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KIB322 Semester 2 2013 Professional Practice

KIB322 Semester 2 2013 PROJECT PLAN

Version 0.3 Team 4 Signatures Katelyn Mergard – Caroline Ochoa – Ella Mobbs – Vinh Nguyen

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Project Team Sign-off and Approvals Project Plan Sign-Off: In submitting this project plan the undersigned members of this team agree that we are committed to completing the requirements for this KIB322 Group Assignment according to the Assignment Guidelines and as described in this Project Plan. Person’s name & student number

Signature

Date

1. Katelyn Mergard n8576963 2. Caroline Ochoa n8539294 3. Ella Mobbs n6936342 4. Vinh Nguyen n8292213 Tutor approval

Team Blog The team blog can be found through Tumblr via www.kib322blog2013.tumblr.com. The blog is password protected, viewable by entering the password “kib322blog2013”. The blog is a team Tumblr page; the members are Ella, Caroline, Katelyn, Vinh and Jen. Non-members who have entered the password may also comment and post on the blog.

Document Change History Revision Number 0.1 0.2 0.3

Date of Issue th

5 August, 2013 th 13 August, 2013 th 16 August, 2013

Project Plan v 0.3

Author(s)

Brief Description of Change

Ella, Katelyn, Caroline, Vinh Ella, Katelyn, Caroline, Vinh Katelyn, Vinh

Individually drafting up sections of the document Refining the report Proofreading and finalising

i


Executive Summary This purpose of this Project Plan is to propose the theme Signatures, for the 2013 IVD Graduate Exhibition. Every year the unit coordinator and school of design pose the design problem - for the graduate exhibition to the students of KIB322 Professional Practice for Designers, helping the cohort develop useful insight and real world experience of a working exhibition. Outlined in this plan is Team 4’s response to the problem, with consideration of the Stakeholders (client/s, management and development team, students, public, etc), the location, purpose, direction, implementation steps and timeline. The team proposes the integration of two ideas - signatures and networking, which will incorporate an interactive experience of paper. Our unique theme is central around Signatures - is a beautiful juxtaposition of the large exhibition and celebrating each student’s unique style. The foundation of this theme is the networking concept, whereby each stakeholder is encouraged to leave their business card and take a student’s profile displayed on a postcard - an interaction with paper. The team are excited and dedicated to implementing this project plan. Together we have a vast range of experience and skills we can use to assist us in the development.

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Table of Contents Project Team Sign-off and Approvals .................................................................................................................. i Team Blog ........................................................................................................................................................... i Document Change History................................................................................................................................... i Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................ ii Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................... 1 Description of Project.......................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose and Objectives................................................................................................................................. 1 Scope Management....................................................................................................................................... 2 Dependencies and Assumptions ................................................................................................................... 3 Constraints ..................................................................................................................................................... 3 Time Management: Schedule & Milestones .................................................................................................. 3 Evolution of the Plan ...................................................................................................................................... 4 Project Team and Process ................................................................................................................................. 4 Client Liaison ................................................................................................................................................. 4 Team Roles ................................................................................................................................................... 4 Internal Structure ........................................................................................................................................... 6 Team Code of Conduct and Communications............................................................................................... 6 Project Work Breakdown Schedule .................................................................................................................... 7 Project Budget ..................................................................................................................................................12 Labour budget estimate ............................................................................................................................... 12 Income and expenditure estimates .............................................................................................................. 12 Risk Management .............................................................................................................................................14 Outline of Development Method .......................................................................................................................15 Conclusion ........................................................................................................................................................16 References .......................................................................................................................................................17

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Table of Appendices Appendix 1 ........................................................................................................................................................18 Proposal Theme Exploration and Justification ............................................................................................ 18 References .......................................................................................................................................................19 Appendix 2 ........................................................................................................................................................20 Definitions for Tools and Methods ............................................................................................................... 20 Appendix 3 ........................................................................................................................................................23 Marketing Campaign.................................................................................................................................... 23 Digital ........................................................................................................................................................... 23 Social Media ................................................................................................................................................ 23 Event Marketing ........................................................................................................................................... 23 Public Relations ........................................................................................................................................... 23 Direct............................................................................................................................................................ 24 Print.............................................................................................................................................................. 24 Guerrilla Marketing ...................................................................................................................................... 24 Fundraising .................................................................................................................................................. 24 References .......................................................................................................................................................25 Appendix 4 ........................................................................................................................................................26 Branding Concept ........................................................................................................................................ 26 References .......................................................................................................................................................29

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Introduction This document is a proposed Project Plan for the Interactive and Visual Design undergraduate end of year exhibition. The project is to be developed by a small team of students from the KIB322 Professional Practice over the course of semester 2, 2013. The project plan proposes an exhibition theme derived from the idea of signatures and networking, reflecting an interactive experience of paper. This project plan includes: •

Description of the project (project background, purpose, objectives, scope, constraints, milestones and deliverables, etc.);

Description of the project team;

Milestones, tasks, and work allocations for the project; and

Outline of the development method.

Description of Project Purpose and Objectives Signatures is a project management and design proposal for the 2013 Interactive and Visual Design (IVD) Graduate Exhibition. The graduate exhibition serves as a platform IVD students participating in the capstone unit KIB322 Professional Practice for Designers to exhibit their work to family, friends and industry. This project plan puts forward the concept of signatures and networking as a framework for guiding the exhibition theme. The overarching concept of signatures is utilised for its reference to making meaning from images - a central learning outcome from the IVD course. The idea of signatures as mark marking is used throughout the project marketing and event night as a way of juxtaposing the multiple purposes the exhibition has; a) to highlight the individuality and unique skill sets of each student, and b) to showcase the student body collective. The resultant question put forward to the KIB322 student cohort in the planning for the event is then ‘how do you make your mark to stand out?’ The ‘mark making’ outcomes from each student are translated into tangible printed cards, that when combined created an interactive experience with paper reflective of the secondary theme: networking. Networking as a secondary theme is derived from a mutual interested expressed from the project team for what they would like to gain from the project. It is expected from the project team that their participation in this project will strengthen existing, and create new network ties with community and industry. In terms of motivating the greater student body to have a meaningful engagement with the exhibition, it is important that those participating are also given opportunities for creating network ties. This is achieved through an installation on the night of the exhibition, whereby signatures ‘mark making’ cards are able to be interlocked and extended to be representative of the student body network. This installation is able to be added onto by the general public and also industry, and the resultant networks are documented for students to follow them up in a virtual environment. These virtual ties become an important starting point for creating weak ties, which research shows can lead to greater work opportunities (Granovetter, 1983). And of course, this is important since the goal for most undergraduate design students is to find employment in the creative industries after finishing their graduate degree (Fleischmann 2009). In terms of generating awareness, interest, and revenue for the event, various marketing strategies will be used (see Appendix 4) over the course of the 17 week project. This project proposal document sets out to explain the steps and work required in order to develop and manage the project within the constraints this timeframe.

