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WIN MIXTER | PORTFOLIO ARCHITECTURAL WORK 2009-2012

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

CV

1. THESIS

2. ADDITION

3. CASE STUDY

4. BOATHOUSE

5. DOUBLE NEGATIVE

6. LIBRARY

7. POOL

8. FLOATING ISLANDS

9. CHEVRON

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WIN ROGER CONANT MIXTER 476 36th St. Apt. A Oakland, CA 94609 Phone: (414) 218 - 4544 Born May 22, 1987, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

EDUCATION

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

University of California, Los Angeles, 2005 - 2009 B.A. Design | Media Arts B.A. Spanish and Linguistics Graduated Phi Beta Kappa Alumni Arts Scholar, 2005-2009

January 2011 - January 2012: Graduate Student Instructor, Digital Representation Fall 2011 - Architecture 100B, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (Prof. L. Iwamoto) Summer 2011 - InArch Summer Program, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (Prof. M. Bogan) Spring 2011 - Environmental Design 11B, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (Prof. K. Plymale)

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, NH, 2001-2005 High School Diploma (Honors)

June 2011 - August 2011: Architectural Intern Min | Day San Francisco, CA (EB Min), www.minday.com

Brown University, Providence, RI, Summer 2004 Summer Study, “Behind the Exhibit: How Museums Work”

September 2006 - June 2009: Designer Daily Bruin Newspaper at UCLA Society of Professional Journalists’ Mark of Excellence Award ‘07, ‘08

University of California, Berkeley, 2009 - 2012 Master of Architecture (M.Arch Opt. 3 2012)

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Summer 2003 Summer Architecture and Urban Planning Program with James Dicker Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, Winter 2003 Introduction to Graphics Course

ADDITIONAL TRAINING

June 2007 - June 2009: Tennis Instructor UCLA Recreation, Los Angeles August 2008: Architecture and Design Intern Tirimbina Rainforest Center, Sarapiqui, Costa Rica

Attended the Following Leadership Programs: Leadership Conference for Best Buddies International July 18-21, 2009, Bloomington, IN

June - July 2006: Intern NBBJ Architects (under Henry Chao), Columbus, OH

Design Seminars for Daily Bruin Newspaper October 7 14 21 28 2006, Los Angeles, CA

BUILD, Oakland, California (graphic design), Oakland, CA, Fall 2012; Director Christopher Nelson

COMMUNITY SERVICE

Best Buddies at UCLA (through Best Buddies International), Los Angeles President 2008 - 2009; honored with “Best Buddies California Chapter of the Year 2008-2009” Director of Transportation 2006 - 2008 Associate Member 2005 - 2006 Lose the Tattoos, Irving J. Sehrer Milwaukee Boys and Girls Club, Milwaukee, WI Volunteer, 2002 - Present

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PROFESSIONAL SKILLS & PROGRAMS

PUBLISHED WORK

Adobe Creative Suite 6: Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop Autodesk: AutoCad 2012 Grasshopper plug-in for Rhino v.0.8 Maxwell for Rhino 1.7 Rhinoceros v. 5.0 V-Ray for Rhino Vectorworks 12

The Susquehanna University Press, 2003, original personal narrative, “Low Tide”

Adobe Creative Suite v. 3: Flash Adobe Premiere v. 3.0 Audacity v. 1.33 Arduino 12 Final Cut Pro v. 6.0.4 Microsoft Office 2012: Excel, Powerpoint, Word (typing speed 88 WPM) Processing v. 0135 SAP v.14 Smultron v. 3.5

HONORS/GRANTS AWARDED Best Buddies at UCLA, from Community Activities Committee and Community Service Commission 2008 - 2009 academic year; $9,559.23 Best Buddies California, May, 2009: Best Buddies California Chapter of the Year (statewide)

FOREIGN LANGUAGES Fluent in English and Spanish, reading, written, spoken Conversational knowledge of French, elementary reading, written, spoken Basic knowledge of Italian, elementary reading, spoken

EXTRACURRICULAR INTERESTS I am a native Wisconsinite, though I have lived in California since 2005. I am an avid museum patron; specific regional favorites include SF MOMA, MOCA Los Angeles, and LACMA. I am an experienced snowboarder, tennis and squash player. I am also an ardent fan of UCLA athletics, the Milwaukee Brewers and the Green Bay Packers.

