of four grants that YGA made in 2006–2007 was to the Youth Advisory Council of the Youth Tobacco Prevention Program. A youth-led Tobacco-Free Shoot-Out was held on May 5th at the Central Family YMCA basketball courts. The event was designed to engage teens in a day of fun and sports, while highlighting the dangers of teen tobacco use. Over 70 teens attended the Shoot-Out where the tobaccofree message resonated strongly. Highlights included an art display, a lively broadcast of the Youth Advisory Council’s “radio rap,” youth-led tobacco quiz games, a guest appearance by a cancer survivor, and educational displays. The Shoot-Out itself involved a series of competitions for top prizes in a three-point shootout, dunk contest, and four on four scrimmages. Overall, it was both a fun and educational day — and a very high-energy event.

YOUTH ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBERS AND ADULT VOLUNTEERS GATHER AT THE TOBACCO-FREE SHOOT-OUT IN MAY.

Regarding the event’s planning process, Gina Humble, youth tobacco prevention coordinator notes, “Our Youth Council was involved in every aspect of the planning of this event — the Shoot-Out idea was actually the result of brainstorming by five of our members.” Gina adds, “We all want to empower youth to be the leaders in the issues they’re interested in — and in this case the youth had a very specific vision of how they wanted to reach other teens.” Be on the lookout for more exciting youth-led projects funded by Youth Grantmakers in Action in the coming year. It’s a slam-dunk for our community!

BLACK PHILANTHROPY INITIATIVE WELCOMES NEW ADVISORY MEMBERS THE BLACK PHILANTHROPY INITIATIVE (BPI) was established in 2000 with a grant from the ECHO Fund and the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation. BPI seeks to build effective philanthropic relationships with the African American community by expanding social capital and building relationships of trust. The Winston-Salem Foundation and BPI also offer public speakers and informational seminars to the black community in an effort to maintain the momentum in building these new relationships. The thirteen-member BPI Advisory Committee is currently in the planning stages of establishing a Black Philanthropy Fund at the Foundation — stay tuned for more exciting details.

Many thanks to the new and returning members of the BPI Advisory Committee: Dr. Jessica Bailey* Ms. Florence Corpening Mr. Richard Davis Ms. Brenda B. Diggs Ms. Denise Franklin* Mr. Danny Freeman Rev. Donald Jenkins

Rev. Dr. Joseph Jones* Ms. Corena Norris-McCluney* Mrs. Robin Paul* Mr. James K. Reaves* Mr. Napoleon Richardson, Jr.* Ms. Janet Wheeler

* new BPI Advisory Committee member C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S [ 4 – 5 ]


Foundation Announces New Staff THE WINSTON-SALEM FOUNDATION IS PLEASED TO WELCOME A NUMBER OF NEW INDIVIDUALS TO OUR TEAM. THESE INDIVIDUALS TOUCH EVERY ASPECT OF THE FOUNDATION AND EACH BRINGS A WEALTH OF KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE. THE FOUNDATION WELCOMES THE FOLLOWING INDIVIDUALS TO THE FOUNDATION STAFF:

MICHAEL CLEMENTS, Vice President, Community Investment Clements will oversee and guide the Foundation’s initiatives and community investment activities and supervise the Foundation’s grantmaking and student aid departments. Through his work he will design, develop, and participate in coalitions across the community and move forward the Foundation’s work with social capital building. Since 2000, Clements has served as director of the Downtown Health Plaza of Baptist Hospital, including the Cleveland Avenue Dental and Eye Center. Clements served as director since its inception and intentionally focused on building a service-oriented environment where patients and staff were treated with dignity and respect. Previously, he served as director of Reynolds Health Center and has held multiple positions in the public health field in Winston-Salem. A native of New York City, Clements received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Shaw University and master of social work and master of public health from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. CLEMENTS

ROBIN BURR DeVANE, Grants Manager Burr DeVane will serve as the first point of contact for nonprofits, providing information to applicants, grantees, and other community members on the grantmaking process and procedure. She will provide programmatic and administrative support to the grants department, and will maintain all information relating to the Foundation’s grantmaking. Burr DeVane joins the Foundation BURR DEVANE with extensive experience in administrative

work and technology. She most recently served as business office assistant at Salem Academy and College. She earned her bachelor of arts from Salem College and is currently working towards a masters of arts in liberal studies at Wake Forest University.