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Scope Management In this section, Signatures will satisfy the requirements of the stakeholders by analysing and delivering each of their needs. There are four key stakeholders; students, academics/lectures, industry and the public. Their common requirement is the need for a graduate exhibition to showcase this year’s graduating student’s work. Each stakeholder has its’ own set of individual needs. These include: Students: •

Exhibit course work in a digital and physical space. In the place of: o

A physical graduate exhibition in The Block

o

An online portfolio platform to showcase their work

o

Highlight their work in a unique work

o

Want their work to stand out amongst the crowd

Opportunities to network with Industry experts, businesses and the student cohort

Potential employment opportunities

Gain respect and credibility for their work

Academics/lectures: •

Mark individual/group student iteration and outputs

Gain credible opinion and review from the direct reflection of student work quality

Network with industry people

Industry: •

Network with students and academics

Provide real world opportunities for student employment and postgraduate training programs

Browse student work both in physical and digital contexts o

Visit the Graduate Exhibition and online portfolio - skills which may be desired by the company

o

Share students work with colleagues

Public: •

Browse student work both in physical and digital contexts: o

Understand the IVD course and possibly apply/enrol

o

View the Exhibition at The Block and the online portfolio

o

Looking for freelance/permanent employees

Network with students or academics

Engage their interests

The direct characteristic of the project is to develop a graduate exhibition to showcase student work, as a result it aims to cover the needs of the key stakeholders (stated above). However, this project plan is not the actual implementation of the theme, just the proposal. Additionally, this project is not aimed at the wider state, national or international audience, only to the specific target market. Tourists can and may wander through the exhibition or stumble upon the portfolio website, however will not cater for different languages or cultural assumptions. The needs presented will be made possible by the key outputs created from the exhibition planning. These key processes and/or outputs are as follows: •

Postcards printed and distributed

Live website

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Facebook page developed

Guerrilla marketing campaign

Rom designed and set ready for exhibition opening

Opening night event

Dependencies and Assumptions Constraints Student managed and produced events face constraints based on time, cost, capabilities and resources. The following points give a description of these constraints, as well as solutions to minimise their limitations on the project. Time & Resource Constraints Time is a major constraint as there are only 12 weeks to get all the major milestones completed. The completions of the milestones outlined in Table 1.4 are dependent on the student body and their efforts in completing each task on time. Tasks that are dependent on whole class participation are at most risk, as students have different timetables and all may not be available when required. Lack of experience and skills of the students involved in the delivery of the exhibition may also be a constraint. Budgetary Constraints Cost is also a constraint to take into consideration. A projected expenditure list will guide the students on the budget however if funding isn’t raised in time it will affect the quality of the end result of the exhibition. If quotes are not followed through this will also affect the budget. Resource Constraints Resources available from The Block can be a constraint if objects are broken or unavailable at short notice and if there is a limited number of a resource. By acknowledging project dependencies and constraints they can be accounted for to take proactive steps throughout the project, outlined in Table 1.7.

Time Management: Schedule & Milestones The following table outlines the major milestones for the project and the deliverables due upon these dates. Refer to section 4 for a more detailed time management schedule Table 1.1: Project Management Major Milestone / Deliverable

Date

QUT Week

Project theme chosen and refined

5-6

Exhibition branding released

6

Facebook community page established

6

First round of marketing/promotion

5-7

Second round of marketing/promotion

7-9

Final round of marketing/promotion

8-6 9-14

Student work collected and catalogued Exhibition bump in Exhibition Opening Exhibition bump out

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th

15-16

th

16

th

16-17

11 Nov 14 Nov 16 Nov

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Evolution of the Plan This project plan is a living document, which will change over time, as more details are known and understood about the project and more is known about the team’s capabilities and individual skills and abilities, personalities, strengths and weaknesses. Current content is based upon information requested for the Project Plan. This plan will be updated over time to reflect the work breakdown of each project phase: tasks identified, work allocations to individuals, and completion dates of activities.

Project Team and Process Client Liaison If nominated, the project team will liaise with management representatives: Jennifer Seevinck, Lachlan Spencer and the client (as specified by these representatives). It will be important to stay in contact with these clients to ensure satisfaction and direction. The communication tools specified below will assist with liaising with the client: Facebook community page: A Facebook community page is a platform for creating online communities (private). Utilised for it's ease of use and easy integration in students existing social networking routines, it will serve as the main communication hub for students to network amongst each other. Management representatives are able to log in and view discussions, and any issues unable to be resolved by students here may able be emailed to management representatives. Weekly Group Meetings: Weekly group meetings are arranged on a week-to-week basis by the project leader. Each meeting follows an agenda and aims to look at the work done the previous week, follow up any issues or problems that have arisen, appropriately re-evaluate the tasks for the following week, and conclude that all members are comfortable with the tasks they are assigned. Key outcomes from the meeting (such as any changes the timeline or assigned tasks) are noted and record via the blog to keep the client informed. Client Meetings (tutorials): Meetings directly with the client are arranged on a regular basis, and may occur during or after tutorials. These client meetings are used to resolve any conflict that can’t be sorted through email, as well as to go over any revisions for design outcomes, and to gain permission for additional outcomes. Blog: In line with the reflective practice method adopted, a private and password protected Tumblr blog is used regularly by all project members to document project outcomes and meeting minutes. Tumblr is utilised for its ease of creating a group blog, as well as it’s simple to navigate blogging platform. Through documenting the project processes regularly on the blog, the group maintains a transparency and clarity about the resolution of outcomes. Management representatives are able to log in and view the work if they seek more information on certain areas of the project. Email: Team members and management representatives may communicate via their student email for any private conversations or to bring any issues to attention. Emails should not be the first point of contact - overuse can create more work.