REFERENCES Lisa Iwamoto, Iwamoto//Scott Architecture 415.864.2868 lisa@iwamotoscott.com EB Min, Min | Day, San Francisco 415.255.9464 eb@minday.com

The Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth, 2000; $500.00

FAVORITE BOOKS Honoré de Balzac: Cousin Bette, Eugenie Grandet A.O. Dean: Samuel Mockbee and Architecture of Decency Ernest Hemingway: A Farewell to Arms, Islands in the Stream Rem Koolhaas: Delirious New York V.S. Naipul: Miguel Street George Remi (Hergé): The Adventures of Tintin

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1. EVOLUTION OF THE BILBAO EFFECT : MASTER’S THESIS WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 - SPRING 2012 ADVISORS LARRY RINDER (BAM/PFA), RODDY CREEDON (CED) AND RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI (CED)

“MUSEUMS MUST ADAPT THEMSELVES TO NEW FORMS OF DISTRIBUTION TO ESCAPE OBSOLESCENCE.” -

CHRISTINE VAN ASSCHE, HEAD CURATOR FOR NEW MEDIA AT THE CENTRE GEORGE POMPIDOU, SPEAKING TO THE BERKELEY CENTER FOR NEW MEDIA, OCTOBER 2011 This quote from Christine Van Assche, Senior Curator for the new media collection at the Centre George Pompidou, Paris, comes from a response to a query about the need for museums to change in light of the advent of the internet and the availability of information. This raises a whole slew of questions that the museum of the 21st century must face, and quickly if it hopes to build on the cultural status that has been granted to such institutions ever since the boon of the starchitect and the

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hype instigated by the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, completed some fifteen years ago in 1997. These questions can be provocative insights into the nature of the experience of things, of art and artifact created by an artist or artisan and later assigned value and importance because of the work of curators and conservationists alike. The digital age of information is well upon us; the internet, like our universe, is an ever-expanding web of interconnected knowledge (and a healthy portion of space-trash). In this light, our present age calls into question the fundamental nature of architecture and space, especially on a civic level of public infrastructure that can influence daily life of an average citizen. Architectural solutions to some of the most blaring questions


seem apropos in terms of physical proximity (and in the context of literal viewing with one’s own eyes). This thesis addresses the impending need for museums to change based on a series of tenuous relationships at the current juncture: 1) the relationship of the public to the museum; 2) the relationship of the artifacts to the surrounding local populous; 3) the relationship of art and artifact to the gallery with regard to meaning and monetary value; 4) the relationship of the institution to the city. The thesis also treads cautiously into other territory that mandates rigorous consideration at the present with regard to museums as institutions. Primary aims of the work include:

1. Refocusing of the monumentality of the museum not on the form of the architecture itself, but on the monumentality of the extents of the collection. This also means a rethinking of the current storage practices and accessibility to the collection by the public on a larger scale. 2. Redefine the relationship of the museum to the city. It should not only captivate its citizens attention, but provide a closer insight to the history, art, and science of the place itself. It shouldn’t strive to be something that it isn’t. 3. The museum should not exist as a single, solitary entity, but have a multi-faceted, dynamic presence that permeates the urban fabric.

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1. EVOLUTION OF THE BILBAO EFFECT : MASTER’S THESIS WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 - SPRING 2012 ADVISORS LARRY RINDER (BAM/PFA), RODDY CREEDON (CED) AND RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI (CED)

people to museum

art second to form

collection to storage

The diagram at RIGHT shows cultural, historic, natural, academic, and otherwise locally important and engaging sites surrounding Lake Merritt. All of these resources should be woven together to create a stream of flows between them, unleashing the capability of this rich urban environment, focused at the museum. This page: ABOVE diagrams represent simplified representations of some of the fraught relationships created by the museumartifact-storage dynamic in contemporary museum practice; BELOW is a collage aggregating some of the most recognizable museum architecture from the last 20 years.

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1. EVOLUTION OF THE BILBAO EFFECT : MASTER’S THESIS WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 - SPRING 2012 ADVISORS LARRY RINDER (BAM/PFA), RODDY CREEDON (CED) AND RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI (CED)

The interior space could be easily reconfigured as the displays would be lightweight scrims on a sliding track. These barriers would also offer a projection surface so that the museum’s extensive catalog of photographs and negatives could be more fully exploited. Special engagements could also dictate the configuration of the space. Invariably information is all around us in contemporary society; a significant portion of the population walks around with a computer in his or her pocket, a few taps away from knowledge previously inaccessible to the masses. Why, then, have museums been hesitant to adapt? RIGHT: population demographics of Oakland FAR RIGHT:: breakdown of the OMCA’s multi-faceted collection. 10


THE BOB WALKER COLLECTION RUSTLER RANCH MASTODON SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA CREEKS CALIFORNIA LIBRARY OF NATURAL SOUNDS THE OHLONE BASKET PROJECT AMERICAN INDIAN COLLECTIONS NATURAL SCIENCES HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA ART AND DESIGN

ASIA AND PACIFIC COLLECTIONS DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY THE TRIBUNE COLLECTION THE ANDREW J. RUSSELL COLLECTION

EXHIBITION SPACES

DOMESTIC FURNISHINGS

AT THE MUSEUM

EPHEMERA OTHER SPACES

TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGY MUSEUM STORE OMCA CAFE THEATER