ANDREA FALDEN, Program Officer Falden will work with the grants team as a program officer and will become familiar with issues relevant to the local nonprofit community and review grant proposals. She will keep informed on community issues and organizations by attending meetings, consulting with prospective grantees and assisting nonprofit organizations in their interactions with The Winston-Salem Foundation. Falden joins the Foundation from Today’s Students, Tomorrow’s Teachers in Culpeper, VA, a national career development program working with minority high school students who are interested in becoming teachers. A Salem College gradFALDEN uate, Falden received both the Elizabeth Oesterlein Award and the Sophisteia Award. She earned her master’s degree from the University of Virginia in religious studies.

CICI FULTON, Director, Marketing and Communications Fulton will strategically position WSF in the community and is responsible for planning, implementing, and monitoring all marketing, communications, and public relations efforts for the Foundation. She will develop and maintain the Foundation’s overall identity, branding, key messages, themes, materials, and implementation of special events. Fulton has a rich background of marketing experience


including positions at Sara Lee Knit Products (HanesBrands Inc.), as well as Capital Development Services, Inc, where she served as a campaign associate coordinating the development and implementation of capital campaigns. She also worked previously as a community relations assisFULTON tant and marketing coordinator in Atlanta, Ga. She holds a bachelor of science degree in business administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

JONATHAN HALSEY, Donor Services Officer Halsey will concentrate on the Foundation’s donor services efforts by cultivating relationships with donors and their professional advisors. He will be an active part of the community as he meets donors’ needs and provides to them resources for expanding and facilitating their charitable activities. Halsey joins the Foundation from the New River Community Partners, Inc. in Sparta, NC where he served as project manager. He has also played a key role in the development of the Sparta Teapot HALSEY Museum. He also served as an instructor at Wilkes Community College and director of music at Christ Episcopal Church. A native of Alleghany County, he earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has served on numerous community boards, including the board of directors for the Alleghany County Community Foundation.

Hanneman joins the Foundation from Metis Consulting. As the principal she provides program and strategic planning, organizational development and project management services to nonprofit organizations. Prior to Metis, she worked with the California Endowment as a program officer. Hanneman holds a master of public administration from the University of Southern California, and a bachelor of arts in study of HANNEMAN women and men in society and political science.

MARY JO MORGAN, Accounting Associate Morgan will assist the finance team by performing a variety of accounting functions that relate to the receipt of gifts and to compute, classify, record and reconcile transactions. Mary Jo is a native of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Zaire). She has lived and worked in NC since 1992. One of her former jobs fostered a passion for accounting and she returned to school full-time. In 2004, she earned an associates degree in accounting from Forsyth Tech, and subsequently she received a bachelor of science in accounting from WSSU. Since then, Mary Jo has worked for US Trust (Greensboro) as a tax accountant and for Barbara Fulp & Company MORGAN (Kernersville) as a staff accountant.

FOR A PHOTOGRAPH OF THE ENTIRE FOUNDATION TEAM, PLEASE

TARI HANNEMAN, Women’s Fund Coordinator Hanneman will serve as the primary liaison between the Foundation and The Women’s Fund of Winston-Salem. Working closely with the Executive Committee of the Fund, she will connect them to Foundation resources, provide leadership for the Fund, and sustain daily tasks required for the Fund’s maintenance.

VISIT OUR WEB SITE AT

WWW.WSFOUNDATION.ORG

THEN CLICK ON “ABOUT US” AND “WSF STAFF.”

C O M M U N I T Y M AT T E R S [ 6 – 7 ]


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Winston-Salem, NC Permit No. 406 860 West Fifth Street Winston-Salem, NC 27101-2506 Telephone 336-725-2382 Toll Free 866-227-1209 Fax 336-727-0581 www.wsfoundation.org

CONNECTING PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS WITH MENTAL HEALTH PROVIDERS, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3

Personal visits were made to many primary care providers throughout Forsyth County and in King, including practices specializing in pediatrics and obstetrics/gynecology. Brochures were developed and purchased to leave behind with physicians and referral specialists to assist primary care physicians in making appropriate referrals to mental health providers. Depression screening tools were also provided to help physicians better identify their patients’ symptoms of depression. Hagler notes that an important result of this program has been improved communication between the physicians and mental health providers. “It really opened up dialogue between primary care physicians and the mental health community. We were able to see how passionate the doctors are about their patients’ mental health — and their earnest desire for follow-up informa-

tion after a referral has been made.” The Mental Health Association will continue to communicate with primary care practices and provide access to their mental health provider database upon the program’s completion. “This grant has opened up a door — mental health issues are being discussed and addressed, and that is a big plus for our entire community,” said Hagler.

Community Matters Sept 2007  

Community Matters newsletter

Community Matters Sept 2007  

Community Matters newsletter