Team Roles There are 8 development roles for the proposed project, which have a minimum of 1 person assigned to each role at any stage throughout the project. The roles ranked in hierarchy are as follows, and their focus is further explored in the table below. • Project Leader • Visual Designer • Exhibition Designer • Marketing Designer • Photographer / Editor • Paper Engineer Project Plan v 0.3 - 19/08/2013

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•

Web Designer / Interactive Designer / Programmer

Higher ranking roles have more people assigned to them throughout the project where appropriate and where other roles haven’t come into play yet. That is, a photographer not required until later in the project may adopt the role of the visual designer in the early stages of the project if their skills are useful. Skill specific roles not met by the skill sets of the internal team members (Table 1.3) will be recruited from the KIB322 student cohort. It is expected that roles requiring broader skill sets and more man hours will seek help from the KIB322 student cohort. Table 1.2: Team Roles Role

Focus of Responsibilities

Project Leader

Scope project requirements, and develop a cost/time effective approach. Ensure the project is progressing according to the timeline, and that significant milestones are met. Periodically review evaluation outcomes with project objectives and propose adjustments to project resources and objectives as required. Research any problems and issue that may arise, and suggest appropriate solutions. Ensure each team member is performing to the best of their abilities. Liaise with outsourced resources e.g. printers. Ensure stakeholders are communicating.

Visual Designer

Design, produce and optimise branding, graphics and layouts for use throughout the project, including outputs for electronic media and print. Scope may include prototyping, programming, interactive & visual design, typography, photography or sourcing and maintaining graphic material, editing written content, liaising with stakeholders.

Exhibition Designer

Liaise with students to collect and manage exhibition pieces. Design and plan exhibition floor plan. Requires coordination with QUT academic and professional staff and students for venue design, installation of work, catering, entertainment, bump in, out etc

Marketing Designer

Design of marketing and advertising campaigns. Organising fundraising activities with cohort. Responsible for the pursuit of sponsorship, prizes from external groups and agencies.

Paper Engineer

Design, prototype and refine installation methods for portfolio cards. Build installation exhibition piece. Plan desirable positions for business card additions. Design for paper interactivity with general public. Educate team and students on the effect of the interactive elements on the design and layout of the cards.

Photographer / Editor

Research and plan an appropriate location for photography shoots. Design and document concepts for portraits. Liaise with students and staff to arrange photography sessions. Conducting photography sessions. Communicating with the visual design to edit, crop and export the photographs for web and print.

Web Designer / Interaction Designer / Programmer

Research and map the website in consultation with the group and client. Design and implement components, including coding and interactivity behaviours, hardware hacking etc. Create any website templates and set up URLs. Develop prototypes according to industry best practice, to ensure maintainability. Consult with the visual designer for any graphics/artwork required.

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Internal Structure The members that make up the team for the project proposal, as well as their skills and assigned team roles are outlined in the table below. While roles are assigned, it is expected that each member will contribute to all aspects throughout the project. Table 1.3: Existing Team Members

Name

Student Number

Existing skills

Management Roles

Development Roles

N6936342

Time management, illustration, layout, public speaking

Team leader

Proect Leader

Caroline Ochoa

N859294

Layout, illustration, photography, interior design

Designer

Exhibition Designer

Katelyn Mergard

N8576963

Literacy, illustration, budget, marketing

Document manager

Marketing Designer

Vinh Nguyen

N8292213

Drawing, photo editing, illustration, literacy, IT

Designer

Visual Designer

Ella Mobbs

Team Code of Conduct and Communications In line with the exhibition goal of representing work ready graduates, it is expected that team members will behave at an industry level standard throughout the progression of the project. The points below address issues for team conduct and will serve as a contract agreement for newly recruited team members to sign off on. Teamwork • Each member must work together to achieve high industry standards • Being polite and respectful between members to ensure working harmony • Ask for help and offer help where needed - each task is critical for completion • On time for scheduled, once a week meetings - prepared and co-operative Accountability of Team • Follow team processes • Meet team expectations • Complete tasks that reflect background and skills, whilst spending time to improve them • Members should always represent the University and IVD graduates in a positive light to sponsors, the community and other stakeholders - this means always communicating in a polite, honest, respectful and clear manner. Communication • The communication methods outlined in section 3 (above), including blog, email, weekly meeting, etc will help keep track of team progress, be used for posting announcements, updates, reminders, problems • Team members will be required to: o Check these streams every 1-2 days o Reply as necessary o Maintain a presences o Document progress Meeting Attendance • As well as the above methods it will be required for members to attend weekly meetings on the day(s) specified by the project leader • In addition to weekly meetings, members will be required to attend weekly client meetings (held in tutorials) Project Plan v 0.3 - 19/08/2013

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• • • • • •

If a member is unavailable to attend required meeting, appropriate amount of time for notification must be given through chosen method to project leader Each role in the group may wish to have separate team meetings in addition to the whole team meetings. Whole team meetings may not be required each week - this will be the same with role meetings. Meeting will have agendas outlined by the project leader These meetings will be documented using appropriate methods which will be decided by the group Meeting minutes will be available to all team members through the chosen communication streams (specified in section 3 above)

Exhibition Budget • Funds will be spent in agreeance of team members and to the discretion of the unit coordinator and client • Proposed expenditure will be submitted in a timely manner to respective parties for approval • Evidence must be provided for purchases in the form of a TAX invoice. • Remaining funds will be donated to the IVD school for injection into the following year exhibition. Marketing: • Proposed marketing material must be approved by the client before being made public Disregarding the team code of conduct on multiple occasions is to be considered on a case-to-case basis. Where appropriate reasoning (e.g. illness) is communicated for the non-compliance the project manager should re-arrange roles to appropriately manage the set back. Non-communication with team for repeated breaches should be considered as disinterest in the project, at which point the unit co-ordinator should be notified to communicate with the member(s). Extreme cases may result in individual grading or removal from the project team. .