OMCA

BAY AREA FIGURATIVE ART DORTHEA LANGE ARCHIVE ARTHUR AND LUCIA MATTHEWS

OFFICES | ADMINISTRATIVE EDUCATIONAL SPACE

JOANNE LEONARD AND HELEN NESTOR COLLECTIONS EARLY LANDSCAPE PAINTING

GARDEN AFFILIATED WITH MUSEUM

ARTWORK RESTORATION

GOLD RUSH ERA WORKS

OAKLAND STANDARD

CALIFORNIA CERAMICS

555 12th STREET GALLERY

MARGAERT dE PATTA JEWELERY

500 12th STREET GALLERY

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1. EVOLUTION OF THE BILBAO EFFECT : MASTER’S THESIS WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 - SPRING 2012 ADVISORS LARRY RINDER (BAM/PFA), RODDY CREEDON (CED) AND RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI (CED)

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This thesis also seeks to resolve some of the issues that are changing the direction of contemporary museum architecture. The freedom of information that is currently inundating our generation continues to redefine every day life at large; architecturally, the museum’s long-standing (and uncontested) role as major resource for humankind’s collected history is diminishing more and more each day. Locally, the Oakland Museum faces a number of pressing issues common to museum institutions in the information age. These conditions are further exacerbated by aggressive capital campaigns and monumental expansions currently being undertaken at other Bay Area museums, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Berkeley’s own Berkeley Art Museum. This thesis project pursues answers to questions including: how to evolve the static display paradigm while balancing a continuously aging and expanding collection, how to efficiently show, store and maintain more artifacts from an already vast archive, and how to engage an increasingly disengaged public by adapting static display practices to reflect temporal registration. In reaction to the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and evaluating its ambitions against its performance, this project seeks a resolution that is identifiable and influential at both a macro and micro scale. The primary issue that I have identified relative to the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao’s success is that it has pushed aside the local arts community in favor of high end real estate and retail opportunities. The people of Bilbao have played second string to the larger aspirations of the city and the Guggenheim foundation itself, which sought a signature attraction to the fledgling region after the hyper de-industrialization that followed a boon of production in the early 1980’s. Further expounding on these notions and the bold statement posited by Christine van Assche during her talk Berkeley’s Center for New Media, museums must adapt to the current state of technology and pervasiveness of the internet to escape obsolescence. LEFT: Plan of museum showing relationship to existing museum structure and Lake Merritt. RIGHT: Conceptual illustration of the capability of the museum as an all-encompassing urban entity. ABOVE: exterior rendering of new museum at night. 13


1. EVOLUTION OF THE BILBAO EFFECT : MASTER’S THESIS WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 - SPRING 2012 ADVISORS LARRY RINDER (BAM/PFA), RODDY CREEDON (CED) AND RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI (CED)

“A museum is like a living organism which thrives on a particular set of circumstances and is justified by them. An authentic museum senses its natural, ‘organic’ size and capabilities. If the institution fails to recognize this period of greatest self-understanding - the true fulfillment of its purpose - it will irrevocably lose its authenticity and vitality.��� -Richard Koshalek, first director of MoMA, 1931 14


The state of museum culture itself is at a crossroads. As Nina Simon, museum scholar and author of the blog “Museum 2.0,” puts it, museums are “deliberately unsustainable business models,” meaning that they aim to function and provide services for as long as possible, more often than not without turning a profit, before the funds dry up and another solution must be pursued. Her prognosis for the foreseeable future is not all together bleak, though she cautions museums and their staff to consider two points: 1) what core services they provide that people depend on and need to survive, and 2) services they provide that are unique and make an institution stand out. Ultimately, what needs to evolve is the role of the museum in its relationship to the people of the city (of Oakland). If the museum can attain a status as a solution to the city’s graffiti problem by providing an encouraged public space for artistic pursuits as opposed to vandalism, it could mean a lot more to the local arts culture of the place while still generating interest. RIGHT: drawings of existing (and utilized) Kaiser Convention Center. ABOVE: model made from CNC’d foam insulation; color diagrams. 15


1. EVOLUTION OF THE BILBAO EFFECT : MASTER’S THESIS WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 - SPRING 2012 ADVISORS LARRY RINDER (BAM/PFA), RODDY CREEDON (CED) AND RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI (CED)

In some sense, the building’s exterior would look like this. I am imagining the initial construction would reuse the demolition materials from gutting the Henry J. Kaiser Convention Center, creating a paneled system that would be color coded to indicate interior function and a fun visual collage aesthetic that would allow for continuous maintenance and minimal upkeep. The building could look like this, but then, not really - it should be covered in graffiti. There are other skin conditions - including portions of living roof, digital projection screens showing information about vandalism in the city, and space for informal after hours dining at spaces conducive to food cart presence. Tell your own story. Use it how you like, day, night, or in between. It is a temporal destination, a dynamic, living entity on the salty shores of Lake Merritt. 16