Project Work Breakdown Schedule Project milestones, tasks and work allocations are shown in the following table. As the project progresses, this work breakdown schedule will be developed to include full details of identified activities (tasks) for each project phase, when the task is due to be completed, what its dependencies are, who the task was assigned to, and the date the task was actually completed. Table 1.4: Project work breakdown schedule QUT Wk

Person

Develop and refine project plan document

1-4

All

Develop and refine design response (1 page to be included as an appendix to the project plan)

1-4

All

Proof and print project plan

4-5

Katelyn

5

Ella

4-5

All

5

All

Refine project pitch based on presentation feedback (if chosen)

5

All

Project manager to reference back with document as project develops

5-8

Ella

Project Task

Date(s)

Planning, Specification and Project Management

Upload project plan via Blackboard

19th August

Write and prepare project pitch presentation (including powerpoint slides) Present project pitch (week 5, 19th August)

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Elected time in tutorials

7


Check timeline and milestones are aligning/modify project work breakdown schedule where necessary

4-15

Ella

Set up group blog

1

Ella

Document project processes, inspirations and developments online

1-12

All

Meetings with group members to update and discuss progress

1-16

All

Establish Facebook community page

5-6

Katelyn

Initial concepts for event logo

5

Vinh

Refine concepts for logo

5

Vinh/ Client

Proof branding

5

Client

Finalise and develop logo and style guide to suit

5-6

Vinh

Export branding media: Facebook Icon Facebook banner Website branding (header image, footer)

5-6

Vinh

Communication/Project Documentation

Branding

Marketing and Fundraising (See Appendix 3 for full details of Marketing and Fundraising activities) First round of marketing/promotion: Facebook Page & Cadbury Chocolate Sales

5-7

Create and share exhibition Facebook page

5

Order Cadbury chocolates

6

Ella

Create & distribute promotional web poster for Cadbury sales

7

Vinh

Distribute Cadbury chocolate

7-15

All

7-9

Katelyn

Advertise the upcoming fundraising

8-9

Katelyn/ Vinh

Bake goods for sale

9-11

All

9

Katelyn

Katelyn

Second round of marketing: Bake Sale & Sausage Sizzle Find sponsors for the exhibition fundraising Hire a barbeque, table, tent for sausage sizzle Organise student volunteers and permissions for stall locations

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8


Conduct first round of fundraising stalls at Kelvin Grove Village Markets and at QUT Kelvin Grove - volunteer group

9

All

On the day fundraising promotions on Facebook

9-11

Katelyn

Find sponsors to donate prizes for the opening night event

7-9

Katelyn

8-16

Katelyn

Create instalments

11-13

All

Guerrilla marketing implementation

14-16

All

Prepare for Discover QUT open day promotions

9-10

Katelyn/ Vinh

10

All

Invite industry, journalists, donors and sponsors to opening night

10

Katelyn

Create and share exhibition event on Facebook

10

Ella

Write press release about Guerrilla Marketing campaign and submit release to MX Newspaper and QUT e-Newsletters

15-16

Katelyn

Link to any newspaper reviews or articles on the event to the website and Facebook page

16

Ella

Email students/contact via Facebook page to request descriptions for work to be included in the exhibition (recontact weekly)

9-10

Ella

Catalogue list of student work to be included in the exhibition

9-14

Ella

Prepare floor plan for exhibition based on collected student work

15

Caroline

Final round of advertising: Guerrilla Installations Gain permission for instalment at locations

Discover QUT open day promotion

Wed 26th September

Exhibition Management & Design

Collect student work via an allocated point/day/time for students

11th Nov

15-16

Caroline

Install work in the Block (includes print, 3D installations, computer devices, etc)

11th Nov

16

All

Setup and test lighting

12th Nov

16

Block Staff/All

Pull down work

16th Nov

16

Caroline

Pull down/pack away props and installations

16th Nov

16

Caroline

Return work to students via an allocated collection point/day/time for students

16th Nov

16

Caroline

Dispose and/or store of work left behind

16th Nov

17

Caroline

14

Katelyn

Order catering

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Exhibition Visual Design Design and refine model structures for folio cards

5-8

Paper Engineer

Collect student information for folio cards

9-10

Ella

Collect student photographs for folio cards

8

Vinh

Collect students artworks to exhibit on folio cards

9-10

Ella/Caroli ne

Layout and design of folio cards

10

Vinh

Proof folio cards layouts with client and students

10-12

Ella/Vinh

Finalise folio cards and export for print

12

Vinh

Liaise with printers for best quote on folio cards

10

Ella

Source and buy rings for binding folio cards

10

Ella

Source and buy paint pens for guests to sign folio cards

10

Ella

Send final folio card artwork to printers

12

Caroline/Vi nh

Collect printed folio cards

14

Caroline

Cut and score folio cards

Paper Engineer/K IB322 Students

Build exhibition card installation

15-16

Paper Engineer/K IB322 Students

Distribute folio cards at exhibition

16

Caroline

Monitor installation progress on exhibition night

16

Caroline

Document and pull down installation

16-17

Caroline

Distribute leftover cards to students with their work

17

Caroline

Requirements analysis including clients goals and target audience

4-6

All

Create site map including links and a hierarchy of page organisation

6

Web designer

Gain access to servers including establishing a domain name, FTP host, control panel login, and database configuration.

6

Web designer

Determine required software and resources (photos, fonts, etc)

6

Vinh

Design mock-ups in Photoshop

7

Vinh

Website

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10


Review and proof mock-ups until client approval

7-8

Web designer/C lient

Export visuals for web

8

Vinh

Code XHTML/CSS and add in visual elements

8

Web designer

Develop and test special features and interactivity

8-9

Web designer

Organise/source photographer including setting up multiple photo shoots for students

7-8

Katelyn

Photograph students including editing photos and exporting versions for web and print

7-8

Caroline/Vi nh

Receive content

8

Web designer

Add content

9

Web designer

Test and verify links and functionality

9

Web designer

Transfer to server, test the website and do a final browser check

10

Web designer

Launch and announce live website

10

Katelyn

Back up and document the website

10

Web designer/V inh

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Project Budget Labour budget estimate The project will take approximately 1360 hours to deliver, based on 8 students in team roles, each doing 10 hours per week, for 17 weeks.