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2. MUSEUM ADDITION: A NEW EXHIBITION SPACE FOR EL MUSEO DE ARQUEOLOGÍA DE ÁLAVA WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | SPRING 2010 | INSTRUCTORS RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI & MARK ANDERSON

The design for an addition for the archaeology museum of Álava, a sleepy Basque town in Northern Spain, called for a divided exhibition space for two kinds of native plants - those that require higher amounts of sunlight would be placed within the roof atrium, those that require low light levels would be implanted in the upper basement levels. Additionally, rare and fossilized specimens would be buried down in the lowest level of the addition’s basement. The roof scheme was

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a result of the extension and unfolding of the existing light penetrations; recalling the inherent archaeological themes of memory and rediscovery, the basement was then composed of the re-appropriated roof landscape into a series of buried cave-like chambers for the gallery space. In order to accommodate the new office and maintenance program, the existing dead space beneath the courtyard was further reconfigured into a system of interconnected offices and storage spaces.

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2. MUSEUM ADDITION: A NEW EXHIBITION SPACE FOR EL MUSEO DE ARQUEOLOGÍA DE ÁLAVA WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | SPRING 2010 | INSTRUCTORS RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI & MARK ANDERSON

Conceptual models studying (CLOCKWISE from TOP LEFT): potential for floor space expansion; addition of volume above and below museum (2 parts); potential roof scheme; connection of roof and basement; light penetration into gallery space (a condition to be preserved)

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Upon completion of the case study model of the Museum (pages 25-27), we were then tasked with designing an addition to the museum’s galleries. The addition design was deeply rooted in the additional information we gathered at our site visit during March 2010. My initial reaction was in part due to the physical limitations of the site (courtyard space is scant and highly prized in this small Basque town) as well as climate (there would be a need to protect living plants within an atrium space for warmth and moisture). The scheme’s dual nature was expressed initially with a series of conceptual models (facing page). ABOVE::drawings show the design process as it evolved in section; below are two models exploring later stages of unfolded roof schemes; LEFT: drawings of the final roof. A combination of physical modeling, drawing, and conceptual form-finding led me to the final formal logic. The faceted, highly contrasting roof atrium could serve as a symbolic form for the museum and for the city itself. 21


2. MUSEUM ADDITION: A NEW EXHIBITION SPACE FOR EL MUSEO DE ARQUEOLOGÍA DE ÁLAVA WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | SPRING 2010 | INSTRUCTORS RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI & MARK ANDERSON

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ABOVE: Site Plan, 1:250 Scale Plans (Top down) Roof Atrium 1:50 Scale RIGHT: Basement -1 Basement -2 Basement -3 1:100 Scale * Mangado y Asociados plan at RIGHT of plan 22

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2. MUSEUM ADDITION: A NEW EXHIBITION SPACE FOR EL MUSEO DE ARQUEOLOGÍA DE ÁLAVA WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | SPRING 2010 | INSTRUCTORS RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI & MARK ANDERSON

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The existing interior light shafts would be extended onto the roof (left rendering) to serve as informational displays for the new living greenhouse on the top of the existing museum. The individual shafts would further be unfolded to meet the other unfolded elements to create an undulating, barnaclelike roofscape. This roof would be duplicated in the basement volumes as well to display the fossilized collections and native Spanish mosses and low-light plant collections. As it is a history museum, the extension would invoke a sense of journey, from basement to rooftop, reflecting the actual many-layered Basque and Roman collections that exist within. RIGHT: Exploded axonometric, highlighting construction of roof structure LEFT: Interior rooftop rendering of atrium space for living plant species. ABOVE: entryway rendering with access to basement; planting scheme reacts to light.

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3. CASE STUDY: MUSEO ARQUEOLOGICA DE Ă LAVA, VITORIA, SPAIN | PATXI MANGADO Y ASOCIADOS WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | SPRING 2010 | INSTRUCTORS RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI & MARK ANDERSON STUDY & CONSTRUCTION WITH MICAH BURGER, JESSICA IVRY & MADELINE HARTZELL

THE STUDY This case study was approached as a chance to get to know a building and its details from the inside-out; the broader scope of the study included an actual site visit in Vitoria, Spain, about 5 hours north of Madrid. After initiating contact with Mangado y Asociados, whose office is based in Pamplona, we were tasked with redrawing their plans and sections, complimented by an assembly of the building at 1:50 scale. Upon completion, our team then was challenged to design an addition to the museum for the exhibition of native Spanish plants and fossils (project 2).

Model photos showing the exterior, roof and sectional qualities of the building.

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THE MODEL The model we constructed included the adjoining Fournier-Naipes card museum, which occupies an old castle; a site building provides immediate context; as with both of these details, the base was poured with rockite, a cement-like substance. The museum itself was constructed of lasercut mahogany and basswood, as well as wooden dowels and acrylic. Finally, the design includes a section of the museum that you can pull out to investigate the interior space in further detail.

TOP & BOTTOM: comparing site visit photos (from Spring 2010 trip, LEFT) with model photos (RIGHT).

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4. BOATHOUSE: ROWING FACILITY FOR THE BERKELEY AQUATIC PARK WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2009 | INSTRUCTORS RODDY CREEDON, LISA IWAMOTO & MARK ANDERSON

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The boathouse project called for a revitalization of the Berkeley Aquatic Park, a small, tidally influenced lagoon that stretches between the end of the East Bay street-grid and the freeway at the western most edge of the city of Berkeley. I specifically looked at the Dwight Way terminus.

the grain of the area and traced the path and termination of the grid right through to the lagoon. The program was then arranged according to this directionality, resulting in a splitlevel boathouse that draws the user down towards the boats and the water through the boathouse structure.

Following the overall progression from the hills of Berkeley’s Eastern end down towards the bay and ultimately the Pacific, my scheme for the boathouse followed a thorough analysis of

Images (CLOCKWISE from RIGHT): Entryway render, longitudinal section (1/64”=1’0”); waterfront facade, visible to aquatic users; 1F Plan (1/64” = 1’0”) 29


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Storage

Loading & Unloading

S hop B ay

Boat Storage

Circulation

Scull Tank

Lockers & Showers

Convertible Component

Club Observation Deck

Training Room

Public Restrooms

History Room

Entry Hall | Reception Area

Coach’s Office

Catering Kitchen

Laundry Room

4. BOATHOUSE: ROWING FACILITY FOR THE BERKELEY AQUATIC PARK

WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2009 | INSTRUCTORS RODDY CREEDON, LISA IWAMOTO & MARK ANDERSON


The sectional direction of the design came from a series of inferences about the spatial needs of a public boathouse and storage facility in conjunction with the strong flow of direction that sweeps down from the hills of Berkeley all the way to the bay-side shores of San Francisco Bay.

The serial section above shows the three different programmatic elements of the design: (TOP TO BOTTOM) the entryway, subterranean locker rooms; viewing platform and history room; rowing shell storage, in custom racks. All sections at 1/32”=1’0”. 31


4. BOATHOUSE: ROWING FACILITY FOR THE BERKELEY AQUATIC PARK WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2009 | INSTRUCTORS RODDY CREEDON, LISA IWAMOTO & MARK ANDERSON

Roof panels Wood composite (recycled)

Glass curtain wall and interior glass

Rowing Shells (carbon fiber)

Boat racks (steel)

Docks and flooring (wood) Maintains directionality

FACING PAGE: Site plan with grain analysis of the Berkeley Aquatic Park. The strong directionality of the city’s urban design was a strong influence for the overall layout of the building and site.

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5. DOUBLE NEGATIVE: THE INTERSECTION OF THREE VOIDS WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2009 | INSTRUCTORS RODDY CREEDON, LISA IWAMOTO & MARK ANDERSON

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The double negative was a response to an article written by Craig Scott, inspired by the original ‘earthwork’ by Michael Heizer. By intersecting two voids within a prescribed 7”x8”x15” volume, a new condition could be created and exploited as an excavation tool. The exercise was to intended to spark architectural discourse without a specifically prescribed program, with a focus on this specific methodology for form-finding which was open to interpretation.

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My scheme consisted of three singular paths that would only intersect each other outside the void; the result was a series of three crisscrossing voids slicing through the volume (see ABOVE formal diagram). The form was also affected by a second applied condition wherein each time a path penetrates the volume, it enters with a four-sided polygon but leaves with a three-sided polygon; the resulting transformations create a ‘third condition’ in which the volumes form a cavernous faceted interior and a decayed, deformed exterior. MIDDLE, BELOW: photographs of museum board model.

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6. DAEGU GOSAN PUBLIC LIBRARY COMPETITION MIN|DAY | PROFESSIONAL | SEPTEMBER 2012 EB MIN, JEFF DAY (PRINCIPLES); LAUREN TICHY, KRISTEN PRITCHARD, ASHLEY BAERS (DESIGNERS); MICHAEL STANLEY, WIN MIXTER (DRAWING AND DIAGRAMMING)

These drawings were done as part of a competition entry put together by the San Francisco- & Nebraska-based offices of Min | Day. The overarching idea of the project was to foster a sense of community with this library building by creating a series of ramped spaces in a continuous tube that wrapped around the media-core, a multimedia installation and book repository for youthemphasized books, computer programs, music, and other digital media.

I came in during the final week of the competition to help finalize diagrams and a site plan for the competition entry boards. The diagrams at RIGHT (TOP to BOTTOM) illustrate the overall structural plan of the building (regularly spaced steel members), and the circulation path through the building including a pair of egress stairs designed as shortcuts to the spiraling circulation path. The site-plan below (1/64”=1’0”) illustrates a textured and colored field that extends the building’s tangible presence while creating a colorful promenade to the library.