Income and expenditure estimates Table 1.5: Project Budget Projected Income

$$6587.00

Sponsorship from different Businesses Bluewire Media (If we receive any funding or item donations, we will put that towards marketing prizes)

$ N/A

Funding from QUT/CIP Based off Last year (Seevinck)

$4027.00

Student Fundraising (aim) Bake Sales

$500.00 (total profit)

Sausage Sizzles

$500.00 (total profit)

Cadbury Fundraiser One box per student with $30 profit per box (52 students)

$1560.00 (total profit)

TOTAL PROJECTED INCOME

$6587.00 (total profit)

Table 1.6: Project Expenditure Projected Expenditure

$$5409.57

Promotional Material 2000 x A6 Flier Cards (Fast Printing)

$352.00

Guerrilla Marketing Campaign

$100.00

MX Advertisement

$0.00

Online Marketing 1 x Domain Name

$12.00

1 x Hosting (Hosting donated by QUT or anyone willing to host website)

$0.00

Exhibition Materials 250 x Blank Branded Cards (Fast Printing)

$152.00

15,600 x Student Portfolio cards (WorldWide Printing Milton)

$ 3228.53

400 x Rings (Amazon $9.38 for 50 steel rings)

$75.04

Pens

$100.00

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Catering 20 x Finger food platters Fabulous Catering Brisbane. Selection of 4 different type of platters (20 platters)

$ 1190.00

Drinks for 300 people (water and soda including cups)

$200.00

TOTAL PROJECTED EXPENDITURE

$5409.57

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Risk Management As part of the planning process, potential risks (things that can go wrong) will be identified, and the risks managed to ensure that the project steers clear of avoidable potholes. Initial risk factors and response planning (either proactive actions in advance to reduce or avoid the risk, or reactive actions planned for if the event actually does occur) are detailed in the following table: Table 1.7: Project Risk Management Risk No. of expected guests not met

Response Strong marketing campaign/s prior to the event Use of social media Word of mouth Flyers/posters

Physical injuries

Prevention through following health and safety guidelines Having a first-aid kit on site

Exceeding budget

Organise limits to be slightly less than the maximum budget Fundraisers Donations

Goals not met on time

Following a strict time management plan Frequent meetings to make sure everything is going according to plan and everyone is on track with their set tasks Also to address any issues that may arise and come up with resolution/s

Installations/props breaking during the event Media failing during the event (powerpoints/video/ audio etc.) Guests not interacting with interactive elements Student work going missing and/or getting damaged

Thorough testing of installations/props to ensure stability and durability If risk occurs, have repair materials standing by Sound checks and microphone checks prior to opening Multiple versions/file compatibility/software versions Graduates demonstrating and encouraging guest interaction Have instructions that are easy to understand Setting up safety line that people cannot cross Having security guards Protective boxes

Lack of student work put forward to the exhibition i.e. not enough pieces to exhibit “Empty� exhibit Ensuring the exhibition it ready to open in time One of the curators becomes ill

Having a set minimum of works to exhibit per student (possible maximum too?) Adequate spacing/positioning between works to make the rooms seem filled as opposed to too much in one area and having mass empty areas Create and use a floor plan for The Block Thorough planning and preparation for setting up the exhibition following a time management plan Having backup curators that can take over if a curator becomes ill prior or during the night

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Outline of Development Method The proposed project adopts a combination of iterative and reflective design methodologies at it’s core. Driven by a small group of students who go above and beyond to deliver, the end of year exhibition is an industry standard show developed over 16 weeks. In line with iterative reflective practice there are 4 main stages of the design process that are revisited over the course of the semester, and leading up to the exhibition peak and aftermath. As outlined by Seevinck in 2011, there are 4 main stages in iterative reflective practice: framing, development, reflection, and evolution. The stages below outline the activities and deliverables for each stage, as well as suggestions for useful tools and methods. Each milestone in the project should be approached following these steps and the processes should be continually revisited to iterate the best result. The methods listed should be used in conjunction with the project work breakdown schedule to ensure deliverables are met on their respective deadlines. To enhance the capacity for concept development, a team blog is kept to record developments, thoughts and outcomes of each stage. Through this, the project maintains transparency between members, as well as opening up a platform for examining practice reflectively and reflexively. Stage 1: Framing Activity

Tools and Methods (see Appendix 2 for definitions)

Frame and reframe the concept (problem) by determining objectives, alternatives, and constraints.

Mind maps, focus groups, model making, personas, interviews, questionnaires, goals analysis

Deliverables

● ●

Describe a participants goals from their own perspective to create what’s called a user-story. Focus on needs and motivations, rather than technology or content (Digital Eskimo, 2013) Develop the use-story in conjunction with the stakeholders to prioritise the most important aspects of the project (Digital Eskimo, 2013) Regularly check back with the stakeholders to ensure the development progress is on track (Thompson, 2013) The objectives of the portion of the product, the alternative means of implementing this portion of the product, the constraints imposed on the application of the alternatives (Bohem, 1986)

Stage 2: Development Activity

Tools and Methods

Begin to construct the artefact (solution) by evaluating alternatives, identifying and resolving risks.

Low fidelity prototypes, task analysis, analysis of information utilisation, contextof-use analysis, field studies, contextual inquiry, prototyping

Deliverables ● ●

Break tasks into smaller chunks and deliver prototypes and draft design as soon as possible (Digital Eskimo, 2013) Adopt a design process comfortable to the designer: conceptualise, develop, test, trial, revise, install/make

Stage 3: Reflection Activity Project Plan v 0.3 - 19/08/2013

Tools and Methods

Deliverables 15


Evaluate progress through feedback and reflection

Blog, journal, user testing, critique, selfevaluation and other situation talk-back

Use reflection in the form of the tools suggested to identify unconscious values and assumptions (Sengers et al, n.d.) Listen to and absorb information in a state of readiness to apply and experiment with the new information (Waters, 2005)

Stage 4: Evolution Activity

Tools and Methods

Validate and verify the design, as well as plan the next phase

Gantt chart, requirements analysis, priorities, risks, schedules

Deliverables ●

Respond to changing priorities brought forward by the reflection (Digital Eskimo, 2013) ● Plan and revise considering a) What shall we do next? b) How long long shall we continue to do it? (Bohem, 1986)

These iterative reflective design methods are not always a linear process, and there should be successive sub-phases within each main phase. Each iteration produces outcomes for evaluation, with an emphasis on enabling stakeholders to experience and provide feedback on working examples (Digital Eskimo, 2013). Through this, the iterations should ideally be better than the previous version.

Conclusion This document proposed a project plan for the Interactive and Visual Design undergraduate end of year exhibition. A description of the project was given to explain the exhibition theme and it’s connection to the clients request for an interactive experience with paper. To match the appropriateness of the chosen theme to the skill sets of the team members, and also to illustrate where more members are required, a description of the project team was given. To validate the capability of the team to complete the project a detailed Project Management table including milestones, tasks and work allocation for the project was given. To be used in line with Project Management table are development outline methods, which will ensure the project outcome is the best resolution for the students and client needs. If nominated for development, this proposal will provide valuable experiences to the team and KIB322 student cohort for identifying themselves as designers and creating network ties with industry.