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7. MISSION POOL REDESIGN, 19th & LINDA, SAN FRANCISCO WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2010 | RODDY CREEDON

1F PLAN 1/64” = 1’0” Operability/ lighting diagram (RIGHT) 38


ABOVE: Exterior view showing absence of street-side visual porosity. My primary goal for this project was to create a space for withdrawal and isolation from the boisterous everyday urban environment. My organizational scheme consisted of a series of perceptible layers that the pool users would traverse, harboring a sense of removal and transformation as they proceed from the entry to the pool area. The design was inspired by two distinct experiential qualities, one of the site and another directly from the act of swimming itself. The visceral experience of submerging oneself in water was my primary inspiration; underwater, one is effectively disconnected from our normal reality. The sensory deprivation that results from plunging below the surface forces the mind to calm and allows the body to move flexibly. The site is situated at the corner of 19th Street and Linda Street, at the heart of the Mission district of San Francisco. My initial reaction to the immediate context was a desire to isolate the pool program, not only from the rest of the park’s program but from the neighborhood as a whole. Swimming can be a restorative and highly individual experience, and this approach to a public space actively cultivates spaces that are accessible for groups of people (community room, mezzanine/ observation area) as well as a pool that provides tranquility and physical dissociation. 39


7. MISSION POOL REDESIGN, 19th & LINDA, SAN FRANCISCO WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2010 | RODDY CREEDON The physical model making aspect of this project was a strong factor in the forward progress of the use of layers as an organizational system. Each of these models explores some of the primary concepts inherent with attaining a secluded feel from a very public building.

Specifically, these four study models explored different ideas of how to use layers on the site to dictate its use and organization.

The completed mid-review model (LEFT) was made from rockite and museum board, showcasing the change in material that exists between the entryway, the locker rooms and the pool itself.

At LEFT, demonstrating how a change in perspective from oblique to direct when looking at the roof of the pool area would reveal a peekthrough to the sky, granting the user a connection to the outside (as currently exists at the mission pool) without sacrificing privacy.

FACING PAGE: serial sections showing the transition from exterior (on 19th street) to the innermost regions of the new building, the swimming pool. The faceted wall adjacent to the pool is a reminder to the user of the facade, a way to force them to recognize the layers they had traversed to get there. 40


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7. MISSION POOL REDESIGN, 19th & LINDA, SAN FRANCISCO WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2010 | RODDY CREEDON

Part of the comprehensive studio was to understand how real building systems and construction methods are used in the design of a building. This type of study necessitated the generation of a wall-section, which was cut through the actual pool area to demonstrate the overarching ideas of memory, isolation and repetition as methods to communicate the experience of being underwater. Model-making was also used to simulate lighting changes and the operable roof system that replicated the experience of the Mission Pool at the time of its renovation, an open-air recreation facility. FACING PAGE: Wall section, 1/64” = 1’0” LEFT: wooden model showing removable roof of ceiling to expose modeled structure; above, interior shot of pool model of area; below, detail of glass louvres in hallway area

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7. MISSION POOL REDESIGN, 19th & LINDA, SAN FRANCISCO WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | FALL 2010 | RODDY CREEDON

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ABOVE: Longitudinal Section, 1/32”=1’0” BELOW: W Elevation, 1/32”=1’0”

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E. ELEVATION - FROM PLAYGROUND 1/4” = 1’0”

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8. FLOATING ISLANDS: SKELE - F.I.S.H. | IN CONJUNCTION WITH ARCHITECTURE FOR HUMANITY’S PAC-RIM STUDIO WIN MIXTER | ACADEMIC | SPRING 2010 | INSTRUCTORS RAVEEVARN CHOKSOMBATCHAI & MARK ANDERSON CONCEPTUAL DESIGN WITH VIRGINIA CHARITAKI & MENGXI WU

Architecture for Humanity, a San Francisco based non-profit architectural organization, approached our studio at UC Berkeley with two challenges: first, to combat the alarming spread of toxic plastic waste throughout the world’s oceans (in particular the Pacific gyre); second, to envision an alternative habitat for local species and human life to evacuate to as the sea levels continue to rise (Tivoli, a small Southern Pacific island, served as a test case). The Skele-F.I.S.H. (Floating Islands for Sustainable Habitation) is a collaborative product of sustainable energy analysis, modular design and time-based progression, from individual unit to a cluster of hundreds of symbiotic units. The wave diagram BELOW illustrates the harnessing of the ocean’s wave energy. The study at left illustrates a hypothetical potential for the capture and use of wind energy. The solution was presented at the Studio for Urban Architecture in San Francisco, in front of a panel of area-based architects and planners, as well as members of Architecture for Humanity. All work on this page by author aside from diagram at immediate LEFT (done by Mengxi Wu), and jellyfish image by Alexander Semenov, RIGHT (posted on http://www.thisiscolossal.com/ 8/26/12).

WIND MOVEMENT

wind motion diagram

46

ABOVE: Above water (LEFT) and below water (RIGHT) renderings FACING PAGE: Exploded axonometric structural diagram.


Fins capture wind energy (SRPET)

Air pocket (SRPET) Inner core Buoyancy component

Piston (Steel)

Tentacles harvest wave energy (SRPET)

47


9. MATERIAL INTELLIGENCE : CHEVRON WIN MIXTER w/ASH LOW & ANASTASIA VICTOR | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 | INSTRUCTOR JORDI TRUCO

Along with my thesis work in the Fall 2011 semester, I was concurrently taking a studio with Esherick Visiting Professor Jordi Truco of the Barcelona practice Hybrida. Using generative design techniques outlined by our professor we endeavored to combine material performance with adaptable behavior to

48

create a community greenhouse for Oakland that would be responsive to sunlight exposure and the life cycle of a plant from germinated seedling to fully grown adult plat. Ash Low, Anastasia Victor and I envisioned a system of kinetic pieces that would nest and bend with each other to adjust the


aperture necessary for the roofing system. The overall design was conceived as a system of synergy: structure, function and aesthetic all simultaneously considered and interdependent. Extensive study of individual combinations of components was used to ascertain the limits of our chosen system and

to define limits ourselves as to its potentials. In order to establish these limited possible morphologies, we determined the final combinations using a system of measured notches and perforations to combine the components in a highly intentional way. See following pages for further explanation of this process.

49


9. MATERIAL INTELLIGENCE : CHEVRON WIN MIXTER, ASH LOW & ANASTASIA VICTOR | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 | INSTRUCTOR JORDI TRUCO

93.01mm

WIDTH

88mm

150.72mm 114.43mm

LENGTH R125.00

R93.78

HEIGHT

16.4

0

O

R111.24

O

4

16.26

O

13.9

ABOVE: Our final presentation included digital animations, static presentation boards, a demonstrator model and a physical model. LENGTH

The family tree (RIGHT, composed by Ash Low) shows the elimination process for the components as we tested different configurations and manners of aggregation. The tests were also phased to include different material tests, including polystyrene, duralar and wood veneer, to ensure that our designs would be inflected with the material qualities of the custom designed pieces. These considerations also helped shape the trajectories of each smaller combined aggregations of components. Ultimately we used a large-scale combination of individual component pairs to aggregate a model (FACING PAGE). 2.50

8

4 2

2.50

18.00

10 1

7

6 23.00

3

5

50

9

19.00


CHEVRON

component variation

base shape

scale 2x horizontal

connections for global change

scale 2x vertical component connectivity with longer tabs at different angles Basic Chevron one notching variable

connection system between components with the idea of using fasteners.

scale vertical outside edge x 0.5

rather than having a slide 3 holes are used to define the different positions

longer tabs scale vertical centre x 0.5 Basic Chevron four notching system longer chevron arms and longer tabs

longer chevron arms

number of tabs is reduced and a slider to make the component move up and down is introduced

scale edge 1,2, 4 or 5 x 2

Chevron surface

M O V E M E N T _ SENSORING AND ACTUATION

Chevron shape that can address change of aperture and can contract the system.

Introducing movement using gears

Change of motion strategy

Component’s present stage.

9

dimensions(mm)

87.22 51.61 53.94 25.25 85.00 53.98 54.63 23.78 69.72 72.23

9

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

9

85.94 53.54 53.74 21.41 83.76 51.71 51.71 03.00 70.00 70.00

dimensions(mm)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

87.22 51.69 51.69 30.18 73.78 28.41 91.49 71.93 70.64 29.66

9

8

8

4

8 7

6

6

6

6

7

5

4

3

6

2

7

7

4

7

7

6

7

6

dimensions(mm)

dimensions(mm)

10

dimensions(mm)

9

11

8

dimensions(mm)

dimensions(mm)

10

89.50 57.00 22.00 73.00 91.57 57.50 57.50 14.00 73.00 73.00

8

6

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

10

10

5

6

5

4

83.00 56.00 57.00 17.00 83.50 70.00 55.50 05.50 71.00 71.00

8

9

9 7

7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

8

8

1 86.78 2 70.50 3 74.59 4 88.00 5 26.21 6 28.41 7 91.49 8 71.36 9 72.58 10 27.04

9

9

1

8

1

6

1 83.00 2 57.00 3 56.00 4 19.00 5 30.00 6 70.00 7 56.00 8 58.00 9 58.00 1 0 18.50 1 1

10

10

1 84.82 2 48.74 3 50.53 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.85 7 81.04 8 68.16 9 69.08 10 19.45

10

87.22 53.62 53.72 74.08 73.78 28.41 91.49 71.93 70.64 29.66

10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

10

dimensions(mm)