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References Boehm, BW (1986). 'A Spiral Model of Software Development and Enhancement', ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes. Accessed 8th August from http://www.cs.umd.edu/class/spring2003/cmsc838p/Process/spiral.pdf. Digital Eskimo (2013). ‘Iterative Design & Development’. Accessed 8th August, 2013 from ttp://digitaleskimo.net/approach/iterative-design-development. Fleischmann, K. 2009. For the implementation of a new learning and teaching model for digital media students in order to enhance real-world learning and graduate employability, Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning: James Cook University. Retrieved 14th April, 2012 from http://www.jcu.edu.au/teaching/public/groups/everyone/documents/advice/jcu prd_050556.pdf Granovetter, M. 1983. The Strength of Weak Ties: A Network Theory Revised. Sociology Theory, vol. 1 Iss:7, p. 201-233. Seevinck, J (2011). ‘The Concrete of Now’ in INTERACTING Art Research and the Creative Practitioner , Candy and Edmonds (Eds). Faringdon: Libri Publishing Ltd pp. 242-56. Sengers P., Boehner, K., David, S., Kaye, J (n.d.) ‘Reflective Design’ Culturally Embedded Computing Group. United States of America: Cornell Information Science. Thompson, B (2013). ‘Boehm’s Spiral Revisited’. Accessed 8th August, 2013 from http://leansoftwareengineering.com/2008/05/05/boehms-spiral-revisited/. Waters, M (2005). ‘Schon and Reflective Practice;. Accessed 8th August, 2013 from http://www.resources.scalingtheheights.com/Schon%20and%20Reflective%20Practice.htm.

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Appendix 1 Proposal Theme Exploration and Justification Signatures is an exhibition proposal based on two themes, networking and signatures. These themes follow the idea that each student’s work is unique, however they all have the same goal which is to stand out in order to make meaningful connections with future employers. Of networking and signatures, networking is the primary theme. This concept was chosen after a quick, small survey between group members showed that their expected outcome of the exhibition revolved around networking. This chosen primary theme emphasizes the importance of networking for not only graduating students but also for professionals. As Forret and Dougherty state “networking is an important career management strategy” (2001, p.283). Networking through face-to-face interactions has proven to help people develop the required sense of connection, trust and affinity needed to engage in many professional activities. It has also been proven that effective networkers find new jobs more easily (Farnham, S. D., Brown, P. T., & Schwartz, J. L. p.236). Therefore as graduating students, networking should be the main goal of the exhibition. This theme is carried out through the use of taking, and leaving their mark. Guests have the opportunity to take a student’s portfolio card and leave their own business card if they are impressed. These student portfolio cards also mesh the secondary theme, signatures, into the exhibition. The signatures concept explores the idea of “how do you make your mark” in the competitive creative industry and specifically how will the students get their work to stand out from the other 51 students’ work? This idea combines business cards, portfolios and the catalogues into something large enough to hold information about the student yet small enough to carry around and pick up as well as leaving a lighter carbon footprint. For the exhibition night each student has multiple postcard sized portfolio cards displayed next to their work at the exhibition. Guests may collect the cards of students they find to be of interest and place the cards on a ring or sleeve provided at the entrance. The card contains a summary of the student, a photograph of the student as well as important contact information. On the other side of the card there is an example of the student’s work. Each card has a pre-scored line and/or cut which is what creates the interactive experience of paper. These cuts and scores allow the card to be created into a sculpture by combining it to another card. There is a pre-built installation at the exhibition using the cards to illustrate the concept of ‘network.’ Each card will have a different colour scheme to create a nice pattern on the sculpture. With a mix of cards all interlocked together it will be easy to see the vast display of skills and talents of the class as well as juxtaposing each students designs with each other making it easier for prospective clients to find the signature they like. The cut slots on the cards allow for business cards of guests to be added to the sculpture so they can “leave their signature.” There will also be blank cards and paint pens available next to the instalment so that other guests without business cards can play along with the paper sculpture and also leave their mark to add to the “network”. The resultant networks are documented for students to follow them up in a virtual environment. This simple interactive experience of paper can also be transferred to marketing and advertising (see appendix 3 for more details).

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References Farnham, S. D., Brown, P. T., & Schwartz, J. L. (2009). ‘Leveraging social software for social networking and community development at events’. ACM Proceedings of the fourth international conference on Communities and technologies (pp. 235-244). ACM. Forret, M. L., & Dougherty, T. W. (2004). ‘Networking behaviors and career outcomes: differences for men and women?’ Journal of Organizational Behavior, 25(3), 419-437.

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Appendix 2 Definitions for Tools and Methods Goals analysis: A statement of general purpose of intent. Goals setting is essential to effective problem solving, selfmanagement and self-determination. (Source: http://www.headinjury.com/goalset.htm) Mind maps: A simple technique for drawing information is diagrams, instead of writing it in sentences. The diagrams always take the same basic format with a single starting point that branches out, and divides again and again. Used at a convergence stage of the project, nothing that comes to mind should be left out. (Source: http://www.mindomo.com/help/mind-mapping.htm) Focus groups: A form of market research with a small number of people brought together with a moderator to focus on a specific topic. Encourages students to express and share their perceptions, feelings and ideas with each other about their needs and their expectations from participating in the project. Focus groups and are an effective way to encourage participants to share thoughts about future possibilities for the project. Produce qualitative data. (Source: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/focus-group.html) Personas: A summary of a person’s perceived or evident personality. Usually include a photo, their age, interests, and key concerns. (Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/persona) Interviews: A series of open-ended questions with interviewer and interviewee to gain a more detailed understanding of specific requirements. Produce strictly non-statistical data that need to be carefully analysed by experienced practitioners. (Source: http://grammar.about.com/od/il/g/Interview-term.htm) Questionnaires: List of a research or survey questions asked to respondents, and designed to extract specific information. It serves four basic purposes: to (1) collect the appropriate data, (2) make data comparable and amenable to analysis, (3) minimize bias in formulating and asking question, and (4) to make questions engaging and varied. (Source: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/questionnaire.html#ixzz1xcVSeMQ9) Low fidelity prototypes: Quick and easy translation of a high-level design concept into tangible and testable artifacts. Consist, most of the time, of a mixture of paper, cardboard, post-it notes, acetone sheets etc. A clear advantage of lo-fi prototyping is its extremely low cost and the fact that non-programmers can actively be part of the ideacrystallisation process. (Source: http://www.telono.com/fr/articles/lo-fi-hi-fi-prototyping) Model making (High fidelity prototypes): Characterised by a high-tech representation of the design concepts, resulting in partial to complete functionality. Higher costs, both temporal and financial, and necessitates good programming skills to implement the prototype. The main advantage is that users can truly interact with the system, as opposed to the sometimes awkward facilitator-driven simulations found in lo-fi prototyping. There is a continuum from low to high-fidelity prototyping that usually stretches out from early to late design. (Source: http://www.telono.com/fr/articles/lo-fi-hi-fi-prototyping) Task analysis: Systematic identification of the fundamental elements of a job, and examination of knowledge and skills required for the job’s performance. This information is used in human resource management for developing institutional objectives, training programs, and evaluation tools. Project Plan v 0.3 - 19/08/2013