Family tree by AL Chevron Diagrams created by team members, composed by AV

5

3

symmetrical/straight

symmetrical/straight

4

4

symmetrical/straight

symmetrical/straight

symmetrical/straight

15.49

3.00

7.26

proliferation series #9

15.60

9.74

9.32

3.26

5.72

21.81

8.93

proliferation series #9

18.39

29.94

3.00

6.59

proliferation series #9

25.01

3.50

18.50

4.00 1.65

2.00

19.00

proliferation series #9

symmetrical/straight

5.01 26.65

1

1

17.50

5.50

proliferation series #9

6.00

7.00

21.00

2.50

1

26.34

4

symmetrical/straight

2

2

2

83

16.00

proliferation series #9

17.00

2.50

3.50

1.98

20.00

proliferation series #9

22.00

20.50

2.50

28.00

10.00

19.00

2.50

23.00

2.50

18.00

proliferation series #9

3

3

1

1

3

3

symmetrical/straight

4

4

proliferation series #9

1

1

1

5

2

2

3

4

83.5

2

20.50

3

2

3.00

2

28.50

3

5

2

symmetrical/straight

two component module

50

50

50

50

50

50

0

0

0

0

100

50 50

R70.55 30.00

R53.95

0 0

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

-50

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

-50

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

0

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

-50

radii(mm)

-50

radii(mm)

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

radii(mm)

-50

radii(mm)

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

radii(mm)

-50

radii(mm)

1 102.4 2 104.8 3 69.09 4 104.8 5 102.4 6 97.5

radii(mm)

radii(mm)

R57.88

-50

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

radii(mm)

0

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

radii(mm)

0

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

side elevation

100

100

100

100

R251.41

100

100

100

100

100

R325.30

R205.60

R377.55

0

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

0

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

0

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

0

radii(mm)

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

radii(mm)

0

radii(mm)

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

radii(mm)

0

radii(mm)

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

radii(mm)

0

radii(mm)

R615.32

0

1 87.22 2 53.62 3 53.72 4 74.08 5 73.78 6 28.41

0

plan

R227.28

R316.53

R72.64 R214.09

1 2 R3 4

3

R4 R5

R82.89

R6

R66.56

5 R194.37 R106.342

R2

R223.62

R82.80

R342.97

R1

R93.36

five component proliferated module

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9. MATERIAL INTELLIGENCE : CHEVRON WIN MIXTER w/ASH LOW & ANASTASIA VICTOR | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 | INSTRUCTOR JORDI TRUCO

The final phase of the Material Intelligence studio was to apply a program to the system that had been cultivated over the previous 14 weeks of the semester in a subversion of traditional architectural pedagogy. The most useful ability of the chevron’s engaged form and repetition was the ability of the structural skin to modulate light and to control the aperture between individual components to dictate the interior atmosphere. The program that Anastasia, Ash and I selected was a community greenhouse, to be built in various formations across the city of Oakland’s empty lots, primarily in residential neighborhoods. Each could be tailored to the specific restrictions as dictated by the site layout and community within which it would function. In order to facilitate both the germination cycle of a seed and the life cycle of a plant, the components would respond to changes in sunlight in order to regulate the light and atmospheric (read: humidity) conditions within. This would allow the greenhouse to simultaneously accommodate plants with different needs and different phases of growth. This is one scheme hatched among many. Light modulation is the key. 52

(CLOCKWISE from BOTTOM RIGHT): germination process and light modulation; the structure partially illuminated at night; a daytime shot of the flower beds and a possible reflection pool.


ABOVE: image of the model, created from over 1,000 individual polystyrene pieces, tied together laterally with clear fishing line. Mounted on a base of CNC routed polycarbonate. All images except two BELOW (by AV) on this spread were produced by the author.

53


9. MATERIAL INTELLIGENCE : CHEVRON WIN MIXTER w/ASH LOW & ANASTASIA VICTOR | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 | INSTRUCTOR JORDI TRUCO

BELOW: These longitudinal sections showcase the adaptive nature of the architecture. Since the system provides a porous and aesthetically unique skin, structure, and ability to change based on response to environmental conditions, the profile of the building and the spaces within are susceptible to small-scale reconfiguration. Here, the building morphs its overall shape to reflect the changes experienced by seeds during the germination process. FACING PAGE: 1F Plan, 1:50

54


longitudinal sections 2777 foothill ave, oak scale 1:50 (metric)

N full sunlight

high-mid sunlight low-mid sunlight

6’

low sunlight

55


9. MATERIAL INTELLIGENCE : CHEVRON WIN MIXTER w/ASH LOW & ANASTASIA VICTOR | ACADEMIC | FALL 2011 | INSTRUCTOR JORDI TRUCO

The final model, made from 1,000+ individually mounted polystyrene chevrons of our own design, and mounted on a CNC milled base of polycarbonate sheet. 56


57


FRONT & BACK covers : 3 takes on a door - open, closed, 50%

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Win Mixter Architectural Portfolio