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(Source: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/task-analysis.html#ixzz1xcbKsxNm) Analysis of information utilisation: Method supports the human-computer interface designer with relevant and appropriate information structured specifically for a document oriented design methodology. It gives a suitable basis for user cantered interface design, without the possible limitations that improper user participation could cause, and focuses on all aspects relevant for a “good” work environment, such as competence, organisation, work activity and information technology development. Analysis of information utilisation is performed through “observation-interviews” in which a human-computer expert interviews a typical user about his work situation in the domain of work and observes information handling routines that the user might not be aware of. (Source: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.47.8961) Context-of-use analysis: A technique that assists development by posing certain probe questions about the project. The effect of carrying out CoU analysis is to bring this information out into the open at an early stage in development, when the implications can be examined and to drive the formulation of a realistic test plan. This is a method whereby the salient characteristics of the application can be determined: useful both for requirements and for planning an evaluation. Characteristics of the Users, Tasks, and their working Environments can be analysed, and a user/ task matrix can be created. (Source: http://www.usabilitynet.org/tools/r_context.htm &http://www.ucc.ie/hfrg/emmus/methods/CoU.html) Field studies: Investigative studies undertaken in a natural setting (in the users context). (Source: http://www.education.com/definition/field-studies/) Contextual inquiry: A structured field interviewing method, more a discovery process than an evaluative process; more like learning than testing. Designers who don’t understand their users frequently develop products that are difficult to use and understand, do not meet real-world requirements, or provide irrelevant functionality. The best way to get to know users is to spend time with them, in their own environments, watching them do the things that your Website is going to support or enable. (Source: http://www.deyalexander.com.au/resources/uxd/contextual-inquiry.html) Blog/Journal A platform (private or personal) for recording events, thoughts, and reactions to situations on a daily basis. (Source: http://www.yourdictionary.com/journal) User testing A technique used to evaluate a product or service by testing it on users to receive direct input on how real users use the system. Goals of user testing including testing efficiency, accuracy, recall, and emotional response. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usability_testing) Critique A type of written review that gives your opinions and observations. (Source: http://www.yourdictionary.com/critique) Self-evaluation and other situation talk-back Includes looking at your progress, development and learning to determine what has improved and what areas still need improvement. Usually involves comparing a ‘before’ situation with a current situation. May be done in the moment, or at a later date looking back at a situation. (Source: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/self-evaluation.html) Gantt chart A visual representation of a project schedule in the form of a of bar chart. Gantt charts show the start and finish dates of the different required elements of a project. (Source: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/g/gantt-chart.asp)

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Requirements analysis The process of determining user expectations for a new or modified product. These features, called requirements, must be quantifiable, relevant and detailed. Requirements analysis involves frequent communication with users to determine specific expectations. Energy should be directed towards ensuring that the final system or product conforms to client needs rather than attempting to mould user expectations to fit the requirements. (Source: http://searchsoftwarequality.techtarget.com/definition/requirements-analysis)

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Appendix 3 Marketing Campaign It is paramount that all marketing communications conducted by the team are well integrated and are consistent in their messaging. This will be achieved by using multiple platforms and layers of marketing including; digital, direct, event, social media, public relations (PR) and guerrilla marketing.

Digital As a basis of all our marketing, a highly sophisticated website will be developed. This will include student profiles and work, event details, course details, student and staff interviews and expert reviews, newspaper quotes and other PR.

Social Media A simple way to direct traffic to the website is by using social media in a genuine and meaningful way. It has been found that search engines, like Google, are now including social media presences in their algorithm to determine result ranking (Anderson, 2013). This can be implemented in multiple ways, firstly by creating a Graduate Exhibition Facebook page, where updates can be posted and events can be shared with the network. Secondly, a photo sharing campaign can be established on Facebook where fans are encouraged to repost an exhibition flier, and are entered into the draw to win a prize donated from one of the exhibition sponsors. This campaign aims to 'spread the word' and encourage people to attend.

Event Marketing Events, activities, or fairs can be used to promote the graduate exhibition, this is known as event marketing (WebFinance Inc, 2013). This can create quality individual impressions from specifically developed messages for target groups (Kandu, nd.). To promote the exhibition possible options could be: ● Advertise at QUT market days - targeting current students ● Advertise at a fundraising stall at Kelvin Grove Village Markets - Every Saturday from 6am ● Discover QUT open day at Kelvin Grove - Wednesday 26 September 9am - 2pm for prospective Creative Industry students ● Run a promotional event leading up to the exhibition, for example a design party - targeting interested people ● Opening night event to mark the Graduation Exhibition opening - targeted at key stakeholders To ensure the event marketing is a success, it is important to integrate social media, for example a promotion and updates on the Graduate Exhibition Facebook page (Lagorio, 2011).

Public Relations Today, PR is highly important to stand out and survive in such a competitive market. It manages an organisation's reputation and relationship with its' stakeholders by effective communication and clear messaging (CIPR, 2010). To conduct this type of marketing, media and press releases should be written and distributed to credible news sources (REFERENCE). Ways this can be implemented for the exhibition: ● Invite all stakeholders to the exhibition and key stakeholders to the opening night ● Invite donors/sponsors to the event night ● Invite industry experts and possible hiring businesses ● Invite a journalist to the opening night event to write an article for MX Newspaper. ● Send out a press release to Courier Mail, MX Newspaper, QUT News page, QUT Register's Update, art!culate Newsletter and Peppermint Magazine.

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Direct Direct marketing is a good way to invite industry experts and possible hiring businesses. Usually this is conducted by materials such as catalogues, mailers and filers (Investopedia US, 2013). However as this exhibition concept relies on alternative print and digital methods for promotion, a direct email method would be most beneficial to the exhibition. A specially conducted email campaign will not appear as spam, so long as the message is appropriate for the receivers, is personally addressed and interested - from past attendance (Margaret Rouse, 2007).

Print Postcard sized print material will be distributed in the lead up to the event to promote the Graduate Exhibition, on one side will feature exhibit artwork and on the reverse key information, dates and a blurb about the event. The cards will be distributed at event marketing locations, at local hip cafes and in postcard stands around the campus and the wider Brisbane Region. These cards will also be available on the opening night promoting individual student work, replacing any need for a printed exhibition catalogue.

Guerrilla Marketing Leading up to the exhibition's opening night, guerrilla marketing can be conducted to generate buzz and excitement (Duncan, p378, 2005). Guerrilla has been used successfully by many brands around the world and in past graduate exhibitions. It will be effective in supporting the key theme and concept of the exhibition, whilst providing a cost-effective method of promotions (Levinson, p256, 1993). Large scale, freestanding versions of the exhibition instalment can be created and placed in unexpected locations, making people question the context (Lyon, 2009). A cheap way to achieve this is by painting the exhibition logo, dates and any other details onto recycled cardboard and interlocking them to reflect the exhibition instalment. On these large scale instalments fliers will be slotted into the sculpture for any passer-by to collect. The advertisement fliers will reflect the theme for the postcards and also contain folds to hint at the theme. Suggested locations for instalment include; McCaskie Park in Kelvin Grove, Brisbane CBD or near cafes where key stakeholders regularly hang out. Of course placing this marketing material in these locations will require permission from the local council or cafe owners and should be considered early in the development process.

Fundraising In order to afford all of the marketing endeavours, quality print finishes, and high class events, fundraising will be conducted as it is a simple and effective way to raise money. Last year’s cohort raised $1572.00 from Cadbury chocolate box sales and sausage sizzles around Kelvin Grove. With this in mind, a Cadbury chocolate drive will be an affordable option to make some quick profit, selling chocolates at QUT, to family and friends, in workplaces, at sporting games, at community events, etc. These boxes will be distributed to all the students in the cohort. General rule of thumb applies where the student must pay for the box in advance, this will minimise theft. In addition to this, a sausage sizzle will be conducted at QUT Kelvin Grove, at the Kelvin Grove Village Markets (on every Saturday) and at Woolworths Kelvin Grove. Permission and location will have to be granted prior to any activities at QUT, at the markets and at Woolworths. This should be sought as early as possible. Out of this sausage sizzle bake goods will be sold, these may include cupcake jars, cookies and cakes. These goods will be baked by student volunteers, therefore it will be paramount that a group meets a few times to bake, this will ensure high health standards and practices. Some bake goods may be donated by companies, however not always viable. Lastly, prizes will be required to be donated by sponsors for competitions, opening night promotions and awards. Some of these may include; Facebook competitions, lucky door prizes, best student collection award, etc. These will need to be sourced early on by our sponsors, to ensure there are enough prizes and awards for the activities. In addition to this, our sponsors will be invited to the opening night event as a thank you.

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References Anderson.T. (2013). TheGurdian.com. Engage, don't broadcast: the need for authenticity in social media. Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/aug/12/engage-dont-broad cast-the-need-forauthenticity-in-social-media, 12 August 2013. CIPR Public Relations Centre. 2010. What is PR? Retrieved from http://www.cipr.co.uk/content/ careerscpd/careers-pr/what-pr, 15 August 2013. Duncan, T., (2005). Principles of Advertising and IMC (2nd Ed). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. Investopedia US, 2013. Direct Marketing. Retrieved from http://www.investopedia.com/terms/ d/directmarketing.asp, 15 August 2013. Kandu. nd. What is Event Marketing - Event Marketing in a Nutshell. Retrieved from http://kandumarketing.com/frequent-questions/whats-event-marketing.html, 12 August 2013. Lagorio.C. 2011. The New Rules of Event Marketing. Retrieved from: http://www.inc.com/guides/ 201102/new-rules-of-event-marketing.html, August 12 2013. Levinson, J.C., (1993). Guerrilla Marketing: secrets for making big profits from your small business. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Company. Lyon, E., (2009). Top 5 Guerrilla Marketing Strategies. Retrieved from http://sparxoo.com/2009/ 06/ 22/ top5-guerilla-marketing-strategies/ Margaret Rouse. 2007. Direct Email Marketing. Retrieved from: http://searchcrm.techtarget. com/definition/direct-email-marketing, 15 August 2013. WebFinance Inc. 2013. Event Marketing. Retrieved from: http://www.businessdictionary.com/ definition/event-marketing.html, 12 August 2013.

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Appendix 4 Branding Concept The branding of this exhibition will reflect both the themes of the exhibition as well as reflect the identity of the graduating cohort. It is important that the branding and identity of the exhibition is unique and stands out as research has shown that branding can help consumers recall brands and advantages of those brands (Chandler, 2007). The visual design of the branding has to be something that would appeal to the stakeholders, industry professionals and the general public. The branding and visual design will include the following: â—? Logo design â—? Advertisement design â—? Website design Because we plan to invite a large number of industry professionals to the exhibition, the branding of Signatures has to be something modern and eye catching. If we are to impress these professionals as a cohort, first we must persuade them to attend our exhibition. By creating modern branding, we are showing these professionals that we are capable of creating current designs. Our proposed design incorporates geometric shapes and bright colours. The geometric shapes reflect the interactive card sculpture instalment at the exhibition and represent networking. These geometric shapes all join together to create a representation of a network. The bright colours represent the contrasting talents and signatures of the students in the class. It is important to reflect the themes networking and signatures in the branding as the brand is the first point of contact people will have with our exhibition. Below are several mood boards created to show different design elements and styles we will use for the branding.

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This image shows the geometric and networking shapes that will incorporated into the branding. The use of bright colours to highlight the geometric shapes will also be used.

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This image shows the modern style that will be reflected in the branding.

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References Chandler, J. D. (2007). In-branding: development of a conceptual model.Academy of Marketing Studies Journal, 11(2).

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QUT KIB322 Professional Practice  

Assignment 1 Semester 2, 2013 Project Plan - Signatures

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